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Whidbey Island’s Only Locally Owned, Independent Newspaper

THURSDAY, MARCH 29, 2012

More cash sought for S. Whidbey fire response

VOL. 17, NO. 34

A taste of the ’50s

By Betty Freeman Examiner Staff Writer

South Whidbey Fire/EMS Commissioners and Fire Chief Rusty Palmer invited public comment at a recent board meeting on a proposed 15-cent levy lid lift to support volunteer firefighters and emergency medical technicians (EMTs). The proposed levy is being considered for the November general election ballot. The levy lid lift would cost an additional $3.75 per month for the owner of a $300,000 home, or about $45 per year. Currently, South Whidbey taxpayers pay 61 cents per $1,000 of assessed valuation for fire and EMS protection, or $15.25 per month. The new levy would raise the cost to 76 cents per $1,000 of a home’s assessed value. South Whidbey Fire/EMS District has eight paid employees, and 76 volunteer firefighters and emergency medical technicians. In 2011, the agency responded to 1,900 calls, 80 percent of which were for emergency medical help. “We save approximately $1.1 million dollars per year by relying on volunteers to respond to emergency calls instead of full-time personnel,” Chief Rusty Palmer said. “The levy is designed to maintain the emergency response provided by our volunteer firefighters and EMTs.” Palmer said additional money would primarily be used to train volunteers, as well as maintain and replace the fire and medical equipment needed to respond to emergencies. He said it costs about $4,500 to train and outfit a volunteer firefighter. If the levy passes, it would be the first voter-approved funding increase for the fire district in more than 20 years. At the meeting, Langley resident Bob Wolters argued against the proposed levy lift. “This department is actually the pride of South Whidbey, but what you’re asking is beyond what our citizens can pay for,” he said. “The demographics of an aging population and economic realities are not going to change for a long time.” Wolters also questioned the number of stations on South Whidbey, and asked why the South Whidbey Fire District and See FIRE, page 9

Elisabeth Murray / The Whidbey Examiner

At the Blue Fox Drive-in before a Friday-night screening of “The Hunger Games,” Amber Wiles, April Walton, Alyiah Wiles and Lori Walton of Mount Vernon share a load of snacks from the concession bar. Amber said she is a longtime fan of the iconic outdoor movie theater, and brought her family along for their first visit.

Iconic drive-in eyes digital age Elisabeth Murray Examiner Staff Writer

R

unning the snack-stand cash register at the Blue Fox Drive-in Theater, owner Darrell Bratt knows that every penny he earns will matter when it comes to the day his operation has to make the transition from traditional film to digital. “This is a hard road to go down, but the reality is that if we don’t go digital, we are done,” said Bratt, who says purchasing a projector that can handle digital movies will likely cost him about $80,000. “That’s a heck of a lot of popcorn to cover the cost,” he said. The Blue Fox is among thousands of independent, familyrun theaters across the country that are being forced to purchase expensive new equipment to accommodate the movie industry’s

Kasia Pierzga / The Whidbey Examiner

See DRIVE-IN, page 6

Visible from Hwy. 20 south of Oak Harbor, the drive-in’s neon sign beckons outdoor movie fans.


Page 2

The Whidbey Examiner  •  Thursday, March 29, 2012

Rep. Bailey to challenge Haugen for Senate seat By Kasia Pierzga Examiner Staff Writer

Washington’s 10th Legislative District can expect to see a political battle this year as Republican Rep. Barbara Bailey attempts to unseat Democratic Sen. Mary Margaret Haugen. Bailey, 67, of Oak Harbor, announced her candidacy on Monday at San Remo Restaurant in Oak Harbor, where some 50 people had gathered in support. Bailey pointed to the fact that the state Legislature has still not come to agreement on a state budget this year as evidence of the problems that she would like to work to address. “It’s ridiculous that we continue to find ourselves in this situation over and over and over again, and continue to do the things that are being done in Olympia that are not solving problems and taking care of the issues that need to be taken care of,” she said.

Bailey said her campaign would focus on job creation, controlling government spending and improving public schools. She said if she wins the Dist 10. Senate seat, she would make job creation her No. 1 priority. “The present make-up of the Legislature refuses to address the real issues, that’s concerning our budget and how we deal with the finances of this state,” she said. “We’ve got to have some change, and I am going to be part of that change.” The Whidbey Examiner reported March 22 that Haugen, who is chairwoman of the Senate Transportation Committee, had said she would seek re-election. On Monday she confirmed she will not make a formal announcement until after lawmakers agree on a state budget and the Legislature’s special session comes to an end. “We are in the race,” she said. A lifelong Camano Island resident who owned a beauty shop

Kasia Pierzga / The Whidbey Examiner

Rep. Barbara Bailey, R-Oak Harbor, is surrounded by Republican supporters Monday at a gathering at San Remo Restaurant in Oak Harbor as she announces her plans to run for the Dist. 10 Senate seat held by Democrat Mary Margaret Haugen of Camano Island. for 30 years, Haugen served three in 1982. Elected to the Senate in terms on the Stanwood School 1993, Haugen, 71, is now the lonBoard before being elected to the gest-serving legislator in Olympia. state House of Representatives First elected to the state House

of Representatives in 2003, Bailey is the ranking minority member of the House Business and Financial Services Committee and assistant ranking member of the House Ways and Means Committee. She also serves on the Health Care and Wellness Committee. Haugen said she’s confident that she’ll benefit from the recent redistricting that changed the voter makeup of District 10. A number of voters who are new to Dist. 10 are in the Mount Vernon area, where there are a significant number of Democratic voters. Haugen said she plans to do a lot of doorbelling so she can talk directly with voters. “My goal is to get out and meet people,” she said. Bailey also said she will work hard to earn the votes of people who are new to the district. “There are 6,000 people waiting to get to know Barbara Bailey, and I’m fully intending to let them know who I am,” she said. A

Mukilteo Republican seeks election to Congress U.S. Rep. Rick Larsen for his seat representing the 2nd Congressional District, which includes Island Mukilteo Republican Dan County. Matthews announced last week A retired U.S. Air Force lieuthat he will challenge Democratic tenant colonel who served in VietBy Kasia Pierzga Examiner Staff Writer

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nam and later in Operation Desert Storm, Matthews went on to work as a pilot for Delta Air Lines and is now a contract trainer for Boeing, where he teaches pilots how to fly 747s. A graduate of the University of Puget Sound, he holds degrees in political science and public administration and government. Matthews spoke last week at a meeting of the Republicans of Island County, where he talked about his background and policy views. Matthews, who describes himself as a fiscal and social conservative, warned the audience that American liberties are under siege by “big government.” “Too many Americans today are just apathetic or ignorant of what’s happening, and that is a crisis,” he said. “When our very president takes a front-on assault at our religious liberties, things have really gone too far,” he said. “I’m motivated

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Mukilteo Congressional candidate Dan Matthews spoke at a Republican meeting in Oak Harbor. by just that alone.” At the meeting, which was attended by Republicans from throughout Whidbey – including a number who have connections to the military – Matthews warned that President Obama is planning to make severe cuts not only to the military, but also to military retirement benefits. “The president is planning to cut the budget further on the backs of the military,” Matthews told the audience. At the same time, he said, Obama will seek to expand government. “Their idea is to increase government to take away your liberties,” he said. “What we need today is big citizens and small government,” he said. “We are one step closer to socialism every day. And folks, socialism needs

the hand of Big Government behind it or it will collapse.” Matthews criticized Obama for allegedly slighting deceased veterans, saying that the White House had ordered the military to cease reciting the phrase “on behalf of the President of the United States” when presenting the burial flag to the next of kin. “I cried when I heard about this,” Matthews said, his voice cracking with emotion. A number of people in the audience gasped and shook their heads. But according to factcheck.org, a project of the nationally recognized Annenberg Public Policy Center, the policy Matthews described is no more than an urban legend. No such change in protocol has ever been ordered, and it’s up to the individual branches of the military to determine the words spoken during a flag presentation. Even though it’s not true, the rumor has been circulated widely through a chain e-mail. Matthews also talked about his opposition to abortion. “I am in favor of choice. The choice was made earlier; it’s called consequences,” he said. “Two people got together and they made a choice. You do that, and you’re going to have to pay the price.” He also encouraged those in the audience to sign the petition to place Referendum 74 on the statewide ballot in November. “It will stop the gay-rights thing,” he said. “They’ve got the rights they need. They don’t need to steal marriage. I think government needs to get out of the bedroom anyway.” A


