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CON TA IN IN G p.02

General Knowledge about Wheaton p.04

The Wheaton Edge Our Guarantee to Every Student p.06

Specific Facts about Our Academic Experience, the Campus and the Region p.10

The Year in Ideas p.12

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Helpful Information about Admission and Financial Aid, plus a Sketch of Life after Wheaton


The Wheaton Year in Ideas (Pleasingly Controversial)

Brought to you by 1,600 students and 150 professors who don’t take anything for granted, love a good debate and believe, really believe, that some of the most important, unexpected, possibly world-changing ideas can come from a liberal arts college on a 400-acre campus set between Boston and Providence.


1,600 students Network of 15,000 graduates across the country and around the world

39 states

72 countries Founded:

1834

400-acre campus in Norton, Mass.

80+ study abroad programs

4

General K n

Nearly $1.2 million dedicated annually to student research, travel and internships

35% of students

receive scholarships for academic merit

205+ 02

scholarships and fellowships (Rhodes, Fulbright, etc.) won by students since 2000


to faculty ratio

600 courses

11 to 1 student

7 majors 59 Minors

97%

success rate for graduates six months out

15–20 students in the average class

nowledge 21 NCAA Division III athletic teams student-run clubs and Organizations

about Wheaton

03


OUR GUARANTEE to you and every student

The Wheaton Edge is our guarantee that you and every student will have the opportunity for a funded internship, research position or experiential learning opportunity before your senior year. It’s also the personalized support from professors and staff, our distinctive Connections curriculum that links the liberal arts to the world, and the power we give you and your fellow students to shape campus life and develop leadership skills. Our students do all sorts of exciting things—from working at major investment firms and Fortune 500 companies to assisting on independent film projects and teaching English to high school students in Rwanda.

We can’t wait to see what you will do with the Wheaton Edge.

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�

97%

96%

Success Rate Success Rate Data based on a knowledge rate of 76 percent for the classes of 2014 and 2015

SUCCESS RATE Our most recent graduates, the classes of 2014 and 2015, are a perfect example. Six months after graduation, 97 percent of these graduates had found their first job, enrolled in graduate school, begun a fellowship or pursued an experience in public service.


Specific

Facts about Our Academic Experience, the Campus and the Region

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MAJORS AND MINORS

47 majors and 59

CONNECTIONS

Students choose sets of two

minors? Isn’t that rather ambitious for a liberal arts

or three courses of interest, often from very different

college with 1,600 students? It is, it is. You can also

disciplines, organized around a common theme,

design your own major, take a dual-degree program

e.g., Biology and Art, Politics and the Environment,

with another fine school, or cross-register for courses

Psychology and Business, New Media and Society.

at Brown, in nearby Providence. For much more, go

This part of our curriculum promotes critical

to wheatoncollege.edu and click through Academics.

thinking and out-of-the-box problem-solving skills —

African, African American, Diaspora Studies

Greek

vital in today’s dynamic and complex world.

Hispanic Studies History

FIRST-YEAR SEMINARS

International Relations

first courses you’ll take, and a foundation for the

Italian Studies

academic experience to come: feisty, deep-thinking,

Latin

wide-ranging,

Mathematics

Economics

American Studies Ancient Studies Anthropology Art History Astronomy and Physics Biochemistry Bioinformatics Biology Business and Management Chemistry Classical Civilization Classics

Mathematics and Computer Science Mathematics and Economics Music Neuroscience Philosophy Physics Political Science

Computer Science Creative Writing and Literature Economics Education English

Psychology Religion Russian Language and Literature Russian Studies Sociology

Environmental Science Film and New Media Studies French Studies German

Studio Art Theatre and Dance Studies Women’s and Gender Studies

Additional Minors Animal Behavior

Latin American Studies

Asian Studies

Legal Studies

Astronomy

Medieval and Renaissance Studies

Dance Development Studies Environmental Studies Jewish Studies Journalism Studies

of

Sports,”

Examples: “The

“Visualizing

Circus:

From Freaks and Geeks to Cirque du Soleil,” “1968: The Year the World Exploded,” “The Selfie and More (Much More),” “The Rituals of Dinner,” “Storytelling

Through

Google

Maps”

and

“A More Sour Pang: The Psychology of Illness.”

OFF-CAMPUS

PROGRAMS

A few of

the many ways to extend your Wheaton experience: semester-long

programs

at

other

institutions,

which could involve field research, an internship, travel, intensive creative work or celestial navigation. Examples: the Marine Biological Laboratory at Woods Hole, the National Theater Institute at the Eugene O’Neill Theater Center, the Salt Institute for Documentary Studies, the Washington Semester at American University and the Williams-Mystic Maritime Studies Program. Wheaton is also a member

German Studies

Community Health

head-spinning.

