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Kansas City


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FIRST LOOK A preview of Kansas City’s must-see attractions, landmarks and sights, from historical buildings to modern marvels.

BY ANY OTHER NAME Kansas City’s municipal rose garden is the realization of a dream by founder Laura Conyers Smith TEXT BY JENNIFER MCKEE PHOTOS BY DAN VIDETICH

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IN A LEAGUE OF THEIR OWN How the Negro National League, led by Andrew “Rube” Foster, brought the greats to prominence. BY DAVID LANCASTER

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LET THE GOOD TIMES FLOW A tumultuous history, a penchant for good whiskey and a desire to pay homage to the past have helped the distilling scene in Kansas City flourish. BY ANNA ARCHIBALD

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ALL ABOUT TOWN Kansas City’s neighborhoods, each with its own vibe, offers visitors a welcoming Midwest experience.

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THE GUIDE The best shops, entertainment options, restaurants, museums, galleries and attractions to seek out in Kansas City.

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PARTING SHOT Pay homage to Charlie Parker by visiting one of the city’s iconic jazz joints. ON THE COVER: CARVED BY ROBERT AITKEN AND EACH STANDING 40-FEET TALL, FOUR GUARDIAN SPIRITS WATCH OVER THE NATIONAL WORLD WAR I MUSEUM AND MEMORIAL. COURTESY THE NATIONAL WORLD WAR I MUSEUM AND MEMORIAL.

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TOP: ©WAYNE MCKOWN/DREAMSTIME.COM; BOTTOM LEFT: ©NEGRO LEAGUES BASEBALL MUSEUM, INC.; BOTTOM RIGHT: COURTESY OF UNION HORSE DISTILLING CO.

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KANSAS CITY G UE S T B O OK

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MORRIS VISITOR PUBLICATIONS MVP I EDITORIAL & DESIGN EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Margaret Martin MANAGING EDITOR & KANSAS CITY EDITOR Jennifer McKee ASSISTANT EDITORS Scott Rouch, Tyler Strong CREATIVE DIRECTOR

Jennifer Keller Vaz

PHOTO EDITOR Vincent Hobbs ASSISTANT PHOTO EDITOR

Kiara Bouyea

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Anna Archibald, David Lancaster CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER Dan Videtich

MVP I MANUFACTURING & PUBLICATION SERVICES DIRECTOR OF MANUFACTURING Donald Horton PUBLICATION SERVICES DIRECTOR Karen Fralick

Cher Wheeler Erik Lewis

PUBLICATION SERVICES MANAGER

Incredible Selection of Imported & Domestic Cheeses Fresh Caviar and Pâté European Chocolates Cured Meats Olive Oils, Vinegars, Teas, Coffees, Pastas, Preserves, Nuts, Locally Made Charcuterie Boards Gift Baskets-Shipping Available

Prairie Village Shops Country Club Plaza 71st & Mission Rd. 604 W. 48th Prairie Village, KS Kansas City, MO (913) 362-7575 (816) 561-8204 www.thebettercheddar.com ACS Certified Cheese Sensory Evaluator and ACS Certified Cheese Professionals On Staff NASFT Outstanding Retailer Award Winner Member of The Specialty Food Hall of Fame Locally Owned Since 1983 4

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IMAGE & RETOUCH MANAGER

MVP I HOSPITALITY RELATIONS & DISTRIBUTION REGIONAL MANAGER - HOSPITALITY RELATIONS, DISTRIBUTION & EVENTS

Emily Goodman E-MAILS FOR ALL MVP EMPLOYEES, EXCEPT CONTRIBUTORS: FIRSTNAME.LASTNAME@MORRIS.COM

MVP REGIONAL SALES OFFICE 134 N. LaSalle St., Suite 1700 Chicago, IL 60602 www.wheretraveler.com

WhereTraveler® GuestBook® publishes editions for the following U.S. cities and regions: Arizona, Atlanta, Boston, Charlotte, Chicago, Colorado, Dallas/ Fort Worth, Florida Gold Coast (Fort Lauderdale & Palm Beach), Island of Hawai‘i, Houston, Jacksonville/St. Augustine/Amelia Island, Kansas City, Kaua‘i, Los Angeles, Maui, Miami, Nashville, New Orleans, New York, Northern Arizona, O‘ahu, Orange County (CA), Orlando, Philadelphia, Reno/Lake Tahoe, San Antonio, San Diego, San Francisco, Seattle/The Eastside/Tacoma, Southwest Florida (Naples), Tampa Bay, Tucson, Washington D.C. ©2019 by Morris Visitor Publications. All rights reserved. This publication may not be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, in whole or in part, without the express prior written permission of the publisher. The publisher assumes no responsibility to any party for the content of any advertisement in this publication, including any errors and omissions therein. By placing an order for an advertisement, the advertiser agrees to indemnify the publisher against any claims relating to the advertisement. Printed in the United States of America.


KANSAS CITY G UE S T B O OK

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ADVERTISING JAMES G. ELLIOTT CO., INC. EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR Pat O’Donnell MIDWEST & MID-ATLANTIC DIRECTOR Mike Runkle

312.348.1210, m.runkle@jgeco.com MARKET MANAGER Maribell Abeja-DeVitto

312.348.1204, m.abeja@jgeco.com MORRIS VISITOR PUBLICATIONS MVP I EXECUTIVE PRESIDENT Donna W. Kessler CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER Dennis Kelly VICE PRESIDENT, OPERATIONS Angela E. Allen DIRECTOR OF DIGITAL OPERATIONS Jamie Turner DIRECTOR OF CIRCULATION Scott Ferguson CHIEF CREATIVE OFFICER - CUSTOM PUBLICATIONS Haines Wilkerson E-MAILS FOR ALL MVP EMPLOYEES: FIRSTNAME.LASTNAME@MORRIS.COM

MORRIS COMMUNICATIONS CHAIRMAN William S. Morris III PRESIDENT & CEO William S. Morris IV

luxurious C LOT H I N G

eclectic O B J E C TS

thoughtful D E S I G N

4 8 24 R A I N B OW B LV D, W E ST WO O D, KS 6 6 2 0 5 AS I AT I C A KC .CO M • 9 1 3 /8 3 1 - 0 8 3 1 H O U R S : M O N - F R I : 1 0 A M - 5 P M • SAT: 1 2 P M - 4 P M

WhereTraveler® GuestBook is produced by Morris Visitor Publications (MVP), a division of Morris Communications, Co., LLC. 725 Broad St., Augusta, GA 30901, morrismedianetwork.com. WhereTraveler® magazine and the WhereTraveler® logo are registered trademarks of Morris Visitor Publications. MVP publishes WhereTraveler® magazine, WhereTraveler® QuickGuide, IN New York, and IN London magazines, and a host of other maps, guides, and directories for business and leisure travelers, and is the publisher for the Hospitality Industry Association. In Kansas City, WhereTraveler® GuestBook is pleased to be a member of the following associations. MVP IS A PROUD SPONSOR OF LES CLEFS D’OR USA

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SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

THE CRESTWOOD SHOPS EST.1922

The Crestwood w wood Shops

The Crestwood Shops were established in 1921 making it one of Kansas City first neighborhood shopping centers. Our historic block is prefect place to spend the day shopping and dining at one of Kansas City most charming independently owned retailers On 55th St. between Brookside Blvd. and Oak St. www.crestwoodshops.com


SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

CHARLECOTE Specialists in English antique furniture & accessories with a focus on the Georgian period (1720-1830). Stepping into our shop is like taking a step back in time where talented cabinetmakers proudly made pieces by hand. Every piece of furniture acquired by Charlecote is rigorously vetted for its authenticity and chosen for its merits of quality, colour, and condition. Today, Charlecote offers a variety of services including antique restoration, interior design, and custom reproductions for modern use. Member of the Art and Antique Dealers League of America, Inc Member of CINOA (International Confederation of Art and Antique Dealers’ Associations) Member of LAPADA (London Antique and Art Dealers Association) Member of the Antique Council Todd Spencer Miller - the owner with 40 years of expertise and Sir Bentley Churchill - believes to be the CEO of the store...a lovable and charismatic English Bulldog is always present to assist you in trade for a scratch on the head or a biscuit. 337 East Fifty-Fifth Street

816.444.4622

www.charlecoteantiques.com

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GEORGE a lifestyle store

GEORGE offers an eclectic selection of products, from clothing to furniture, from books to jewelry, from art to housewares. Each item is presented to be seen with no clutter and a wide range of prices. 315 East Fifty-fifth Street

816.361.2128

www.georgelifestyle.com


SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

CAFE EUROPA Cafe Europa is located in the Crestwood Shops in Kansas City, Missouri. Cafe Europa is a welcoming neighborhood restaurant that focuses on great, farm to table seasonal food. We change our menus on a monthly basis to reflect ingredients at their peak of quality and sustainable availability. Whether you are looking for a European style lunch with friends, a casual dinner, a cozy spot for a special occasion , a fabulous homemade dessert, great cocktails, or a glass of wine and dinner at the bar, we invite you to visit Cafe Europa and let us welcome you to our little corner of the world. Arrive as a guest. Become a friend. Return as family. Where dining is personal.