Thursday, March 29, 2012  •  The Whidbey Examiner

Page 3

Local demand strong for ‘green’ construction By Elisabeth Murray Examiner Staff Writer

By the time construction began at The Highlands in Langley, a precipitous drop in the housing market threatened the success of the earth-friendly development planned by Langley Builders owner Erl Bangston. It was 2008, the economic recession was on, and Bangston realized his timing was awful. But thanks to demand for homes built to green standards, sales have gone very well, he said. “It was a tough marketplace, but it is nice to say that 16 houses have been built and completed,” said Bangston of the project, which has 53 lots. “Green building is alive and well.” “For the market, these are good numbers for new housing,” Cynthia Bangston said. And it’s not just in Langley that green homes are in demand. Ron Wright, owner of Wright Construction in Coupeville, said he sees growing demand for environmentally friendly homes, despite the slow economy. “Many people are trying to go as green as their budget will allow them,” Wright said. “The initial cost of building green can get expensive, but the owner gets the money back over the years.” Durable products hold up better in the long term, Wright said, and saving energy pays off with lower power bills, he said. From the big decisions to the small, at The Highlands the Bangstons say they prefer to choose what makes the best sense ecologically. For example, on two of the homes in the development, the garage has been placed in front rather than behind, even though it partially obstructs the view. “We considered placing them behind the houses so that more of the water could be seen,” Cynthia said. “But that would have required more pavement, which is contrary to building in a low-impact way.”

tunity to tour several green projects from Coupeville to Freeland on Saturday, March 31 during Whidbey Island Green Home Tour the 2012 Whidbey Island Green is set for 10 a.m. - 4 p.m. Saturday, Home Tour, which is sponsored March 31. The tour, sponsored by by Whidbey Watershed Stewards. the Whidbey Watershed Stewards, Among the technologies on offers a look at energy-saving, display will be structural insulated ecological building styles and low- panels, rainwater catchment sysimpact development at five homes tems, geothermal heat pumps and and two businesses from Freeland solar power systems. to Coupeville. Tickets are $20 or Two homes on the Green Homes tour were built by Ted two for $35 if in the same vehicle. Clifton. While The Highlands is Visit whidbeywatersheds.org. not on this year’s tour, Cynthia Bangston said they hope to partictions, ranging from selecting ef- ipate in the future. A ficient windows to installing solar panels, it is difficult to quantify how many new homes or remodeling projects incorporate earthfriendly choices. According to Wayne Crider, executive officer for the Skagit/Island County Builders Association, over the past eight years, 63 houses in Skagit and Island counties have been certified as BuiltGreen. That’s not a huge number, considering how many homes have been built during that time, but Crider said the actual number is probably a lot higher. “There are many houses that Janet Burchfield would meet BuiltGreen standards, Front Street Realty but they have not been certified,” 22 NW Front St., Ste. B • Coupeville he said. 360-678-6100 • janetburchfield.com Local residents have an oppor-

Save the date

Elisabeth Murray / The Whidbey Examiner

Langley Builders owner Erl Bangston shows off an earth-friendly tile countertop at a new home in The Highlands in Langley, the first lowimpact development community on Whidbey Island. In addition to being certified BuiltGreen, The Highlands is the first low impact development to be built on Whidbey. Langley was the first municipality on Whidbey Island to officially adopt the guidelines and to use the manual created by the Puget Sound Partnership. BuiltGreen is a program developed by the state homebuilders association in which buildings are given a star rating based on a checklist of criteria. One aspect of being a lowimpact development is that The Highlands manages all storm water on site, keeping it out of Langley’s city storm drains. “In storm sewers, everything, including oil, gets flushed into the bay,” Erl Bangston said. The community uses rain gardens to filter pollution from storm water, and narrow roads and gravel walkways help reduce the amount of non-porous surface, which in turn reduces runoff. Earth-friendly strategies extend indoors, as well. For example, the kitchens feature tile countertops rather then granite from a quarry that requires a significant amount of fossil fuels for processing and transportation. And when it comes

Kasia Pierzga, Publisher & Editor Published since 1995, The Whidbey Examiner is Whidbey Island’s only locally owned, independent newspaper. The Examiner is a legal newspaper for Island County. ADVERTISING: Media kit available at whidbeyexaminer.com. DEADLINES: Advertising: Display: Noon Thursday; Classifieds: 5 p.m. Monday; Legal Notices: Noon Tuesday; News, Events & Letters: 5 p.m. Monday. The Whidbey Examiner (USPS 015276) is published weekly by Cascadia Publishing Co., LLC. Annual subscriptions are $19.50 in Island County; $23 outside Island County. Periodicals postage paid at Coupeville, WA 98239. CONTACT US news@whidbeyexaminer.com • subscribe@whidbeyexaminer.com advertising@whidbeyexaminer.com The Whidbey Examiner, P.O. Box 445, 6 NW Coveland St., Coupeville, WA 98239 ph. 360-678-8060 • fax: 360-678-6073 • www.whidbeyexaminer.com

to making sure the house is sealed up tight, the Highland homes exceed the standards for the air-leakage tests. These days, many homeowners may be going green without even knowing it. With the Washington state energy code, new buildings are more energy efficient, and therefore “greener” than their predecessors, Wright said. In addition to energy efficiency, green homes are also healthier for their occupants, Ted Clifton, owner of Clifton View Homes said. “The indoor air quality of green homes is better,” Clifton said. “Products used in these homes don’t emit toxic chemicals.” Clifton said that he builds homes to five-star BuiltGreen standards. And for the past few years, his projects have also earned the U.S. Department of Energy’s Builders Challenge certification. “This is about building a better house,” Clifton said. “It is nice being able to make a difference – for the environment and the people living in the home.” Given the wide array of op-

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The Whidbey Examiner  •  Thursday, March 29, 2012

viewpoints Greenbank Farm is a money pit for taxpayers

Small-business jobs will help lead Washington out of recession

Kudos to Port of Coupeville commissioner Laura Blankenship for trying to put some forethought and brakes on further expenditures by the port commissioners. Gov. Gregoire kicked off 2012 with a strong statement about the importance of the (“Port commissioners bicker over financstate’s small businesses in creating the jobs that will turn the state’s economy around: “If we can make it easier and cheaper for them [small business owners] to do business, es,” March 22). The Port of Coupeville’s webpage they can afford to add more employees. This is the key to our economic recovery.” states that its “primary mission is to proYou might notice the governor did not say jobs created by government are the key mote economic development.” Fourteen to economic recovery. Yet that is precisely what is proposed in several “jobs” bills being considered by the Legislature. In an effort to stimulate the economy and reduce the years ago the purchase of the Greenbank Farm was promoted as being “self sustainhigh unemployment rate, the bills would use tax dollars to try to get people working. ing.” This was a popular, but hastily and Financed primarily by revenue bonds (that is, more public debt), these bills together poorly conceived business plan and clearly would spend well over $1 billion to create make-work jobs, like weatherizing public a boondoggle for the port and the taxpaybuildings and improving fish passages. ers of central Whidbey. The inherent flaw in these proposals is government cannot create the real jobs that Each year the farm continues to benefit will spur economic recovery. Government has no money of its own; the state would relatively few individuals while continuing simply be shifting money it takes from working taxpayers to those who are unemto be a financial black hole for residents of ployed, not creating true economic growth. The private sector, small businesses specifi- the port district. Does the Greenbank Farm cally, must create those jobs for the state to have any hope of pulling out of the recestruly fit the port’s criteria for “economic sion. History shows that the entrepreneurs who run small businesses, not government development,” or is it something else? Conservation easements, grants, purbureaucrats, know how to be the catalyst for economic growth and revitalization. chase of development rights, etc., are rareRather than use tax dollars to “create” jobs, lawmakers should provide meaningful relief to small business owners. Reducing the cost of doing business for the state’s small ly free, whether from local, state or federal sources. businesses would encourage entrepreneurs to expand their existing businesses, and inTake a look at your own property tax vest in new projects and businesses, putting more people to work. bill for the Port of Coupeville and consider, Ironically, while the legislature contemplates spending $1 billion to “create” jobs, as a recent letter writer suggested, whether this session lawmakers rejected several common-sense bills that would have provided relief for small business owners. Most prominent was the failure of legislation requested it might be time to cut our losses and quit by Gov. Gregoire that would have simplified the collection of Business and Occupation throwing good money after bad. Hopefully, the farm is not viewed by the commissiontaxes. ers simply as too big to fail. Currently 39 cities impose and collect their own municipal B&O taxes. Small busi– Al Lunemann nesses operating in more than one municipality say keeping track of and paying the inCoupeville dividual B&O taxes is confusing and burdensome. Centralizing the administration and collection of these B&O taxes by the state, as is currently done with local sales and use taxes, would cut administration costs without reducing local revenues. Although the governor asked the Legislature to pass the bills, and the business community overwhelmingly supported the proposal, the legislation failed to even make it to the House or Senate floor for a vote. Recently, I had a conversation with an Rather than reducing the burden on our state’s job creators with this simple fix, individual who was complaining about the which would allow employers to spend less time doing paperwork and more time grow- state of politics in this great nation. ing their business and creating jobs, lawmakers are considering generating new public He then proceeded to inform me that he debt to create temporary jobs. has never voted and never intends to. That Washington already is heavily in debt. Taxpayers must spend nearly $2 billion in the is when I have a major problem with complaining. 2011-2013 biennium budget just servicing the outstanding public debt, comprising 6.1 I was raised with the ideal that if you percent of the state’s General Fund budget. Increasing the state’s debt is contrary to the urgent goal of reducing public spending have the ability to vote and simply choose not to utilize that option, then you forfeit to create a sustainable budget. The role of government is not to create jobs, and Olympia’s efforts to do so will not your right to complain. I remain optimistic that many people feel the same way. promote real economic recovery.  Lawmakers should instead focus on policy reforms – Jeff Swanson that will improve the small business climate, and foster an environment in which private entrepreneurs can do what they do best: create jobs and get Washington working again. Everett By Erin Shannon, Washington Policy Center

