Whidbey Weekly, January 4, 2018

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January 4 through January 10, 2018

A LANGLEY SEASIDE TRADITION

FREE AND FUN FOR THE WHOLE FAMILY

11AM SATURDAY JANUARY 6, 2018

Langley Seawall Park Hunt for seaside treasures hidden in plain sight. Over 1,000 sea floats created by Firehouse Studio, Langley.

CALLAHAN’S FIREHOUSE PRODUCTION

Under 5 years, disabled or elderly go to the Langley City Park at 2nd Street & Park. Sign up begins 9am.

Sponsored by Langley Main Street, the City of Langley and Whidbey Weekly

More Local Events inside

Harvest Fest Races Coupeville Green Coupeville Page 6

Proud supporter of Whidbey Island

Zumba & Hula by Ate Flo SW Syrian Refugee Project community events and your source for Knights of Columbus Langley United Methodist Church What’s Happening on Whidbey Oak Harbor Langley Island www.whidbeyweekly.com Page 6 Page 9 390 NE Midway Blvd #B203 • Oak Harbor • 360-682-2341


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GUEST COLUMN By Karla Sharkey

Why I Relay People ask me, “how did you become involved in Relay For Life?” A co-worker asked me to be part of a team in honor of her young son. A young person with cancer just blew my mind. I had two small children myself and I thought what a great way to honor this survivor and it sounded FUN. I mean really, having one person from your team on the track at all times, being with friends and family for a common cause – I was in. My name is Karla Sharkey and I have been Relaying on Whidbey since 1994. 23 years of committing myself to Celebrating our cancer survivors, Remembering those we have lost and Fighting Back by raising money and awareness for research and services. During the 23 years I have had many roles; participant, team captain, and 15 years on the leadership committee. This year, I wanted to step back a little but no one wanted to take on the job as Event Chair. I said no again and again. Not because I didn’t believe in the cause and the mission of the American Cancer Society, but because I need to recharge my battery. Then, in September a 10-year-old young lady from Oak Harbor died from cancer complications. I looked myself in the mirror with tears in my eyes and made a choice to take on Event Chair because she didn’t have a choice and I do. I don’t tell you this story to get an "atta girl" or for you to feel sorry for me, but so you know that even though we all have busy lives we can’t stop being part of Relay For Life. No matter how busy we are we all can make an impact and I would like to invite you to our Kick Off happening January 10, 2018 from 7-8 pm at the Oak Harbor Elks Lodge to find out how YOU can make a difference. If you are unable to attend the meeting please email relaywhidbey@gmail. com for more information about how you can be part of the fight against cancer.

UNITED E R U C A R O F

KICK OFF RELAY FOR LIFE 2018 7-8pm • January 10, 2018 Oak Harbor Elks Lodge

Relay for Life of Whidbey Island • June 1-2, 2018 • RelayForLife.org/whidbeyislandwa Thank you for reading! Please recycle the Whidbey Weekly when you are finished with it.


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JANUARY 4 - JANUARY 10, 2018 www.whidbeyweekly.com LOCALL LOCALL Y OWNED Y OWNED

ON TRACK with Jim Freeman

If you are like me, your resolutions for the new year have already gone the way of this year’s flu shot. Why bother?

I learned long ago that most of my maladies are created by the stress between my ears. Furthermore, why go any further with trying to change the kid from 4th grade who turned into an old fart with hearing aids? Hear on The above sarcasm segues nicely into the mention of an article I read in The SpokesmanReview. Reporter Treva Lind articulated the growing needs of the 37.5 million Americans of all ages who have some degree of hearing loss. A good chunk of this group, about 20-25%, are baby boomers. I'm still waiting for the boom. No matter when it hits, even with minor hearing loss, audiologist Barbara Peregroy of University Speech and Hearing Clinic in Spokane gives her patients a page entitled “10 commandments for communication.” Are you ready? Thou shalt– 1. Not speak from another room. 2. Not speak with your back toward the person with a hearing impairment, (or their back toward you). 3. Not speak and walk away. 4. Not start speaking and turn away. 5. Not speak in competition with something else (turn off the water or turn down the radio or TV). 6. Get the attention of the person with a hearing impairment before speaking. 7. Try to speak face-to-face at all times. 8. Try to remove obstructions while speaking (your hand from your face, etc.) 9. Try to speak distinctly. 10. Try to be patient. Number 3 above, Thou shalt not speak and walk away, was a tough one for me to learn when I was married. Sometimes I just retreated for my own personal safety, evidencing good eye, hand and walk backward coordination to avoid being hit by a flying mayonnaise jar. Number 5 has been an issue for years. Ever visit a friend or family member who has the TV going so loud in the background it becomes the foreground? It's one thing to have to wake up to the voices of Today, but trying to carry on a conversation with a cohort or two with a TV going is like trying to watch The View. I know. It's a great show and we all learn a lot. Back in the seventies, I violated #9 and #10 at my first ever comedy performance. The audience – six rows of six in a row, wheel-chaired residents of the Arcadia Convalescent Home, just a few exits down from the Santa Anita racetrack. In all my years of fear, I may not have been that nervous since trying to pin a corsage on Kathie Call at the 9th grade dance. I forget who she went home with. Anyway, I am starting my alleged routine, racing my heart and mind and mouth, when all of a sudden I feel a tap, tap, tap on my right shoulder. I look behind me and see a nurse in a white uniform. She had one of those nurse hats the nurses used to wear in the Dr. Kildare movies. In fact, the hat may have once been worn by Myrna Loy. So the nurse whispers in my ear, which was shocking enough, “Mr. Freeman, you're going to have to slow down. We're all on Valium here.”

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Non-Southern hospitality On the December 8, 2017 PBS broadcast of the Mark Shields-David Brooks-Judy Woodruff segment, in reference to Roy Moore's special election, Mr. Shields stated, “If it weren't for Mississippi, Alabama would be 50th in everything.”

ACCEPTING NEW MEMBERS

Ouch, one Mississippi, two Mississippi.

ORIENTATION • January 14, 2018 • 1pm-2pm

Mom was born in Jackson. My brother was born in Jackson. I fell in love in Jackson. What about William Faulkner, Tennessee Williams, John Grisham, and Eudora Welty? All Mississippians. How about Conway Twitty, Jimmy Buffett, and Howlin' Wolf? All Mississippians. One summer night in Jackson, while visiting Aunt Dorothy and Uncle Johnny and cousins Betty and Henry, I brought up the subject of Martin and Lewis, “The Colgate Comedy Hour”, and my sending off to Jer for an autographed picture when I was a tender 12. “I can't staaaaaaaaaand Jerry Lewis!”

Central Whidbey Sportsmans Association Coupeville, Washington

All new members must attend orientation which lasts about 1 hour. These are only held a few times a year. Dues for the year are currently $84. + $5 for a key. Membership in the NRA is required for insurance purposes. NRA membership through CWSA is only $30 per year, or $100 for 5 years. CWSA can only accept cash or checks at this time. FOR MORE INFORMATION go to www.cwsaonline.org or call Kirby Stevens at 360-929-9122

Bring a copy of this ad for $5 off!

“Why's that Aunt Dorothy?” “One night on the Tonight Show he told Johnny that every time and anytime he is in an airplane flying over Mississippi that he goes to the bathroom so he can flush over us.” I think Mark Shields may have done more than that. Remember, Mississippi gave us magnolia trees, Elvis, and Oprah. Don't forget Britney Spears! The Magnolia State also gave us root beer. Root Beer was invented in Biloxi, Mississippi in 1898 by Edward Adolf Barq, Sr. In 1894, Coca-Cola was first bottled by Joseph A. Biedenharn in Vicksburg, Mississippi. Shoes were first sold as pairs in 1884 at Phil Gilbert’s Shoe Parlor in Vicksburg, Mississippi. The International Checkers Hall of Fame is in Petal, Mississippi. Here is something I bet Mark Shields does not know about Mississippi. “While on a hunting expedition with Mississippi Governor Andrew Longino near Onward in November of 1902, President Theodore ("Teddy") Roosevelt refused to shoot a bear that had been captured and tied to a tree. News of this spread across the country and a satirical cartoon of the event inspiring a Brooklyn candy shop owner to create a stuffed 'Teddy’s Bear.' Teddy bears soon became the favorite stuffed toys for generations of kids all over the world.”

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TABLE OF CONTENTS

Whidbey Weekly LOCALLY OWNED & OPERATED

390 NE MIDWAY BLVD | PO BOX 1098 | OAK HARBOR, WASHINGTON 98277 Publisher & Editor.......................................................... Eric Marshall Marketing Representatives................Penny Hill, Roosevelt Rumble Graphic Design............................................................. Teresa Besaw Production Manager......................................................TJ Pierzchala Circulation Manager.................................................... Noah Marshall

Contributing Writers Jim Freeman Wesley Hallock Kae Harris Tracy Loescher Kathy Reed Carey Ross

Volume 10, Issue 1 | © MMXVIII Whidbey Weekly

PUBLISHED and distributed every week. No part of this publication may be reproduced without the written consent of the publisher. The Whidbey Weekly cannot be held responsible for the quality of goods or services supplied by advertisers in this publication. Articles, unless otherwise stated, are by contribution and therefore the Whidbey Weekly is not in a position to validate any comments, recommendations or suggestions made in these articles. Submitted editorial is NOT guaranteed to be published. DEADLINES: The Whidbey Weekly is a submission based editorial with contributing writers. Please feel free to submit any information (please limit to 200 words) that you would like to share with the Whidbey Weekly. You may submit by email to editor@whidbeyweekly.com, by fax to (360)682-2344 or by postal mail to PO Box 1098, Oak Harbor, WA 98277. Submitted editorial is NOT guaranteed to be published. Deadline for all submissions is one week prior to issue date. For more information, please visit www.whidbeyweekly.com.

While Shields is correct that Mississippi is 50th in state rankings for infrastructure and opportunity, according to US News & World Report, Mom's home state came in 21st in crime and corrections. Putting off the Ritz Just read Bill Phillips editorial, "How Can I Stop Procrastinating?" in the Jan/Feb 2015 issue of Mens Health. I wanted to read his suggestions back then, but in fairness to the subject, I put it off for three years. My subscription lasted just the one year. I enjoyed the magazine but I felt so healthy after that first year, why renew? Phillips offers three sure-fire tips about how to break the procrastination cycle. 1. See the slack. Don't waste time that you don't have. 2. Don't wait to be inspired. It's not about how you feel. 3. Don't wait, period. Just get started. Attitude follows behavior, not vice versa. Somewhere close by, I have a box of cassette recordings with answering machine messages that were left on my voice mail machines between 1975 and 1998. Twenty-five years of voices, many gone, many forgotten. I started to play a cassette. The sound quality was incredible. The cassette dated 1993 had never been played. It was an audio recording of our first ever Island Arts Council poetry slam, at the back of the Dog House. The room was packed. Maureen Cooke was the emcee. Celebrity judges were at the ready. Nachos were reproducing in the kitchen before disappearing on the tables. The cast of characters playing pool in the front room would peek around the corner when they heard laughter.

Damn, I thought. I missed the basket by the door.

Yep, if I get crackin', I should get through these twenty-five years of cassette recordings before Radio Shack moves again in Freeland.

So, lesson learned, improv comedy and Valium don't mix unless everyone in the room is participating.

To read past columns of On Track in the Whidbey Weekly, see our Digital Library at www.whidbeyweekly.com.

FEBRUARY 3, 2018

8AM - 4:15PM, Saturday • South Whidbey High School For more information and to register online visit: soundwaterstewards.org/sw No tickets sold at the door

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Bits & Pieces six-week program focuses on personal and professional growth through the development of leadership, communication and marketability. The hope of pageant organizers is that participants will gain confidence, self-esteem and a sense of accomplishment that will enable them to serve as role models for the youth of their community.