BRANDON JACOBS GALLERY

Brandon Jacobs Gallery is an established fine art gallery with an emphasis on twentieth and twenty first century art. Our extensive inventory includes works by American Regionalists that include Thomas Hart Benton, T.P. Benton and Anthony Benton Gude. Brandon Jacobs also has an extensive inventory of world renowned Contemporary artists. The gallery is owned and operated by Shelly Cascio a Kansas City native with a B.F.A. from the Kansas City Art Institute, an M.A. in Art History and is a licensed appraiser. Hours 10am - 5pm Monday - Saturday 319 E. 55th Street Kansas City, Missouri 64113

816-249-2525 • 816-800-4741 www.brandonjacobsgallery.com

323 E. 55th Street, Kansas City, Missouri 64113

816-523-1212

www.cafeeuropakc.com

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SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

DELBRENNA JEWELRY

AIXOIS

Once upon a time in Cortona, Italy a Tuscan entrepreneur making jewelry and a Aixois is a classic French bistro in the Brookside neighborhood of Kansas City. Kansas college student studying architecture met in Tuscany. DelBrenna would Owner/Chef Emmanuel Langlade trained in Marsaille, France before opening never be the same again! Now, sharing time between our Cortona and Kansas Aixois in 2001, where he believes that fresh ingredients make the best dishes. City Boutiques with family and friends - We are proud to be artisans, to French Emmanuel wife Megan, buy local organic meatswith andabreads. ToSteak Frites and a glass Aixois ishappy a classic bistro inand thehisBrookside neighborbustlingproduce, dining room delicious own a small company, and very honored to continue heightening passion give Emmanuel’s menu its traditional flavor,du they import special season-are served Monday thru hood our of Kansas City. Owner/Chef Emmanuel Langlade trained French of Cotes Rhone. Lunch and Dinner for building DelBrenna with all of you! Here, we joyfully offer you share inFrance our before ings, cheeses oil from France. The Bistro is well-known forfind its approachable in to Marsaille, openingand Aixois in 2001, where Saturday. You’ll also the Aixois Coffeebar, where you wil beautiful love story as it continues “Under the Tuscan and Kansan Sun”. Enjoy! refined classic French Sit outsidefind andaenjoy Nicoise salad and and a fresh-baked glass he believes that freshyetingredients make the cuisine. best dishes. greatacup of coffee pastry. Sunday ~Megan & Sebastian of Megan, French Rose on their patio,produce, or enjoy the Brunch bustlingisdining a delicious Emmanuel and his wife buy local organic servedroom everywith Sunday from 9:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Frites and a glass Cotes du Rhone. Lunch and Dinner are served Monday meats and breads. To Steak give Emmanuel’s menuofits traditional 307 E. 55th St Street thruspecial Saturday. You’ll alsocheeses find theand Aixois where you will find a great cup French flavor, they import seasonings, oil Coffeebar, 251 East Fifty-Fifth Street and a for fresh-baked pastry. Sunday Brunch is served every Sunday from 9:30 from France. The Bistroof is coffee well-known its approachable yet www.delbrenna.com a.m. to 2:30 p.m. and enjoy a Nicoise refined classic French cuisine. Sit outside

AIXOIS

816.982.9922

816.333.3305 1006 Walnut Street

East Fifty-Fifth Street salad and a glass of French Rose on their patio, or251 enjoy the

816.474.0000 816.333.3305

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SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

HUDSON & JANE Hudson & Jane is a local boutique bringing unique style for men and women from the world’s top and emerging designers to the historic Crestwood Shops in Kansas City. We offer in-home consulting, custom tailoring and personal styling services. From couture to ready-to-wear, let us help you discover your signature style. 309 & 313 E. 55th Street, Kansas City, Missouri 64113

816.753.5010

www.hudsonandjane.com

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A preview of Kansas City’s must-see attractions, landmarks and sights, from historical buildings to modern marvels.

COURTESY OF THE NATIONAL WORLD WAR I MUSEUM AND MEMORIAL

FIRST LOOK


National WWI Museum and Memorial

PHOTO CREDIT GOTHAM BOOK 5.5/9PT

Committed to educating visitors about the conflict that changed the world, the National WWI Museum and Memorial stands apart as one of KC’s most impressive attractions. It’s the only museum in the country dedicated to the Great War and the stories of those who lived it. At night, the Liberty Memorial Tower is illluminated and its Flame of Inspiration can be admired from miles away. Two Memorial Drive, 816.888.8100, www.theworldwar.org

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FIRST LOOK

Missouri’s first and largest contemporary museum, more than 75,000 visit the Kemper Museum of Art each year. In addition to the rotating exhibits and impressive permanent collection, there are creative programs and special events like the yearly Kemper Gala and the Artist Dinner Series, where the Kemper’s in-house restaurant, Café Sebastienne, hosts an artist-themed dinner headed up by executive chef Rick Mullins. 4420 Warwick Blvd., 816.753.5784, www.kemperart.org

College Basketball Experience

Kansas Jayhawks fans and college basketball lovers in general will feel right at home at the College Basketball Experience. It houses the National Collegiate Basketball Hall of Fame, and has interactive exhibits like “Beat the Clock,” where visitors try to make a game-winning buzzerbeater. 1401 Grand Blvd., 816.949.7500, www.collegebasketballexperience.com 14

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ABOVE: ©VISIT KC.COM; BELOW: ©COLLEGE BASKETBALL EXPERIENCE. OPPOSITE: ©VISIT KC.COM

Kemper Museum of Art


PHOTO CREDIT GOTHAM BOOK 5.5/9PT

Kansas City Zoo

Celebrating its 110th birthday in 2019, the KC Zoo provides more than 200 acres of wildlife experiences for visitors to enjoy. Rare black rhinos, an impressive chimpanzee habitat and Stingray Bay have been drawing in the crowds since 1909, and the KC Zoo remains one of the best zoos in the country. The exhibits are split into three areas: KidZone, Australia/Asia and Africa, and it’ll take most of the day to enjoy all the different attractions this zoo has to offer. 6800 Zoo Drive, 816.595.1234, www.kansascityzoo.org WHERET RAV EL ER ® G UEST B OOK

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FIRST LOOK

KC Streetcar

Arrowhead Stadium

Opening its gates for the first time in 1972, Arrowhead Stadium, which hosts the NFL’s Chiefs, was constructed as a two-stadium concept in partnership with Kauffman Stadium. In 2014, the Chiefs’ dedicated fans earned a Guinness World Record for the Loudest Stadium by cheering to a level of 142.2 decibels, a record that is still held today. One Arrowhead Drive, 816.920.9300, www.chiefs.com 16

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TOP: ©DAVID ARBOGAST; BOTTOM: VISIT KC.COM. OPPOSITE: ©TIMOTHY HURSLEY

Running from the River Market to the north end to Union Station and Crown Center, the KC Streetcar and its 16 stops give you plenty of options for crisscrossing the city, no matter the reason for hopping on. The route runs through the heart of downtown, so skip fighting for parking and hop on the rail. Streetcars arrive every 10-15 minutes during peak hours, and it’s absolutely free to ride. 600 E. Third Street, 816.627.2527, www.kcstreetcar.org


Kauffman Center for the Performing Arts

©VISIT KC.COM

This visually stunning, state-of-the-art performance center, designed by internationally acclaimed architect Moshe Safdie, features a theater and a concert hall that accommodates the seasons of its resident companies— Kansas City Symphony, Kansas City Ballet and Lyric Opera of Kansas City—as well as a season of touring shows and artists. 1601 Broadway Blvd., 816.994.7222, www.kauffmancenter.org

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FIRST LOOK

Money Museum

Union Station

Kansas City’s grand, 1914 train station, with a 95-foot ceiling and 3,500-pound chandeliers, has been renovated to house a collection of the city’s top attractions, including Science City, Dinosaurs Revealed, Gottlieb Planetarium and Regnier Extreme Screen movie theater, plus unique shops and fine restaurants. As it was at its peak as a train terminal during World War II, you can still catch a train at the station’s Amtrak stop. 30 W. Pershing Road, 816.460.2020, www.unionstation.org 18

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ABOVE: VISIT KC.COM; BELOW: ©WAYNE MCKOWN/DREAMSTIME.COM

The Money Museum, part of the Federal Reserve of Kansas City, is unique among museums as it doesn’t just have artifacts on display. Millions of dollars in real U.S. currency are processed on-site, and visitors can watch it all take place. Lift a gold bar worth nearly $400,000, peruse a 450-piece collection of coins minted under each president and wander through exhibits that educate about the U.S. economy. One Memorial Drive, 816.881.2683, www.kansascityfed.org/moneymuseum


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Serving Kansas City for years with Úf]calchen accoutrements “THE HARDWARE STORE FOR COOKS” ~ SINCE 1968 ~

115 W e s t p o r t Ro a d , Ka n s a s C i t y 6 4111 816 - 5 31 - 5 5 8 8 10 - 6 M o n d a y - S a t u r d a y pry\]kcitchen.com


Kansas City’s rose garden is the realization of a dream by founder Laura Conyers Smith. TEXT BY JENNIFER MCKEE. PHOTOS BY DAN VIDETICH

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BY ANY OTHER NAME


PHOTO CREDIT GOTHAM BOOK 5.5/9PT

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In the mid-’30s, the the Kansas City Rose Society, headed by Laura Conyers Smith, saw its dream for a municipal rose garden become a reality. Designed by landscape architect S. Herbert Hare, the garden has a lily pool in the center of the garden and contained 120 rose plants. Today, it has grown to about 4,000 roses of 168 varieties in the 1.5-acre garden. The rose garden’s most recent renovation, in 2014, restored the 66 stone pillars that encircled the garden. New wooden pergolas were placed atop these structures, and bronze plaques that were stolen in the 1940s where recreated and placed at the main entry points to the garden. 22

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In 1965, the garden was officially named the Laura Conyers Smith Municipal Rose Garden. It is maintained through a partnership with the Rose Society and the KC Parks and Recreation Department, and has received multiple awards from the American Rose Society.

Opening spread: The rose garden’s stone pillars were refurbished in a 2014 renovation. Opposite page: The garden’s colorful displays feature roses of 168 different varieties. This page: A worker tends to the garden.