If you don’t vote, then don’t complain

Whidbey Examiner online poll To cast your vote, visit the Examiner online at www.whidbeyexaminer.com and look for the poll at the bottom left side of our home page. The poll isn’t scientific, but safeguards are in place to keep people from voting repeatedly from the same computer, and all votes are cast anonymously. This week’s question:

• What characteristics do you look for when choosing a candidate for public office?

Poll results will appear each week in the Viewpoints section of our print edition. Log on and vote!

Soroptimist Ball was a rousing success Held at the Bakerview Restaurant (Chief Petty Officers’ Club) in Oak Harbor on Feb. 25, the first Whidbey Island Soroptimist Red Dress Ball was a huge success and a great evening. The Soroptimist clubs of Coupeville, Oak Harbor and South Whidbey would like to thank Whidbey Island Bank, all of the community members who attended this event and Soroptimist members for their donations and show of support for our Heart of a Woman program at Whidbey General Hospital. The program funds heart-health screenings for women in our communities who are unable to afford cardiovascular health screening. Following introductions of the Red Dress Ball planning committee and VIP attendees, a brief talk and slide presentation on women and heart disease was made by guest speaker Dr. David Jessup, who shared his expertise and a few of the personal results from women who have benefited from heart-health screenings. Altogether, the evening’s festivities and subsequent donations brought in more than $8,300 for the Whidbey Soroptimists’ Heart of a Woman program. Money raised will fund more than 125 heart-health screenings for Whidbey Island women. – Martha Page President, Soroptimist International of Oak Harbor

What’s your opinion? Letters to the editor may be submitted online at whidbeyexaminer.com. Click on “Submit Letters” at the top of the page. To submit a letter by e-mail, send it to news@ whidbeyexaminer.com.

Correction A story on page 1 of the March 15 issue, “Sparks fly on students’ lighthouse project,” provided incorrect information about the source of the $5,000 grant. The grant was provided by Lighthouse Environmental Programs, a local nonprofit organization.

Last week’s Examiner online poll question: What characteristics or qualifications are most important in the choice of a new Coupeville schools superintendent? How our readers voted: q With the budget so tight, the person needs to be able to balance priorities. q This is a small town, so it’s important that the person connects well with the community. q We need a person who not shrink from taking on problems in the district. q We need a leader who sets a positive tone for both teachers and students.

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Thursday, March 29, 2012  •  The Whidbey Examiner

Page 5

Madrona Way slated for repairs By Elisabeth Murray Examiner Staff Writer

Coupeville resident Sammye Kempbell has been honored by Washington State Parks as Volunteer of the Year. Kempbell was honored earlier this year with the Jan Holmes Island County Coastal Volunteer of the Year award.

State Parks honors Coupeville volunteer Sammye Kempbell of Coupeville has been named Volunteer of the Year by the Washington State Parks and Recreation Commission. Kempbell has cared for the tide pools at Deception Pass State Park’s Rosario Beach and provided interpretation for park visitors for the past eight years. She has volunteered more than 300 hours at the tide pools during nearly every low tide during summer and her efforts include helping the park’s interpretive specialist with school group visits each spring. In February, Kempbell was honored with the 2012 Jan Hol-

mes Island County Coastal Volunteer of the Year award. The award was co-sponsored by the Island County Marine Resources Committee and Washington State University-Island County Extension to encourage and recognize the achievement of volunteers working to protect and restore the marine waters and coastal resources of Island County. Kempbell collaborated last year with park staff and the Deception Pass Park Foundation, WSU Island County Beach Watchers and Lighthouse Environmental Programs to launch a Beach Naturalist program.

Turbine project to be discussed A Snohomish Public Utility District project that is exploring the possibility of generating electrical power using underwater turbines in Admiralty Inlet will be discussed at an upcoming meeting of the Island County Marine Resources Committee. The meeting is set for 3:30 p.m. Tuesday, April 3 in the Island County Commissioners hearing room B-102, in the basement of the courthouse annex building in Coupeville.

The PUD hopes to place two test units in Admiralty Inlet within the next few years. PUD spokesman Craig Collar will talk about progress on the project. The MRC is an advisory body to Island County government focused on addressing environmental problems in Puget Sound with bottom-up, local, innovative solutions rather than topdown mandates. For information, visit islandcountymrc.org.

The cost to repair a small strip of road in Coupeville along with the water and sewer system hidden beneath it will come with a hefty price tag. Projected to cost $1.24 million, which includes a 25 percent contingency built into the estimates, the project will reconstruct and repave a 1,800-foot section of Madrona Way from Broadway west to the town limit. But with federal and state dollars secured to cover the surface improvements, the Town of Coupeville is moving forward with plans for the much-needed repairs. In October, the town was awarded $416,400 in federal funding for the project, and in December the Washington State Transportation Improvement Board awarded the town another $64,987, said town Engineer Greg Cane. The construction project not only means new pavement for cars, but also the addition of a paved walkway on the south side of the road. At present, pedestrians must walk on the road, stepping onto the narrow shoulder whenever cars pass by. The road also will be widened from 23 feet to 25 feet. Managing storm-water runoff along this stretch of road also is a key element of the project. Right now, water flows into a shallow ditch on the south side of the road. Workers will install bioswales and biofiltration ponds – more commonly referred to as rain gardens – that will help filter pollution from storm water, Cane said. The remaining portion of the project, which will involve replacing the aging water and sewer system and constructing a sewage lift station, will cost another $761,500. Town officials are looking for more grant money to cover that cost. One option, Cane said, is applying for money from a statewide public-works initiative that’s under consideration by the state Legislature. If no grant money can be found to help pay for this portion, however, the town may have to foot the bill.

Coupeville Engineer Greg Cane looks at road deterioration on Madrona Way. The section from Broadway west to the town limits is slated for repairs. Elisabeth Murray / The Whidbey Examiner

Reichardt and Ebe Engineering has been hired by the Coupeville Town Council to design the project at a cost of $85,027, which includes environmental services and an examination of the site for Native American remains. “A date for getting bids for the construction portion of the project has not been set yet, but could

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New ordinance to ease Coupeville parking rules A plan to make parking requirements more flexible for property owners in Coupeville’s core has been temporarily put on hold. At a public hearing Tuesday night, the Coupeville Town Council agreed to continue the hearing on Tuesday, April 24 in order to address public input on a new ordinance that would replace the one currently in place. The section that caused the de-

lay is the part that would establish a Historic Downtown Parking District, which would expand the portion of Coupeville that can use the Coupeville Community Green public parking lot rather than develop on-site parking. Exempting historic homes in Coupeville’s core from providing on-site parking would help preserve the town’s historic character, town planner Larry Kwarsick said.