One of the

Peace and Social Justice

of the Twelve College Exchange Program, which allows students to spend their junior year at one of the other member schools, including Amherst, Bowdoin, Wellesley and Wesleyan. To learn more, go to: wheatoncollege.edu/academics.

Public Health Science Public Policy Studies Statistics Urban Studies

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RESEARCH

All of our resources are designed

disguised excuses to be a tourist) on nearly every

to help you do it; our faculty actually sit around and

continent. The center also sponsors Wheaton-

think of cutting-edge projects that require collabo-

only initiatives like our one-of-a-kind program in

ration with students; and once you do it, it leads to

Bhutan, plus short-term, faculty-led programs;

more, and then to graduate school, and then to other

recent

inspiring places. A few recent faculty-student projects

Traditions of Trinidad and Tobago , Tropical Field

offered through our Wheaton Research Partnerships:

Biology in Costa Rica and Belize, and Arts in Ireland.

• Analyzing Ethiopian Visual Culture: Monuments, Murals and Museums

For more, go to: wheatoncollege.edu/global.

• Cognitive Effects of Video Game Play • A Development Critique of Micro-Enterprise • Mining Memory: Reimagining Self and Nation Through Narratives of Childhood in Peru •Effect of Panax notoginseng on Angiogenesis, the Growth of Blood Vessels

examples

include

Innovative

Music

MARSHALL CENTER FOR INTERCULTURAL LEARNING A resource for anyone who believes that understanding other cultures is essential to a liberal arts education— which we’re hoping is everyone. The center sponsors

• Filmmaking Assistantship

cultural events and offers workshops, academic and

• Probing Accretion Physics Near Black Holes and Neutron Stars

career advising, and a genuine sense of community.

• The Nature of Obesity Prejudice

THE CAMPUS

• Legitimate Lies and Forbidden Truths • Religious Devotion and Monumental Transformation in Nepal

INTERNSHIPS

Every student has the

opportunity to do at least one with funding from the college. Some are paid positions, some involve research or fieldwork, some are in other parts of the world,

many lead to jobs or to a full-scale

reimagining of what your life might look like. A few recent examples: William J. Clinton Foundation, Child Family Health International, Department of Homeland Security, HBO and the Raptor Trust.

GLOBAL EDUCATION

About half of our

students study abroad. Our Center for Global Education offers access to more than 80 specialized, intensive study abroad programs (i.e., not cleverly

It’s lovely. Red brick buildings,

grassy lawns (including the Dimple, a unique landmark

in

the

heart

of

the

campus),

public art, Peacock Pond and 300 acres of woodlands. Most students live on campus, so it feels family-ish. When people come here for the first time, they say things like, “This just feels right,” or, “I feel at home here,” or, “What in the world is a Cowduck?” (Answer: That’s the name of our longtime resident duck, who was white with black spots resembling those of a cow and is memorialized with a studentcreated bronze sculpture on Peacock Pond.)

ACTIVITIES

More than 100 student-run

clubs and organizations; a student-run coffeehouse (The Lyon’s Den); regular concerts by student and

national

bands;

monthly

campus-wide

throw-downs, often sponsored by a club (e.g., the Antiquities Club hosted a Toga Dance); a popular Drag Show; a thriving chapter of the Roosevelt Institute, a national think tank—so, yes, we’re active. Special note: Our a cappella groups have a stupefying amount of social capital. Midnight initiation ceremonies, complicated nicknames, feverish crowds at their

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concerts—they’re a big deal is what we’re saying.


ATHLETICS

Our varsity teams win NEWMAC

NORTON, MASS.

Norton is a town in the sense

and ECAC and national championships (recent stand-

that 20,000 people, a traditional New England town

outs: baseball, lacrosse, softball, soccer, track and field),

common, a post office, three drugstores, a handful of

our entire program is nationally recognized, and in

other stores and an excellent liberal arts college make

the past decade hundreds of our student-athletes

a town. It’s in an undiscovered part of Massachusetts,

have been All-Americans. Our student-initiated,

20 miles from Providence (in Rhode Island), 35 miles

student-run club sports (recent examples: men’s

from Boston, and close to several well-resourced

and women’s rugby, men’s and women’s ice hockey,

suburbs (Moroccan food, Thai food, public transpor-

fencing) offer spirited intercollegiate competition, and

tation to the cities). It’s not in the middle of nowhere;

our intramural program is wildly popular. Through

it’s in the middle of somewhere very, very important.

the magic of the Web, you can learn much more.

