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Q 2008

Whidbey Island Farm Tour

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Kasia Pierzga / The Whidbey Examiner

Selling produce at the Coupeville Farmers Market and other markets and directsales venues allows farmers and consumers to connect in person.

By Kasia Pierzga Examiner Staff Writer

As visitors tour the farms showcased on this year’s Whidbey Island Farm Tour, it’s evident the Island is experiencing a kind of agricultural renaissance. Small farms producing everything from organic vegetables, lavender, herbs and squash to grass-fed beef, alpaca wool and a variety of value-added products are cropping up all over the Island. They are led by small-scale farmers with the passion and enthusiasm to launch new enterprises that appeal to consumers’ growing interest in buying and eating “local.� It’s an exciting time for local agriculture, said Karen Bishop of the Whidbey Island Conservation District. Bishop, who hails from a family with a long history of farming in Coupeville,

has seen local farming shift away from growing commodities and toward finding niche markets to meet consumer demand both on Whidbey Island and in the larger, Puget Sound regional market. Within the next few months, a committee that’s been working on developing a brand identity for Whidbey farm products will be unveiling the results of their efforts. They hope that promoting local farm products with a Whidbey brand logo will help farmers better market what they grow. Another committee has been exploring the idea of developing a meat processing facility that would allow local livestock producers to offer freshly cut and wrapped meat to local shoppers. And

a committee on agritourism is working on a driving-tour map that provides visitors with information about local farms. “What I am impressed with is the interest and the energy of local farmers for this,� Bishop said. “With so many small farms, the importance of us working together is more important than ever.� Despite the growing interest in farming – and in eating local – agriculture has many challenges. A persistent labor shortage is a big obstacle for farms that require a lot of hand labor. Some local farms bring in agricultural interns who get a small wage and a place to stay in exchange for their work. Others bring in their own labor, such as the Skagit County-based companies that rent fields on the Island to grow beets, cabbage and other crops for seed. The price a farmer can get for agricultural produce is also a challenge, especially in an economy in which many consumers are tightening their belts. And the cost of starting up a new farm enterprise can be huge, especially for operations that require special equipment. But consumers are increasingly willing to pay a little more for fresh produce that comes from local farms, Bishop said. And widespread news coverage of health scares related to tainted factoryfarmed meat and produce has prompted consumers to look for ways to get their food from local producers. “They want to know where their food comes from, and they want it fresh,� said Peg Tennant, who manages the farmers markets in Coupeville and Oak Harbor. Tennant said she believes the interest

in “buying local� also has to do with a growing desire for a sense of community. “I think people are feeling disconnected from each other, and from the rhythms of nature,� she said. Tennant said she gets a deep sense of satisfaction as she watches community “happen� at farmers markets each week. “People are talking to each other, they’re sharing recipes, they’re visiting with the farmers,� she said. “You can just hear it in their voices.� Events such as the Whidbey Island Farm Tour help promote awareness of local farms and allow locals and visitors alike to connect with the people who grow things, Tennant said. “It’s really awesome to watch children figure out where food comes from,� she said. “Not only are people’s bodies being fed by paying attention to how food is grown, but they’re also feeding their mind and spirit.� An important step in strengthening the farm industry on Whidbey Island is making changes in public policy that encourages farming instead of converting farmland to high-priced residential lots. Getting organized is the first step in making sure local farmers’ voices are heard, Bishop said. Tennant also emphasized the need for farmers to take action on issues that matter to Whidbey agriculture. “I see local ag ready to take off in this county if we can get land and tax policies that support it,� she said. Bishop takes a similar view: “When you get a group of people together, it’s easier to make the argument for change.�

#VZ-PDBMt&BU-PDBMt#F-PDBM Local Food from Local Farms. 1BSUJBMGVOEJOHQSPWJEFECZ84%"

Don’t miss Harvest Fest 10 am-2 pm Saturday, Oct. 11

featuring the annual Giant Pumpkin Contest!

Celebrating Our 30th Season

4BUVSEBZTtUI"MFYBOEFS#FIJOEUIF$PVQFWJMMF-JCSBSZ We accept FMNP coupons

☛ Make the Market your first stop for all your family’s food needs! Page 2    A special publication of The Whidbey Examiner  â€˘â€ƒ The Whidbey Island 2008 Farm Tour Guide 


The Whidbey Island Farm Tour is a chance to experience the Island’s rural character and to connect with the farmers who provide locally grown food, fiber and other products for purchase. Set for Saturday, Oct. 4 and Sunday, Oct. 5, the free event encourages families to wander through 18 different farms, checking out everything from horses, cows, alpacas, chickens, mussels and bats (yes, bats!) to all types of herbs and produce – grapes, lavender, pumpkins and squash just to name a few. You can even watch dog agility and horse training demonstrations at Reinshadow Ridge in Greenbank. “People are becoming more aware of the importance of knowing how and where their food is raised and produced,” said Karen Krug, Farm Tour chair. “We want to make it easy for our community to know which of their neighbors are farming, what they are growing, and how they are doing it.” This year is the farm tour’s third year, and it’s a big hit with local families. “It’s exciting to see the 3,000 or so people visit the farms on the Island, particularly families with children,” said Judy Feldman, tour committee member and Island County 4-H coordinator. “The tour is so effective at raising awareness of issues that impact our local farms, but it also connects families and educators to new kinds of resources available to them.”

Kasia Pierzga / The Whidbey Examiner

Friendly alpacas are an appealing attractions for families visiting some of the farms on the 2008 Whidbey Island Farm Tour. A map of the farms is on pages 6 and 7, and a descriptive guide to the farms begins on page 8.