Currently, the town requires a set number of off-street parking spots based upon how the property is to be used. The revised rules would have also offered more flexibility for parking-lot design, and would encourage the use of permeable surfaces to reduce the amount of storm-water runoff, as well as the use of plantings to make parking areas more attractive.

be this year or early next spring,” Coupeville Mayor Nancy Conard said. “The town is currently applying for grants and loans to cover the utility portion of the project, and we are waiting to see what funding will be available.” The construction project is expected to get under way by February 2013, Cane said. A

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Page 6

The Whidbey Examiner  •  Thursday, March 29, 2012

Drive-in; From page 1 shift from traditional film to digital. According to Patrick Corcoran, director of media and research for the National Association of Theatre Owners, small theaters, both indoor and out, will be most affected by this change. While there’s no way to know how the shift to digital will affect each individual theater, as many as 10 percent of screens may go dark rather than invest in the new technology, he said. The impact could be greater on drive-in theaters, which have waned in popularity since their heyday in the 1950s. According

to figures from the United Drivein Theatre Owners Association, of the 4,063 drive-in theaters that were in business in 1958, only 366 remain. Like many other small, familyrun theaters across the United States, drive-in theaters are facing a choice between shifting to digital movies or sticking with the traditional 35-millimeter films. However, it’s not much of a choice for the owners – by the end of this year, theaters that stick with film will only be able to screen older movies or small, independently produced ones. The blockbusters that bring in the

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Blue Fox Drive-in employee Mundo Corrales works the concession bar. He said he’s looking forward to warmer weather, when more customers turn out to enjoy movies and snacks as well as the game arcade and go-kart track.

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crowds will all have gone digital. The main impediment to making the switch is that it’s expensive. For small, indoor theaters, the cost for a projector for each screen starts at $40,000. But for Bratt, his cost will be twice that amount. That’s because he needs to project movies at a screen across a field, rather than just across the room. And the image needs to appear bright and clear despite competing light. “Unlike an indoor theater, we can’t turn the lights down,” Bratt said. Bratt said the transition will have a big impact on the theater’s budget. If the money was to come from snack-stand sales, he’d have to sell some 30,000 tubs of popcorn to cover the cost. The Blue Fox opened in 1959, when drive-in theaters were booming and sleepy Whidbey Island offered few activities for teens and families. Despite a decline in attendance and an increase in competing entertainment options such as Netflix, the drive-in continues to draw a following of loyal locals in search of affordable family entertainment. “We have customers that come back week after week,” Bratt said. “I enjoy seeing the customers that came here as little kids bringing their own children here.” Bratt and his wife Lori took over the business in 1988 at the tail end of a wave of drive-in closures across the country. To draw more customers – and keep them on site longer so they spend more money at the snack counter – they expanded their game arcade and added a go-kart track. The Blue Fox is not the only local, independent theater going

digital, despite the expense. The Clyde Theater in Langley, which celebrates its 75th anniversary this year, went digital in December, owner Blake Willeford said. To pay for the upgrade, the price of a movie ticket went up by $1. Willeford said it would take several years to bring in enough revenue to cover the cost. At the Rose Theater in Port Townsend, owner Rocky Friedman has turned to the entire community for donations to help cover the estimated $200,000 cost of conversion. “Over 400 people have contributed so far,” Friedman said. “It has been very gratifying.” At the Blue Fox, the Bratts are taking a similar approach. They’ll accept donations, of course, but right now their focus is on selling glow-in-the-dark “Save the Drive-in” t-shirts for $20 each to raise money for the project. Bratt said he started his t-shirt campaign this month and so far it’s been well received. He’s gotten orders from fans as far away as New York and Alaska. “Realistically, the t-shirt sales won’t cover the entire cost,” Bratt said. “But they will help.” Bratt said that the fundraising effort will also be critical if they need to ask the bank for a loan. “Banks are not lending as readily, but if we can show some success with our fundraising efforts they might be more willing to loan to us,” he said. Also a big factor in the Blue Fox’s ability to afford new equipment is concession-stand sales. Theaters sometimes get to keep as little as 20 to 40 percent of each movie ticket they sell. As a

result, the Bratts have to sell a lot of popcorn, burgers, pizza, candy and pop in order to make ends meet. And sometimes, the theater spends more to screen a film than it brings in from ticket sales. Fans of the Blue Fox said they’re happy to support the Bratts in their efforts to bring in some extra money to pay for the transition. “We plan on buying t-shirts,” said Amber Wiles, who lives in Mount Vernon. “I love this theater.” Wiles brought her daughter Alyiah Wiles, mom Lori Walton, and sister April Walton to the Blue Fox Drive-in on Friday for a girls’ night out. It was the first visit for Lori and April, but it won’t be the last, they said. “I grew up with drive-ins,” Walton said. “I would hate to see another one close.” Bratt said he’d like to get the entire community excited about saving Whidbey Island’s one and only drive-in theater. Kind of like back in 1998, when friends and neighbors pitched in to help his family build and erect a new movie screen after a big windstorm destroyed the original one. “The community was very supportive,” Bratt said. “A lot of people offered their labor, including several contractors.” Bratt said he knows the Blue Fox holds fond memories for generations of Whidbey Islanders who went to the landmark theater on everything from first dates to family outings. “One way or another we will get it saved,” Bratt said. “As our t-shirts says, ‘The show must go on.’” A


Thursday, March 29, 2012  •  The Whidbey Examiner

Page 7

Diamond men hit a rough patch “One moment it gives you everything you want, and then the next it turns on you, punishing you for some unknown transgression by sending you plunging to three straight losses.” Now 2-4 after being swept by Cascade Conference rival Cedarcrest (10-0 on the road Monday, March 19 and 4-3 at home two days later) and walloped 15-5 by non-conference foe Lynden Christian the following Saturday, in a make-up of a rained-out game, Coupeville did have some bright spots along the way. The middle game, in particular, was one to remember, as the Wolves went toe-to-toe with one of the best Class AA schools in the state. Pushing Cedarcrest to the very brink, Coupeville had the po-

tential tying and winning runs on base in the bottom of the seventh and final inning, only to squander the chance when a final strikeout erased their hopes. The loss negated a strong team pitching effort from hurlers Aaron Trumbull, Aaron Curtin, Korbin Korzan and Ben Etzell, a spectacular defensive play from catcher Jake Tumblin, who gunned down a key runner trying to steal second with the game on the line, and heads-up, aggressive base-running by senior Brandt Bodamer, who knocked the ball loose from the catcher’s grasp while scoring on a bang-bang play. Tumblin led the offense with a triple and two RBI, while Drew Chan eked out a crucial basesloaded walk to pull the Wolves

within one during their last stand. The other two losses were much more forgettable, with Cedarcrest’s Nick Gagner no-hitting Coupeville in the first one and an explosion of errors derailing Coupeville against Lynden Christian. Frittering away 10 walks and a home run from Etzell, the Wolves shot themselves in the foot repeatedly, with ill-timed strikeouts and an inability to get an offensive rhythm going. About the only thing Coupeville can take away from the loss is the realization it may yet have a chance to garner some payback. Shelli Trumbull photo “They are a team that we will Wolf hurler Aaron Curtin brings the heat in a recent game. see again in the playoffs and are definitely a team that is not ten lie Smith said. “Hopefully we will fense and doing a better job of exruns better than us,” coach Wil- get back to playing strong on de- ecuting offensively.” A

Sparked by the big bat of freshman Hailey Hammer, and myriad contributions from just about everyone on their roster, the Coupeville High School softball team is the surprise team of the spring, rolling to three wins in its first five games. An extremely young team which took its lumps during an 0-17 regular season a year ago is now inflicting some serious noggin damage of its own, and none of the wins were any bigger than an electrifying, world-rattling 9-3 romp over the wicked witch of the Cascade Conference, Archbishop Thomas Murphy. Sparked by Hammer’s four RBI and the nuclear-powered arm of senior hurler Alexis Trumbull, the Wolves routed ATM, a

team not used to losing anywhere, much less on its home field, just two days after pulling off a wild come-from-behind 16-15 win over Lakewood. In that game, it again was Hammer who swung the big bat, as she tied the game in the bottom of the seventh and final inning with a screaming double off the wall to score Bessie Walstad. Hammer then completed the perfect afternoon by sliding home with the winning run after Lakewood bobbled a chopper by fellow Wolf frosh phenom McKayla

Bailey. The Wolves were hot at the plate all week, even in a rare 10-3 loss to Cedarcrest. Hammer and Walstad abused their rivals with resounding two-run triples, while Hammer and Haley Sherman each rapped doubles. Others collecting hits during the week-long festivities included Trumbull, Bailey, Sydney Aparicio, Madeline Roberts, Taya Boonstra and Arianna Johnson. It was especially sweet for Johnson, who singled in her firstA leading hitter, freshman Hailey Hammer also plays a mean defense, ever varsity plate appearance. A as she proves here by keeping a close eye on an ATM runner.