Letters to the Editor Editor, Thank you for your joyous, full-page celebration of Christmas on the December 21-27 Whidbey Weekly cover. How glorious! I deeply appreciate your resounding proclamation of the Christmas message during this wonderful season: unconditional and all-encompassing love for each and every person. Merry Christmas and a blessed New Year to you and your staff! Yours in Christ, Laura L. Phillips, Oak Harbor

Editor, In response to our Christmas Eve snow event I would like to send my deepest gratitude and appreciation to the Island County Public Works employees who worked so hard through the holiday. We had crews out manning plows and spreading sand from 1800 (6:00pm) Christmas Eve until 1800 (6:00pm) Christmas Day and were back out again at 0500 (5:00am) on Boxing Day. I commend those who gave up their holiday time with family in order to provide this service to our community. It is important to understand that Island County maintains 534 miles of roadway and we have a priority map that determines the order in which roads get treated. Of course it makes sense to do arterials first, then feeder roads with neighborhoods last. We do not maintain state, city or private roads. Additionally, our road crews can only respond as fast as safety permits. When there are other vehicles on the road our drivers proceed as quickly as the flow of traffic allows, however, when individual cars are sliding or stuck we must consider our drivers’ safety as well as that of the public. I realize that there were many difficulties to face in attempting to travel during this time and for that I apologize for any inconvenience you encountered. That being said I ask that you consider our crews and what they gave up to be out on the road for you, the citizens of Island County. Our employees devoted many long and stressful hours to take care of our roadways in the safest manner possible, and for this effort and sacrifice we should all be grateful, I certainly am. Lastly, should you feel that your road is in need of clearing and has not yet been addressed you can register a request for service by calling (360) 679-7331, e-mailing c.herrera@co.island. wa.us or visiting the Public works website. Public Works will respond as priorities and safety allow. Commissioner Richard M. Hannold, District 3 Board of Island County Commissioners

Miss Oak Harbor Scholarship Pageant Seeks Contestants The Miss Oak Harbor Scholarship Pageant is currently accepting up to 25 contestants in its fourth year. Interested Oak Harbor female students, freshman-senior, may compete for college scholarships totaling over $8000.00. Applications must be received by January 5, 2018. Miss Oak Harbor is presented by Pageant Wyse, Inc., whose mission is to provide scholarships for young women interested in the advancement of their education through the spirit of a competition that embodies the four points of the crown: scholarship, service, success and style. This unique

You can find more information at www. pageantwyse.org, or contact Jes Walker-Wyse, Director, at pageantwyse@gmail.com. [Submitted by Jes Walker-Wyse, Pageant Wyse]

Sound Waters University Returns to South Whidbey High School Brought to you by Sound Water Stewards of Island County, Sound Waters University 2018 is a “One Day University For All – On All Things Puget Sound.” Held since the early 1990’s on the first Saturday in February on Whidbey Island, WA, Sound Waters University attracts over 600 people yearly who want to learn more about the amazing place Washington residents call home. Attendees can choose from 60 fun and informative classes and presentations about the natural world and the fragile environment of the Salish Sea. Over 50% of the classes are new this year and include fascinating explorations and presentations on such subjects as whales, adventures at sea, habitat restoration, birds, coastal geology, earthquake preparedness, landscapes and gardens, citizen science, marine alternative energy, photography, and so much more. Sound Waters University 2018 Keynote Speaker, Dr. Florian Graner, will present “The Salish Sea–A Sense of Place.” Dr. Graner is a world-renowned research diver and marine cinematographer who has lived on Whidbey Island since 2006. Florian will share portions of his recent film “Beneath the Salish Sea.” His perceptions and images illustrate how we impact our natural world and how we can mitigate this impact and become true stewards. Anne Baum, the Chairperson of Sound Waters University says it’s inspiring how many people attend this event every year and how they are excited and empowered by the classes they attend. A first year attendee reported: “This is fantastic! The quality and caliber of the classes is more than anything I’ve seen available in western Washington outside of the UW. “ The overall schedule for Sound Waters University starts with the keynote speaker at 9:00am, followed by three sessions of classes with breaks and lunch - concluding at 4:15pm. Plan on coming early. Doors to South Whidbey High School will open at 8:00am to allow attendees to pick-up their registration packets and enjoy a hot beverage prior to the keynote presentation. Sound Waters also welcomes a number of interesting exhibitors who are involved in environmental issues. These exhibits open at 8:30am and can be explored throughout the day. Registration for Sound Waters University closes January 24, 2018. Based on the popularity of this event, no tickets will be sold at the door and all attendees must register in advance online. Registration costs $50 per person. Students, current teachers, and AmeriCorps volunteers can receive a discount on registration fees. A pre-ordered catered lunch costs an additional $14 or you may bring your own lunch if desired. Classes fill quickly so it is highly recommended to register early for the best chances of getting the classes you are most interested in. For more information, visit http://soundwaterstewards.org/sw/ [Submitted by Anne Cushing Post]

Ways of Whales Workshop Dedicated to the memories of K13 “Skagit” and J52 “Sonic” Orca Network’s annual Ways of Whales Workshop will be held Saturday, January 20, from 10:00am until 4:30pm at the Coupeville Middle

www.whidbeyweekly.com LOCALLY OPERATED a Washington State Memorandum of Understanding) for inland missions, and/or tasking by the United States Coast Guard for all other aeronautical and maritime regions, when other assets are unavailable.

School Performing Arts Center, 501 S. Main St, Coupeville.

[Submitted by Michael Welding, NAS Whidbey Island]

The 2018 Ways of Whales workshop features presentations on a wide variety of cetaceans, from blue and humpback whales to the endangered Southern Resident Community of orcas and their primary prey, Chinook salmon.

Transform Your Boundaries(R) Presents: Sarri Gilman and Transform Your Boundaries Immersion Weekend

The day will feature presentations by the region’s top cetacean experts and advocates, including: Howard Garrett and the Lummi Nation: Update on Lolita/Tokitae Thomas Quinn, School of Aquatic and Fishery Science, U.W.: Resident Salmon in the Salish Sea John Calambokidis, Cascadia Research: Blue and Humpback Whales Rick Huey, Washington State Ferries: Environmental Protection and Marine Mammal Monitoring during Ferry Terminal Construction John and Olivia Carpenter: Ride for the Orcas Florian Graner: Updated Return of the King footage And a special performance of The Great Salish Sea by Dana Lyons Environmental education displays and materials will be available throughout the day, including a table from Orca Network’s Langley Whale Center gift shop, with whale books, DVDs, CDs, field guides and more. Cost of the workshop is $35 ($25 for students/ seniors), and a hot lunch is available for purchase for an additional $10 (for those who pre-register before January 14, or on an as-available basis after this date). The Ways of Whales Workshop is sponsored by the Captain Whidbey Inn. Join Orca Network after the workshop at the Captain Whidbey Lounge for a post-workshop no-host social time, drinks and eats. Pre-registration is highly recommended, as seating is limited. Further information and online registration are available at www. orcanetwork.org. Questions? Contact Orca Network at info@orcanetwork.org or (360) 331-3543 or 1-866-ORCANET. [Submitted by Cindy Hansen, Orca Network]

NAS Whidbey Island SAR Transports Cardiac Patient from Port Angeles A Search and Rescue (SAR) team of six from Naval Air Station (NAS) Whidbey Island conducted a medical evacuation (MEDEVAC) from Olympic Medical Center in Port Angeles, WA to Harborview Medical Center in Seattle on Friday, December 29, 2017. The SAR alert crew received an early morning call for help from Olympic Medical Center staff for an elderly male suffering from an Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm. The crew launched about 3:45am and arrived shortly thereafter at Olympic Medical Center to conduct patient turnover. After the turnover was complete the crew took off shortly after 4:30am and proceeded directly to Harborview Medical Center where the patient was turned over to a higher level of care. This was the 22nd Medical Evacuation (MEDEVAC) of 2017 for NAS Whidbey Island SAR, which has also conducted seven Searches and 36 Rescue missions delivering 72 lives to a higher level of care. The Navy SAR unit operates three MH-60S helicopters from NAS Whidbey Island as search and rescue/medical evacuation (SAR/MEDEVAC) platforms for the EA-18G aircraft as well as other squadrons and personnel assigned to the installation. Pursuant to the National SAR Plan of the United States, the unit may also be used for civil SAR/MEDEVAC needs to the fullest extent practicable on a non-interference basis with primary military duties according to applicable national directives, plans, guidelines and agreements; specifically, the unit may launch in response to tasking by the Air Force Rescue Coordination Center (based on

We live in challenging and overwhelming times. This Transform Your Boundaries(R) Immersion Weekend, held Friday, February 2 at 4:30pm through Sunday, February 4 at 2:00pm, at Whidbey Institute in Clinton, will help you build your toolkit and discover ways to use your boundaries for your wellbeing, your relationships, your work in the world, and to navigate through these times. Change making is taxing work; tuning into and strengthening your boundaries will help you find and maintain balance as you forge ahead. You use your boundaries in every interaction, and in every relationship, for your entire life. Sarri will use story-telling, writing, drawing, clay, and theater to trace your boundary life lessons. You will tune in and listen to your inner boundary compass - when it is telling you “No” and when it is telling you “Yes.” It’s never quite that simple as most of us argue with our inner compass. This is an excellent way to begin the new year; boundaries are necessary to follow the callings and stirrings, goals and dreams you hear within. Sarri rarely has “open enrollment” workshops - most of her workshops are privately scheduled for groups. This is a unique nurturing weekend immersion specifically designed to offer you generous healing and retreat space, with Whidbey Institute’s 100-acre woods and incredible meals, as you take a deep dive into developing a significant understanding of your boundaries. You’ll leave with new skills you can begin using right away. Early enrollment is encouraged for this workshop, as space is limited. You can view Sarri’s TEDx talk (https://www. youtube.com/watch?v=rtsHUeKnkC8) to hear her thoughts on boundaries and the significance in our lives. In this Immersion Weekend you’ll gain tools you can practice using for a lifetime. For more information or to register, call (360) 341-1884, email info@whidbeyinstitute.org or visit https://whidbeyinstitute.org/event/transform-boundaries/ [Submitted by Nancy Tubbs]

Seeking Applicants for Ferry Advisory Committee The Island County Board of Commissioners is seeking applicants to serve on the Coupeville Ferry Committee. The Board of County Commissioners appoints Ferry Advisory Committee members for 4 year terms, which may be renewed by mutual agreement. The Ferry Advisory Committee consists of six members, three for the Clinton Ferry Terminal and three for the Coupeville Ferry Terminal. By RCW, no more than two members, at the time of their appointment, may be of the same major political party and your party affiliation must be included in your application materials. The Ferry Advisory Committee meets as needed to discuss the concerns of the ferry user groups and relay that information to lawmakers in Olympia. Service on the Ferry Advisory Committee is without fee or compensation. Interested individuals should provide a letter of interest and statement of qualifications by mail, email or fax to: Island County Board of Commissioners, Attn: Pam Dill, Re: Ferry Advisory Committee Vacancy, Post Office Box 5000, Coupeville, WA 98239. The fax number is (360) 679-7381 and email applications should be sent to pamd@co.island.wa.us Application materials should be received no later than 4:30pm on January 16, 2018. For additional information please phone (360)

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LOCALL LOCALL Y OWNED Y OWNED 679-7353 or e-mail Pam Dill at the above address. Applicants must reside within the area they are representing. [Submitted by Pam Dill]