On Saturday, visitors can check out local goods, information and more at the Farm-to-Home Fair at Greenbank Farm. And throughout the weekend, 17 Whidbey Island restaurants will be serving locally grown foods. On Saturday night, the Deer Lagoon Grange near Langley is offering a family-friendly Country Western dance. And don’t forget the fundraising auction of this year’s Farm Tour painting titled ‘Lavender Lunch on Whidbey.’ In other words, there’s something fun for everyone. “Our primary goals are to educate our community about our farms, promote the benefits of locally grown food, fiber and other products, and assist our local farms in their sustainability, marketing and publicity efforts,” Krug explained. “It’s only fitting that we in turn support these goals by acting sustainably ourselves with our fundraising efforts.” The Whidbey Island Farm Tour is a family-friendly event, with children’s activities at several farms and plenty to see at all the rest. 4-H members will be on hand to talk about the programs they are involved with. “We want our kids to feel just as welcome on the tour as our adults,” said Feldman. The farm tour is about more than farms and food. It’s also about community, Feldman said: “It’s about knowing you have a place here, and that you and your neighbors know each other and are looking at a common future.”

We Love Whidbey Farms. Thank you for supporting our farm!

Open all year for your lavender needs. www.lavenderwind.com Lavender Wind Farm I 2530 Darst Road, Coupeville I 360.678.0919

2008 Whidbey Island Farm Tour Guide A special supplement to The Whidbey Examiner, Whidbey Island’s only locally owned, independent community newspaper. Publisher Kasia Pierzga

Advertising Pam Bishop Ad Assistant B. Halmann

Graphic Design Sueann Carter Abbie Martin

Editorial Assistant Joan Soltys

P.O. Box 445, 6 NW Coveland St., Coupeville, WA 98239 phone 360-678-8060 • fax 360-678-6073 E-mail: news@whidbeyexaminer.com • www.whidbeyexaminer.com

Northwest Farm Credit Services

is proud to support the Whidbey Island Farm Tour. Helping farmers, ranchers, and rural residents thrive for more than 90 years.

800.548.2699 | farm-credit.com

Copyright 2008. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part without written permission is prohibited.

The Whidbey Island 2008 Farm Tour Guide  •  A special publication of The Whidbey Examiner

Page 3


Farm-to-Home Fair links consumers & producers As you tour the many farms across Whidbey Island, you will find a wide variety of food and products grown locally. Equally diverse is what you can make with the harvest from these farms. The Farm-to-Home Fair pulls together many Whidbey Island craftspeople and chefs to demonstrate how to turn this wonderfully diverse harvest into a wide array of products for your home and palate. Demonstrations include: Cooking with Local Food: Chef Susan Vanderbeek, former owner of The Oystercatcher, will demonstrate how to use herbs to enrich the flavors in vegetables as well as how to layer the cooking of vegetables to enhance their tastes. She will also talk about how using local ingredients improves nutrition and taste. Goat Cheese Processing: Vicky Brown of Little Brown Farm will demonstrate cheese-making techniques from supplies you can get at the local grocery store. She will be talking about things like curds and whey, culture and enzymes – and of course offering samples! The Little Brown Farm is a small goat

Oak Harbor and Freeland • Feed • Fencing • Pet Supplies • Carhartt and Other Brand Name Clothing • Lawn & Garden Supplies • Propane Oak Harbor • 24 Hour Gas & Diesel • Easy RV Access 360-675-2277

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Page 4 

farm in Freeland working towards becoming a fine cheese source for Whidbey Island, featuring goat milk and sheep milk cheeses. Beekeeping: Dave Austin from the Stanwood-Camano Beekeeper’s Association teaches the basics of beekeeping and equipment required with the help of demonstration beehives and various displays. Don’t forget to take home some wonderful sweet honey! Soapmaking with Goat’s Milk: Susan Miles of Maple Hill Soap will explain the daily process of running a micro-dairy, the benefits of goat milk and the entire soap-making process. Creating Cosmetics: Karen Wilson of Sweet Sisters Bodycare will demonstrate how to make body polish and offer samples to take home. You’ll be amazed at how soft your skin can be while enjoying the aromatic scents of Whidbey Island-grown plants. Weaving: The Whidbey Weavers Guild will demonstrate spinning techniques of various kinds of fleece from our own local farms. Fiber artists from the guild will also be at some of the farms on the Whidbey Island Farm Tour. Farm-inspired Art: Stacey Neumiller will display a collection of her color-

Kasia Pierzga / The Whidbey Examiner

Scenic and historic Greenbank Farm hosts the Farm-to-Home Fair from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 4, offering local food and farm products, demonstrations, children’s activities and more.

ful paintings of farm animals. Each year, she donates a painting to be used for the brochure image. This year’s image is “Lavender Lunch on Whidbey.”

The original painting of “Lavender Lunch on Whidbey” will be auctioned on eBay beginning Saturday, Oct. 4. See a photograph of the painting on page 11.

Dance the night away Deer Lagoon Grange opens its doors for a family-friendly Country Western dance and ice cream social starting at 7 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 4. Music is performed by Chris Guenther and the Honky Tonk Drifters. The grange is at 5147 Bayview Road near Langley. Admission is $15 for adults; $12 for seniors 65 and older; and $10 for children under 12. For details, call Chuck Prochaska at 360-222-3110.