The Christine and Austin Fields’ Traveling Golf Show plays on, sometimes quite successfully. The Coupeville High School siblings, who are teeing off along side South Whidbey this season, since the Wolves don’t have a golf program of their own, continue to be among the front runners in every event in which they have stuck a tee in the ground. Christine Fields, a freshman, has been at the front of both of her first two high school events, recording scores of 19 and 18 under Stableford scoring rules. Austin, a junior who already boasts the only state meet appearance in Coupeville High School history, fired a 47 over nine holes in his season-opener, a three-team battle royal at Useless Bay Golf and Country Club. He followed that up last Thursday with a 68 on 15 holes during a Cascade Conference meet in Snohomish.

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Page 8

The Whidbey Examiner  •  Thursday, March 29, 2012

whidbey island’s community calendar The Earth Portal, 7 p.m., 7:45 p.m. and 8:30 p.m. Thursday, March 29, Whidbey Island Center for the Arts, Zech Hall, 565 Camano Ave., Langley. Preview the GeoDome, a device used to create an immersive digital environment for virtual tours of the universe, evolution and other systems. $10; $6, 18 and under. 360-221-8268; 800-6387631; WICAonline.com. Mick Moloney Performance, 7:30 p.m. Friday, March 30, McIntyre Hall, 2501 E. College Way, Mount Vernon. Irish American song, dance and story telling performance with Mick Moloney and his accompaniment. $25. mcintyrehall.org. Music on the Sound, 7:30 p.m. Friday, March 30, Whidbey Island Center for the Arts, 565 Camano Ave., Langley. Robert W. Prosch directs the Whidbey Island Center for the Arts Chamber Singers. $50. 360-221-8268; 800-6387631; WICAonline.com.

Weavers Spin-In,10 a.m.-4 p.m. Saturday, March 31 and Sunday, April 1, Oak Harbor High School, 950 N.W. 2nd Ave. On Saturday, Karen Selk talks about weaving with silk. On Sunday, Barbara Seeler talks about spinning silk and silk blends. $15 for two-day admission. whidbeyweaversguild.org. Whidbey Green Home Tour, 10 a.m.4 p.m. Saturday, March 31, Explore green living and a variety of energysaving, ecological building styles and low-impact development techniques at five locations from Freeland to Coupeville. Tickets $20, or 2 for $35 if in same vehicle. 360-579-1272; brownpapertickets.com. 877-385-5360.

volunteer opportunities. 360-6792237; office@whidbeyplayhouse.com. First Aid for Horses, 2 p.m. Saturday, March 31, Skagit Farmers Supply, 5463 Cameron Road, Freeland. Equine Emergency Rescue Team demonstration and fundraiser. Free. Details at 360-3314855; RSVP at 360-331-4855.

Think spring!

Chanteuse Women’s Choir, 4 p.m. Saturday, March 31, Unitarian Universalist Congregation, 20103 Hwy. 525, Freeland. Cheryl Veblen directs the choir in the program “How Can I Keep from Singing?” Includes adaptations from Renaissance through modern composers. Adults $12; Seniors and youth $10; Children $5. 360-579-4053; Whidbey Playhouse Volunteer chanteuse.wi.@gmail.com. Informational, 1-3 p.m. Saturday, March 31, Whidbey Playhouse, 730 SE Benefit Concert: Derrick SanderMidway Blvd, Oak Harbor. Learn about lin, 7 p.m. Saturday, March 31, Pavolunteer opportunities in production, cific Rim Institute, 180 Parker Road, stage management, lighting, costumes Coupeville. Benefit to raise money and and more. The event is a series of 15 awareness for Ginny Schneider, who is minute classes that covers different volunteering in Chicago as part of the Mission Year program. Free; donations accepted. lunapoet@sbcglobal.net. Egyptian Painting, 2:30-4 p.m. Sunday, April 1, Pacific NorthWest Art School, 15 N.W. Birch St., Coupeville. Art instructor Sharon Hall leads a discussion on Egyptian depictions of the human form. Part three of a four-part series. $10. 360-678-3396; pacificnorthwestartschool.org.

Kasia Pierzga / The Whidbey Examiner

Don Lawson of Clinton shows off a box filled with plants purchased at Bayview Farm and Garden in Bayview Saturday. Nurseries around Whidbey Island drew plenty of customers over the weekend as warmer weather inspired people to get out in their gardens.

Theater Camp: The Tale of Peter Rabbit, 10 a.m.-2p.m. Monday, April 2 through Friday, April 6. Whidbey Children’s Theater, 222 Anthes Ave., Langley. Week long day camp for children 360-678-4911; sno-isle.org. ages 7-12. Registration now open. $135. wctonline.com, 360-221-2282. Greenbank Garden Club Meeting, 10 a.m. Thursday, April 5, Greenbank Island County Astronomical Soci- Progressive Clubhouse, 3500 Fireety Meeting, 6:30-8:30 p.m. Monday, house Rd. Presenter Kristi O’Donnell April 2, First United Methodist Church, speaks about plant propagation. Nan1050 S.E. Ireland St, Oak Harbor. Dan cy, 360-678-5933. Pullen, 360-679-7664; icaspub@juno. Water Resources Advisory Comcom; icas-wa.webs.com. mittee Meeting, 3-5 p.m. Thursday, Underwater Turbine Presenta- April 5, City of Oak Harbor Public tion, 3:30 p.m. Tuesday, April 3, Is- Works Facility, 400 NE 16th Ave. Publand County commissioners hearing lic meeting regarding the use of water room, 1 N.E. Sixth Street, Coupeville. resources in Island County. 360-679Learn about Snohomish Public Utility 7352; islandcountyeh.org. District project exploring the possibility of generating electrical power with Construction Zone, 1 p.m. Thursday, underwater turbines in Admiralty Inlet. April 5, Coupeville Library, 788 N.W. Al360-679-7327; islandcountymrc.org. exander St. School -age children build with K’Nex, Lincoln Logs and other Growing Groceries Class, 5 p.m. toys. Free. 360-678-4911; sno-isle.org. Tuesday, April 3, Good Cheer Garden, 2812 Grimm Rd., Langley. Learn about Water Resource Advisory Commitdrip irrigation and what vegetables tee Meeting, 3-5 p.m. Thursday, April should be planted in April. $15; sliding 5, City of Oak Harbor Public Works Fafee scale available. growinggroceries. cility, 400 NE 16th Ave. 360-679-7352; wordpress.com. islandcountyeh.org.

Complete the grid so each row, column and 3x3 box (in bold borders) contains every digit, from 1 to 9.

Whidbey Forest Tour, 10 a.m. Wednesday, April 4, South Whidbey Island. Tour of a private, 176 acre forest. Sponsored by the Whidbey Camano Land Trust. Details and directions available upon RSVP. Free. RSVP 360-2223310; info@wclt.org. “Citizens Ignited against Citizens United,” 5-8 p.m. Wednesday, April 4, Oak Harbor Library meeting room, 1000 SE Regatta Drive. Local effort to oppose the Supreme Court decision “Citizens United.” 360-675-5888; mfgold@comcast.net. Film: “A Murder of Crows,” 6 p.m. Wednesday, April 4, Coupeville Library, 788 N.W. Alexander St. Whidbey Reads presents this film about the intelligence and behavior of crows. Free.