BOSTON AND PROVIDENCE

Go to: wheatoncollege.edu/athletics.

NCAA Division III Athletic Teams Baseball (M) Basketball (W, M) Cross Country (W, M) Field Hockey (W)

Let us

merely hint at the magnificent things you will find in these two cities, both of which are historic and walkable and lovable yet also forward-looking and complex and endlessly new. Boston: the North End, the Museum of Fine Arts, Quincy Market, Fenway Park, Newbury Street, the Boston Symphony

Lacrosse (W, M)

Orchestra, the Swan Boats, and 250,000 people

Soccer (W, M)

in college. Providence: a general feeling of friendly

Softball (W)

hipness, several nationally renowned restaurants,

Swimming and Diving (W, M)

many locally beloved restaurants, a lot of startup

Synchronized Swimming (W)

ventures in the arts, new media and high technology,

Tennis (W, M)

plus many more people in college.

Track and Field (W, M) Volleyball (W)

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The On-Campus FARMERS MARKET

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THEMED LIVING

Throwing an ACADEMIC FESTIVAL

The Year 17 things that seemed unusually interesting,

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Doing Something Amazing AFTER GRADUATION p.25

10-MINUTE PLAYS

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to Make Whatever We Can Imagine

Building the FUTURE OF SCIENCE

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MAKING SPACE

KEY TO THE KINGDOM

GETTING READY for What Comes Next


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Building DEMOCRACY by Being LITERARY

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BUSINESS of the Future

PLAYING SOCCER on a World Stage

in ideas

innovative, inspired or just unusual. p.22

CHANGING THE WORLD right now p.28

Someone had an IDEA ABOUT IDEAS and then this happened

p.24

Crowding into an Office to Talk about

NATIONALISM and MARGINALIZATION •••••••••••••••••••

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••••••••••••••••••

Parodying a MAJOR REGATTA

••••••••••••••••••

POTATO TACOS

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•••••••••••••••••••


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The On-Campus

FARMERS MARKET Students wanted one, students organized one, and now it’s a weekly event. Held on the Dimple (our quad) in spring and fall and in the BalfourHood Center in winter. Featuring fresh fruits and vegetables, artisanal cheeses, herbs, breads and pastries, all grown or made by local farmers or bakers or cheesemongers and so on. Also featuring dishes prepared on site by AfterTaste, the student-run slow food group.


THEMED LIVING In each one of our 17 student-run theme houses, students with shared interests (world health, outdoor education, sustainability) cook and do chores and generally live like real people in a house. Rosemary Liss (with the lovely orange scarf, at a shared meal at ECCO House) stayed in the House of the Living Arts for three years. “We do a lot of cooking together, which turns out to be a huge benefit. It’s a way of spending quality time with friends. And there are bigger social and cultural meanings to meals, too, which I discovered in a First-Year Seminar called ‘The Rituals of Dinner.’ Wheaton is all about going at subjects from different perspectives.”

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Throwing an ACADEMIC FESTIVAL On a spring afternoon, the campus stops, and dozens of students present research or creative work on which they’ve labored for many months. There’s a festival-like feeling in the air (congratulations, amazement, revelations, free snacks), and so we call this the Academic Festival.


Building DEMOCRACY by Being LITERARY

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Shawn Christian makes the case: “Studying literature can prepare you to participate in, and contribute to, a truly diverse democracy. It provokes an exchange of ideas, it exposes you to a range of human experience, and it shows the power of language in action. Learning to respect a poem, a novel or a theory, even if you disagree with it, builds the skills that it takes to navigate

our very dynamic and consistently diverse world.� Shawn Christian (shown being teacherly) is a professor of English and African American studies. He also directs the Summer Institute for Literary and Cultural Studies, a national program that prepares college students from underrepresented populations for graduate study in the humanities.


Business of the FUTURE The world needs inventive, broad-minded leaders who see, and make, the connections that are not obvious to everyone else. That’s why our business and management major takes the wide view. Sure, our program spans the range of thought and practice of the field, from micro- and macroeconomics to marketing and applied ethics. But it also cultivates the ability to think creatively, ask hard questions and innovate across industries—from for-profits to nonprofits to organizations in developing countries, and beyond.