Seeking Applicants for Ebey’s Landing Historic Preservation Commission The Island County Board of Commissioners is seeking applicants to serve on the Ebey’s Landing Historic Preservation Commission (HPC). Applicants should have a demonstrated interest, experience or knowledge in history, historic preservation, architecture, design, landscape architecture, cultural landscapes and/or related disciplines. The Board of County Commissioners appoints Historic Preservation Commission (HPC) members for 3 year terms, which may be renewed by mutual agreement. Commission members work with the Town of Coupeville, Island County and Ebey’s Reserve Trust Board staff to process applications for Certificates of Appropriateness for properties located within Ebey’s Landing National Historical Reserve. Ebey’s Landing Historic Preservation Commission (HPC) consists of nine members, four (4) members appointed by the Council of the Town of Coupeville; four (4) members appointed by Island County; and one (1) member appointed jointly by Island County and the Town of Coupeville. Interested individuals should provide a letter of interest and statement of qualifications by mail, email or fax to: Island County Board of Commissioners, Attn: Pam Dill, Re: Historic Preservation Commission Vacancy, Post Office Box 5000, Coupeville, WA 98239. The fax number is (360) 679-7381 and email applications should be sent to pamd@co.island.wa.us Application materials should be received no later than 4:30pm on January 16, 2018. For additional information please phone (360) 679-7353 or e-mail Pam Dill at the above address. [Submitted by Pam Dill]

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Local Business News Goosefoot Offers New Business Workshops for Winter 2018 Goosefoot continues to offer workshops to assist entrepreneurs in getting their businesses off the ground or to help established businesses. Workshops are free and full details can be found at www.goosefoot.org. Workshops include Facebook for Business, Posters, Flyers, & Brochure Design, YouTube for Business, Websites & Ecommerce, and Introduction to Food Business Licensing Requirements & Costs. All workshops, except for Food Business Licensing, apply to all types of businesses. Additionally, for those who have attended previous Goosefoot workshops, they are now offering “Sessions with Sami.” These 30-minute one-on-one sessions with Goosefoot’s Education & Event Coordinator, Sami, are a business owner’s chance to get more in-depth and specific information on any previous workshop topics. Contact Sami for more information or to book your session at (360) 321-4246 or sami@goosefoot.org.

Get In On Everything

LOCAL

List of Workshops All workshops are free. Workshops take place at the Bayview School building, upper level classroom, 5611 Bayview Road, Langley. To register, please email sami@goosefoot.org or call (360) 321-4246. Facebook for Business Tuesday, January 9, 1:00pm-3:00pm Facebook is the largest social media site in the world. But how do you tap into that market to work for your business? Explore the ad system, attract users, and learn about Facebook’s creative tools. Introduction to Food Business Licensing Requirements & Costs Wednesday, January 10, 6:00pm-8:00pm Saturday, January 20, 10:00am-12:00pm Monday, February 5, 6:00pm-8:00pm BITS & PIECES

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What’s Going On All entries are listed chronologically, unless there are multiple entries for the same venue or are connected to a specific organization (such as Sno-Isle Libraries) in which case all entries for that venue or organization are listed collectively in chronological order under one heading.

Live Music: Erik Christensen Band Saturday, January 6, 6:00pm-10:00pm Penn Cove Taproom, Coupeville Erik Christensen plays lead guitar, writes songs, and sings. When he’s not rocking, he acts as the English Department Chair of Oak Harbor High School. No cover. For more information, call (360) 682-5747 or visit www.penncovebrewing.com

Casting Call for The Vagina Monologues Sunday, January 7, 4:00pm-6:30pm Freeland Library, 5495 S Harbor Ave. Casting Call for the community production of The Vagina Monologues by Eve Ensler. Come be part of the production, the cast will be diverse and inclusive. Any person who lives the female experience is welcome to come. No auditions; no memorization. Performances are on Sunday, February 25 at 2:00pm and 7:00pm, WICA.

Star Party Friday, January 19, 6:30pm Fort Nugent Park, Oak Harbor Explore the night sky and view distant galaxies, planets and nebulas at this free public Star Party hosted by the Island County Astronomical Society (ICAS). No telescope is needed and people of all ages are welcome to attend. Be sure and dress warmly and note that the event will be canceled if the weather is cloudy. For more information, contact Bob Scott at ICAS_ President@outlook.com, or visit www.icas-wa. org.

Open Skate Fridays Every Friday, 6:00pm-8:00pm Roller Barn, 98 NE Barron Dr, Oak Harbor Proceeds support Boys & Girls Club. $5 per skater and $3 for general admission. Last Friday of the month, skate with the Whidbey Island Roller Girls! Sorry, checks not accepted, credit card fees apply. For more information, call (360) 240-9273.

Upcoming Sno-Isle Library Events See schedule below Cost: Free Recipes for Fun Thursday, January 4, 1:00pm-2:00pm Freeland Library Explore fun sensory activity stations and try our recipes for play dough bubbles kinetic sand and more. WIHHA Presents: Therapeutic Touch Thursday, January 4, 4:00pm-6:00pm Freeland Library As human beings we are made up of energy in the form of a “field.” When we are healthy that energy is freely flowing and balanced. Disease is a condition of energy imbalance. Karen Carbone will talk about the Therapeutic Touch process and how harmony and order are created and rebalanced in the human energy field. Everyone is welcome. For more information visit wihha.com Used Book Sale Saturday, January 6, 10:00am-2:00pm Freeland Library Large selection of great books for all ages at bargain prices. Proceeds support the Friends of the Freeland Library.

Baby & Me Storytime Mondays, January 8, 22 & 29, 9:30am Coupeville Library Wiggle and giggle with your baby through stories, happy songs, rhymes, and activities that inspire a love of reading. Playtime follows. For newborns through 24 months. Caregiver required. North Sound Writers Group Monday, January 8, 10:00am-1:00pm Freeland Library

join the discussion of “Eruption: The Untold Story of Mt. St. Helens” by Steve Olson.

Religious Services Prayer Group Every Tuesday, 4:00pm-5:30pm St. Hubert Catholic Church, Langley Charismatic Prayer and Praise group. Everyone welcome. For more information, call Bill at (360) 222-4080 or email Sobico@comcast.net.

Filipino Christian Fellowship

Join other writers to discuss, problem solve, share and receive feedback and work on the craft of writing. Everyone is welcome. For more information about this group visit northsoundwriters.com

Sundays, 2:00pm Meets at Church on the Rock, 1780 SE 4th Ave., Oak Harbor. www.ohcfellowship.com

Read the Classics with Rita Drum Monday, January 8, 1:30pm Oak Harbor Library

Every Thursday, 6:30pm-8:30pm 5200 Honeymoon Bay Road, Freeland

Discuss and enjoy the practical applications and the very special message within the pages of The Little Prince. We meet each Monday to discuss “Classic Literature” and would so enjoy your insights. Please contact Rita Drum at (631) 707-5980 or ritadrum777@gmail.com for more information. Film: “Before the Flood” Monday, January 8, 2:00pm-4:00pm Freeland Library Follow environmental activist and U.N. Messenger of Peace Leonardo DiCaprio as he travels to five continents and the arctic speaking to scientists, world leaders activists and local residents to gain a deeper understanding of the complexity of climate change. Everyone is welcome. Baby and Me Storytime Tuesdays, January 9, 16, 23 & 30, 9:30am Freeland Library Wiggle and giggle with your baby through stories happy songs rhymes and activities that inspire a love of reading. Playtime follows. For newborns through 18 months. Caregiver required. Toddler Storytime Tuesdays, January 9, 16, 23 & 30, 10:30am Freeland Library Jump and bounce into a magical world of stories music and movements that nurture the desire to read in toddlers. Playtime or craft may follow. For ages 18 months to 3 years. Caregiver required. Literature & Laughter Book Group Wednesday, January 10, 6:15pm-7:45pm Coupeville Library Join us for a discussion of “The Sellout” by Paul Beatty. All are welcome! Lit for Fun Book Group : “ Did You Ever Have a Family” Thursday, January 11, 9:00am-11:00am Freeland Library Join us for a discussion of Bill Clegg’s “Did You Ever Have a Family,” a story about a circle of people who find solace in the least likely of places as they cope with a horrific tragedy. For adults. Family Storytime Thursdays, January 11, 18 & 25, 9:30am & 10:30am Coupeville Library Funny stories and action songs will make you giggle and move while getting your toddlers and preschoolers ready to read. Playtime or craft may follow. For ages 2 to 5 years with a caregiver. 2nd Friday Nonfiction Book Group Friday, January 12, 10:30am - 12:00pm Coupeville Library Enjoy reading nonfiction? Bring a friend and

Healing Rooms

The Healing Rooms are open to anyone desiring personal prayer for physical, emotional, or spiritual needs. There is a team of Christians from several local churches that are dedicated to praying for healing the sick in our community. All ministry is private, confidential, and free. Teams are available to pray for individuals who drop by on a first-come, first-serve basis. For more information, contact Ann at (425) 263-2704, email healingwhidbey.com, or visit the International Association of Healing Rooms at healingrooms.com.

Teaching Through God’s Word Sundays, 9:00am & 11:00am Calvary Chapel, 3821 French Road, Clinton

www.whidbeyweekly.com LOCALLY OPERATED

Galleries & Art Shows Featured Artist: Richard Nash Meet the Artist: Wednesday, January 10, 10:00am-5:30pm Thursday, January 11, 10:00am-5:30pm Penn Cove Gallery, Coupeville Richard Nash will be at Penn Cove Gallery to discuss the methods and motivations behind his artworks. A Washington native and lifelong student of the visual arts, Richard holds a MFA and has completed lengthy studies in Japan and Europe. His 2-D work ranges from botanicals to abstracts, with 3-D sculptures of Cor-ten and stainless steel. His main focus is always composition. For his abstracts he draws inspiration from the play of light and shadows created by architectural forms. http://www. rjnashart.com/

Meetings & Organizations Disabled American Veterans Chapter 47 Thursday, January 4, 7:00pm DAV, 3037 N Goldie Rd, Oak Harbor Call (360) 682-2945 for more information.

Whidbey Island Genealogical Searchers (W.I.G.S.) Tuesday, January 9, 1:00pm-3:00pm 2720 Heller Road, Fire Station #25, Oak Harbor Laura Sparr will speak about finding Ship Passenger Lists for your genealogical research. All are welcome to attend.

Healthcare Enrollment Event Tuesday, January 9, 1:00pm-7:00pm Skagit Valley College, Oak Hall, Oak Harbor It is an open enrollment event for the Affordable Care Act health insurance. Certified navigators and insurance brokers will be available. This is a free event and walk-ins are welcome. The final deadline for enrolling in the Affordable Care Act health insurance for 2018 is January 15. Enroll online at healthcare.gov or call (800) 318-2596.

For more information, visit ccwhidbey.com.

Oak Harbor Library Board Meeting

Unitarian Universalist Sunday Service

Wednesday, January 10, 2:00pm-3:30pm Oak Harbor Library

Sundays, 10:00am Unitarian Universalist Congregation, Freeland

Library Board Meeting is open to the public.

All are welcome. Values-based children’s religious exploration classes and childcare will be provided. Visit www.uucwi.org for more information. The Unitarian Universalist Congregation building is located at 20103 Highway 525, two miles north of Freeland.

Wednesday, January 10, 6:00pm-8:30pm Hospice of WhidbeyHealth, Coupeville

Unity of Whidbey Sundays, 10:00am 5671 Crawford Road, Langley If you’re one of the “spiritual but not religious” people who questions your childhood faith or is looking for something more, Unity of Whidbey may feel like a homecoming. Visit our website: unityofwhidbey.org

Whidbey Quakers Sundays, 4:00pm-5:00pm Unitarian Universalist Congregation, Freeland Whidbey Islands Friends Meeting (also known as Quakers) meet in silent worship and community, with occasional spoken messages, every Sunday at the Unitarian Universalist building. For more information, contact Tom Ewell at tewell@whidbey.com or go to www. whidbeyquakers.org.