• • • • • •

9:00 to 6:00 Mon - Sat Organic Products

Annuals & Hanging Baskets New & Unusual Perennials Fruit, Flowering & Shade Trees Shrubs of Every Kind Seeds, Bulbs, Tools, Gifts Timothy Alfalfa & Orchard Grass Garden Center Magazine’s Innovator of the Year

Workshops & Classes

• • • • •

10:00 to 5:00 Sunday Non-toxic Solutions

Quality Livestock Feed Live Chicks in Season Pet Foods & Accessories Wild Bird Feed & Feeders Experienced Staff

Experienced Nursery Professionals WSU Master Livestock Advisors

A Full-Service Farm & Garden Center

Voted

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bayviewfarmandgarden.com

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Discover

11 a.m. - 2 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 4, Greenbank Farm

Helping You Put Knowledge to Work… Master Gardeners, 4-H Youth Development, Beach Watchers, Shore Stewards, Waste Wise Volunteers, Livestock Advisors, Admiralty Head Lighthouse Docents, Weather Network, Agriculture Sustainability & Land Stewardship, Marine Resources Committee For more information visit www.island.wsu.edu

  A special publication of The Whidbey Examiner  •  The Whidbey Island 2008 Farm Tour Guide 


committee has catalogued more than 100 Island producers interested in or already selling their beef, hogs, sheep, goats and chickens directly to the public. Earlier this year, the committee requested a USDA financial grant and, if successful, will work with the NABC on a feasibility study of USDA-inspected processing options for all of Island County. One major advantage to USDA inspection is that meats may then be sold farm direct to the public by the cut – just like in mainstream grocery stores.

By Olivia Forté-Gardner Washington State University Extension

The latest trends in agriculture on Whidbey have less to do with raising new crops and animals than with marketing them. Working hard to help farmers develop markets for their produce are the Whidbey Sustainable Agriculture Committee and the Northwest Agriculture Business Center. Collaborating for nearly two years, these partners have spearheaded several community-driven efforts aimed at expanding profits for farmers through new marketing channels.

A Whidbey identity

Marketing local meats The Whidbey Island Meat Processing Steering Committee, organized in 2007, strives to create more availability and purchasing options for buyers of local meats. The group, composed largely of active farmers, has since been working on selecting the best and most sustainable processing options for Island County. “We come from different parts of Whidbey and from all scales of produc-

Kasia Pierzga / The Whidbey Examiner

4-H participants Caterina and Curtis Amsler show off their pigs at the Island County Fair, held each year in August.

tion,” said Maryon Attwood, committee chair. Attwood has been working on connecting local farmers’ efforts to larger efforts in the Puget Sound. To date, the

Small farmers have enough to do in a day without worrying about how to get their name out there to help their products sell. Branding Island-grown products as a collective is one solution that a group of island farmers, supportive nonprofits, and even a retired chef are developing

together to improve marketing opportunities for the wide array of farm goods. The objectives of this branding effort encompass quality and production standards, farmland and small-farm business sustainability, producer and consumer education, as well as honoring farmers and creating emotional connections to Whidbey Island. “Soon Whidbey Island will be associated with its quality farm products as well as a scenic destination. Both are worth protecting through farming,” said Vicky Brown of The Little Brown Farm, a micro dairy near Freeland. Marc Wilson of Maha Farm near Clinton said he’s excited about what a growing market might mean for local agriculture. “It’s an incentive for farmers to adopt more sustainable farming practices,” Wilson said. The group’s most recent victory came in the form of a grant through the Washington Department of Community Trade and Economic Development via the NABC. The $10,000 award is now being used to create a logo and other marketing materials. No date is set to launch the brand, but as participating farmers wind down their season, they’ll be ramping up their work cultivating a home-grown brand.

Celebrating and exploring a rural working community.

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The Whidbey Island 2008 Farm Tour Guide  •  A special publication of The Whidbey Examiner

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To Mount Vernon, Burlington & I-5

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Whidbey Island’s only award winning restaurant & brewery. Steak, burgers, seafood, pasta, pub fare. Always fresh. Always local. Open M-F 11:30 am, Sat & Sun at 10 am. Breakfast and lunch until 2pm. 32295 Hwy. 20, Oak Harbor 360-675-5858

PO LNE LL RD.

SWEET RICE THAI CUISINE

Best of Whidbey’s Best New Restaurant. Serving authentic Thai cuisine. Open 7 days a week. Happy Hour 4:30-6:30pm. 885 SE Pioneer Way, Oak Harbor 360-679-8268

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4. Wildwood Farm

Specializing in steaks, seafood and sushi! All served up with live music. Open for lunch and dinner. 930 SE Pioneer Way, Oak Harbor 360-279-2528

7. Penn Cove Shellfish (Saturday only)

COVE RD. PENN LIBBEY RD.

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Fresh Steamed Mussels, Seafood, Great Burgers, Clam Chowder Daily. Smoke-free Tavern. Open 7 days a week. 8 NW Front Street, Coupeville 360-678-4222

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11. Greenbank Cellars

We Toss‘em, They’re Awesome!® 10% OFF WITH THIS AD! Dine In or Take Out 107 S Main Street, Coupeville 360-678-3200

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KEYSTONE CAFE

GREENBANK FARM FARM TO HOME FAIR

Across from the Keystone Ferry. Espresso, Soups, Salads, Cascade Glacier Ice Cream, Sandwiches, Chowder 360-678-5396

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at the Greenbank Farm offering handmade pies, hearty soups, quiche, seasonal salads, artisan breads and other edible works of art. Open daily 11-4, weekends 10-5. 765 Wonn Road, Greenbank 360-678-1288

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The Whidbey Island Farm Tour Guide is a special publication of The Whidbey Examiner, Whidbey Island’s only locally owned, independent newspaper. Special thanks for contributed photos and stories go to Karen Bishop, Olivia Forté-Gardner and Karen Krug. Read the guide online at www.whidbeyexaminer.com

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News from the Heart of Whidbey Island

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The Whidbey

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events at specific times, and some are open for one day only.

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the rural character of our beautiful island home.

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food, fiber and farm-related products, and soak up

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to visit with the farmers, purchase locally grown

to help guide your way. Please note that some farms offer

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endeavors on Whidbey Island. You’ll have a chance

or as few farms as you like. Driving directions are provided

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offer a glimpse of the variety of agricultural

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The 18 farms taking part in this two-day event

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Welcome to the third annual Whidbey Island Farm Tour!