Whidbey Middle School, 67 NE Izett St., Oak Harbor. Sponsored by Skagit Valley College Asian and Pacific Islander Club. $10 at the door; $7 in advance; Students $5. For tickets, call 360-6795353. Play: “Doubt, A Parable,” 7:30 p.m. (most shows; check online) Friday, April 6-Saturday, April 21, Whidbey Island Center for the Arts, 565 Camano Ave., Langley. Director Andrew Grenier directs this play focused on a priest’s moral dilemmas. $12-16. 360-2218268; 800-638-7631; WICAonline.com. “The Curious Savage,” 7:30 p.m. on Thursdays, Fridays and Saturdays; 2:30 p.m. Sundays. From Friday, April 6 to Sunday, April 22, Whidbey Playhouse, 730 SE Midway Blvd., Oak Harbor. Saga of a wealthy widow and her greedy stepchildren. $16. 360-6792237; whidbeyplayhouse.com.

Farmers Market Book Sale, 10 a.m. Saturdays starting April 7, Coupeville Library, 788 N.W. Alexander St. Friends of the Coupeville Library sells books Wildlife Artist Bart Rulon, 5:30 p.m. from the shed behind the library. 360Thursday, April 5, Coupeville Library, 678-4911; sno-isle.org. 788 N.W. Alexander St. A slide show presentation on Rulon’s painting tech- The Art of Storytelling, 10 a.m.12:30 p.m. Saturday, April 7, Coupeniques. Free. 360-678-4911. ville Library, 788 N.W. Alexander St. InDisabled Veterans Chapter 47 structor Pat Burnjes shares techniques Meeting, 7 p.m. Thursday, April 5, Oak for reading written work aloud. SponHarbor Library meeting room, 1000 SE sored by Whidbey Island Writers AsRegatta Drive. 360-257-4801. sociation. Free. Registration required, 360-341-1861; writeonwhidbey.org. First Friday at the Farm, 5-8 p.m. Friday, April 6, Greenbank Farm, 765 Soroptimist Easter Egg Hunt, 11 Wonn Road. Art reception with an a.m. Saturday, April 7, Coupeville Town “April Showers” theme. The reception Park, corner of Coveland Street and features a number of artists and artistic Madrona Way. Coupeville Soroptimist mediums. 360-222-3010; artworksw- International sponsors this Easter egg hidbey.com. hunt and raffles 10 Easter baskets. Food bank donations welcome. Beat’n Taiko Drums and Dance Fest, 6:30-8 p.m. Friday, April 6, North See CALENDAR page 9


Thursday, March 29, 2012  •  The Whidbey Examiner

Fire: From page 1

Central Whidbey Fire and Rescue aren’t consolidated. South Whidbey Fire Commissioner Bob Elliot defended the district’s six fire stations, saying, “Stations must be spaced to protect property and people.” Commissioner Kenon Simmons said the South Whidbey situation is unique. “We cover 66 square miles from Possession Point north to Classic Road,” he said. “We need to look at what response time voters would expect if their house was on fire or if they had a heart attack.” “The National Fire Protection Agency recommends that for populations with less than 200 people per square mile, the response time should be under 14 minutes,” Elliot said. Palmer said merging with Central Whidbey Fire Rescue would increase the amount of taxes residents would pay. Central Whidbey taxpayers pay $1.25 per $1,000 of assessed property value for fire and EMT services. The population of the area covered by the agency ranges from

Whidbey Island Service Directory “We clean so you don’t have to.”

Underage Drinking Panel, 12:45 p.m. Saturday, April 7, Trinity Church’s Grigware Hall, 18341 Hwy. 525, Freeland. Open to all, required for drivers education. 360-672-8219; idipic.org.

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Fire Chief Rusty Palmer and volunteer Lt. Firefighter/EMT Mari St. Amand stand by one of the two fire trucks at the South Whidbey Fire District’s main station on Cameron Road in Freeland. 15,000 in the winter to 25,000 during the summer, when tourists and weekenders head to Whidbey. The decision to file for the levy lift must be made by June. Additional public meetings are in the works. “We work hard to be accountable and transparent to our taxpayers,” Palmer said, adding that

Cultural Study: Laos, 5:30 p.m. Monday, April 9, North West Language Academy, 5023 Langley Rd, Langley. Presenter Channapha Khamvongsa, from the nonprofit group Legacies of War will lead a discussion about unexploded ordnance in Laos. Free. 360321-4027; legaciesofwar.com. Oak Harbor Garden Club Meeting, 9 a.m.-12 p.m. Tuesday, April 10. First United Methodist, 1050 SE Ireland St., Oak Harbor. Horticulture and flower show critique and speaker Elizabeth Guss. 360-675-0392. Right to Bike, 5:30-6:30 p.m. Tuesday, April 10, Oak Harbor City Hall, 865 S.E. Barrington Drive. Police Of-

TOWN OF COUPEVILLE

PLANNING COMMISSION MEETING AGENDA

Island County Hearing Room

6:30 p.m. Tuesday, April 3, 2012 THE APRIL 3, 2012 MEETING OF THE COUPEVILLE PLANNING COMMISSION HAS BEEN CANCELLED. THE NEXT SCHEDULED MEETING OF THE PLANNING COMMISSION MAY BE ON TUESDAY, MAY 1, 2012

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his agency has no debt and has passed state financial and accountability audits. “If we don’t receive additional money through the levy lid lift, we’ll see a reduction in services starting in 2014,” Palmer said. Comments on the proposal may be sent to Chief Palmer at chief@icfd3.org. A

ficer John Dyer will talk about cycling laws and Whidbey Bike Club founder Brian Wood will talk about local bike routes and bike safety. Free. mcrandell@oakharbor.org.

Running Start Informational Meeting, 6:30 p.m. Tuesday, April 10, Laura Angst Hall, Room 125, 2405 E. College Way, Mount Vernon. Learn about the Running Start program, which allows Starting a Successful Writers high school students to earn college Group, 1:30-4 p.m. Saturday, April 7, credits. 360-416-7632; rose.brierley@ Coupeville Library, 788 N.W. Alexan- skagit.edu. der St. Instructors Dorothy Read and Rowena Williamson talk about forming Home Brewing Beers, 7 p.m. Tuesa writing club. Sponsored by the Whid- day, April 10, Deer Lagoon Grange Hall, bey Island Writers Association. Free. 5142 Bayview Rd., Langley. Brewer Registration required, 360-341-1861; John Burks gives a presentation on how to brew ale from liquid or dry malt writeonwhidbey.org. extract. Free. 360- 321-4027. Art Opening: “Flights of Fancy,” 5-7 p.m. Saturday, April 7, Brackenwood Gallery, 302 First St., Langley. Artists Janie Cribbs and Sara Saltee present oil paintings and mixed media. 360221-2978; brackenwoodgallery.com. Easter Celebration, 11 a.m. Sunday, April 8, Whidbey Institute, 6449 Old Pietila Road, Clinton. Non-sectarian Easter celebration with songs, poetry and other presentations. 360-341-1884; whidbeyinstitute.org.

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Page 10 LEGAL NOTICES NOTICE TO CREDITORS SEGLIN SUPERIOR COURT OF WASHINGTON FOR ISLAND COUNTY In the Estate of: MICHAEL O. SEGLIN, Deceased. NO. 12-4-00068-1. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The Personal Representative named below has been appointed as Personal Representative of the above estate. Any person having a claim against the decedent must, before the time the claim would be barred by any otherwise applicable statute of limitations, present the claim in the manner as provided in RCW 11.40.070 by serving on or mailing to the Personal Representative or the Personal Representative’s attorney at the address below stated a copy of the claim and filing the original of the claim with the court in which the probate proceedings were commenced. The claim must be presented within the later of: (1) Thirty (30) days after the Personal Representative served or mailed the notice to the creditor as provided under RCW 11.40.020(1)(c); or (2) four months after the date of first publication of the notice. If the claim is not presented within this time frame, the claim is forever barred, except as otherwise provided in RCW 11.40.051 and 11.40.060. This bar is effective as to claims against both the decedent’s probate and nonprobate assets. DATE OF FIRST PUBLICATION: March 29, 2012 Personal Representative: DEBRA A. ADAMS 755 Edgefield Lane Coupeville, Washington, 98239 PAUL A NEUMILLER, WSBA#28124 Attorney for Personal Representative Address: 390 NE Midway Blvd., Suite B201 Oak Harbor, WA 982772680 Telephone: (360) 675-2567 Court of Probate Proceedings and Cause Number: 12-4-00068-1 Superior Court Of Washington For Island County Legal No. CEX 2582 Published: The Whidbey Examiner March 29, April 5, April 12, 2012