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The rose garden delights with enchanting striations. Opposite page: Rose petals float atop the garden’s pool.


PHOTO CREDIT GOTHAM BOOK 5.5/9PT


PHOTO CREDIT GOTHAM BOOK 5.5/9PT

Renowned landscape architect S. Herbert Hare is the brain behind the garden’s circular plan. Here, its centerpiece fountain shimmers at sunrise.

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IN A LEAGUE OF THEIR OWN How the Negro National League, led by Andrew “Rube” Foster, brought the greats to prominence

Opposite page: Jackie Robinson was one of the stars of the Kansas City Monarchs, a mainstay of the Negro National League. This page: A former pitcher, Andrew “Rube” Foster created the Negro National League.

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In 1892, the great Cy Young—baseball’s all-time pitching leader in wins (511), innings pitched (7,356), starts (815) and complete games (749)—won 36 games, the highest single-season mark of his storied career. In 1903, Rube Foster, a 24-yearold African American pitcher, won 54. Foster’s prodigious talents as a ball player, however, were eclipsed by his gifts as a manager and executive, gifts that enabled him to form, govern and maintain the Negro National League, the nation’s first successful professional African American baseball league, until a mental breakdown ended his amazing career. The league he created outlived him for several years until it succumbed to the Great Depression. Other black baseball leagues would be formed, however, and many of their players went on to successful careers in the Major Leagues after Jackie Robinson broke baseball’s color barrier in 1947. Andrew “Rube” Foster, was born in Calvert, Texas, in 1879, the son of a minister. Soon after completing the eighth grade, Foster began his professional baseball career with the Waco Yellow Jackets as a pitcher. In 1902, he won 51 games for the

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Chicago Union Giants—“giants” in those days was code for a black team—and in 1903, he went 54 and 1 for the Cuban X Giants. The 6-foot 3-inch Foster combined a solid repertoire of pitches with a devastating screwball and a razor-sharp baseball mind. Foster out-pitched the Hall of Fame white pitcher Rube Waddell in an exhibition game in 1902, and thereafter was nicknamed “Rube.” Foster was, in the words of Frederick North Shorey of the Indianapolis Freeman (the leading black newspaper in America), “the greatest pitcher in the country.” In 1907, he was named as player-manager for the Chicago Leland Giants and led the team to a head-turning 110-10 record, the beginning of a brilliant managerial career. Foster’s teams combined good pitching with sound defense and an aggressive running game that often employed the hitand-run. In 1910, Foster acquired ownership of the Leland Giants, re-named it the Chicago American Giants and led the team to a 123–6 record. In the words of author Robert Peterson: “If the talents of Christy Mathewson, John McGraw, Ban Johnson, and Judge Kenesaw Mountain Landis were combined

©NEGRO LEAGUES BASEBALL MUSEUM, INC. OPPOSTE: ©EVERETT COLLECTION HISTORICAL/ALAMY STOCK PHOTO

BY DAVID LANCASTER


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tained the fiction that there were simply no black players good enough to play in the major leagues. In 1920 the ingredients for a Negro league finally came together: financial support, skilled players, newspaper coverage and, most importantly, the leadership of Rube Foster. A group of owners met at the Kansas City Paseo YMCA in February, 1920, to discuss the formation of a colored baseball league, to which Foster brought an official charter document that was formally adopted. The original Negro National League, with Rube Foster as its president, consisted of the Chicago American Giants, Chicago Giants, St. Louis Giants, Dayton Marcos, Detroit Stars, Indianapolis ABCs, Cincinnati Cuban Stars, and the Kansas City Monarchs, whose owner, J.L. Wilkinson, was the lone white among the league’s teams. Foster prohibited swearing, fighting and protesting umpire decisions by leaving the playing field, although barnstorming was still allowed during the season. Far from the onfield antics depicted in “Bingo Long Traveling All-Stars & Motor Kings,” the conduct of the teams in the NNL was all business; the game was played to win. And Foster’s team did most of the winning, taking pennants in 1920, 1922, 1926, 1927, 1932, and 1933. The other mainstay in the NNL was the Kansas City Monarchs, whose owner, J.L. Wilkinson, traveled with his play-

ALL PHOTOS NEGRO LEAGUES BASEBALL MUSEUM, INC.

From left to right: Andrew “Rube” Foster on the pitching mound; “Cool Papa” Bell is one of the many players from the Negro National League who are now installed in the National Baseball Hall of Fame.

in a single body, and that body were enveloped in a black skin, the result would have to be named Andrew (Rube) Foster.” Foster flourished in a baseball milieu that deliberately shut blacks out of the highest levels of the sport, but he both longed for and anticipated its end. Baseball began in the 1840s when Alexander Cartwright drew up written rules for the game, which had evolved from rounders, cricket, and English town ball. In 1867, baseball’s first structured national organization, the National Association of Baseball Players, included in its constitution this chilling clause: “It is not presumed by your nominating committee that any clubs…are composed of persons of color.” In 1887, white owners instituted a “Gentleman’s Agreement” to keep black athletes off white teams. But the mass migration of African Americans to the industrial North after the Civil War made black baseball teams financially viable, even if they had to barnstorm—travel to cities and towns big and small in search of opponents from amateurs to pros—to make ends meet. Early attempts to form a Negro league were tried and failed in 1886, 1890 and 1910. In an op-ed piece Rube Foster wrote for the Indianapolis Freeman in 1910, he called for support to form a black league. He understood that black players needed the legitimacy of a league to earn recognition by the white baseball establishment, which main-


“If the talents of Christy Mathewson, John McGraw, Ban Johnson

ALL PHOTOS © NEGRO LEAGUES BASEBALL MUSEUM, INC.

and Judge Kenesaw Mountain Landis were combined in a single body and enveloped in a black skin, the result would have to be named Andrew (Rube) Foster.” —author Robert Peterson

Above: The Kansas City Monarchs in 1945.

ers, stayed in the same hotels and often ate meals with them, giving him a deep understanding of the problems his players faced as they encountered segregated accommodations. Wilkinson demanded high standards of conduct and appearance from his players, and in return transported them in a tourist bus equipped with a cook. He even took lights to barnstorming games, making night games possible. In 1922, the Kansas City Call, a black newspaper, declared, “There is nothing that brings the two races closer together than the Monarch ball games.” The Monarchs went on to become one of the great black franchises, fielding such stars as Buck O’Neil, Satchel Paige, Ernie Banks and Jackie Robinson. The NNL proved a roaring success for Rube Foster, who took a percentage of the gate receipts for every league game, but in 1926, the triple demands of owner, manager and president took its toll. Foster exhibited signs of a mental breakdown and was ordered to an asylum in Kankakee, Illinois, where he

remained until his death in 1930. Foster’s passing and The Great Depression precipitated the demise of the first Negro National League, but others popped up in its place and provided the first professional experience for greats like Willie Mays, Henry Aaron and Roy Campanella. Jackie Robinson’s celebrated entrance into the major leagues in 1947 was the beginning of the end for black teams in America, who nevertheless survived until 1960. They demonstrated the athletic prowess of black players, and ensured that when the color barrier was finally broken, African Americans would be poised to take full advantage. Rube Foster, J.L. Wilkinson, Satchel Paige, Josh Gibson, Buck O’Neill, James “Cool Papa” Bell and many others associated with the Negro leagues have been installed in the National Baseball Hall of Fame in Cooperstown, but their stories are more expansively told in the Negro Leagues Baseball Museum, established in 1990 and located two blocks from the Paseo YMCA in the 18th and Vine District in Kansas City, where the first Negro National League was formed in 1920. Since moving into its 10,000-square foot home in 1997 (which it shares with the American Jazz Museum), the museum has welcomed more than 2 million visitors and continues to illuminate a vital and undertold chapter in American baseball history. WHERET RAV EL ER ® G UEST B OOK

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LET THE GOOD TIMES FLOW A tumultuous history, a penchant for good whiskey and a desire to pay homage to the past have helped the distilling scene in Kansas City flourish.

IMAGES COURTESY OF UNION HORSE DISTILLING CO.

BY ANNA ARCHIBALD

Nearly 100 years ago, the United States entered into one of the most violent and debaucherous periods in its history: Prohibition. While the country carried on with bootlegging and illicit drinking behind closed doors, Kansas City took a slightly different approach. Though notorious Prohibition activist Carrie Nation called the region home, her hatchet failed to smash through the stronghold corrupt political leader Tom Pendergast had on the city, its vote and its police force. Pendergast’s so-called “machine” did its best to sidestep federal law throughout the country’s 13-year government-enforced dry spell—when it benefited him, that is. With the whiskey flowing readily, people flocked to the Midwestern metropolis for cocktails and a thriving jazz

scene. This earned Kansas City the nickname Paris of the Plains. Now, a century after the Volstead Act took effect, these must-visit distilleries are paying homage to Kansas City’s past in order to shape its future.

HOLLADAY DISTILLERY Located just half an hour outside of Kansas City, in Weston, MO, is one of the region’s most storied distilleries. It’s where, in 1856, enterprising brothers Ben and David Holladay purchased a meat-packing plant to repurpose the site’s limestone springs—first documented during Lewis and Clark’s 1804 expedition—to distill bourbon. The distillery was prolific even throughout Prohibition. Though the site was purWHERET RAV EL ER ® G UEST B OOK

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S.D. STRONG DISTILLING When husband-and-wife team Steve and Lisa Strong founded S.D. Strong Distilling in 2012, they chose a rather unconventional location to distill their debut vodka: A cave 65 feet below ground in Parkville, MO. Though technically below ground, this operation is entirely on the level. The cave maintains naturally cool temperatures year-round, and the Strongs use a single still to produce their arsenal of spirits, which has grown to include both unaged and aged gins, straight rye whiskey and straight bourbon. They offer tours the second Saturday of every month, during which you’ll be guided through the barrel-lined alcoves of this unusual distillery by Steve Strong himself and have the chance to taste through the entire lineup of spirits.