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1351 SW Barlow Street Oak Harbor Next to Island Pet Center 360-675-4800

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Whidbey Island’s ultimate in fine dining. Open Tuesday-Saturday 4:30pm-9pm. 1191 SE Dock Street, Oak Harbor 360-279-1231 www.frasersgh.com

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Our Goal: To make each bite the BEST you’ve ever had. Texas Brisket, Chicken, Memphis Ribs Lunch & Dinner. Eat In & Take Out 601 NE Midway Blvd., Oak Harbor 360-679-3500

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5. Hummingbird Farm Nursery and Gardens

2. Case Farm

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Clinton Ferry to Mukilteo, I-5


space is available. Boat Tour Directions: Boats leave from the north side of the Coupeville Wharf building. Take Hwy. 20 to Coupeville. Turn north at the light onto Main Street. Follow Main Street to Front Street, turn left, and at the end is the wharf. Parking available up the hill 2 blocks on the right side of Alexander Street. 1 • A Knot In Thyme Jack & Wendy Rawls • Open all day Saturday and from 1 - 4 p.m. Sunday • 4233 DeGraff Road, Oak Harbor • 360-298-0443 We are a working horticultural farm, encompassing a 75-year-old holly grove. As black Percheron mares pull you on a guided wagon tour, you’ll see how we care for holly and enjoy our unique “quilted garden.” Dried flowers, lavender products and gifts inspired by the farm and by nature will be available in our floral shop. Directions: Located 2.5 miles south of Deception Pass or 7 miles north of Oak Harbor, from Hwy 20 turn west onto DeGraff Road. The farm is on the right. 2 • Case Farm Mike & Sheila Case-Smith • 98 Case Road, Oak Harbor • 360-675-1803 Celebrating 110 years of continuous family stewardship, this rustic farm produces fresh vegetables, plants, beef calves, grain and hay. Through October we are open for u-pick pumpkin sales along with picked gourmet onions, winter squash, and other produce. Animals and equipment are on display for self-guided tours and Case family members will answer questions. This year we are partnering with a local grower for blueberry sales during the Farm Tour. Directions: Case Farm is located just north of Oak Harbor, off Hwy. 20 at mile marker 34 near the intersection of Hwy. 20 and NE Regatta Drive. Go down Case Road .5 mile to the farm. Parking is on the grass. 3 • Island Bliss Alpacas Dina Blackstone & Tracy Quinten • 2839 Taylor Road, Oak Harbor • 360-420-7130 We breed, raise and sell gentle, award-winning alpacas with luxurious fiber in a variety of colors. We offer educational materials, tours, alpaca-related clothing, hand-spun yarn and fiber, plus spinning and fiber processing demonstrations. Hand-feed animals and feel their fabulous fleece! We will also be giving away free compost – ready for use in your garden. Directions: From Hwy. 20, turn east on Fakkema and go about 1.5 miles, then turn south onto Taylor Road for about a mile. The farm is on the corner of Taylor and Mounts, just south of Silverlake. 4 • Wildwood Farm Heather Carder • 2326 N. Happy Valley Road, Oak Harbor • 360-679-3474 • wildwoodfarm.com Wildwood Farm is an 80-acre breeding facility that raises horses for the racetrack and Sport Horse disciplines. Home to Noble Horse Saddlery, we have a bed and breakfast, offer a training and instruction program for riders of all ages and host tours that include training demonstrations, hay rides and pony rides for children. Directions: From Hwy 20 in Oak Harbor, turn east on Whidbey Ave. Turn left on Regatta Drive, then right on Crescent Harbor Road. At the end of Crescent Harbor Road, turn right then turn left on N. Happy Valley Road. Follow signs to the farm. 5 • Hummingbird Farm Nursery and Gardens Lee and Lori Spear • 2319 Zylstra Road, Oak Harbor • 360-679-5044 • humming-

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birdfarmnursery.com We are a destination farm, nursery and display garden on north Whidbey featuring a large selection of both unusual and popular perennials, herbs, shrubs, vines and small trees. We’ll have self-guided demonstration stations on horticulture and personal gardening, as well as live, handson sessions demonstrating fall garden preparation and planting and transplanting techniques. Compost tea is brewed onsite. Native plants for rain gardens are available for sale. Directions: Heading north, take Hwy. 20 and turn left on Zylstra Road (4 miles north of Coupeville). Go 4 miles and watch for blue barn after Fort Nugent Road. Heading south, take Hwy. 20 and turn right on Swantown Road, (at the last stoplight leaving Oak Harbor) turn left on Fort Nugent Road. Go 1.75 miles and watch for the blue fence at Zylstra Road. 6 • Lavender Wind Farm Sarah Richards • 2530 Darst Road, Coupeville • 360-678-0919 • lavenderwind.com We sell lavender in lots of forms, including dried lavender, essential oil, food items, lotions & soaps and offer nursery plants that include lavenders, herbs, flowers, and shrubs. Collect tips on how to grow and use lavender and learn how to prune plants, process dried lavender, and make sachets. Enjoy lavender snacks as you view the Strait of Juan de Fuca from the lavender labyrinth. Directions: About 3.5 miles north on Hwy 20 after the light at Coupeville (or about 6 miles south of Oak Harbor) turn on Libby Road. Go .5 mile and take a left on Darst Road, and watch for the sign on the right.