The Whidbey Examiner  •  Thursday, March 29, 2012 LEGAL NOTICES LEENE MAE BEREND, Deceased. NO. 12-4-00067-2. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The Personal Representative named below has been appointed as Personal Representative of the above estate. Any person having a claim against the decedent must, before the time the claim would be barred by any otherwise applicable statute of limitations, present the claim in the manner as provided in RCW 11.40.070 by serving on or mailing to the Personal Representative or the Personal Representative’s attorney at the address below stated a copy of the claim and filing the original of the claim with the court in which the probate proceedings were commenced. The claim must be presented within the later of: (1) Thirty (30) days after the Personal Representative served or mailed the notice to the creditor as provided under RCW 11.40.020(1)(c); or (2) four months after the date of first publication of the notice. If the claim is not presented within this time frame, the claim is forever barred, except as otherwise provided in RCW 11.40.051 and 11.40.060. This bar is effective as to claims against both the decedent’s probate and non-probate assets. DATE OF FIRST PUBLICATION: March 29, 2012 Personal Representative: Daniel J. Berend, 5709 Newport Drive, Edina, MN 55436 PAUL A. NEUMILLER, WSBA #28124 Attorney for Personal Representative Address: 390 NE Midway Blvd., Suite B20l Oak Harbor, WA98277-2680 Telephone: (360) 675-2567 Court of Probate Proceedings and Cause Number: 12-4-00067-2 Superior Court Of Washington For Island County Legal No.: CEX 2583 Published: The Whidbey Examiner March 29, April 5, April 12 2012

NOTICE TO CREDITORS ZUST

IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF WASHINGTON FOR ISLAND COUNTY IN PROBATE. In the Matter of the NOTICE TO CREDITORS – Estate of ZUST, RICHARD BEREND M. Deceased. No: 12-400066-4 The personal represenSUPERIOR COURT OF WASHINGTON FOR IS- tative named below has been appointed and has LAND COUNTY In the Estate of: AR- qualified as personal repre-

LEGAL NOTICES sentative of this estate. Persons having claims against the decedent must, prior to the time such claims would be barred by any otherwise applicable statute of limitations, present the claim in the manner as provided in RCW 11.40.070 by serving on or mailing to the personal representative or the resident agent or the attorneys of record at the address stated below a copy of the claim and filing the original of the claim with the court. The claim must be presented within the later of: (1) Thirty days after the personal representative served or mailed the notice to the creditor as provided under RCW 11.40.020(3); or (2) four months after the date of first publication of the notice. If the claim is not presented within this time frame, the claim is forever barred, except as otherwise provided in RCW 11.40.051 and 11.40.060. This bar is effective as to claims against both the decedent’s probate and nonprobate assets. DATE OF FIRST PUBLICATION: March 29, 2012 KEITH RAYMOND., Personal Representative JOAN H. McPHERSON, WSBA #14141 Resident Agent and Attorney for Personal Representative ADDRESS FOR MAILING OR SERVICE: P.O. Box 1617, One NW Front Street Coupeville, Washington 98239 Legal No. CEX 2584 Published: The Whidbey Examiner March 29, April 5, April 12. 2012

PROBATE NOTICE TO CREDITORS - GAUDINIER In the Matter of the Estate of Bailey J. Gaudinier, Deceased The Personal Representative named below has been appointed as Personal Representative of this estate. Any person having a claim against the decedent must, before the time the claim would be barred by any otherwise applicable statute of limitations, present the claim in the manner as provided in RCW 11.40.070 by serving on or mailing to the Personal Representative or the Personal Representative’s attorney at the address stated below a copy of the claim and filing the original of the claim with the court in which the probate proceedings were

LEGAL NOTICES commenced. The claim must be presented within the later of: (1) Thirty days after the personal representative served or mailed the notice to the creditor as provided under RCW 11.40.020(1)(e); or (2) four months after the date of first publication of the notice. If the claim is not presented within this time frame, the claim is forever barred, except as otherwise provided in RCW 11.40.051 and 11.40.060. This bar is effective as to claims against both the decedent’s probate and nonprobate assets. Laurin M. Gaudinier Personal Representative 3637 Albion PIN, #107 Seattle, WA 98103 Attorney for Personal Representative Mark D. Albertson, WSBA 17373 PO Box 1046, Kent, WA 98035-1046 Telephone: (253) 8528772 Legal No.: CEX 2576 Published: The Whidbey Examiner March 22, March 29, April 5, 2012

INVITATION TO BID PUBLIC WORKS 2012 CULVERT SUPPLIES ISLAND COUNTY PUBLIC WORKS ROADS DIVISION Sealed bids will be received by the Island County Auditor in the County Administration Building, 1 NE 7th St., (P.O. Box 5000) Coupeville, WA 98239, until 9:30 A.M., Tuesday, April 10, 2012 for the following: 2012 Culvert Supplies for Camano, Coupeville, and Oak Harbor Road Shops: Corrugated DoubleWalled, Smooth Bore, NonPerforated, Polyethylene Plastic Drain Pipe, with all couplings/bands, gaskets, seals, and lubricants necessary to insure watertight connections and HDPE Pipe for the Public Works Surface Water Division. Bids will not be accepted after 9:30 A.M. Proposals will be publicly opened and read in the Administration Building Meeting Room 116, 1 NE 7th St., Coupeville, WA at 10:20 A.M., April 10, 2012. All envelopes shall be clearly marked “ATTN:

LEGAL NOTICES MICHELE TEFFT. BID PROPOSAL – 2012 CULVERT SUPPLIES – TO BE OPENED AT 10:20 A.M., APRIL 10, 2012”. SPECIFICATIONS are available without cost at the office of Island County Public Works, Roads Division, 360-679-7331. Island County reserves the right to reject any or all bids and to waive all informalities in the bidding. BOARD OF ISLAND COUNTY COMMISSIONERS ISLAND COUNTY, WASHINGTON Legal No.: CEX 2578 Published: The Whidbey Examiner March 22, March 29, 2012

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Island County has received the following applications for review. This may be the only time to comment. File Number: 290/11 SVAR/SHE Applicant: Mike & Wendi Waitt Proposal: Modifications to existing home consisting of: 1) addition 50 sq ft in size on landward side of home; and, 2) enclose 450 sq ft of space under home in order to create new finished area. Portions of the new finished area will be within the required shoreline setback. Project site is located in or near: shorelines, flood hazard area, steep slopes, & geo hazards. Location: 262 Kolia Pl, Greenbank Staff Contact: Brad Johnson, b.johnson@ co.island.wa.us FILES AVAILABLE FOR REVIEW: The application files are available for inspection and copies will be provided at the cost of reproduction in a timely manner. PUBLIC COMMENTS must be received by Community Development by 4:30 p.m. on April 12, 2012. Mail to: Island County Community Development, P.O. Box 5000, Coupeville, WA 98239; deliver to 6th & Main Street, Coupeville, WA between 8 a.m. & 4:30 p.m. Monday through Thursday; or sent by FAX to (360) 6797306. ADDITIONAL INFORMATION To request notice of hearings, or receive a copy of the decision or fi-

LEGAL NOTICES nal threshold determination or appeal procedures, mail your written request to the before mentioned address. Legal No.: CEX 2587 Published: The Whidbey Examiner March 29, 2012

NOTICE OF APPLICATION WITH SEPA Island County has reviewed the proposed project for probable adverse environmental impacts and expects to issue a determination of non-significance (DNS). The optional DNS process established by WAC 197-11-355 is being used. The public comment period as described below may be the only opportunity to comment on the environmental impacts of the following proposals. File Number: 062/12 CGP Applicant: Gregory & Kathleen Richardson Proposal: Selective clearing & grading of approx 350 cu yds to construct a single family residence within a geo hazardous area. Location: 4697 Wrightsman Pl, Clinton Staff Contact & E-mail: Bill Poss, billp@co.island. wa.us The proposal may include mitigation under applicable codes, and the project review process may incorporate or require mitigation measures regardless of whether an EIS is required. Application files are available for inspection at no cost, and will be provided at the cost of reproduction in a timely manner. PUBLIC COMMENT must be received by 4:30 p.m. on April 12, 2012. Mail to: Island County Community Development, P.O. Box 5000, Coupeville, WA 98239; deliver to 1 NE 6th St Coupeville, WA between 8:00 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. Monday through Thursday; FAX to (360) 679-7306. ADDITIONAL INFORMATION To request notice of hearings, receive a copy of the decision or SEPA determination, or information on appeals contact us at the above address. Legal No.: 2586 Published: The Whidbey Examiner March 29, 2012 See LEGALS, page 10


Thursday, March 29, 2012  •  The Whidbey Examiner LEGAL NOTICES

LEGAL NOTICES

Page 11

LEGAL NOTICES

Legals, from page 11

CLASSIFIED ADS Weekly ad deadline is 5 p.m. Friday. Free ads must be submitted online. Go to www.whidbeyexaminer.com and click on “Classifieds”.