UNION HORSE DISTILLING CO. One of the first microdistilleries in the region, Union Horse opened shop in Lenexa, KS, in 2010. Since then, it’s helped pave the way for local distilleries—particularly those on the Kansas side of the border. In 2012, the family-run business hired a lobbyist to help pass a Kansas microdistillery law that would allow it to serve spirits on premise. That same year, it launched its Rider Vodka and Long Shot White Whiskey, and a range of aged whiskies followed, all of which are made from regionally sourced grains and are made in the distillery’s copper pot still, aptly nicknamed Chester 34

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Copperpot. Union Horse opens to the public in spring and fall for tours and tastings—don’t miss its latest Midwestern 4 Grain Whiskey during your visit.

J. RIEGER & CO. The latest distillery making waves in Kansas City’s distilling scene is this whiskey-fueled operation in the up-and-coming Electric Park neighborhood. The Rieger brand first got its start in 1887 and became a successful mail-order whiskey business before the 18th Amendment shut it down. The brand was revived in 2014 when Jacob Rieger’s descendent Andy Rieger and bartender Ryan Maybe partnered to launch Rieger’s Kansas City Whiskey. Now, the brand’s lineup also includes vodka, gin and amaro. But the distillery achieved one of its biggest milestones yet in summer 2019 when it opened the doors to its new tri-level distillery experience in the former Heim Brewery bottling house, which also met its demise at the onset of Prohibition. The space is now home to stills and barrels, as well as to a tasting room bar, historical exhibit, and its upstairs bar and restaurant, The Monogram Lounge. Stop by for a tour—and whatever you do, don’t forget to take a ride down the 40-foot slide on your way out.

TOM’S TOWN DISTILLING COMPANY Founded by two Kansas City natives in 2015, it’s no wonder that Tom’s Town paid homage to one of the city’s most compelling—and corrupt—historical figures. Located in the heart of the bustling Crossroads Arts District, it claims the distinction of being the first full-functioning distillery in downtown Kansas City since Prohibition. Its core range of vodka, gin and bourbon features an eye-catching Art Deco design that pairs nicely with its speakeasy-themed bar and restaurant. Don’t miss Pendergast’s Royal Gold Bourbon, which is named for the boss’s very own whiskey brand, and the Pendergast Machine series, a line of experimental bottlings including a Garden-Party Gin and a Gingersnap Whiskey.

Tom’s Town Distilling Co. pays homage to Kansas City politician Tom Pendergast, who chose to thumb his nose at a governmentenforced “dry” spell.

PHOTOS COURTESY OF S.D. STRONG DISTILLING, UNION HORSE DISTILLING CO., AND HOLLADAY DISTILLERY

chased and rebranded in 1942 by McCormick Distilling Company, its legacy lives on: In 1974, it was added to the National Register of Historic Places and now marks the oldest distillery west of the Mississippi River still on its original location. In 2016, McCormick relaunched the Holladay brand and opened to the public for tours and tastings. In 2020, the new Holladay Distillery will release a wheated bourbon, the first under the Holladay label in nearly a century.


CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: ”THE STABLE” AT UNION HORSE. THE DISTILLERY HIRED A LOBBYIST TO HELP PASS A KANSAS LAW THAT WOULD ALLOW DISTILLERIES TO SERVE THEIR SPIRITS ON PREMISES; YOUNG BEN HOLLADAY; HOLLADAY DISTILLERY’S NAMESAKE; RYE GRAIN USED AT UNION HORSE; HOLLADAY’S NORTH WELL—IT’S THE OLDEST DISTILLERY WEST OF THE MISSISSIPPI RIVER THAT STILL SITS ON ITS ORIGINAL LOCATION; A CASK AT S.D. STRONG DISTILLING, WHICH DISTILLS ITS PRODUCTS IN A

PHOTO CREDIT GOTHAM BOOK 5.5/9PT

CAVE 65 FEET BELOW GROUND.

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ALL ABOUT TOWN Kansas City’s neighborhoods, each with its own vibe, offer visitors a welcoming Midwest experience.

DOWNTOWN A skyline of skyscrapers and art deco jewels (like the iconic 1931 Power & Light building), Downtown is also home to the Kansas City Convention Center (and its dramatic “Sky Stations” on top), the Kansas City Public Library, the Federal Reserve Money Museum and more. Add that to numerous historic hotels, excellent restaurants and great live music nightclubs, and you’ll find Downtown a good place to base your visit or spend an evening. Check out the schedule of chamber music, jazz, cabaret, comedy, dance and more at The Folly Theater, opened in 1900, which has featured such entertainers as the Marx Brothers and Humphrey Bogart. Downtown’s southern border features the Power & Light District, complete with fine dining, trendy shopping and a multitude of entertainment options. Sail through Downtown (all the way to River Market or Union Station) along Main Street on the KC Streetcar.

CROSSROADS ARTS DISTRICT The art and gallery district centered on Baltimore Avenue at Southwest Boulevard gets 36

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RIVER MARKET One of Kansas City’s oldest neighborhoods, nestled between Downtown and the Missouri River, offers vintage architecture, restaurants, specialty shops, a spectacular Asian supermarket, free events, food festivals and the famous City Market. Since 1857, City Market has been one of the largest farmers’ markets in the Midwest. The best time to visit the market is on Saturday mornings, when vendors from miles around offer a mind-boggling array of produce, spices, herbs, crafts, art and a variety of live performances. City Market is also home to the Arabia Steamboat Museum, repository of the extraordinary collection of pioneer artifacts unearthed from the vessel that sank in the Missouri River just outside Kansas City in 1856.

©VISIT KC.COM

Kansas City

downright bustling for its popular First Friday gallery walks (5-9 pm on, you guessed it, the first Friday of each month), but there’s plenty to explore outside those hours, too. Vast, live/work studio spaces, chic contemporary galleries and a number of darling, independent boutiques (selling shoes, jewelry, KC-made clothing and more) share the sidewalks with eateries that range from barbecue to Thai to cutting-edge contemporary American. Grab a handy Crossroads directory to help you find hidden gems.


LEFT TO RIGHT: ©BEN PIEPER; ©KIM GOLDING

BROOKSIDE/WALDO Located around the intersection of Wornall Road and 63rd Street, Brookside was one of the first masterplanned suburban shopping areas built to cater to the newly mobile, 1920s-era car owners. Today, the streets are lined with shops (kids clothing, wine, home décor, jewelry and antiques) and charming restaurants where you’ll find everything from happy hours to haute cuisine. The friendly, neighborhood feel gives visitors a glimpse into everyday Kansas City. Just to the south, Waldo (Wornall Road to State Line, from 75th Street to 85th Street) also offers many locally owned retail and dining outlets, including a microbrewery, ladies and children’s boutiques, coffee shops, bakeries and a popular pizza parlor. Wornall Road, by the way, got its name from John Wornall, whose nearby namesake museum is housed in one of four remaining Civil War period homes in the Kansas City area.

WESTPORT/39TH STREET Locally renowned as a happening nightlife neighborhood, Westport kept its historic architecture and some cobblestone streets, but these days the old-fashioned

(Opposite page) Town of Kansas Pedestrian Bridge. (This page) Legendary Kansas City barbecue; the Buy Art installation at Crossroads Art

street lamps shine down on local and national touring bands at the area’s clubs, a vibrant bar scene and some excellent and inventive culinary options. Just to the north, along the 39th Street corridor, the eclecticism continues with the fun and funk of excellent eateries, wine shops, bookshops, vintage clothing and furniture and more.

18TH & VINE The entertainment district that nurtured the distinct sound of Kansas City jazz still grooves in venues like the Blue Room and the Gem Theater, but tourists also flock here from all over to visit the American Jazz Museum and Negro Leagues Baseball Museum, both under one roof. The nearby Charlie Parker memorial, wistfully titled “Bird Lives,” pays tribute to one of jazz’s greatest players. And if you want a taste of the smoky, tangy flavor that put Kansas City on the barbecue map, you can get your fill at the legendary Arthur Bryant’s Barbeque or Gates Bar-B-Q.

Brookside’s streets are lined with shops and charming restaurants where you’ll find everything from happy hours to haute cuisine.