Photo: Penn Cove Shellfish

7 • Penn Cove Shellfish Ian Jefferds • (Farm open Saturday only) Madrona Way, Coupeville • 360-678-4803 • penncoveshellfish.com This unique Island County farm is the largest and oldest commercial mussel farm in the US. Boat tours are available at 11 a.m. and 1 p.m. Saturday. Sign up in advance at www.island.wsu.edu or by calling 360240-5558. Those not pre-registered will be taken on a first-come, first-served basis, if

tours of the prairie, forests, birds and wildlife, and you can check out pheasants, turkeys and chickens, or observe production of bio-diesel. Directions: From the north, follow Hwy. 20 signs south past Coupeville. Turn left onto Parker Road, two miles past Coupeville. Parker Road leads “straight off” at a right bend in the highway. Turn left at the stop sign and the Au Sable Institute will then be on your right. From the south, take Hwy. 20 north toward Coupeville. Make a slight right onto Parker Road. (About two miles south of Coupeville) and the entrance is the second drive on the right. 11 • Greenbank Cellars Frank Rayle • 3112 Day Rd, Greenbank • 360-678-3964 • whidbey.com/wine Greenbank Cellars is a winery and threeacre vineyard. We are currently producing estate-bottled wines from our vineyard. The winery will be open, offering wine tasting and sales. Directions: From Hwy. 525, just south of the Greenbank Farm, turn west onto Bakken Road go .5 mile. We are at the corner of Bakken and Day roads.

Kasia Pierzga / The Whidbey Examiner

8 • Willowood Farm Georgie Smith • 399 S. Ebey Road, Coupeville • (Farm open Saturday only) 360-929-0244 Run by fourth-generation Ebey’s Prairie native Georgie Smith, the farm produces naturally grown row crops for the local fresh market (Coupeville Farmers Market, local groceries and restaurants), including gourmet garlic and potatoes, mixed greens, fresh/shell/dry beans, onions, shallots, cabbage, broccoli, winter squashes and pumpkins. Take a self-guided tour of the fields and historic barn, or get a real hands-on farm experience by participating in a fall garlic planting! Directions: From Hwy. 20, turn onto Ebey Road (about 1/3 mile north of the stoplight/ pedestrian bypass in Coupeville). Stay to the right when road curves left, turn right onto Cook Road. Travel about a quarter mile, turn left onto farm dirt road, follow signs to parking behind the big barn. 9 • Rosehip Farm and Garden Linda Bartlett • (Farm open Saturday only) 338 Fort Casey Road, Coupeville • 360678-3577 Rosehip Farm & Garden is a small, diversified organic farm. We grow over 30 vegetables, including many heirloom varieties, and old garden roses, peonies, dahlias, bedding plants and cut flowers. We use integrated systems whenever possible, such as chicken tractors to till beds, and interplanting food and flowers. Fall vegetables, plants and cut flowers will be available for purchase from two local farms. Guided and self-guided tours of the fields and display gardens will be offered. Directions: Northbound on Hwy 20 turn left on Terry Road (southbound turn right), then take first left onto Fort Casey Road. Rosehip is .7 miles on the right. 10 • Au Sable Institute Robert Pelant • (Farm open Saturday only) 180 Parker Rd, Coupeville • 360-678-5586 • ausable.org The Au Sable Pacific Rim site covers 175 acres of prairie and forest, including a fiveacre remnant of prairie with native plants such as camas, chocolate lilies and Roemer’s fescue. We will have expertly guided

12 • Reinshadow Ridge Jerry & Connie Lloyd • 752 Plantation Drive, Greenbank • 360-222-3445 Reinshawdow Ridge is a small horse farm practicing good land stewardship. We enjoy horseback riding and dog agility, and our goal is to establish a learning center that promotes education, rider self-improvement through body awareness, and the sharing of training information with other dog and horse enthusiasts. Our arena is used by pony club and 4H participants for both dog and horse training. Saturday & Sunday Demonstrations: • 10 p.m., Dog Agility • 11 p.m., Horse Connections • 1 p.m., Body Awareness, riders or walkers • 2:30 p.m., Horse Liberty Training Directions: From Hwy. 525, two miles south of the Greenbank Farm, turn west onto Plantation Drive (the same turn for the Whidbey Island Free Evangelical Church). Continue on, entering the Plantation Ridge Community. The road narrows to a single lane. Watch for oncoming traffic. After a quarter mile, watch for the gravel driveway on the left with a signpost clearly marked “Lloyd Horse Arena” and a 752 blue address sign. Turn left and stay on the gravel drive for about a quarter mile. The road goes up a hill, and sweeps to the right coming out at the arena. Watch for signs directing you to parking. 13 • M Bar C Ranch Forgotten Children’s Fund • 5264 Shore Meadow Road, Freeland • 360-331-6019 Home to The Forgotten Children’s Fund, this beautiful ranch is in the business of producing smiles as you check out the horses and wander through the Western village, which features a post office, barber shop, jail, bank, hotel, Red Dog Saloon, church and “boot hill.” Directions: From Hwy. 20, head west on Bush Point Road in Freeland. Just as you go down the hill into the valley, Shore Meadows Road will be on your right. Follow the signs down and to your left. 14 • Forget Me Not Farms Darrell, Lois and Josh Wenzek • 5700 Double Bluff Rd, Freeland • 360-321-2523 A year-round family farm specializing in flowers, berries and produce, we offer a community-supported agriculture program, educational opportunities for families, a wedding site and floral work. Our self-serve shop is open daily. Children’s activities and guided tours run all day Sat-

  A special publication of The Whidbey Examiner  •  The Whidbey Island 2008 Farm Tour Guide 


Farm tour offers plenty to taste, see and do

urday and Sunday from 12 to 4 p.m. We will have baked goods, flowers, produce, and gifts for sale in our shop, as well as u-pick produce available. Directions: Going north on Hwy. 525 (about 15 minutes from the Clinton ferry), turn left on Double Bluff Road. Go about a quarter mile and turn right at the sign “Forget Me Not Farms.�

Hungry for local produce? Willowood Farm (8) and Rosehip Farm & Garden (9) in Coupeville; A Knot in Time (1) and Case Farm near Oak Harbor (2); Forget Me Not Farms (14) and South Whidbey Tilth (15) near Freeland; and Pam’s Place Produce (18), Clinton, will have produce available for purchase. South Whidbey Tilth has demonstrations on how to grow your own garden veggies.