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Island County has received the following applications for review. This may be the only time to comment. File Number: 048/12SHE & 049/12VAR Applicant: Derel Finch Proposal: Construction of a single-family residence & garage within 10.5 ft of Shore Ave. Project is located in or near the vicinity of a wetland, MFWHCA, flood hazard area, habitat of local importance & the shoreline residential designation. Location: 2194 Shore Ave, Freeland Staff Contact: Kyla Walters, k.walters@co.island. wa.us FILES AVAILABLE FOR REVIEW: The application files are available for inspection and copies will be provided at the cost of reproduction in a timely manner. PUBLIC COMMENTS: must be received by 4:30 p.m. on April 12, 2012 mail to Island County Community Development, P.O. Box 5000, Coupeville, WA 98239; deliver to 6th & Main Street, Coupeville, WA between 8:00 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. Monday through Thursday; by FAX to (360) 679-7306. ADDITIONAL INFORMATION To request notice of hearings, or receive a copy of the decision or final threshold determination or appeal procedures, mail your written request to the before mentioned address. Legal No.: CEX 2585 Published: The Whidbey Examiner March 29, 2012

INVITATION TO BID - LIQUID ASPHALT MATERIALS

ISLAND COUNTY PUBLIC WORKS

ISLAND COUNTY PUBLIC WORKS

ROADS DIVISION

ROADS DIVISION

Sealed bids will be received by the Island County Auditor in the County Administration Building, 1 NE 7th St., (P.O. Box 5000) Coupeville, WA 98239, until 9:30 A.M., Tuesday, April 10th, 2012 for the following: ASPHALT CONCRETE MATERIALS for the period of May 1, 2012 to May 1, 2013: Modified G, Class B, ATB, & Tack Coat Oil (CSS1) Bids will not be accepted after 9:30 A.M. Proposals will be publicly opened and read in the Administration Building Meeting Room 116, 1 N.E. 7th Street, Coupeville, WA at 10:00 A.M., April 10, 2012. All envelopes shall be clearly marked “ATTN: MICHELE TEFFT. SEALED BID – CONCRETE ASPHALT PRODUCTS – TO BE OPENED ON TUESDAY APRIL 10, 2012 at 10:00 A.M.” SPECIFICATIONS are available without cost at the office of Island County Public Works, Roads Division, 360-679-7331. Island County reserves the right to reject any or all bids and to waive all informalities in the bidding process. BOARD OF ISLAND COUNTY COMMISSIONERS ISLAND COUNTY, WASHINGTON Legal No.: CEX 2579 Published: The Whidbey Examiner March 22, March 29, 2012

Sealed bids will be received by the Island County Auditor in the County Administration Building, 1 NE 7th St., (P.O. Box 5000) Coupeville, WA 98239, until 9:30 A.M., Tuesday April 10th, 2012 for the following: LIQUID ASPHALT MATERIALS for the period of May 1, 2012 to May 1, 2013: CRS-2P, CMS-2P, CSS-1, CRS-2 & CMS-2 Bids will not be accepted after 9:30 A.M. Proposals will be publicly opened and read in the Administration Building Meeting Room 116, 1 N.E. 7th Street, Coupeville, WA at 10:10 A.M., April 10, 2012. All envelopes shall be clearly marked “ATTN: MICHELE TEFFT. SEALED BID – LIQUID ASPHALT PRODUCTS – TO BE OPENED ON TUESDAY, APRIL 10, 2012 AT 10:10 AM”. SPECIFICATIONS are available without cost at the office of Island County Public Works, Roads Division, 360-679-7331. Island County reserves the right to reject any or all bids and to waive all informalities in the bidding process. BOARD OF ISLAND COUNTY COMMISSIONERS ISLAND COUNTY, WASHINGTON Legal No.: CEX 2580 Published: The Whidbey Examiner March 22, March 29, 2012

WHIDBEY WEATHER SUMMARY March 19-25, 2012 Source: Island County WSU Cooperative Extension

PAID ADS

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INVITATION TO BID -ASPHALT CONCRETE MATERIALS

HI Temp

LO Temp

Wind MPH

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YTD Rain

Last Year

Crockett Lake, Haglund

57

31

24

0.08

7.66

8.25

Fort Casey, Barnes

57

34

––

0.13

7.90

8.40

Fawn Run/Coupeville, Bachert

44

30

––

0.20

7.18

9.05

Greenbank, Mercer

54

35

––

0.09

8.55

9.96

West Beach, Marion

54

32

––

0.11

7.51

6.58

NAS Whidbey, Weather Desk

53

31

53

0.20

6.10

7.16

Polnell Point, Seaward

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

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Page 12

Wolf booters lose scoring touch Where have all the goals gone? Having hit the road without packing its shooting touch, which resulted in a sudden scoring shortage, the Coupeville boys’ soccer squad sputtered a bit last week, being bounced in back-to-back Cascade Conference bouts. A 5-0 loss to Archbishop Thomas Murphy Tuesday, March 20 and a 3-0 defeat at Cedarcrest Friday, March 23 dropped the Wolves to 1-2 on the season, 0-2 in conference play. In both games, Coupeville’s defense, headed by goaltender Zac Forland, played well, holding the tide back for chunks of time. In the end, however, every little break became a huge one, with Coupeville unable to mount an offensive charge of its own.

Wolf netters drop opening matches “It’s always difficult to face the most difficult opponent in the first match, but we will take those lessons and apply them to our future opponents.” Imparting his usual sage wisdom, Coupeville High School girls’ tennis coach Ken Stange could still find the bright side after

The Whidbey Examiner  •  Thursday, March 29, 2012 watching his Wolves be bounced 5-0 by Class AA juggernaut South Whidbey in their March 19 opener. After all, with the rain (and sometimes snow) finally departing, at least Coupeville actually got on the court, which was a considerable psychological win. With the Wolves’ first two matches washed away, it was starting to look like the season would never get under way. True to Stange’s words, the Wolves bounced back quickly, throwing a scare into Granite Falls before being nipped 3-2. With singles ace Emily Burchfield and the doubles duo of Amanda d’Almeida and Lexi Blanchette rolling to big wins, the Wolves are starting to fine-tune their games before facing Friday Harbor in their annual three-match rumble for league supremacy. “Although we lost, we played well,” he said. “Emily’s effort was tremendous today. I’m impressed by her resilience on the court.” Allie Hanigan, who transferred in from Kelso this year, has made an impact as well, Stange said. With Hanigan available to step into the second singles spot, Coupeville was able to slide Blanchette out of that position and team her with d’Almeida, who was minus a partner after Jessica Riddle transferred to Anacortes. “Allie played well,” Stange said. “Her game continues to develop, and she will continue to be-

come more competitive.” For complete results, visit whidbeyexaminer.com.

Wolf track aces blitz the field Burning up the track oval in an apparent effort to prove the Coupeville High School track squad has more than one superstar, Mitch Pelroy blitzed the field Thursday, March 22, sweeping the 100, 200 and 400 during a three-team meet in Duvall. But then, just to prove why she’s still the big dog in 2012, Wolf hurdler supreme Madison Tisa McPhee went out and matched Pelroy, sweeping all three of her events as well. Wins in the 100 and 300 meter hurdles were followed by a leg on a winning 4 x 200 relay squad, where she was joined in going really, really fast by fellow speedsters Katie Smith, Nicole Becker and Jai’Lysa Hoskins. Hoskins (100) and Shawn Kump (high jump) rounded out the event winners for Coupeville, which didn’t have the team depth to keep up with either Cedarcrest or Sultan in the final team standings. Still, let the Wolves pick their spots, and then let them unleash the beasts, and they can compete with just about anyone.

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The Whidbey Examiner, March 29, 2012