First Church of Christ, Scientist Worship, 10:00am Sunday School to age 20, 10:00am Wednesday Testimony Meeting, 2:30pm Christian Science Reading Room Tuesday & Friday, 11:00am-3:00pm Wednesday 3:30pm-5:30pm The church and Reading Room are located at 721 SW 20th Court at Scenic Heights Street, Oak Harbor. Call (360) 675-0621 or visit christianscience.com Services and Sunday School are also held at 10:30am on South Whidbey at 15910 Highway 525, just north of Bayview and across from Useless Bay Road; testimony meetings are held the first Wednesday of each month at 7:30pm.

Suicide Grief Support Group

This is a time for individuals who have had a loved one die of suicide and would like to meet with others to learn some coping strategies ways to move forward through your grief and other feelings. Registration is requested by contacting Dave Bieniek, Bereavement Coordinator for Hospice of WhidbeyHealth at (360) 321-1372. There is no charge for this event.

Relay for Life Kick-Off Wednesday, January 10, 7:00pm Oak Harbor Elks Lodge, 155 NE Ernst St. The Event Leadership Meeting will be held from 5:30pm-6:30pm. For more information, email relaywhidbey@gmail.com

Improvisational Theatre Group Saturday, January 20, 1:00pm-2:30pm Whidbey Playhouse STAR Studio Interested in Improvisational Theatre? Whidbey Playhouse has a group forming and would like to invite you to join. There is an improvisational comedy group too. Contact the Playhouse office if you have questions: (360) 679-2237

Gamblers Anonymous Every Friday, beginning January 26, 7:00pm St Augustine Catholic Church, Oak Harbor The church is located at 185 N. Oak Harbor St., the meeting is held in the north end of the building. Enter through the double doors next to the parking lot. For more information, email OakHarborga@gmail.com Washington GA hotline: 855-222-5542

Al-Anon Every Wednesday, 9:30am-10:30am 432 2nd St., Langley If a friend or relative has a problem with alcohol, you can find solutions for yourself at Alanon. WHAT'S GOING ON

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Whidbey Weekly

NEWS www.whidbeyweekly.com

ORGANIZING 101 p. 10 JANUARY 4 - JANUARY 10, 2018

LOCALLY OWNED & OPERATED

Scramble for sea float treasure in Langley By Kathy Reed Whidbey Weekly Lace up some sturdy footwear and head to Seawall Park in Langley at 11 a.m. Saturday for the annual Sea Float Scramble. Hundreds of people of all ages will descend upon the seaside community to hunt for more than 1,000 handmade glass sea floats “hidden” along the beach, ripe for the picking. The event is the brainchild of glass artist Callahan McVay, owner of Callahan’s Firehouse Studio in Langley, and is sponsored by McVay, the City of Langley and the Langley Main Street Association. “People used to go to the beaches in Oregon and California, collecting the floats that washed up from the old fishery nets,” McVay said. “People love finding stuff on the beach, whether it’s bits of sea glass, a neat sea shell or a sea float. It’s really neat.” And Seawall Park, along First Street in Langley, is the perfect venue in which to tuck these one-of-a-kind treasures.

“I saw Seawall Park as an ideal setting. It allows two points of entrance and is kind of a contained space,” McVay described. Langley Park, at 2nd and Anthes, serves as a secondary location for smaller children, senior citizens or those with physical limitations or disabilities. But rest assured, the word scramble is in the event name for a reason, according to McVay. “It’s a freaking mad house,” he said. “You’ve gotta run and you’ve gotta work for it.” McVay said he enjoys the enthusiasm people have for the scramble. He said they even put a few of the floats in shallow water last year, and yes, people took the bait, braving the cold water to grab their prizes. But there is a strategy to sea float-seeking. “People are excited, they’re running hard. But we distract them,” he said. “We place a lot of the floats in the center

See SCRAMBLE continued on page 10

Photo Courtesy Langley Main Street Association People of all ages will participate in the 8th annual Sea Float Scramble to be held at 11 a.m. Saturday in Langley. More than 1,000 handmade glass sea floats will be hidden around Sea Wall Park.

Photo Courtesy of Langley Main Street Association More than 1,000 handmade, blown glass sea floats will be “hidden” at Sea Wall Park and Langley Park for the annual Sea Float Scramble, to be held at 11 a.m. Saturday.

Photo Courtesy of Langley Main Street Association One person, working steadily, can produce about four or five handmade glass sea floats in a hour. More than 1,000 sea floats have been produced by Callahan’s Firehouse Studio in Langley for this year’s annual Sea Float Scramble.

UNITED FOR A CURE

Relay For Life Of Whidbey Island June 1-2, 2018

Team Meeting: January 10, 7-8pm Oak Harbor Elks Lodge

Come join us and see for yourself what Relay For Life is all about! Website: RelayForLife.org/whidbeyislandwa Email: relaywhidbey@gmail.com • Facebook: www.facebook.com/whidbeyrelay

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JANUARY 4 - JANUARY 10, 2018 LOCALLY OWNED

WHAT’S GOING ON

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Al-Anon Group Oak Harbor Are you troubled by someone’s drinking? Al-Anon group can help. Call Laurie at (360) 675-4430 for meeting information.

Alcoholics Anonymous Every Day, 12:00pm & 8:00pm 432 2nd Street, Langley For more information, call (360) 221-2070

American Rhododendron Society Fourth Wednesday, 7:00pm Coupeville Firehouse, 1164 Race Rd., Coupeville For more information, call Stephanie at (360) 678-1896.

Breastfeeding Support Group Third Thursday, 10:30am-11:30am Pregnancy Aid, 816 Camano, Langley You can bring your own lunch if you’d like, tea and muffins are provided. Pregnant Moms welcome. Call Pregnancy Aid at (360) 2214767 for more information.

Bingo Every Monday, 7:00pm Elks Lodge, Oak Harbor Open to the public. For more information, call (360) 675-7111.

Blind Support Group Fourth Tuesday, 2:00pm Oak Harbor Senior Center A support group for people with impaired vision. Learn and share techniques to be more mobile. For more information, call Paul Bovey at (360) 544-2561 or (360) 679-8293.

Central Whidbey Lions First and Third Thursdays, 12:00pm Tyee Restaurant, Coupeville

Conversations of War and Return First & Third Fridays, 7:00pm-8:30pm Trinity Lutheran Church, Old Building, Freeland Veterans Steve Durbin and Chuck McIntyre host a room of conversations for veterans, family members and caregivers. They need to hear your stories. Contact Chuck at (360) 579-1059 or Steve at (360) 678-2928.

Coupeville Chess Club Second and Fourth Fridays, 6:45pm-9:00pm Coupeville Library All skill levels welcomed. Please bring a board if possible. Spread the word and come down for some leisurely play. For information, call (631) 357-1941.

Coupeville Lions Every Wednesday, 6:30pm Coupeville Methodist Church, Coupeville

Debtors Anonymous Every Sunday, 6:00pm WGH Board Room, Coupeville If you are having problems with money and debt and think that you may be a compulsive debtor, the program of Debtors Anonymous can help you. No situation is hopeless. Find the solution that leads to solvency and serenity. Debtors Anonymous is a 12-step program based upon the 12-steps first developed and used by Alcoholics Anonymous. Call (515) 451-3749 for directions to location or for more information.

Divorce Care and DC4kids Every Sunday, 5:00pm Living Word Church, Oak Harbor A support group for people dealing with separation and divorce. For more information, call Larry at (360) 969-0552 or Lisa - DC4kids at (360) 672-4239. Living Word Church is located at 490 NW Crosby Ave.

Dugualla Bay Bridge Club Every Thursday, 11:30am Social Bridge Game. Bring your own brown bag lunch. RSVP required. Call (360) 720-2727 or email dcb601@comcast.net

Duplicate Bridge Club Every Tuesday, 10:30am Sierra Country Club Clubhouse, Coupeville
 The club is ACBL sanctioned and we encourage anyone interested to come with or with

Whidbey Weekly

out a partner. For more information, contact one of the directors: Mardi Dennis at (360) 675-5044, Sue Thomas at (360) 678-7047, or Peter Wolff at (360) 678-3019.

Eating Addiction Support Group Every Thursday, 11:30am Private residence, Langley Meeting based on Becky Jackson’s book “Dieting, A Dry Drunk.” Meeting time subject to change based on groups needs. For more information and meeting address: DietingRecovery.com, or contact Christina (360) 730-1886; christinamjames@hotmail.com.

Gastric Surgery Support Group Second Monday, 7:00pm Oak Harbor Lutheran Church Supporting anyone who’s a pre-, post-, or possible weight loss surgery patient through the process and the recovery. We are not affiliated with any specific surgical technique or insurance program. For more information, call Pat Baldridge at (360) 675-8871.

Genealogical Society of South Whidbey Island Second Monday, 1:00pm Trinity Lutheran Church, Community Bldg., Freeland Visitors always welcome. For more information, call Ann Wright at (360) 597-2352 or visit www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~wagsswi

International Order of the Rainbow for Girls

NWCA Whidbey Island #150 First Tuesday, 6:00pm Building 22, Seaplane Base, Oak Harbor We are a national Navy Wives club that has been doing charity and volunteer work in this community for over 50 years. For more information, call (360) 679-5115.

Oak Harbor Emblem Club Second Tuesday, 7:00pm Elks Lodge, Oak Harbor For more information, call (360) 675-7111.

Oak Harbor Lions Club Every Wednesday, 7:00pm Oak Harbor Elks Lodge, 155 NE Ernst Street Dinner available from the menu at 6:00pm meeting starts at 7:00pm. Visitors and prospective members welcome. For information, call Robert O’Dell at (360) 679-9468.

Oak Harbor Rotary Club Every Friday, 12:00pm Oak Harbor Yacht Club For more information: http://www.clubrunner. ca/CPrg/Home/homeE.asp?cid=806

Open Meditation Group Every Wednesday, 7:30pm-8:00pm Alexander Counseling, 221 2nd Street, #10, Langley Find refuge from the stress of a nervous world. Join for a weekly meditation and cultivate a deeper sense of tranquility and share the joys of peace.

Overeaters Anonymous

First & Third Mondays, 7:00pm-8:30pm Masonic Hall, Coupeville

Every Monday, 6:00pm-7:00pm Langley Fellowship Hall, Langley

The Coupeville assembly of the International Order of the Rainbow for Girls would like to invite all girls ages 11-20 to attend meetings. Rainbow Girls is a service organization that teaches girls leadership and life skills. For more information, contact Naomie Robinson at robinsonnaomie32@gmail.com or visit www. nwrainbow.org. The Mansonic Hall is located at 804 Main Street.

Is food a problem for you? Do you eat when you’re not hungry? Do you binge, purge or restrict? No dues and no fees! No weigh-ins, no diets, no judggments. Just caring support, hope and abstinence.

Kiwanis of South Whidbey

Parents, Families and Friends of Lesbians and Gays (PFLAG) Second Mondays, 6:30pm-8:00pm Unitarian Universalist Congregation Whidbey Island, Freeland

Perspective members eat free. For more information, contact Ron Myers at (360) 331-1876.

For more information and support contact: WhidbeyPFLAG@gmail.com; Chapter President, Sharon Kabler at (360) 222-4028; or Chapter Secretary, Erick Westphal at (360) 331-3393.