15 • South Whidbey Tilth Anza Muenchow and Marc Wilson • 2717 Thompson Road, Langley • 360-579-2890 • southwhidbeytilth.org The Tilth campus has about 10 acres of trails, forest, ag projects, and gardens for you to explore. Learn about conservation practices, organic certification, food security, Slow Food, and other local food organizations as you visit the grounds and see the chicken tractor, composting site and worm bins. Directions: From Hwy. 525, turn onto Thompson Road. Entrance to parking area will be on your left. 16 • Sonshine Alpacas Gary & Pam Uhlig • 5662 Crawford Rd, Langley • 360-321-5772 • alpacanation. com/sonshinealpacas.asp We are a family-run farm, breeding and raising quality fleeced alpacas. Our family friendly tour features chickens, friendly farm dogs and lots of up-close alpaca kisses. Come see the 4-H alpaca obstacle course, alpaca fiber spinning, and needle felting demos. Visit our farm store for unique alpaca products and hand-spun and hand-painted alpaca yarn. 4-H members will be selling needle felting kits and dyed and natural alpaca fiber and will give away samples of alpaca Gold fertilizer. Directions: From Hwy 525, turn north onto Crawford Road. Turn left at the first driveway on Crawford Road. 17 • Whidbey Island Vineyards & Winery Greg Osenbach • 5237 Langley Road, Langley • 360-221-2040 • whidbeyislandwinery.com Whidbey Island Vineyards & Winery has been growing grapes for wine for over 20 years. Our tasting sales room features the wines we produce from our island vineyards as well as the wines we make from a wide range of Eastern Washington grapes. We will be in the thick of “crushâ€? at the time of the Farm Tour and may be busy picking grapes. Tour the vineyard and see the winemaking process taking place. Directions: From Hwy. 525, turn at Ken’s Corner onto Langley Road. Go north 2 miles; farm is on the right.

Fun for kids of all ages Contributed photo

18 • Pam’s Place Produce Pam Mitchell, Tricia Beckner and Laurie Carron • (Farm open Saturday only) • 5754 Bob Galbreath Road, Clinton • 360-2218017 • localharvest.org/farmers-markets/ M20695 A partnership between three people, we run a bio-intensive permaculture garden on .5 acre of land. Our 60 raised beds supply fruits and vegetables for 40 subscribers over 17 weeks from June through September. For the tour, we’ll have fall produce, organic farm fresh eggs, and various jams and preserves. Directions: From Hwy. 525, heading south towards Clinton, turn left on Bob Galbreath Road and follow two miles to # 5754 on the left hand side of the road.

Wilbur & Karen Bishop Growing Hay and Grains on Ebey’s Prairie for Many Generations

Country Western

DANCE Deer Lagoon Grange #846 Since 1927

We have a long history as a rural community gathering place and provide a channel for grassroots efforts to reach the state legislature. COME JOIN US! s"AYVIEW2OAD ,ANGLEY 7!

Special highlights Penn Cove Shellfish (7), Coupeville, takes passengers out to their ‘fields’ on the water. Visit Lavender Wind Farm

Interested in fiber arts? Check out the demonstrations at the Farm-to-Home Fair from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday at Greenbank Farm. Stop by Sonshine Alpacas (16) near Langley to see 4H members demonstrate felting techniques, or visit Island Bliss Alpacas (3) near Oak Harbor for spinning and weaving demonstrations.

Like local wine? Wine fans will definitely enjoy the two vineyards on this year’s tour. It’s picking time, and Whidbey Island Vineyard and Winery (17) in Langley and Greenbank Cellars (11) of Greenbank are the places to see grapes go from vine to wine. Both have tasting rooms for sampling and sales.

Horses, horses, horses At Wildwood Farm (4) near Oak Harbor and M Bar C Ranch (13), Freeland, kids can enjoy a memorable ride in the saddle. Reinshadow Ridge (12) near Greenbank offers horse demonstrations and dog agility performances.

Our U-Pick Certified Organic Sweet Corn Patch Opens September 26!

225 Ebey Road, Coupeville, Washington t

Saturday, October 4th 7:00-10:00 PM

Many of the farms on this year’s tour offer something for the children, and one offers the special treat of a kid-size cowboy town. Kids can play in the little village at M Bar C Ranch (13) including a post office, barber shop, jail, bank and hotel. See and learn about the secret lives of bats at Hummingbird Farm (4) north of Coupeville. Take a hay ride to a pumpkin patch at Case Farm (2) or conquer the corn maze at Forget Me Not Farm (14).

(6) to enjoy lavender, lavender and more lavender. Oh, and spectacular water and mountain views.

featuring

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Les Schwab Proudly Supports Whidbey’s Farming Community 360-679-1535

360-341-3313

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The Whidbey Island 2008 Farm Tour Guide  â€˘â€ƒ A special publication of The Whidbey Examiner

Page 9


Whidbey Island Conservation District

to promote

“helping landowners with conservation practices�

2008/09

Native Plant Sale

Order from our beautiful assortment of bare root native plants (very reasonably priced). Orders will be accepted through January 2009 and ready for pick up February 25.