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KANSAS CITY

THE GUIDE

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SHOPPING • ENTERTAINMENT * DINING MUSEUMS+GALLERIES+ATTRACTIONS

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THE GUIDE SHOPPING APPAREL ALASKAN FUR COMPANYCL0081436 With more than 90 years in business, and access to lines and in-house labels, the staff can help you find the perfect fur coat; leather jackets, fur capelets, gloves, hats and other accessories for men and women. Open M-Sa. 9029 Metcalf Ave., Overland Park, Kansas, 913.649.4000 www.alaskanfur.com H ASIATICACL0070352 They import fabrics from Japan and other faraway points to create lush new jackets, blouses, wraps, scarves and more. Beyond the clothing racks, find unique jewelry, tableware, home décor and furniture. Open M-Sa. 4824 Rainbow Blvd., Westwood, Kansas, 913.831.0831. www.asiaticakc.com

©JONATHAN TASLER

H HUDSON & JANECL00371 Upscale clothing and accessories for men & women features designers like Intarsia, Oxxford Clothes, Cambio, Fabrizio Gianni and many others, in the Crestwood Shops. Open M-Sa, Su by appointment. 309 and 313 E. 55th St., 816.753.5010. www.hudsonandjane.com H MICHAEL'S CLOTHINGCL008145 Menswear specialist for more than a hundred years, Michael’s has an inventory that includes looks both classic and contemporary, from designers including Ike Behar, Enro, Stetson, Kangol, Cole Haan, Johnston & Murphy and others. On-site fittings and alterations. Open M-Sa. 1830 Main St., 816.221.0000. www.michaelsclothing.com

PERUVIAN CONNECTIONCL0059421 Luxurious women’s clothing and accessories, from intricate woven lace tunics and soft pima cotton dresses to alpaca legwarmers and stunning shawls, made by skilled Andean textile artists. Open daily. 335 E. 55th St., 877.520.7378. www.peruvianconnection.com PINSTRIPESCL00814 Located in the Country Club Plaza, this men’s clothing store provides everything from made-to-measure suits and sports coats to sportswear and beyond. Open daily. 601 W. 48th St., 816.531.3355. www.pinstripesclothing.com H WEBSTER HOUSECL008145 Clothing, jewelry, personal accessories, home accents, floral arrangements, and handcrafted furniture, along with 18th- and 19th-century antiques and gift items, in one of KC’s most beloved settings. Fine dining upstairs. Open daily. 1644 Wyandotte St., 816.221.4713. www.websterhousekc.com

GOURMET KITCHEN/ FOOD & DRINK H THE BETTER CHEDDARCL0081453 Gourmet food store stocks fresh, artisanal cheeses from across the U.S. and around the world; plus olive oils, spices, cookies, chocolates, pasta, coffee and more to make your mouth water. Open daily. 604 W. 48th St., Country Club Plaza and other locations, 816.561.8204 www.thebettercheddar.com

GOMER’SCL008145 Well-stocked selection of fine wines and spirits from around the world, including small-batch and handcrafted lines, cigars, coffee and other epicurean items. Tastings offered daily. 3838 Broadway St., 816.931.4170 www.gomers.com H PRYDE’S KITCHEN & NECESSITIESCL008145 Outfit your kitchen with the latest and greatest in appliances, can’t-livewithout chef tools, cookbooks and Fiestaware from 10,000-square-feet of kitchen and home accessories at this KC original founded in 1968. Open M-Sa. 115 Westport Road, 816.531.5588. www.prydeskitchen.com

HOME FURNISHINGS/ ACCESSORIES H GEORGE: A LIFESTYLE STORECL0059471 Culled from around the world, this highly curated collection of antique furnishings, books, textiles, tableware, jewelry and apparel brings a refined sensibility to home furnishings. Open M-Sa. 315 E. 55th St., 816.361.2128. www.georgelifestyle.com.com J’ADORE HOME & GARDENCL0059471 Think of J’adore as a mini-department store, with towels, kitchen accessories, glassware, lamps, rugs, pillows and more. Open M-Sa. 400 E. 63rd St., 816.523.0020. www.jadorehome.com H THE KNOTTY RUGCL0059471 Educates patrons on the origin and uniqueness of hand-knotted rugs. It carries an unparalleled selection of antique rugs, runners and sizes that range from small to larger-than-life. Open Tu-Sa.

4510 State Line Road, 913.677.1877. www.knottyrug.com

JEWELRY H DELBRENNA JEWELRYCL0059471 This family-run brand's Italian roots run deep. Discover dazzling pendants, earrings, bracelets, rings and cufflinks, as well as shoes made from the finest Tuscan leather. Open M-Sa. 307 E. 55th St., 816.982.9922. www.delbrennajewelry.com GOODDEN JEWELLERSCL0037096 The friendly staff at Goodden will help you with your wedding/engagement needs, or will take the time with you to design a unique piece. Open Tu-Sa. 1000 Grand Blvd., 816.421.0281 or 877.901.4367 www.gooddenjewellers.com JEWELRY BY MORGANCL003708 This family-owned store has been selling, creating and fixing jewelry for years. Bring your design ideas to the owner, and he’ll create the piece you’re looking for. The shop also offers watch repair. 8640 N. Boardwalk Ave., 816.587.6020. www.jewelrybymorgan.com

SPAS SPA ON PENNCL0081436 The ultimate urban spa retreat begins with gemstone energized water in the relaxation lounge. From there, launch into a full menu of therapies that range from massages and facials to hair and scalp treatments, lash extensions, brow tinting and more. Open daily. 4143 Pennsylvania Ave., 816.531.8600. www.spaonpenn.com

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THE GUIDE MALLS & SHOPPING DISTRICTS H COUNTRY CLUB PLAZACL0070352 Nearly 100 stores representing the best of national retailers and independent boutiques, all in an architecturally significant, easily walkable 15 blocks. There are also 30 restaurants on-site. Open daily. Broadway and 47th St., 816.753.0100.. www.countryclubplaza.com H CRESTWOOD SHOPS Block-long stretch of charming boutiques (clothing, teas and gourmet items, bath and body products), antiques shops and Euro-style eateries celebrates more than 90 years as KC’s oldest retail center. Open daily. 55th St. between Brookside Blvd. and Oak St., www.crestwoodshops.com H LEGENDS OUTLETS This is a full-service retail mall with department stores and dozens of shops selling apparel, home furnishings, gifts and food. 1843 Village W. Parkway, 913.788.3700. www.legendsshopping.com PARK PLACE Suburban Leawood lifestyle center features shopping and dining and various art galleries. Special events include gardening workshops, arts walks, wine tastings and more. Open daily. 11549 Ash St., Leawood, Kansas 913.381.2229. www.parkplaceleawood.com

ENTERTAINMENT AMERISTAR CASINOCL008140 Complete entertainment facility with live (occasionally big-name) entertainment, dining, hotel and gaming.

3200 N. Ameristar Drive, 816.414.7000. www.ameristarcasinos.com ARVEST BANK THEATRE AT THE MIDLANDCL003571 Big-name contemporary rock and pop acts perform in a gilded theater restored to its 1920s splendor. 1228 Main St., Downtown, 816.283.9900. www.arvestbanktheatre.com COMEDY CITYCL0035714 Improv comedy rules here, with loads of audience participation. The club also offers private shows and traveling shows. Open F-Sa. 3700 Broadway, 816.842.2744. www.comedycity.cc DAVEY’S UPTOWN RAMBLERS CLUBCL003871 This come-as-you-are bar serves cheap bar and books rock and alt-country acts for its stage. 3402 Main St., 816.753.1909. www.daveysuptown.com H THE DRUM ROOMCL0039710 Popular KC bar in the Hilton President Hotel offers handcrafted cocktails, a long list of whiskeys and happy-hour specials. 1335 Baltimore Ave., Downtown, 816.303.1686. www.providence-kc.com/drum-room THE EXIT ROOM A group of two to eight people tries to find clues and solve riddles and puzzles to gain exit from a “locked” elaborately themed room in one hour. Book online. 304 S.W. Market St., Lee’s Summit, 816.434.5808. www.theexitroomkc.com

FOLLY THEATERCL0035716 “The Grand Lady of 12th Street,” Kansas City’s oldest theater, is on the National Register of Historic Places. 300 W. 12th St., Downtown, 816.474.4444. www.follytheater.com

KANSAS CITY CHIEFSCL008149 The NFL's Kansas City Chiefs take the field at Arrowhead Stadium, home to some of the loudest fans in pro football. One Arrowhead Drive, 816.920.4237. www.kcchiefs.com

GRANFALLOON RESTAURANT & BARCL003720 The name for this sports bar comes from a Kurt Vonnegut novel, but the kitchen only serves lunch and dinner. There’s sports on the TVs and sometimes live bands, so it’s always a loud, good time. 608 Ward Parkway, 816.753.7850 www.thegranfalloon.com

KANSAS CITY REPERTORY THEATRECL0081492 Kansas City’s premier professional repertory theater presents classic and cutting-edge drama. Spencer Theatre, 4949 Cherry St., 816.235.2700. Copaken Stage, 1 H&R Block Way, in the Power & Light District. www.kcrep.org

HARPO’SCL00371 This bar and grill draws a young, fun-loving crowd. The main level is packed with revelers, while the second level and back patio offer a quieter vibe, and there’s a craft beer courtyard. 4109 Pennsylvania Ave., Westport, 816.753.3434. www.harposkc.com

KANSAS CITY ROYALSCL0081493 The American-League Royals play at Kauffman Stadium, home to the largest privately funded fountain in the world. One Royal Way, 816.921.8000. www.mlb.com/royals

HARRY’S COUNTRY CLUB BAR66 Kansas Citians have spent many nights downing beers on the patio at Harry’s. Renowned for its beer selection, Harry’s also has a menu featuring sandwiches and entrées including grilled sirloin and pan-fried catfish. 112 E. Missouri Ave., Downtown, 816.421.3505. www.harryscountryclub.com HOWL AT THE MOONCL002831 From Billy Joel to Lady Gaga, it’s a musical party every night with a party-ready crowd with nightly live music played by dueling pianists and a full menu of potent cocktails. 1334 Grand Blvd., 816.471.4695. www.howlatthemoon.com/kansas-city

KANSAS CITY SYMPHONYCL008149 In a season that lasts from September to June, the Kansas City Symphony presents classical music, pops and holiday concerts in the Kauffman Center for the Performing Arts. 1601 Broadway, in the Crossroads Arts District, 816.471.0400. www.kcsymphony.org KAUFFMAN CENTER FOR THE PERFORMING ARTSCL004761 The spectacular, state-of-the-art, Moshe Safdie-designed performing arts facility is home to the Kansas City Ballet, Kansas City Symphony and Lyric Opera of Kansas City as well as a season of varied entertainment by touring performers. 1601 Broadway, 816.994.7222. www.kauffmancenter.org