National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI) Whidbey Island

Parent Support for Miscarriage and Stillbirth

First & Third Thursdays, 12:00pm Whidbey Telecom, Wi-Fire Cafe, Freeland

Fourth Thursday, 7:00pm-8:30pm Trinity Lutheran Church, Freeland NAMI is the largest grassroots organization dedicated to making life better for people with a mental illness and their friends and loved ones. The group is nonreligious but meets at Trinity Lutheran Church, 18341 State Route 525. It isn’t necessary to preregister. Please contact Kathy Chiles, (206) 218-6449 or k.chiles22@live.com for more information.

NAR-ANON Every Tuesday, 7:00pm-8:00pm St. Peter’s Lutheran Church, Clinton NAR-ANON family groups are world-wide for those affected by someone else’s addiction. St. Peter’s Lutheran Church is located at 6309 Wilson Place.

North Whidbey Coupon Club Every Friday, 10:00am-11:30am Christian Reformed Church, Oak Harbor Cost: Free All are welcome. Coupon-clipping, moneysaving conversation and new friends. Our motto is “Eat Better, For Less”. Kids welcome. Money-saving classes are available. Find us on Facebook :”Whidbey Coupon Club” and via email: nwcouponclub@comcast. net. For further information, please call (360) 675-2338.

North Whidbey Island Rotary Sunrise Every Wednesday, 7:00am Whidbey Golf Club, Oak Harbor Come join us anytime! We support local and international projects. Contact Janis Powell at (360) 679-2132 for more information.

Last Wednesday, 7:00pm Freeland Library, Meeting Room, Freeland For details, call Jolene at (360) 331-2113.

Parkinson’s Support Group First Friday, 1:00pm Cherry Hill Club House, Oak Harbor Second Tuesday, 10:00am Bayview Senior Center, Langley No one need struggle with Parkinson’s alone. Gain new friends, get the facts. Call (360) 279-1785.

PASS - Post Abortion Stress Syndrome Wednesday or Thursday, 10:00am-4:00pm Are you suffering from PASS–Post Abortion Stress Syndrome? Many women suffer from depression, flashbacks, suicidal thoughts, relational disfunction, and more after an abortion. We offer free lay counseling, help with healing and restoration. Call Wednesday or Thursday for an appointment, 10:00am to 4:00pm (360) 221-2909.

www.whidbeyweekly.com LOCALLY OPERATED and those with relationship-related compulsivity. We provide an environment free from shame and abuse where all can feel safe to share what they think and feel. You are not alone. For more information call (360) 989-4248.

Soroptimist International of Oak Harbor Every Friday, 7:30am Whidbey Golf Club, Oak Harbor Cost: $9.50 SIOH is part of the world’s largest service organization, made up of dedicated professionals who provide enhancement to the quality of life through friendship, education, service, advocacy and financial support. Members are committed to bettering humanity locally, nationally and globally for the purpose of making a difference for and advancing the status of women and girls. For questions, please call Kathy at (360) 675-3030 or email sioakharbor@soroptimist.net.

South Whidbey Alzheimer’s Caregiver Support Group First Tuesday, 10:00am-12:00pm South Whidbey Senior Center, Langley Expanded quarterly workshops TBA. The Caregiver Support Group, sponsored by the Alzheimer’s Association, Western and Central Washington Chapter, provides emotional, educational, and social support for caregivers of those suffering from memory loss – in a confidential setting. For questions or additional information, contact co-facilitators: Mardell Xavier at (360) 477-5511 or Hestia Laitala at (360) 321-1600.

South Whidbey Coupon Club Every Wednesday, 12:00pm-4:00pm Good Cheer Thrift Store, 114 Anthes Ave, Langley At the South Whidbey Coupon Club, we also welcome those who would like to help clip coupons which will be used for Good Cheer’s shopping. Find us on Facebook :”Whidbey Coupon Club” and via email: nwcouponclub@ comcast.net. For further information, please call (360) 675-2338.

South Whidbey Lions Club Second and Fourth Thursdays, 11:30am M Bar C Ranch, Freeland Lunch is offered ($8) and they enjoy interesting guest speakers. Public is invited. Please contact Herb Bacon at (360) 730-3755 if you wish to attend.

South Whidbey Rotary Every Tuesday, 7:30am Whidbey Tel WiFire Club Room, Freeland For more information, call (360) 321-5867.

TOPS® (Take Off Pounds Sensibly®) Every Thursday, 9:00am-11:00am Family Bible Church, Oak Harbor TOPS® is the short name for TOPS Club, Inc., the original, nonprofit, noncommercial network of weight-loss support groups. TOPS® offers tools and programs for healthy living and weight management, with exceptional group fellowship and recognition. Weigh-in from 9:00am-10:00am, meeting is 10:00am-11:00am. For more information, call Shelly Weeks at (360) 207-9039 or (360) 240-1770.

Veterans’ Coffee Club Every Thursday, 9:00am-11:00am Harbor Tower Village, Oak Harbor

For more information, call President Jane Helten at (360) 631-0752.

Come enjoy a cup of coffee, a baked breakfast good and the company of other local veterans. Harbor Tower Village Independent and Assisted Living is located at 100 E Whidbey Ave. For more information, call (360) 675-2569.

Sex and Love Addicts Anonymous (SLAA)

Whidbey Island A’s, Model A Ford Club

Every Wednesday, 7:00pm-8:00pm Every Sunday, 7:00pm-8:00pm Trinity Lutheran Church Annex, Freeland

Fourth Monday, 7:00pm Race Road Fire Station, Coupeville For more information, call (360) 579-5919.

SLAA is a 12-step fellowship for those who wish to stop living out a pattern of sex and love addiction. We offer relief for both those who suffer from a compulsive need for sex,

For more Meetings and Organizations, visit www.whidbeyweekly.com

Rotary Club Whidbey Westside Every Wednesday, 5:00pm-6:30pm Useless Bay Golf & Country Club, Langley

WHAT'S GOING ON

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12


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10 JANUARY 4 - JANUARY 10, 2018 LOCALLY OWNED

Whidbey Weekly

www.whidbeyweekly.com LOCALLY OPERATED

Organize a revolution this New Year By Kathy Reed Whidbey Weekly

New Year’s resolutions have become kind of a standing joke. Nearly all of us make them, hardly any of us fulfill them. I am guilty of it. As I sat down to begin writing this piece for Whidbey Weekly, I got as far as the title (which for me is sometimes the hardest part) when my poor, befuddled brain experienced a rare jolt of insight. There is but a one-letter difference between a resolution and a revolution. I wanted to write about clearing away the holiday clutter and how it ties into one’s resolve to get organized for the new year. True, clutter is not beholden to a calendar. But the new year represents a fresh start, a chance to begin with a clean slate, so to speak. The perfect time to make a resolution. I, like many, have my own personal goals to de-clutter and simplify my life. And I’ve been working on it for a while, one step at a time. But as I began writing this, I realized I don’t need an organizational resolution – I need an organizing revolution! I need to approach this urge to purge with a battle plan! So here it is; the holidays are over. It’s time to think about putting away all the stuff we’ve put out to make the season merry. We’ve also more than likely been the happy and grateful recipients of more stuff - not that there’s anything wrong with that, to borrow a line from Seinfeld. A winning strategy doesn’t mean we have to get rid of all our stuff, but we do need to learn how to manage it.

To that end, I enlisted the aid of Tammi Moses, owner of Homes Are for Living in Oak Harbor, and a local expert on hoarding, to share some practical advice on getting organized.

“It doesn’t have to be perfection. It just has to be good enough for you,” said Moses. “It really is a personal preference on how much you’re willing to deal with before you feel the need to do something about it.” No one is suggesting having a lot of stuff means one is a hoarder. That is a separate matter requiring professional care and attention. But according to Moses, there does seem to be a generational trend surrounding the acquisition of “things.” Look at the tiny house trend, for example. People are downsizing; they are putting their energy into experiences rather than things. So organizing what we have can help us function better and in some cases, de-stress. Post-holiday is the perfect time to organize holiday decorations, actually. “For example, you’re taking down your Christmas decorations and there are things left in the bins that you didn’t put up,” said Moses. “Obviously, you don’t necessarily need all of it. Bag up the part you didn’t use and donate it or give it to someone in the family who would use it. Recycle it by passing it along to someone else.” Organizing can be intimidating. Try not to get overwhelmed. Moses suggests developing a plan, room by room. “If you’re creating a resolution, create a plan,” she said. “Take the living room for

Kathy Reed/Whidbey Weekly Don’t be overwhelmed by stuff in the new year, says Tammi Moses, local hoarding expert and owner of Homes Are for Living in Oak Harbor.

example. Have an idea of what you want the space to be. Start with the book shelf that has too many books. Sort through the shelf as you’re cleaning up. If you’re not likely to re-read a book because you know the ending, give it up to make room for something else.” And if you are feeling overwhelmed, it’s okay to acknowledge it. “You don’t have to eat the whole elephant at one time,” said Moses. “It took time to accumulate all those things, give yourself some latitude when you start to try to deal with it. Start small; pick a shelf or a basket or box and sort through it.” Moses suggests when you’re sorting through items to keep that simple, too. Separate things into different categories, such as things to keep, things to sell or donate and things to throw away. “Discard or get rid of things you don’t use any more or are not relevant, things that no longer serve a purpose,” she said. “Donating things is good. Think of it as sharing excess with others who might be able to use it. That way you’re not really throwing it away, you’re repurposing it.” Granted, there is sometimes an emotional connection to items, and we hang onto them even if we know we will likely never use them. This can be a little tougher, but there is something you can do.

If you’re feeling overwhelmed by stuff and getting organized is your New Year’s resolution, tackle it one shelf at a time, say experts.

“Take a photo of the item,” Moses suggested. “That way, you still have that connection without having the actual item. It can be challenging to release that attachment.”

It’s never a good idea to hold onto items that evoke bad memories, said Moses. They simply don’t need to be in your space. Other simple ways to stay organized include designating a specific place for items like keys or phones, so you don’t have to search for them. Use clear storage boxes so you can see what’s inside them or use labels to mark contents or as a guide when putting things away. Think about using your computer to help you organize things. Set up secure online files for banking, bills or correspondence and don’t forget to purge your email or sort them into different folders. Think about unsubscribing from things you no longer need. Set up digital or paper files for individuals – one for each child, for example, where you can keep report cards. Or perhaps you have an older parent – you can keep track of medications, legal information or health records. And don’t bring home more stuff unless you intend to use it…soon. “Someday isn’t a day on the calendar,” said Moses. “Think about whether this is something you can or will execute and follow through with. Be honest with yourself, especially if you have 15 other projects waiting for you to get to them at home.” The bottom line is, use the organizational tools that work the best for you. Your space doesn’t have to be perfect, just perfect for you. Plan your own revolution. Keep it going one drawer, one shelf, one room at a time. “You don’t have to wait for a new year to do it, it just has to be a new day,” said Moses.

SCRAMBLE continued from page 7 of the area, getting most people to run to the center. But they ran past half of them. So folks who moved a little slower found the others we placed around. It sort of lessens the pressure." McVay held the first scramble in 2005 for a gallery opening. He brought it back to Langley in 2011, producing 100 floats. It has grown steadily, especially in the past couple of years. This year’s sea float total of 1,000 is twice what McVay produced last year, which was twice what was produced the year before. “The numbers are bigger, the enthusiasm is stronger,” he said. “It’s a neat thing to do after Christmas and New Year’s. It’s cold, there’s not much to do. This is a great chance to get out and play.” According to McVay, one person can produce four or five floats an hour. He works on them throughout the year as demonstrations. Each float is a unique, hand-crafted piece of art. They have become quite collectible to scramble-goers hoping to add a new conversation piece to their assortment every year. “There’s a lot of enthusiasm, a lot of people get in line early to have a chance to get one,” said McVay. “And there are so many good stories. Sometimes people who find more than one will give it away to someone else.” For those who may walk away empty-handed after the scramble, McVay does sell them year ‘round at the Firehouse Studio, so there is an opportunity to acquire sea floats by other means, if necessary. The bottom line is, the Sea Float Scramble provides an excellent opportunity for people of all ages to explore a quaint Whidbey Island community, do a little treasure-hunting, create memories and play a role in what has become a fun Langley tradition. “We’ve set the stage, we wrote the script and the public is the cast,” said McVay. “Now we need to see that wild enthusiasm.”