• Order early for best selection! • To see the complete list and download an order form, go to our website: www.whidbeycd.org

or call 360-678-4708

Karen and Wilbur Bishop Coupeville Cow Pokes

Have You Herd The News? ,FFQVQXJUIXIBUTIBQQFOJOHJOUIFIFBSUPG8IJECFZ*TMBOEXJUI BTVCTDSJQUJPOUPUIF&YBNJOFS*UTOFXTUIBUXJMMNPPPPPWFZPV

19.50/year on island $ 23/year off island

$

a sustainable lifestyle

By Olivia FortĂŠ-Gardner Washington State University Extension

Across the nation, there is growing enthusiasm for sustainable agriculture, and it’s a major theme of the Whidbey Island Farm Tour. But how do you shop for groceries in a way that supports sustainability after the tour is over? Consumers make their purchases based on a variety of factors, including budgets, family taste buds, health or environmental philosophy and popular trends. Terms such as “local,â€? “certified organic,â€? “organically grownâ€? and “sustainably grownâ€? are being increasingly used to promote food and other goods created in a more sustainable manner. So what’s the difference? For the sake of making the most informed choices possible, here is a simplified dictionary of terms: • Local, Locally Grown: Agricultural goods produced within a defined geographic location. Such goods require less transportation costs, and may travel from farm to table in a much shorter time period. They can be produced using a wide variety of methods that may or may not be overtly explained in the packaging. Sales directly contribute to the economic sustainability of a community by allowing for the exchange of money between local producer and local consumer. • Certified Organic: Production methods and the absence of synthetic chemicals must comply with standards

set by a regulatory agency such as the state or federal Department of Agriculture. After a farm’s operation, crop or herd is approved, there is continued oversight to ensure compliance. • Organically Grown: Agricultural goods produced using all organic methods or standards, but without formal certification. • Sustainably Grown: For some farmers, using organic methods exclusively may seem unnecessary, make it too difficult to turn a profit, or prove unrealistic in the wake of an invasion by insects or other pests and diseases. In such cases, conventional methods or synthetic amendments are used on a limited basis. When it comes right down to it, each of these is a pillar of sustainable agriculture because they acknowledge the importance of understanding where our food and other agricultural goods come from and the risks and benefits implied in how it is produced. How we navigate in and around them is what makes the issue so dynamic and interesting. Keep in mind that true sustainability draws upon social, economic and environmental elements in addition to those relating to production methods. For more food for thought, ask the farmers you meet on the tour what they think about it!

BUY LOCAL! Meet the folks behind your local Whidbey Island businesses at the17th Annual

UNIQUELY WHIDBEY BIZ EXPO & HOME SHOW OCTOBER 11 & 12, 2008 10 am - 4 pm Coupeville High School Campus

Call 360-678-8060 and Subscribe Today!

/8$PWFMBOE4USFFUt$PVQFWJMMF 8BTIJOHUPO

Justin Burnett / The Whidbey Examiner

ADMISSION IS FREE! Sponsored by the Island County Economic Development Council

For more info: 678-6889 or 888-506-7999

Page 10    A special publication of The Whidbey Examiner  â€˘â€ƒ The Whidbey Island 2008 Farm Tour Guide 


Local chefs encourage you to “eat local�

islandsanctuaryproperties.com annabelle.hynes@comcast.net 206.372.0374

thelovejoyinn.com relax@thelovejoyinn.com 

bluegoosecoupeville.com info@bluegoosecoupeville.com t

COTTAGE ON THE COVE

spinnakertea.com 

This classic home in historic Coupeville has three bedrooms, a finished attic, kitchen, TV/DVD/ VCR/stereo, WiFi, a private waterview deck and a large lawn & garden. Sleeps 12. whidbeyislandhouse.com thehousenextdoor@gmail.com  Enjoy beachcombing as you step from fully appointed studio with outdoor patio to private beach with sweeping views of Olympics and historic Coupeville. penncovebeachstudio.com penncovebeachstudio@hotmail.com



Completely remodeled cottage sleeps five and has fully equipped kitchen on Penn Cove. Enjoy spectacular views from the 200 sq ft deck. Kids welcome. cottageonthecove.com capn@coupeville.net t STORMY’S CHALET A treasure trove of nautical delights awaits you in this charming one bedroom cottage near Admiralty Inlet. Seasonal swimming pool. Children and pets welcome. stormyschalet.com info@stormyschalet.com 

ANCHORAGE INN B&B A new Victorian-style B&B just steps from the historic waterfront, featuring seven well-appointed rooms with private baths. Full gourmet breakfast. anchorage-inn.com anchorag@whidbey.net t

COMPASS ROSE B&B Town / Ebey’s Prairie

Town / Water Views

THE BLUE GOOSE INN B&B Step back in time as you enter either of our lovingly restored historic Victorian homes offering six luxurious B&B suites. Private baths, beautiful antiques, scrumptious breakfasts, water views, walk to town.

Overlooking Penn Cove, this farmhouse with two bdrms is on 5 acres of open fields and gardens. Enjoy continental or full breakfast, tea & fresh baked cookies.

PENN COVE BEACH STUDIO Rural / Waterfront

Town / Water View

THE LOVEJOY INN & CARRIAGE HOUSE COTTAGE Enjoy coastal living with relaxed Whidbey style. Private baths and family-friendly. WiFi available. Steps to waterfront, dining, shopping and parks. Continental breakfasts.

The Coupeville Farmers Market invites one and all to enjoy the delicious bounty of Whidbey Island at the annual Harvest Fest, set for 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 11. Festivities take place at the market, which is at the corner of Alexander and Eighth streets, in the field behind the Coupeville library. This year’s Harvest Fest celebrates the market’s 30th anniversary with the annual Whidbey Island Giant Pumpkin Contest, the Giant Zucchini Contest and some other silly squash competitions. Whidbey-grown pumpkins and zucchinis are welcome to join in the free competition. Check-in is at noon, and the Giant Pumpkin weigh-in is at 1 p.m. The event also features the ever-popular zucchini races and the first-ever wacky and wonderful Harvest Games in support of the Gifts from the Heart Food Bank.