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THE GUIDE KELLY’S WESTPORT INNCL0037615 In what may or may not be the oldest building in Westport, Kelly’s offers sports, pizza and plenty of cold beer. It’s a great place to spend a St. Patrick’s Day. 500 Westport Road, Westport, 816.561.5800. www.kellyswestportinn.com LYRIC OPERA OF KANSAS CITYCL0081495 The Lyric Opera has presented the great operas of the world for more than 50 years, now holding forth from its impressive home, the Kauffman Center for the Performing Arts. 1601 Broadway, 816.471.7344. www.kcopera.org MCCOY’S PUBLIC HOUSECL003697 The crowd and service here combine for an inviting, relaxing atmosphere. There are plenty of beers to choose from, and the menu is diverse and comfy. Options include: macaroni and cheese, salads, pizza, sandwiches and burgers (including a vegan version). When the weather is nice, you can sit on the patio. Open for lunch and dinner daily. 4057 Pennsylvania Ave.,816.960.0866. www.mccoyspublichouse.com PBR BIG SKYCL003791 Things get wild and wooly at PBR. The country bar usually has a band blasting the twangy stuff, and there’s a mechanical bull for everyone’s amusement. If you take a fall off the bull, there’s plenty of beer and cocktails to soothe the pain. 111 E. 13th St., 816.876.5645. www.powerandlightdistrict.com/eatand-drink/pbr-big-sky SPORTING KANSAS CITYCL003785 This Major League Soccer franchise plays games from March-October in beautiful Children’s Mercy Park

Since 1996, the team has competed against the best in U.S. soccer. One Sporting Way, Kansas City, Kansas, 913.387.3400. www.sportingkc.com SPRINT CENTERCL003761 The shiny, glassy Sprint Center attracts big-name entertainers and hosts major sports tournaments, including the Big 12 Men’s Basketball Tournament. 1407 Grand Blvd., 816.949.7100. www.sprintcenter.com STARLIGHT THEATRECL008149 Broadway shows and concerts are performed under the stars every summer at one of the few remaining self-producing outdoor theaters in the country. 4600 Starlight Road, 816.363.7827. www.kcstarlight.com TOMFOOLERIES RESTAURANT & BARCL0037619 This spot is famous for its late-night happy hour, when drinks become cheaper when you’re most in need. Live music Su-W. 612 W. 47th St., Country Club Plaza, 816.753.0555. www.tomfooleries.com

DINING

TROLLEY TOURS!

Get to know Kansas City from the comfort of an old time, air conditioned Trolley! Our 90 minute 18 mile narrated tour will show you this beautiful and fascinating city.

Departs Union Station everyday March 6 - May 21: 10am, Noon, & 2pm

Sept 28 - Nov 29: 10am, Noon, & 2pm

May 22 - Sept 27: 10am, Noon, 2pm, & 4pm

Dec, Jan, & FebWeekend’s Only 10am, Noon, & 2pm

Over 350 reviews

801 CHOPHOUSE Steaks & Seafood. The leathery interior channels a 1920s NY City steakhouse, and the kitchen delivers the goods: USDA prime beef steaks, chops, live Maine lobsters and madefrom-scratch Grand Marnier souffles. D (daily). 71 East 14th St. and other locations, in the Power & Light District, 816.994.8800. www.801chophouse.com

As seen on Facebook

Call (816) 500-5417 www.kcfuntours.com 30 West Pershing, Kansas City, MO. 64108

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THE GUIDE AFFÄRE European. Modern German cuisine with a locavore ethos in an airy, unpretentious space won owner/chef Martin Heuser a James Beard Award nomination. L (Th-F), D Tu-Su), Br (Sa-Su). 1911 Main St., 816.298.6182. affarekc.com H AIXOIS French. French restaurant and coffee bar offer Gallic cuisine in a casual atmosphere. The classic French menu focuses on locally sourced seasonal ingredients. The wine list is simple but good. Bistro B, L (M-Sa), D (daily), Br (Su). 251 E. 55th St., 816.333.3305. www.aixois.com ANDRÉ’S TEA ROOMCL0036849 European. The European influences are everywhere here, from the food to the chalet-style building. The Swisstinged menu always includes quiche Lorraine and cheese pie. You might also catch cod Florentine or paprika pork. This is one of the restaurants run by chocolatier André’s Confiserie Suisse. 5018 Main St., 816.561.3440. www.andreschocolates.com ARTHUR BRYANT’S Barbecue. You’re probably already planning a visit to Arthur Bryant’s, KC’s most famous barbecue joint. If not, put it on the agenda. Yes, there will be lines, but that’s what you get when you visit a barbecue legend. L, D (daily). 1727 Brooklyn Ave., 816.231.1123. www.arthurbryantsbbq.com BLUE BIRD BISTRO Organic. Charming neighborhood spot with a focus on fresh, local, organic foods: everything from ciabatta French toast to wild-caught Alaskan salmon and black bean burg-

er. B, L, D (M-Sa), Br (Su). 1700 Summit St., 816.221.7559. www.bluebirdbistro.com BLUE KOI NOODLES & DUMPLINGS Chinese. Big, busy room, outfitted in blue, yellow and red tones, keeps crowds happy with a wide assortment of noodle and dumpling dishes, lots of vegetarian choices. L, D (M-Sa). 1803 W. 39th St. and other locations, 816.561.5003. www.bluekoi.net BLUE NILE CAFÉ Ethiopian. The Blue Nile offers a great introduction to Ethiopian food. The friendly staff will serve various meat and vegetarian stews that you can eat with spongy injera bread. L (daily), D (M-Sa). 20 E. Fifth St., City Market, 816.283.0990. www.bluenilekc.com BLUESTEM Eclectic. The dining room is simplicity itself, and the exquisitely beautiful food by husband-and-wife chefs Colby and Megan Garrelts consistently elicits rave reviews and national accolades, including the James Beard Award for Best Chef Midwest. D (Tu-Sa). 900 Westport Road, 816.561.1101. www.bluestemkc.com BROADWAY CAFÉCL0036971 Coffee/Dessert. Coffee devotees who care about things like roast and extraction will tell you to head to Broadway. The baristas know how to pour a pretty cup of latte. B, L, D (daily). 4106 Broadway, 816.531.2432. www.broadwayroasting.com BURNT END BBQL Barbecue. It’s a simple formula: Barbecue, burgers and beer, starring

that Kansas City exclusive, burnt ends (they’re not really burnt, just slow-smoked, oddly shaped pieces of brisket...delicious), plus chicken, pork, turkey, sausage and more. L, D (daily). 11831 Metcalf Ave., Overland Park, Kansas, 913.451.8888. www.burntendbbqkc.com CAFÉ DES AMIS French. Romantic dining par excellence. The lush menu includes imaginatively updated French classics. Outdoor seating is available. L (TuSa), D (Tu-Su), Br (Su). 112 Main St., Parkville, MO, 816.587.6767. www.cafedesamiskc.com H CAFÉ EUROPA European. Restaurant, bar and bakery in the Crestwood Shops serves updated contemporary American cuisine with a hint of Europe. L (M-Sa), D (daily), Br (Su). 323 E. 55th St., 816.523.1212. www.cafeeuropakc.com CAFÉ SEBASTIENNECL008140 American. Inside Kemper Musem of Contemporary Art. The seasonally changing menu, hailed as one of KC’s best, utilizes local organic produce. L (Tu-F), Br (Sa-Su). 4420 Warwick Blvd., 816.753.5784. www.kemperart.org CASCONE’SCL0036891 Italian. This KC staple is famous for its lasagna. Other specialties include Chicken Limonata Elaina in a creamy white wine sauce served with fettucini Alfredo. L, D (Tu-Su). 3733 N. Oak Trafficway, 816.454.7977. www.cascones.com

THE CORNER RESTAURANTCL0036981 American. Sustainable eatery sources local food products and serves a popular breakfast/lunch. Your coffee cup will never be empty. Open from 6 am-3 pm daily. 4059 Broadway St., Westport, 816.931.4401. www.thecornerkc.com CUPINI’SCL003703 Italian. This friendly neighborhood spot offers great sandwiches and freshly made pasta. The chef’s salad is also a big hit. Leave room for pastries. L, D (M-Sa). 1809 Westport Road, Westport, 816.753.7662. www.cupinis.com DANNY EDWARDS FAMOUS KANSAS CITY BBQCL003692 Barbecue. Pork, chicken, beef, ham, turkey...it’s all here, along with the usual sides, plus jambalaya. L (M-Sa). 2900 Southwest Blvd., Downtown, 816.283.0880. www.dannyedwardsblvdbbq.com EGGTC.CL003691 American. Come here with patience and an appetite. It gets packed for breakfast, but your wait will be worth it. B, L (daily). 5107 Main St., Country Club Plaza, 816.561.0116. www.eggtckc.com EM CHAMAS BRAZILIAN GRILLCL0081407 Brazilian. Traditional churrascaria features rodizio service, bringing skewered, roasted meats tableside continuously until you tell them to stop. Choose fixed-price full menu or gourmet bar. Open for dinner nightly. 6101 NW 63rd Terrace, 816.505.7100. www.emchamas.com