Photo Courtesy Langley Main Street Association People of all ages will participate in the 8th annual Sea Float Scramble to be held at 11 a.m. Saturday in Langley. More than 1,000 handmade glass sea floats will be hidden around Sea Wall Park.

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By Carey Ross films and Oscar contenders falls this movie. And that’s all I have to say about that.  (R • 1 hr. 53 min.)

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Ferdinand: I guess this is the movie you take your kids to if they’re not old enough for "Star Wars."  (PG • 1 hr. 48 min.) The Greatest Showman: I can think of few people more equipped to portray P.T. Barnum, i.e. the “showman” in question, than Hugh Jackman, who is a bit like a charismatic human circus himself.  (PG • 1 hr. 45 min.)

360-682-2341 • www.whidbeyweekly.com

Coco: As a creative filmmaking force, Pixar is unmatched. The unstoppable animation juggernaut rolls out another instant classic, this time centering its story on budding musician Miguel, who takes a stunning journey of sight and sound in the Land of the Dead in order to unlock the secrets of his family history. Bring a hanky–this one packs an emotional punch.  (PG • 1 hr. 45 min.) Darkest Hour: Marvel as Gary Oldman transforms into Winston Churchill, singlehandedly keeps Britain from surrendering to Nazis with great speechifying and is nominated for a Best Actor Oscar right before your very eyes.  (PG-13 • 2 hrs. 5 min.) Downsizing: Alexander Payne returns to the big screen with his first film since 2013’s excellent "Nebraska," this time with a more whimsical (at least on the surface) story of a couple (Matt Damon and Kristen Wiig) who decides to become small in order to live large.  (R • 2 hrs. 15 min.)

Wonder: It’s been a minute since Julia Roberts had a film role that reminded us why she’ll always be America’s Sweetheart, and she gets a huge assist in that effort from Jacob Tremblay as her son Auggie, whose singular spirit cannot be hidden by a congenital facial deformity.  (PG • 1 hr. 53 min.)

For Anacortes theater showings, please see www.fandango.com. For Blue Fox and Oak Harbor Cinemas showings see ads on this page. Father Figures: Into this seasonPuzzle of excellent 1 (Easy, difficulty rating 0.36)

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On a scale from 1 to 10...3.6 Every row of 9 numbers must include all digits 1 through 9 in any order Every column of 9 numbers must include all digits 1 through 9 in any order Every 3 by 3 subsection of the 9 by 9 square must include all digits 1 through 9

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9

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1

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STAR WARS: THE LAST JEDI (PG-13) JUMANJI: WELCOME TO THE JUNGLE (PG-13)

*Cash prices

Star Wars: The Last Jedi: Don’t worry everyone: Writer/director Rian Johnson totally didn’t blow it! Star Wars still rules, everyone else continues to drool.  (PG-13)

Movie Hotline 360-279-2226 Book A Party or Special Showing 360-279-0526 1321 SW Barlow St • Oak Harbor

Friday, January 5 thru Sunday, January 7

Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle: How can anyone ever replace the inimitable Robin Williams in this now-franchise about a mystical board game that comes to life? The answer: One person cannot. However, four people– Dwayne Johnson, Kevin Hart, Jack Black, and Karen Gillan–can make a decent go of it.  (PG-13 • 1 hr. 52 min.)

Pitch Perfect 3: It was cute the first time, it was less so the second. In this case, the third time is most definitely not the charm. This had indeed better be the “last call, Pitches.”  (PG-13 • 1 hr. 33 min.)

STAR WARS: THE LAST JEDI PG-13 JUMANJI: WELCOME TO THE JUNGLE PG-13 PITCH PERFECT 3 PG-13

Now Showing!

Insidious: The Last Key: On the one hand, the subtitle “The Last Key” implies this might be the final chapter of this paranormal film franchise. On the other hand, the series is called “Insidious,” so you just never know.  (PG-13 • 1 hr. 43 min.)

All the Money in the World: This will forever be known as the movie Kevin Spacey was edited out of during post-production (long live Christopher Plummer!), but it’s really a lively, taut recounting of the time when one of the Getty grandkids was kidnapped and billionaire J. Paul Getty famously refused to pay the ransom to get him back.  (R • 2 hrs. 12 min.)

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Generated by http://www.opensky.ca/sudoku on Wed Dec 27 21:42:33 2017 GMT. Enjoy!

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and excitement lie. It’s all a matter of perspective. People who have tasted this fine brew say it is flavorful, though not as bold as some coffee and this is likely due to the partial digestion of the coffee beans as they made their way through the Civet’s gastrointestinal tract. Yum! Again, perception is the key and research and understanding of the different foods or cultures from which they hail are crucial to a willingness, or even unwillingness, to consume anything ‘different.’

A NEW TAKE ON FOODS IN 2018 It’s a New Year! Can you believe it’s 2018? This last year breezed by so fast it seems and I’m sure a fair few of you feel the same. So what does a new year mean? It's all up to you of course! A new year can mean anything – the beginning of something, resolutions, clearing out of old things (whether literal or figuratively speaking) and most of all perhaps, it means potential. This year, why don’t we resolve to try new things in every facet of life? I’ll do it with you! And if you will, let’s resolve to try at least one new food this year. It can be anything, from the most daring and even ‘scary’ food, to a dish that might be extravagant – something you have always wanted to try. There are so many foods we could taste test. The list goes on forever! How about something somewhat less oft eaten here in the U.S.? Let’s say, Haggis for example. The national dish of Scotland has a fearsome reputation in other countries, and fearsome could mean anything. Fearsome as in it sounds like it has a fierce bite, texture, and flavor, or fearsome as in I can’t eat it because I’m petrified. It’s all a matter of perception. Haggis, a dish that earned itself a reputation of all sorts, is usually comprised of what’s called ‘pluck’ (the sheep’s pluck). This is the liver, lungs and heart which is then minced up with onions, salt, a bunch of spices, suet, and oatmeal. This entire ‘mash’ is then mixed with a stock, and boiled inside the stomach of the sheep for a good long hour, whereupon it is sprung open and the delicious contents spill forth from their encasement and should be washed down with a ‘wee dram’ of the Scottish national drink – whiskey. I want to add in that suet is the hard beef or sheep fat found around the kidneys and loins of each respective animal and is used in a variety of other dishes; the yummiest of which is spotted dick (in my humble opinion). But back to haggis. No one really knows the EXACT origin of the food (like most things in food history). The sands of time have been blown to and fro

and along with it the precise information about haggis. It’s commonly said haggis was a ‘to-go’ meal prepared by women for their cattle-driving husbands on their journeys through the Scottish glens, and while ‘to-go’ might to many of us be something more like a subway sandwich or a burrito, I suppose haggis was not only a good way to preserve offal which would likely go off quickly if not used, but it was nutritious and filling. Haggis was also a great source of nourishment for the poor who couldn’t afford the expensive cuts of meat, so it was particularly popular for this reason as well. Plus, no deep frying required either. Healthier in that way. And while this is just one theory regarding the birth of a Scottish legend (and I don’t mean William Wallace a.k.a a certain Gibson, a.k.a Braveheart), it is a very interesting one and I’m sure there are a few others to contradict it too. So, yes, definitely if you get a chance to sample some haggis, I encourage you to do so! I’m cheering you on, because, ‘new year, new food.’ And this is but one, tiny, miniscule iota of the wealth of dishes all of us have yet to try. Imagine all the foods we have already tried in our life, and multiply it by at least 100 we have yet to sample. Amazing! What about a drink? If there was one drink you haven’t yet imbibed, one you really want a sip of, what would it be? I’m a coffee drinker, so I would love to sample any new coffee I haven’t yet found in a coffee shop or on store shelves. One such bean that piques my interest is Kopi Luwak or basically, Civet coffee. Hailing from Indonesia, this cup of Joe is a little on the pricey side with the price tag attached reading between $100 and $600 per pound. A little out of my price range and I don’t know that I would want to pay that much to drink coffee brewed from the beans consumed by and passed through the entire digestive tract of a Civet cat, to be expelled from its bottom half, before being collected. Now, while it sounds a bit repulsive, it’s fair to note the beans are, of course, washed and all that before being sold. It’s the thought that it has been found in cat poop that might be a bit off-putting at first to some. To others, it may be where the adventure

Romantic Inn & Restaurant Fresh, Local Island Foods & Wine.

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Mopane worms are one such delicacy I have an unwillingness to try. My partner and a few other family members think they’re rather tasty. To each their own I say. These are caterpillars of large moths found in Mopane trees, normally in Western Africa. Street vendors sell them deep fried or dried as a nutritious snack because they are apparently rich in protein and monounsaturated fatty acids. Looks like beans and turkey have some stiff competition going. Dear Readers, this is a new year and a chance to ‘refurbish’ many aspects of your life, whatever you decide those are. It’s the potential for all things fresh and innovative! Let’s start with a brand new taste for the unusual foods out there! I am including a recipe for a non-alcoholic drink I came across and it’s delicious. With all the heavy foods, festive merriments, and rich drinks, I thought this might make a nice, NEW change. The kin of a mojito- the “nojito” offers the refreshment of the mint, lime and seltzer without the rum for those who want the benefit of having a mocktail pretty much anywhere! I would leave a recipe for Mopane worm fried rice, or a Civet coffee latte, but I dare say it might be a little difficult to obtain the ingredients! A ‘nojito’ is far easier to produce! I hope the start of your New Year is wonderful and is the foundation of something great! Please send any and all comments, questions, information and definitely recipes you would like to share to letsdish.whidbeyweekly@gmail.com and let’s do just that! “Nojitos” 1 ounce freshly squeezed lime juice 1 tablespoon caster sugar 12 (small) fresh mint leaves 4 ounces seltzer Muddle the mint leaves in a cocktail shaker with the lime juice and sugar. Add ice to almost fill the shaker and the top up with the seltzer. Gently shake to mix and using a strainer, pour into a glass. Garnish with a slice of lime and some mint leaves and enjoy! www.epicurious.com www.historic-uk.com/HistoryofScotland/HaggisScotlands-National-dish/ www.most-expensive.coffee/kopi-luwak-ultimative-faq/ To read past columns of Let's Dish in the Whidbey Weekly, see our Digital Library at www. whidbeyweekly.com.

Dining Guide

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Learn to Dance at Dan’s Classic Ballroom.Com! Ballroom, Latin, Swing, Club Dances Groups, Privates, Wedding Prep (360) 720-2727 - dcb601@comcast.net

Compass: A Course for Navy Life January 16-18, 5:30pm-9:00pm NAS Whidbey Island Chapel, Oak Harbor A spouse to spouse mentoring program. Course topics include relocation/moving; deployment; LES/finances; benefits/services; Naval traditions; community; communication. A fun and interactive way to learn about the Navy lifestyle. Free to all Navy/USMC spouses. Free onsite babysitting. Register online at www.gocompass.org/whidbeyisland.html

NRA Basics of Pistol Shooting Course Friday, January 19, 6:00pm-9:00pm Saturday, January 20, 9:00am-5:00pm NWSA Range, Oak Harbor Cost: $35 This course introduces students to the knowledge, skills and attitude necessary for owning and using a pistol safely. The pistol handling and shooting portion is completed at the NWSA range, located at 886 Gun Club Road, where students will learn about safe gun handling, pistol shooting fundamentals, and pistol shooting activities. The Basics of Pistol Course will also help prepare the student for participation in other NRA courses. Students can register online at nrainstructors.org For questions or to register, call NRA instructor John Hellmann at (360) 675-8397 or email NWSA.Training@gmail.com Additional information can be found at www.northwhidbeysportsmen.org.