THE HOUSE NEXT DOOR VACATION HOUSE Town / Water View

Town / Water View

jennefarm.homestead.com feinterz@whidbey.net 360.678.4433

Celebrate the local harvest at Harvest Fest

SPINNAKER TEA GARDEN

JENNE FARM GATHERING HOUSE Located on a working farm, the 1908 Jenne House sleeps up to ten in four large bedrooms, 1.5 baths, well-equipped kitchen, dining room and parlor. Pets welcome.

If touring the farms around Central Whidbey piqued your interest in the area’s history, you’ll want to come back for the Ebey’s Forever Conference on Nov. 7 and 8. It’s a celebration of the first 30 years of Ebey’s Landing National Historical Reserve, which has emerged as a national model for sustainable development in a cultural landscape. The event includes historical field trips, exhibits, a behind-the-scenes look at the Reserve’s unique cultural landscape and rural working community, and an exploration of the challenges facing these resources. On Friday evening, a good old-fashioned potluck dinner brings together Reserve residents and friends. And on Saturday evening, Coupeville’s own Johnny and the Bulldogs will raise the roof during a barn dance at the historic Smith Barn. For information, contact Karen Hossfeld at Karen_Hossfeld@partner.nps.gov or 360-678-1204, or visit www.ebeysforever.com.

Town / Waterfront

The schoolhouse sits on a high bluff with a 180 degree view of the mountains & beach. Come and escape the demands of everyday life.

Rural / Water View

Water View Penn Cove

SAN DE FUCA SCHOOLHOUSE

Explore Central Whidbey history

Rural

Inspired by her love of farm animals and agriculture, Stacey Neumiller creates the mascot for the farm tour each year. Her talent shows through in her latest work, “Lavender Lunch on Whidbey.� The goat with the map of Whidbey on his back is this year’s Whidbey Island Farm tour mascot. The farm tour aims to show-

Knowing where your food comes from and how it was grown is the first step toward making healthier choices for you, your family and your community. Restaurants serving food made with local ingredients this weekend are: Captain Whidbey Inn Restaurant, Christopher’s on Whidbey, Miriam’s Espresso CafÊ and the Oystercatcher in Coupeville; Neil’s Cloverpatch CafÊ in Bayview; Speedboat Family Dining in Clinton; Gerry’s Kitchen and Gordon’s on Blueberry Hill in Freeland; Whidbey Pies CafÊ at Greenbank Farm in Greenbank; The Fish Bowl, The Edgecliff, The Inn at Langley and Primo Bistro in Langley; and Bay City Bistro, Frasers Gourmet Hideaway, Flyers Restaurant and Brewery and Seabolt’s in Oak Harbor.

Town / Waterfront

Auction raises money for Farm Tour

case the sustainability efforts of local farms as well as support them as sources for locally produced goods and services. As a local artist, Neumiller’s work fits nicely. She says she cares deeply about the farms on the Island and wants to do her part to keep them here. As for why she chose goats for her subject, Neumiller says “I wanted something that reflected the challenges of raising livestock, and yet also highlighted the humorous side of day-to-day farm life.� The nice thing about the original painting and the prints is that unlike the goats she used as her models, these beauties won’t damage your row crops. Lavender Lunch on Whidbey will be auctioned on eBay beginning the first day of the tour, Saturday, October 4, at 8 p.m. Funds raised go to support next year’s tour. In addition to the original (to be auctioned), matted prints will be sold to support the tour. They are available for $65 at Lavender Wind Farm, Sonshine Alpacas, Whidbey Island Conservation District, the WSU Extension Office and online at www.whidbeyfarmtour.com. For details, call 360-240-5558.

1890 Victorian with two lovely guestrooms with private baths. Full, elegant breakfast amidst antiques and treasures. Tea in the afternoon. Well-behaved children welcome. compassrosebandb.com t

The Whidbey Island 2008 Farm Tour Guide  â€˘â€ƒ A special publication of The Whidbey Examiner

While visiting Whidbey Island, stay at one of our outstanding Bed & Breakfasts, Inns, Cottages or Cabins. Page 11


P.O. Box 2924 (physica l: 419 South 1st Street) Mount Vernon, WA 98273 Phone: 360-336-3727 Email: Info@AgBizCenter.org Fax: 360-336-3751

Preserving farmland by increasing the economic viability of farms in northwest Washington

Born on an Island County farm, and a lifelong local resident, Senator Mary Margaret Haugen has been

a leader committed to preserving farmland and farmers. ✓ Right to Farm: Prime-sponsored SB 5962, which created disincentives for filing frivolous lawsuits against farmers. The Washington Farm Bureau awarded her its Certificate of Commendation for her efforts to protect farmers from groundless complaints under SB 5962. The bureau’s award recognized her “for her work to preserve our right to farm without interference from illegitimate nuisance complaints.” ✓ Farmland Preservation: Prime-sponsored SB 5108, which established the Office of Farmland Preservation, and serves on the Farmland Preservation Taskforce. ✓ Keeping Island County Rural: Prime-sponsored SB 6195, which will expand the definition of a rural county to include Island County and secured $80,000 in the budget to include funding for the 2 years Island County was not covered in this program.

✓ Ebey’s Landing/Useless Bay Preservation: Supported a budget that included $1.25 million for farmland preservation projects at Ebey’s Reserve and Useless Bay to ensure that their working agricultural lands are preserved.

MaryHaugen Margaret Re-elect

Paid for by Committee to Re-elect Mary Margaret Haugen 1268 North Olsen Road, Camano Island, WA 98282 www.marymargarethaugen.com The Whidbey Island 2008 Farm Tour Guide  •  A special publication of The Whidbey Examiner

Page 12

Whidbey Island 2008 Farm Tour Guide  

A guide to farms open to the public for free tours during the Whidbey Island Farm Tour, Oct. 4 and 5, 2008.