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THE GUIDE THE FARMHOUSECL006481 American. Classically creative comfort food utilizing the “tip-totail” philosophy and lots of local ingredients, including the amazing Green Dirt Farm cheeses. B, L (M-F), D (W-Sa), Br (Sa-Su). 300 Delaware St., 816.569.6032. www.eatatthefarmhouse.com FIORELLA’S JACK STACKCL0036901 Barbecue. Cited by many Kansas Citians as the city’s best barbecue, Jack Stack offers a full selection of meats. L, D (daily). Carryout available. 4747 Wyandotte St. and other locations, in Country Club Plaza, 816.531.7427. www.jackstackbbq.com GATES BAR-B-QCL003697 Barbecue. This is one of Kansas City’s best known barbecue joints. Celebs stop in when they’re in town. The chicken, ribs and turkey all get high marks. And there’s a sauce bar with tons of variations. L, D (daily). 1325 E. Emanuel Cleaver Blvd. and other locations., 816.531.7522 www.gatesbbq.com HEREFORD HOUSECL0081409 Steaks & Seafood. Fifty years of tradition have kept this onetime stockyard neighbor (and its family of newer locations) at the top of many locals’ lists for years, for sirloin, KC strip, filet mignon, lobster and more, cooked over their signature hickory charcoal. Zona Rosa Center, 8661 N. Stoddard Ave. and other locations, 816.584.9000. www.herefordhouse.com JAZZ, A LOUISIANA KITCHENCL00814 Cajun-Creole. Cajun and Creole culinary favorites like voodoo crawfish tails, blackened chicken and hot boiled crawfish come with a healthy

dose of live New Orleans jazz at this classic French Quarter café. L, D (daily). 1823 W. 39th St., Kansas City, 816.531.5556 www.jazzkitchen.com JJ’SCL00814 Eclectic. This KC mainstay delivers an award-winning wine list and innovative menu of seasonally changing specialties, making JJ’s one of the city’s go-to special-occasion restaurants. L (M-F), D (daily). 900 W. 48th Place, 816.561.7136. www.jjsrestaurantkc.com KORMA SUTRACL008145 Indian. Savory, spice-laden cuisine of India, from tandoori chicken, shrimp and mixed grill to various biriyani dishes to vegetarian favorites like saag paneer and chana masala. L, D (daily). 12112 W. 87th St. Parkway, Lenexa, Kansas, 913.345.8774. www.kckormasutra.net LE FOU FROGCL003690 French. The over-achieving menu reflects the French pedigree, but the atmosphere is relaxed. Highlights include steak au poivre and filet mignon with lobster. Fans like the mussels, steak frites and foie gras. D (Tu-Su). 400 E. Fifth St., 816.474.6060. www.lefoufrog.com

JOEL OPPENHEIMER GALLERY Specializing in rare and collectible natural history art, Joel Oppenheimer Gallery offers an unrivaled selection of original works by Audubon, Besler, Gould, Redouté, Thornton, and many other important artists from the golden age of natural history art. We also offer museum-quality framing and complete conservation and restoration services. Discover this beautiful oasis of art within easy reach of the North Michigan Avenue shopping corridor. Open Tuesday through Saturday 10-6.

10 E. Ohio St., Chicago, IL

312.642.5300

www.audubonart.com

H LIDIA’SCL008146 Italian. Located in a historic railroad house near the Union Station, this outpost for TV chef Lidia Bastianich’s cuisine is expansive and inviting. L (M-F), D (daily), Br (Sa-Su). 101 W. 22nd St., 816.221.3722. www.lidias-kc.com

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THE GUIDE MINKSY'SCL00369 Pizza. A favorite of the Chiefs' Travis Kelce—whose "Kelceroni" pizza is on the menu—Minsky's has been voted as Kansas City's favorite pizza too many times to count. Check out the gluten-free menu. L, D (daily). At City Market, 427 Main St., and additional locations, 816.421.1122. www.minskys.com NARACL00369 Japanese/Sushi. One of the most stylish rooms in Kansas City offers sushi, stir fry and creative options like Hawaiian teriyaki trio. L, D (M-Sa). 1617 Main St., Crossroads Arts District, 816.221.6272. www.narakc.com OSTERIA IL CENTROCL00814 Italian. Smart, casual dining features house favorites like calamari, spiedini di pollo, lamb chops and sausage and pepper pasta. D (M-Sa). 5101 Main St., 816.561.2369. www.osteriailcentro.com

Join Us

E N J OY T H E C U L I N A RY DELIGHTS OF CHEF LIDIA B A S T I A N I C H AT L I D I A’ S I N T H E C R O S S R OA D S ART DISTRICT

MAKE A RESERVATION TODAY 816.221.3722 | lidias-kc.com

1 0 1 W. 2 2 n d S t . KC M O 6 4 1 0 8

PEACHTREE OF KANSAS CITYCL0036901 Southern. All the Southern soul food regulars show up here: fried catfish, fried chicken, salmon croquettes and collard greens. The place makes its name on its peach cobbler. 6800 Eastwood Trafficway and other locations, 816.923.0099. www.peachtreerestaurant.com PIERPONT’SCL0081420 Steaks & Seafood. This historic dining room serves aged, prime beef steaks, seafood dishes like seafood brodetto and more than 600 wines. L (M-F), D (daily). Union Station, 30 W. Pershing Road, 816.221.5111. www.pierponts.com

PIROPOSCL008142 Argentinian. It’s an Argentinian twist on a steakhouse, with specialties including grilled KC strip; panseared, stuffed chicken breast, with salads and empanadas. D (daily). Briarcliff Village, 4141 N. Mulberry Drive, 816.741.3600. www.piroposkc.com PONAK’S MEXICAN KITCHENCL0036941 Mexican. Fans of this longtime favorite rave about two things: The modestly priced combination plates offer tons of filling selections, and many say the margaritas are the “best in town.” L, D (daily). 2856 Southwest Blvd., 816.753.0775. www.ponaksmexicankitchen.com H PROVIDENCECL008146 New American. Inside the historic Hilton President Hotel you'll find this intimate gathering place that pays homage to the classic Midwest supper club. L, D (daily). 1329 Baltimore Ave., Downtown, 816.303.1686. www.providence-kc.com Q39 Barbecue. Wings, smoked pulled chicken, beef brisket, chipotle sausage, ribs, steaks, salmon and more. 1000 W. 39th St., 816.255.3753. www.q39kc.com ROSEDALE BARBEQUECL0036924 Barbecue. This institution was founded in 1934. Dinners come with a choice of three sides. L, D (daily). 600 Southwest Blvd.,Kansas City, Kansas, 913.262.0343. www.rosedalebarbeque.com

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THE GUIDE SWEET SIAM Thai. This Thai food restaurant not only has authentic Thai ingredients but the chefs in the kitchen are from Thailand. L , D (daily). 4130 Pennsylvania Ave., 816.492.6196. www.sweetsiam.com H WEBSTER HOUSECL0081430 Eclectic. Genteel dining in a series of three dining rooms on the second floor of one of the city’s great antique/gift shops steps away from the Kauffman Center. L (M-F), D (W-Sa), Br (Sa-Su). 1644 Wyandotte St., 816.221.4713. www.websterhousekc.com

MUSEUMS+ GALLERIES+ ATTRACTIONS ANTIQUES H CHARLECOTE ANTIQUESCL003764 This elegant shop specializes in museum-quality, antique English furniture from the 18th and early 19th century in walnut, mahogany, satinwood and rosewood, along with paintings and other objects d’art. 337 E. 55th St. in the Crestwood Shopping District, 816.444.4622. www.charlecoteantiques.com RETRO INFERNOCL003765 If “Mad Men” turned you on to mid-century modern design, then you’ll have a pretty good time at Retro Inferno. The store specializes in furniture and lighting from the era. 1500 Grand Blvd., Downtown, 816.842.4004. www.retroinferno.com

RIVER MARKET ANTIQUES MALLCL0 More than 100 dealers offer an enormous variety of merchandise, including kitschy rhinestone brooches, fine furniture, vintage clothing, toys, jewelry, prints, furniture, books and more, in this 30,000-square-foot, four-floor facility. 115 W. Fifth St., 816.221.0220. www.rivermarketantiquemall.com

GALLERIES BELGER ARTS CENTERCL00201 Housed in a 100-year-old building in the Crossroads District, Belger Arts Center exhibits work from the John and Maxine Belger Family Foundation and elsewhere. Open WSa. 2100 Walnut St., 816.474.3250. www.belgerarts.org BLUE GALLERYCL0020 Contemporary works by local and national artists in painting, sculpture, works on paper, glass, photography, fiber and ceramics, in the Crossroads District. Open Tu-Sa. 118 Southwest Blvd., 816.527.0823. www.bluegalleryonline.com H BRANDON JACOBS GALLERY Display a collection of artwork from nationally recognized artists varying in styles and genres such as American regionalism, contemporary, modern, abstract and traditional. Located in the Crestwood Shops. 319 E. 55th St., 816.249.2525. www.brandonjacobsgallery.com H JOEL OPPENHEIMER, INC.CL008146 Offers a stunning array of works from the golden age of natural history art, such as antique and contemporary American bird carvings and prints from John James Audubon, Alexander Wilson and Mark Catesby.