AARP Smart Driver Safety Class Wednesday, January 24, 8:00am-4:00pm Oak Harbor Senior Center, 51 SE Jerome St. Refresh your driving skills and know the new rules of the road. Learn research-based driving strategies to help you stay safe behind the wheel. Each class requires a total of 8 hour mandatory course hours. Cost is $15 for AARP members, $20 for nonmembers. For more information, call (866) 955-6301.

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you’re being singled out unfairly, you become the victim, and that’s never good. You can have it either way on the 4th. Just approach the day with firm intent to be the best that you can be and you won’t go wrong.

CHICKEN LITTLE & THE ASTROLOGER By Wesley Hallock

ARIES (March 21-April 19) Your present strong focus on money and acquisitions is going to be a tough one to satisfy. Not that you have trouble in that department. You’re likely to be quite successful in your pursuits, but the sweet taste of success only accents your hunger for more. This week marks a very driven period for you. Try not to let what you don’t have or what didn’t go right on the 4th overpower your appreciation of all the good things you have. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) The main action this week centers on fun and social activities in and around the home. Put aside those more serious matters that are worrying you. A special evening with your loved ones will do wonders to rekindle your optimism. The more you think you can’t afford the time and trouble, the more you stand to benefit from some much needed R and R. Upsets to your routine on the 4th are blessings in disguise. GEMINI (May 21-June 21) You will benefit from a slower and more methodical approach to your affairs this week. Details of great importance may be skipped over entirely unless you adopt a more disciplined regimen. Once over lightly just won’t suffice. Dig into the heart of the matter and you’ll be glad you did. The circumstances of someone close are likely to dictate the pace on the 4th, so be prepared to get in step. CANCER (June 22-July 22) It’s a full speed ahead, no holds barred kind of week for you. Logic and organization are important in all your dealings, but what that means will be constantly changing as the situation changes. This means you’re a volatile commodity and subject to making some rather abrupt directional changes. You may not be aware of this, save for the protests of those who can’t keep up. The 4th is apt to make the point. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) Let pride and independence be your anchors this week against forces that may try to push you in directions you’d rather not go. The odds are with you in getting where you want to be, provided you make your wishes clear from the start. You can be living proof of the adage, “where there’s a will, there’s a way.” It’s your time to hold your ground and refuse to accept no for an answer. Surface appearances may mislead on the 4th. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) An air of competition probably surrounds everything you do this week. This can be a good thing if you let it. Nothing brings out your best like a threat to your supremacy, real or imagined. But if you take the view that

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) Mixing business with pleasure in a way that enhances both activities is not too much to hope for this week. Just being in a social environment is an excellent start. The more you expose yourself to outside ideas and influences, the better you will fare, so consider it your duty to go out and have some fun. Culture figures prominently here, so be alert on the 4th for possible high-brow forms of entertainment. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) This is a good week to partner up in order to achieve what you might not accomplish alone. Always remember that you’ll need to be open and direct about what it is that you’re trying to do. Considering the impact of your proposal on others will take you out of the picture long enough to show you how best to go about your plan. Approached in this fashion, the 4th bodes well for actions large and small SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) Momentum and great strength of will are yours to draw upon this week. You may use them however you deem fit, with one provision. And that is, your strength increases or diminishes in proportion to your willingness to serve as an agent for the good of all. If something is just not working for you, chances are good it’s your ego getting in the way. Put selfishness aside on the 4th and you’ll do fine. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) As much as you are outwardly busy with career and public affairs, even more is going on inwardly. Don’t neglect the inner you by letting yourself get too busy to stop and reflect. The inner is the foundation of the outer, making your private time crucial to your effectiveness in business. Lest you forget that important fact, circumstance has ways of reminding you to look within. Watch the 4th for clues. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb 18) You are well-positioned for success this week in matters that require the letter of the law behind you. Backed by legalities and with principle on your side, there is little you cannot accomplish. This is not to say that everything is automatic or comes easily. You must still pay your dues in time and effort. Do so cheerfully, knowing that it will all work out in the end. Make good use of unexpected turns on the 4th. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) This is a time of material growth for you. Whatever you need to sustain you is likely to be on the increase, money included. A grounded and practical approach to finances will yield good results. If you have prepared well, your coffers can replenish with surprising ease. You may find yourself marveling at the mysterious ways things work in your favor. Enjoy the mystery and know that there is more to come.

Chicken Little looks at what is and fears the sky is falling. Wesley Hallock, as a professional astrologer looks at what is and sees what could be. Read Wesley’s monthly forecast with links to Facebook and Twitter, at www. chickenlittleandtheastrologer.com. To read past columns of Chicken Little and the Astrologer in the Whidbey Weekly, see our Digital Library at www.whidbeyweekly.com.

CLUES ACROSS

49. Conversion rate

23. Takes dictation

1. Measurement (abbr.)

50. Single Lens Reflex

4. Returned material authorization (abbr.)

52. Atlanta rapper

24. 19th letter of Greek alphabet 25. Rounded knob (biology)

7. Sorting

53. Reduce the importance of

12. Attribute

56. Faces of buildings

15. Poked holes in

61. Something achieved

16. Angers

63. Distribute again

18. Doc

64. Tooth caregiver

19. MLB journeyman pitcher Dillon

65. 007’s creator CLUES DOWN

36. An ugly evil-looking old woman

20. Not don’t

1. Skater Lipinksi

38. Of a fasting time

21. Snubs someone

2. Data

40. Filled with passengers

24. Where kids bathe

3. Single step

27. One might be in distress

4. Destroyed financially

43. Below the ribs and above the hips

26. French philosopher Pierre 28. Mothers 29. Dardic ethnic group 32. Supports the rudder

44. Binary-coded decimal

30. Chair

5. Fail to interpret correctly

31. Music industry honors (abbr.)

6. Fava d’__: tree found in Brazil

33. Dash

7. Vehicle

34. Owed

8. Limited

35. Caucasian language

9. Old English

37. One thousand (Span.)

10. Aussie golfer Norman

39. Musical style drum and bass

11. Job

57. __ Spumante (Italian wine)

12. Loose-fitting undergarments

58. Popular commercial “pet”

13. Protected by balancing

59. Supreme god of Ancient Egyptians

41. Evergreen trees native to warm climates 42. Begin __: start fresh 44. Marshy outlets

45. 51 is a famous one 46. Goes into a funk 51. Chief O’Hara actor 54. Videocassette recorder 55. Scored perfectly

14. Give up

47. A chicken lays one

17. Fifth note of a major scale

48. Yemen’s largest city

22. Extravagantly bright

56. Type of tree

60. Room in a home 62. __ and behold Answers on page 15

YOUR GUESS IS AS GOOD AS OURS WEATHER FORECAST Thurs, Jan. 4

Fri, Jan. 5

Sat, Jan. 6

Sun, Jan. 7

Mon, Jan. 8

Tues, Jan. 9

North Isle

North Isle

North Isle

North Isle

North Isle

North Isle

North Isle

H-45°/L-37°

H-46°/L-36°

H-45°/L-37°

H-48°/L-36°

H-46°/L-36°

H-40°/L-33°

H-44°/L-34°

Chance of Rain

Rain

Cloudy

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Rain

Chance of Rain

Wed, Jan. 10

Chance of Rain

South Isle

South Isle

South Isle

South Isle

South Isle

South Isle

South Isle

H-45°/L-36°

H-44°/L-36°

H-45°/L-35°

H-48°/L-37°

H-44°/L-36°

H-38°/L-32°

H-45°/L-34°

Chance of Rain

Chance of Rain

Cloudy

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Rain

Chance of Rain

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14 JANUARY 4 - JANUARY 10, 2018 LOCALLY OWNED

Island 911

Seriously, we do not make this stuff up! THURSDAY, NOV. 9 12:25 am, Country Club Dr. Reporting party advising while taking trash out to dumpster, saw a “very odd man” moving all around the dumpster; scared reporting party. Subject did not say anything to the reporting party. 1:26 am, Country Club Dr. Re-calling. Saw man again, however outfit is different. Man was 12 feet from caller's front door. Blew kisses at caller and made faces. 7:19 am, SE Barrington Dr. Party reporting male subject locked in bathroom, screaming. 11:07 am, Waterloo Rd. Caller reporting approximately 15 goats and a dog currently trespassing at location; ongoing problem. 11:23 am, NE 7th Ave. Caller advising little car is trying to tow a bus. 11:24 pm, Burma Rd. Party on line stating “bitch needs to get out of my house.” FRIDAY, NOV. 10 2:36 pm, Green Island Way Caller reporting neighbor is blowing leaves onto caller's property; husband is outside confronting and it's escalating. 3:31 pm, Woodard Ave. Reporting party advising she refused a male to use the bathroom and he went outside and peed on her property and is now harassing her customers. 4:04 pm, SW Barrington Dr. Caller reporting subject driving around yelling at customers. SATURDAY, NOV. 11 3:22 am, NE 3rd St. Reporting party advising to look up in the ceiling for “him;” won't say who “he” is. Reporting party states he has heard him call himself different things. Party says he is using a “crazy gun” to call. 7:42 am, Swede Hill Rd. Caller reporting three horses walking up Swede Hill Rd. towards Scatchet Head. 10:08 am, N. Oak Harbor St. Caller advising husband is cheating on her and wants him removed from residence.

1:15 pm, E Fakkema Rd. Caller reporting cows running loose on Fakkema Rd.; caller sees one calf, believes more are probably out. Caller is out there now, advising neighbors own cows, but not sure who this one belongs to. 5:19 pm, Crosby Rd. Party advising parked vehicle at Joseph Whidbey State Park; went hiking and came out at golf course; party does not know how to get back to vehicle. 6:54 pm, Zylstra Rd. Reporting party requesting check on mom, not sure of address; when asking reason for the check, party states “because I want to talk to my mom.” SUNDAY, NOV. 12 6:49 am, Old Pietila Rd. Caller advising heard about 20 gunshots in area east of location; says it sounds like a “gun fight.” Have been hearing it for six or seven minutes; caller thinks it was someone shooting at raccoons. 10:22 am, Main St. Caller reporting male subject laying in lobby of post office; states he doesn't want to approach subject in case he is sick, dead or sleeping. Subject is moving; caller does not want to remain in area. 2:19 pm, Boon Rd. Reporting goats along the side of SR 20, grazing in a shallow ditch area. 2:56 pm, Coachman Ln. Caller reporting loose goats, both have horns and collars. 2:56 pm, Jones Rd. Reporting party advising neighbor stole her wheelbarrow. 3:47 pm, Harbor Sands Ln. Party is following up on harassing phone call from neighbor; caller said reporting party was a “bitch” and a “c***.” 8:46 pm, NE 3rd St. Requesting call; needs to report female subject using “ray gun” on reporting party while taking an x-ray. 11:45 pm, Lancaster Rd. Reporting party advising cow in row, headed towards Double Bluff Rd.; cow is walking in middle of Lancaster Rd. Report provided by OHPD & Island County Sheriff’s Dept.