PLAYING SOCCER on a World Stage Our women’s soccer team, led by coach Luis Reis, traveled to Buenos Aires to get some international competition and explore another culture—their third international spring training trip since 2008. Previous destinations include Barcelona and Lisbon. Luis Reis

has been head coach of women’s soccer for 19 years and has won nearly every honor there is to win. (Speaking of “overachievers,” former midfielder Carolyn Wills is one of three Wheaton students to have earned a Rhodes Scholarship.)

AMAZING AFTER GRADUATION Doing Something

Like getting a prestigious funded scholarship or fellowship to pursue high-level research, professional experience or community engagement around the world. We’ve also produced a disproportionate number of Rhodes Scholars, Truman Scholars and Watson Fellows (like Nana Asare, who spent this year studying grassroots public health initiatives around the globe). 18


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MAKING SPACE to Make Whatever We Can Imagine

Professor Tom Armstrong turned his private lab space into a place where students can play games, experiment, develop research and get up to their elbows in the latest technologies. The DIY spirit is alive and well here. Students experience great successes— and spectacular failures. Tom likes to say the lab promotes “the cross-pollination of ideas,” where an artist might sit next to a scientist and develop a project that blends art, science and

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technology into something new. It’s a space for crossing boundaries, where students reach new heights every day (by building remotecontrol airplanes, for example). All this activity calls for the right equipment, and the lab has it all— tools, wires, spare parts, games, LEGOs, computers in every size and other bits and pieces—lining tables and piling up in the corners.


Building a 99,000-square-foot, LEED gold-certified

CENTER for the

FUTUREof SCIENCE We call it the Mars Center for Science and Technology. It recently won the equivalent of a gold medal for being environmentally friendly. The future of science, by the way, is collaborative, which explains the glass partitions dividing the center’s 23 research labs and 12 teaching labs, the specially designed multiuse labs to encourage cross-disciplinary study, the cafÊ, and the welcoming group-study spaces.


changing the world right now A good way to get started is to just get started on whatever topic you happen to be interested in, and the ideas and energy that you have. Our president, Dennis M. Hanno, is an expert on innovation and leadership, so that’s what he shares—with students on our campus and in Africa, where he takes Wheaton students to help high school students dream big. He’s not alone. Our faculty and students apply their talents here

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in Norton and in nearby Boston, where Wheaton has partnered with the world’s largest startup accelerator, MassChallenge, as well as around the globe. It’s the sort of experience that transforms lives.


Someone had

idea about ideas an

and then this happened.

The students who run our chapter of the Roosevelt Institute, a national public policy organization for undergraduates, decided to highlight some of the most interesting ideas on campus. The result: WheaTalks, our own homegrown version of TED Talks. The plan is simple but pure genius. From a pile of proposals, 10 people get 10 minutes each to present a passion, a fascination or an obsession. The range is enormous: from the portrayal of women in video games and Internet security to the untapped potential of fungi. It was a hit the first time it happened, and it’s only gotten bigger since. It’s the kind of intellectual excitement you always imagined happened at college. 23


Crowding into an Office to Talk about NATIONALISM and

MARGINALIZATION Like these five students in Professor Dolita Cathcart’s “History 337: Power and Protest in the U.S.” “On the first day of class, I ask my students to be brave, to stick their necks out and say what they believe, but to do so with respect for others. We’re working with difficult subjects, and we’re going to sit around a table or in an office and try to face them squarely. We have to be honest with each other, hold ourselves to high standards and challenge ourselves to meet them. In the end, we’re trying to think for ourselves, based on our own research. We’re doing serious work—but we try to have fun to boot.” Dolita Cathcart specializes in history; African, African American and diaspora studies; and women’s and gender studies.

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10-Minute

PLAYS

Part of our New Plays Festival, featuring work written, directed and produced by students, and performed in front of packed houses at the Kresge Experimental Theater. Students write a 10-minute play based on a random object produced by a visiting artist—then scramble to stage it in a week or so.

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KEY TO THE KINGDOM Five years ago, we were the first in the world to offer a study abroad program in Bhutan. Now, every fall and spring, another group of students spends a semester studying at Royal Thimphu College in the world’s last Buddhist kingdom. It’s a special relationship made stronger by the fact that King of Bhutan Jigme Khesar Namgyel Wangchuck studied at Wheaton. Along with taking courses, students choose an internship: running a radio talk show, cataloging herbal medicines or training Buddhist nuns to use a computer, to name a few. They learn about Bhutanese music, art, language and history; explore the Himalayan Mountains; engage in a service project; and drink lots and lots of tea.