LIDIA BASTIANICH Lidia is an Emmy award-winning public television host, a seven-time James Beard Award winner, a bestselling cookbook author with a dozen books published to date, and owner of Lidia’s Kansas City and three NYC restaurants. She is also a partner in Eataly NYC, Chicago, Boston, Los Angeles, Las Vegas and Sao Paolo, Brazil. Together with her daughter Tanya and son inlaw Corrado, Lidia also has developed a line of artisanal pastas and all-natural sauces, LIDIA’S, which are sold at fine food stores nationwide. LIDIA’S KANSAS CITY 101 W 22ND ST. 816.221.3722 lidias-kc.com

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THE GUIDE Also offers services such as art resoration, fine framing and shipping. www.audubonart.com

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Over years of fine clothes for men. Since 1905, Michael’s has been fitting men in a fine tradition not easily found in today’s stores. Personalized service, custom fit, and quality clothing has made shopping at Michael’s a unique yet comfortable experience. SPECIALIZING IN: • Sizes from 36-60 • Regular Big, Tall, Extra Tall, Short, Extra Short • Shirt sizes from 14-22, sleeve lengths 30-38 • Suits, sport coats, shirts, outerwear, formal wear, sportswear, shoes, hats, and accessories • Custom clothing available. Delivery in 14 days • IMMEDIATE ALTERATIONS FOR VISITORS PHONE: 816-221-0000 – 1830 Main, 3 blocks north of Crown Center, Minutes from Downtown Hotels, Convention Center, and the Plaza. Free Parking • Mon-Sat 9:30-5:30pm - Major credit cards accepted Michael’s third generation, Keith www.michaelsclothing.com info@michaelsclothing.com

Coppley Custom of Canada • Berle • Kangol • Forsyth • Tallia Johnston & Murphy • Jack Victor • Stetson® • Marcello • Luciano Visconti • Enro Dobbs • Mario Balducci • Tailorbyrd • Allen Edmonds • Calvin Klein Michael Kors • James Tatersall • Mizumi • 34 Heritage Jeans • Brax • Riviera Slacks • Daniel Hechter • Baroni • Privé • Florsheim • Trend • Stefano Hats

WEINBERGER FINE ARTCL0046201 Crossroads Arts District Gallery representing both established and emerging artists, including Tom Gregg, Jeremy Rockwell and John Petrey. Open Tu-Sa. 114 Southwest Blvd., 816.301.4428. www.weinbergerfineart.com

MUSEUMS & ATTRACTIONS THE AMERICAN JAZZ MUSEUMCL0081463 Located in the historic 18th and Vine district, the museum features exhibits such as listening stations and touch screen interactives; memorabilia like Charlie Parker’s Grafton saxophone and one of Louis Armstrong’s trumpets. Open Tu-Su. 1616 E. 18th St., 816.474.8463. www.americanjazzmuseum.org CITY MARKETCL004382 The region’s largest farmers’ market has been connecting Kansas Citians with fresh produce since 1857. The stalls offer produce, meats, baked goods, flowers, gifts, crafts, spices and specialty foods. Open daily. 20 E. Fifth St., 816.842.1271. www.thecitymarket.org THE COLLEGE BASKETBALL EXPERIENCECL003924 The 41,500-square-foot facility, connected to Sprint Center, houses the National Collegiate Basketball Hall of Fame and hands-on, interactive basketball exhibits. Open W-Su. 1401 Grand Blvd., 816.949.7500. www.collegebasketballexperience.com

FOUNTAIN OF BACCHUSCL004382 Located in Country Club Plaza, this fountain depicts Bacchus surrounded by nymphs and satyrs and is composed of 10,000 pounds of lead. 4701 Wyandotte St. www.kcfountains.com H KANSAS CITY FUN TOURS Fully narrated, 75-minute trolley tours take in Country Club Plaza, Union Station, Crown Center, downtown, City Market, Westport, Power & Light District and more. Trolley departs from and returns to the entrance of Union Station seven days a week. 30 W. Pershing, 816.500.5417 www.kcfuntours.com KANSAS SPEEDWAYCL00372 The speedway is home to races in NASCAR’s Monster Energy NASCAR Cup, Gander Outdoors Truck and Xfinity Series’. There’s a shopping area near the track. Open daily. 400 Speedway Blvd., Kansas City, Kansas, 866.460.7223. www.kansasspeedway.com KEMPER MUSEUM OF CONTEMPORARY ARTCL0081470 The permanent collection of Missouri’s first modern art museum includes work by Dale Chihuly, Arthur Dove, Robert Mapplethorpe and more. Open Tu-Su. 4420 Warwick Blvd., 816.753.5784. www.kemperart.org LEGOLAND DISCOVERY CENTERCL0042064 It’s a Lego-lover’s paradise where kids can build, play and immerse themselves in all things Lego. Open daily. 2475 Grand Blvd., in Crown Center, 816.471.4FUN. www.legolanddiscoverycenter.com/ kansascity

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THE GUIDE MEYER CIRCLE SEA HORSE FOUNTAINCL00438 The stone sculpture at the center dates to the 1700s and was purchased in Venice in the early 1920s. The sculpture group includes three mythological sea horses, a lion’s head and five cherubs holding saucers. Ward Parkway and W. Meyer Blvd., www.kcfountains.com THE NATIONAL MUSEUM OF TOYS AND MINIATURESCL0081475 The Midwest’s largest collection of nostalgic toys and fine-scale miniatures is located on the UMKC campus. Open W-M. 5235 Oak St. on the UMKC campus, 816.235.8000. toyandminiaturemuseum.org H THE NATIONAL WORLD WAR I MUSEUM AND MEMORIALCL008147 The only public museum in the U.S. dedicated exclusively to World War I features state-of-the-art, interactive technology to bring history to life. The permanent exhibition, “The World War, 1914-1919,” is in the main gallery. Open Tu-Su. Two Memorial Drive, 816.888.8100. www.theworldwar.org NEGRO LEAGUES BASEBALL MUSEUMCL0081472 Dedicated to the preservation of African American baseball history, the museum features displays, photographs, and artifacts from the late 1800s through the 1960s. It tells the complete story of the Negro Leagues, which existed in the face of segregation, from the average players to the superstars. Open Tu-Su. 1616 E. 18th St., 816.221.1920. www.nlbm.com

We’re full of it.

NELSON-ATKINS MUSEUM OF ARTCL0081473 One of the preeminent art museums in the country is famous for its collection of Impressionist paintings and Asian art, and contains more than 35,000 works of art. Open W-M. 4525 Oak St., 816.751.1278. www.nelson-atkins.org

Great food and drink, that is.

While you are here, enjoy an unmistakably authentic Kansas City experience at Providence New America Kitchen. Our menu features steaks, chops and seafood, designed with a creative flair by our Executive Chef. For reservations, call (816) 303-1686 or go online at providence-kc.com. Complimentary Valet Parking for our Providence guests

POWELL GARDENSCL0041638 The 915-acre garden set on lush, rolling hills includes The Perennial Garden, The Memorial Garden, a nature trail and a calendar of events. Open daily. 1609 NW Highway 50, Kingsville, MO, 816.697.2600. www.powellgardens.org SWOPE PARKCL004389 The 1,805-acre park, one of the largest urban parks in the U.S., is home to the Kansas City Zoo, Starlight Theatre, golf courses, bike and exerProv_WHEREmag.indd cise trails and much more. E. Meyer Blvd. and Swope Parkway, 816.513.7500. www.kcparks.org/park/swope-park UNION STATIONCL008147 Kansas City’s grand 1914 rail terminal was restored in 1999 and now houses Science City, the Planetarium, the 4-story tall Extreme Screen theater, live theater, shops, restaurants, major traveling exhibits and an Amtrak station. 30 W. Pershing Road, 816.460.2020. www.unionstation.org

1329 Baltimore Kansas City, MO

1

Now serving

8/29/16 11:32 AM

more happy

with your hour.

Visit a Kansas City icon: the Drum Room! Enjoy great choices and great prices on a variety of appetizers and drinks during Happy Hour. We also feature over 90 varieties of whiskeys.

Happy Hour Monday – Friday, 4 p.m. – 6:30 p.m. drumroomkc.com 1329 Baltimore Kansas City, MO

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8/29/16 11:23 AM


Where Jazz Got its Legs

AUGUST OF 2020 MARKS THE 100TH ANNIVERSARY OF CHARLIE PARKER’S BIRTH. THAT’S ESPECIALLY SIGNIFICANT IN KANSAS CITY, WHERE “BIRD” BEGAN HIS CAREER AND CHANGED THE TRAJECTORY OF JAZZ MUSIC FOREVER. THESE DAYS, HIS SPIRIT LIVES ON IN THE MANY JAZZ JOINTS AND DIVES FOUND IN KC—AMONG THE MOST FAMOUS ARE GREEN LADY LOUNGE AND THE BLUE ROOM.

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©BRANDON CUMMINS

PARTING SHOT


The Knotty Rug Co. is the authority on Oriental Rugs in Midwest. We are proud to offer the best selection of true hand knotted antique and modern rugs found anywhere. With the finest selection of Oriental rugs we offer unsurpassed knowledge, to help with your selection. In our 7,000-sq. ft. showroom we feature stacks of beautiful Persian, Turkish, Caucasian, and other discerning rugs, including Runners & Mats. In addition to our classic rugs there are needlepoint, flat-woven Kilims, and contemporary designs. From the smallest mat to large oversize pieces, we have what you are looking for. Our inventory is a mix of new and antique rugs, including the largest selection modern rugs in the area. We have rugs with character, fitting your color scheme and style, rugs that meet your taste and desired décor. If you can’t find what you're looking for, let us design and custom make the perfect rug to meet your needs. We think it is extremely important to trust the dealer that you buy from. You need to know that the information you are given is correct. For us to be happy, you need to be satisfied. Our goal is for you to enjoy the rug you buy, every day. Be Knotty and come explore the treasures of The Knotty Rug Co. We are located just west of the Country Club Plaza. Come see us for sales, cleaning, repairs and appraisals, open Tuesday through Saturday.

Appraisal Sell Trade Washing Restoration Again “THE KNOTTIER THE BETTER” Knotty Rug Co. Kansas City’s Largest and Most Reputable Showroom 4510 STATE LINE RD.

KANSAS CIT Y, KS 66103

(913) 677-1877

WWW.KNOT T YRUG.COM


Profile for Where Guestbook Kansas City

WhereTraveler Guestbook Kansas City (2019-2020)  

WhereTraveler Guestbook Kansas City is the premier travel guide for discovering the best things to do and see in Kansas City. Check out the...

WhereTraveler Guestbook Kansas City (2019-2020)  

WhereTraveler Guestbook Kansas City is the premier travel guide for discovering the best things to do and see in Kansas City. Check out the...