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Life Tributes William “Bill” Owen Bell, AZCM, US Navy, Retired May 23, 1940 - Dec. 13, 2017 Surrounded by his loving family, AZCM William “Bill” Owen Bell was called home to the Lord December 13, 2017 after a brave battle with dementia. The only child of Lt. Colonel William R. Bell and Kathryn (Linstad) Bell, Bill was born May 23, 1940 at Swedish Hospital in Seattle, WA. As an Army “brat” Bill moved numerous times as a child, including duty stations in California, Texas and Germany, before graduating from Roosevelt High School in Seattle in 1958. On April 1, 1962 Bill enlisted in the United States Navy to begin what would become a decorated career spanning over 30 years. Bill retired June 1, 1993 as Command Master Chief of VAQ-309 at NAS Whidbey Island in Oak Harbor, WA. After retiring from active duty, Bill went to work for the Army Times, where he served for 13 years as the Western Regional Manager responsible for newsstand sales and distribution for all military installations and communities west of the Mississippi River. In August 1963, Bill met the love of his life, Phyllis Anne Blakely, to whom he proposed New Year’s Eve 1963. The two were married April 25, 1964, in Phyllis’ home town of Enumclaw, WA. The couple gave birth to their first child, Denise, in October 1967 while stationed in Seattle, WA. Their son, Kevin, was born in January, 1970 while the couple was stationed in Minneapolis, MN. Bill loved music, particularly playing the piano and organ. His mother began giving Bill lessons when he was 5 years old and the passion to play remained with him his entire life. Bill was in several bands, including the “Blue Notes” and “Feedback,” and was known to play at several locations around Oak Harbor. Bill also loved to sing karaoke and dance. A member of the American Legion, the Fleet Reserve, NCOA, USO, Navy Memorial, and RCPOA, Bill was active in his community and with numerous charitable organizations. Bill’s other interests included traveling and camping with family, his dogs, sprint car races, NASCAR, and Seattle sports teams (Seahawks, Mariners, T-Birds, etc). A proud supporter of his kids’ (and later his grandchildrens’) athletic events, Bill was once voted the Oak Harbor High School Parent Cheerleader of the Year. Bill is survived by his wife, Phyllis, children Denise and Kevin, five grandchildren and two great-grandchildren. He will be remembered by his family and friends for his indomitable sense of humor and positive attitude. A memorial service with military honors will be held January 27, 2018 at 11 a.m., at the United Methodist Church in Oak Harbor with Pastor David Lura officiating. A reception at the Knights of Columbus will follow the service. In lieu of flowers, the family asks that contributions be made to the Alzheimer’s/Dementia Association at alz.org

Life Tributes can now be found online at www.whidbeyweekly.com BITS ‘n’ PIECES

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Saturday, February 24, 10:00am-12:00pm You’ve got a great food product you want to sell, now what? Learn about the licenses and permits you’ll need to get your food business going. Get an idea of the expenses you’ll incur before you even set foot into a commercial kitchen. Learn about the resources available through Whidbey Island Local Lending (WILL). Learn more about Goosefoot’s vision for a licensed incubator commercial kitchen and help make it a reality! Starting a Business Saturday, January 13, 10:00am-12:00pm Saturday, February 10, 10:00am-12:00pm Increase your chances of starting a successful business. Discover the tools that already exist to help you. Build a business plan that will guide you through years of growth. Learn how to do research on important questions before you lose any money on the business. Topics include: What’s the “heart” of your business? Are there potential customers near you? Where do people spend their money? How can you reach them? Where are you going, and how do you get there? And more… Posters, Flyers, Brochure Design Wednesday, January 24, 6:00pm-8:00pm Learn design tips, tools, and resources to help you better design advertising documents for your business or events, including flyers, rack cards, postcards, brochures, and more! Get examples of what to do, and what not to do. Improve your public appeal for all visitors and customers.

Building a Marketing Plan Saturday, January 27, 10:00am-12:00pm Saturday, February 17, 10:00am-12:00pm Increase the effectiveness of your marketing by laying out a plan with goals, a schedule, and measures of success. In this workshop, you will learn why having a marketing plan is important, and why you should stay on track to save money and be more effective. YouTube for Business Tuesday, February 6, 1:00-3:00 pm YouTube is the second largest social media site, and the second largest search engine. Yet only 9% of small businesses have a YouTube account. Learn how to use YouTube to boost your social media and marketing strategy, and interact with customers in a new and fun way! No need for expensive or specialized equipment. Websites & Ecommerce Wednesday, February 21, 6:00pm-8:00pm Websites are a necessity for many businesses, but many small business owners shy away because of the cost and the technological skill. With all the tools and technology that exist today, websites have never been easier! The workshop will cover the biggest website design tools, basic guidelines, and search engine ranking. After the first hour and a break, the focus will be on ecommerce and selling your product on your own website or a third-party seller. Feel free to come to only one half or the other, depending on your business interest. [Submitted by Sami Postma, Goosefoot]

Thank you for reading! Please recycle the Whidbey Weekly when you are finished with it.


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JANUARY 4 - JANUARY 10, 2018 LOCALLY OWNED

Property Management You Can Count On!

Whidbey Residential Rentals, Inc. We Manage Your Home As If It Were Our Own. 360-675-9596 • www.whidbeyres.com 285 NE Midway Blvd • Suite #2 • Oak Harbor ANNOUNCEMENTS JEEPERS! Let’s start a new club! The inaugural meeting of the Whidbey Wranglers, an all Jeep vehicle organization, will be at the Oak Harbor El Cazador restaurant Saturday, February 24 at 5pm. Feel free to contact me at spillerr@ comcast.net for any questions or just show up! Pregnant? Need baby clothes? We have them and the price is right–FREE. Pregnancy Care Clinic, open most Wednesdays and Thursdays, 10am to 4pm. Call (360) 221-2909 or stop by 6th and Cascade in Langley. Be the difference in a child's life and become a foster parent today! Service Alternatives is looking for caring, loving, and supportive families to support foster children. (425) 923-0451 or mostermick@ servalt-cfs.com The Whidbey Island community is encouraged to try out the paddling sport of dragon boating with the Stayin' Alive team. Our team's mission is to promote the physical, social, and emotional benefits of dragon boating. It has been shown to be especially beneficial to cancer survivors. Practice with us for up to 3 times for free. Life-jackets and paddles provided. Saturdays at the Oak Harbor Marina, 8:45am. Contact njlish@ gmail.com. More info at our Facebook Page: https://www. facebook.com/NorthPugetSou ndDragonBoatClub?ref=hl Medical Marijuana patients unite; If you need assistance, advice, etc. please contact at 420patientnetworking@gmail. com. Local Whidbey Island help. If you or someone you know has been a victim of Homicide,

Burglary, Robbery, Assault, Identity Theft, Fraud, Human Trafficking, Home Invasion and other crimes not listed. Victim Support Services has Advocates ready to help. Please call the 24-hr Crisis Line (888) 388-9221. Free Service. Visit our web site at http://victimsupportservices.org

VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITIES Looking for Board Members to join the dynamic Board of Island Senior Resources and serve the needs of Island County Seniors. Of particular interest are representatives from North Whidbey. For more information please contact: reception@islandseniorservices.org

JOB MARKET PT Evening Janitorial in Oak Harbor: Hiring IMMEDIATELY for part-time evening janitor, Monday-Saturday, 9 hours per week. Start time flexible (after 6:30pm/earlier on Saturday); compensation, $12 per hour. Earn part-time income of $500+ per month! Must have valid DL, cell phone, pass background/drug screening and E-Verify (USCIS). Please provide name and phone number. Resumes welcome. E-mail: susan.valenzuela@ybswa. net (3) We are looking for a dynamic Account Executive. Applicant Puzzle 1 (Easy, difficulty rating 0.36)

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has to be able to work autonomously and be self-motivated; must possess exceptional customer service and organizational skills; marketing or advertising background desired. If you want to join a successful, growing organization and have a strong work ethic, we want to talk to you. Email your cover letter and resume to info@whidbeyweekly.com Langley Main Street program manager: Langley Main Street program manager should have education and/or experience in some of the following areas: architecture, historic preservation, economics, finance, public relations, design, journalism, administration, retailing, volunteer or nonprofit administration and/ or small business development. The program manager would be sensitive to design and preservation issues. The manager would understand issues confronting downtown business people, property owners, public agencies and No Cheating!

community organizations. The manager would be entrepreneurial, imaginative and able to function independently. Excellent communication skills are essential including website and social media management. Knowledge of Quick Books accounting is required. Part time position, 20 hours weekly. Please send resume to mainstreet@whidbey.com (1) DRIVERS: Drivers wanted for Whidbey SeaTac Shuttle. CDL/ P2 Preferred, Training available for those without. Full Time, Part Time and weekend openings available. Details at www. seatacshuttle.com or call (360) 679-4003

HOME FURNISHINGS Round 4-ft, claw-foot oak table with leaf, 4x6 foot, includes 6 chairs, $400. Call (360) 499-9106 (1)

LAWN AND GARDEN 25 aluminum silver deck post caps, $3 each; 200 feet new 8” heavy waterline, $4 a foot,

LOCALLY OPERATED

Foster Homes Needed! Family Tails Dog Rescue needs foster homes! We can't save dogs from high kill shelters without homes for them to stay at while they wait to find their forever home. 1 week to 3 months, a fun and rewarding way to be involved with rescue and also have a dog without the full time commitment. We pay for everything, you just provide the love and the home. Please call 360-969-2014 for more info or for an application.

obo. Can be used for waterline or drain line. (360) 321-1624 Natural Barnyard Topsoil: Good for gardens, flower beds, etc. Unscreened, 10 yard loads, $225 delivered. South Whidbey (360) 321-1624

MISCELLANEOUS Over 50 LP (vinyl) albums for sale, various artists, $3 ea. Call (360) 331-1063 (1) A Lehmann Gross Bahn electric “The Big Train” set. Includes train cars and tracks, in original box. Made in West Germany. Please call for details; we can send photos. Best offer. (360) 678-1167 (0) Terrarium: Stained glass (clear glass and green glass panels). 26-1/2 “ tall; diameter of bottom is approximately 16”; diameter of glass top is 10”. Please call for details; we can

send photos. Best offer. (360) 678-1167 (1) Looking for Xmas, Bday, Father's Day, or just Gifts in general? These are LOCAL made crafts, I have about 50-60 of these available. They are $16.00/ea, plus shipping if you want them mailed. CASH preferred. Dimensions are: 5-6"W X 17”L. Contact me at ljohn60@gmail.com.

ANIMALS/SUPPLIES If you or someone you know needs help in feeding pet(s), WAIF Pet Food Banks may be able to help. Pet Food Banks are located at WAIF thrift stores in Oak Harbor (50 NE Midway Blvd) and Freeland (1660 Roberta Ave) and are generously stocked by donations from the community. If you need assistance, please stop by.

CLASSIFIED INFORMATION US Postal Mail

Whidbey Weekly Classified Department PO Box 1098 Oak Harbor, WA 98277

E-Mail............classifieds@whidbeyweekly.com Telephone..................................(360)682-2341 Fax.............................................(360)682-2344 PLEASE CALL WHEN YOUR ITEMS HAVE SOLD.

Please try to limit your classified to 30 words or less, (amounts and phone numbers are counted as words) we will help edit if necessary. We charge $10/week for Vehicles, Boats, Motorcycles, RVs, Real Estate Rental/Sales, Business Classifieds and any items selling $1,000 and above. We do charge $25 to include a photo. The FREE classified space is not for business use. No classified is accepted without phone number. We reserve the right to not publish classifieds that are in bad taste or of questionable content. All free classifieds will be published twice consecutively. If you would like your ad to be published more often, you must resubmit it. Deadline for all submissions is one week prior to issue date.

DID YOU KNOW MOST CLASSIFIED ADS ARE FREE? Contact us for more info! classifieds@whidbeyweekly.com

Thank you for reading! Please recycle the Whidbey Weekly when you are finished with it.


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