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PHOTOS BY: BRUCE OWENS, ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF ANTHROPOLOGY


Getting Ready for

WHAT COMES NEXT People (usually adults) will advise you to think about the future. We’ve got a few suggestions for the present so that the future takes care of itself. Start with the thousands of summer opportunities available to Wheaton students around the globe. Add $1.2 million in funding to guarantee that every student has the opportunity to participate in an internship, research position or service project. Plus a staff of professional advisors who help students plan for grad school and careers in business, medicine and more. Top it off with a network of loyal alumni ready to offer career advice. We call it the Filene Center for Career Services, but you could also call it the place where dreams flourish.

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POTATO TACOS Also lemon bars and chocolate chip cookies. Made by history professor Dana Polanichka (shown here without tacos) and served in class or at dinner with students at her house. Yes, she’s one of the sharpest young medievalists in the field, but she makes time to cook for students—and recruit them to, say, help her research and write a book about women in the court of Charlemagne—because (as they said in eighth-century France) that’s how she rolls. Many of our professors roll that way.

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THROWING A REGATTA That Parodies the Whole Idea of Regattas and Yet Also Serves as an Exercise in Community Building and DIY Engineering This would be the Head of the Peacock, the lead-in to our annual Spring Weekend (which features live music, a dunk tank and a huge Slip ’N Slide). Teams of students build boats out of nearly nothing and try to paddle across Peacock Pond. They also wear freaky costumes and paint themselves. Literally unforgettable.

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Helpful Information about Admission and Financial Aid ADMISSION

We

are

an

exceptional

What an excellent idea. We may

liberal arts college with a supremely talented

have mentioned a few hundred times that we’re close

and accessible faculty; inspiring students who

to Boston and Providence—two cities with major

want to lead interesting, worthwhile lives; and

airports and public transportation that gets you to

resources that let these people (to use the

campus. Come see us, meet our students, talk to

technical term) shine like the sun. If that sounds

our professors and coaches, pledge yourself to an

about right to you, please apply. We offer Early

a cappella group. This is how lives change.

Decision, Early Action and Regular Decision programs, and you can, of course, learn more by

TRANSFER STUDENTS

going to wheatoncollege.edu/admission/apply.

where you belong, we can’t wait to get to know you.

If you think this is

In fact, we are ready to lend a helping “hand” to

APPLICATION DEADLINES

make the transition to our warm and welcoming

FALL ADMISSION

campus. You can learn more about transferring to

First-Year Admission: Early Decision 1 Early Action Early Decision 2 Regular Decision

November 1 November 1 January 1 January 1

Transfer Admission

April 1

SPRING ADMISSION First-Year Admission Transfer Admission

November 1 November 1

Wheaton and our transfer credit evalution process at wheatoncollege.edu/admission/transfer.

FINANCIAL AID

Approximately 65 percent

of our students receive need-based financial aid. We offer both need-based and merit-based aid, and quite frankly, we’re pretty generous. To find out more, go to

INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS

wheatoncollege.edu/sfs. 2016–2017 COSTS We love

them; they love us. We have more than 70 countries represented on our campus by students who are

Tuition:

Student activity fee:

abroad. We think those diverse international perspectives

Total:

of class. Specific information about admission and financial aid requirements for international students may be found at wheatoncollege.edu/admission.

$48,694

Room and meal plan: $12,500

citizens of other countries and U.S. citizens who live make our campus a more interesting place, in and out

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VISITING

$318 $61,512


Selected Graduate School Placements for the Class of 2015

Selected First Jobs for the Class of 2015

Boston University

Boies, Schiller & Flexner LLP

Butler University

Boston Children’s Hospital

Duke University Medical Center

Brooklyn Daily Eagle

Florida State University

Brown Brothers Harriman

George Mason University

Colgate-Palmolive

Harvard University

Fidelity Investments

Maryland Institute College of Art

Friends School, Tokyo

Massachusetts College of Pharmacy

General Dynamics

New England School of Law

Museum of Fine Arts, Boston

New York University

NBC Universal Inc.

Northwestern University

New York State Senate

Sotheby’s Institute of Art

Raytheon

Tufts University

Sotheby’s

Tulane University

State Street Bank and Trust

University of Edinburgh (Scotland)

Ustocktrade

University of Maine

Zaatrai Syrian Refugee Camp

University of Sydney (Australia)

Notable alumni Chris Denorfia, Chicago Cubs outfielder Nick Fradiani, American Idol Season 14 winner Jean Fritz, Newbery Honor-winning author of children’s books Trish Karter, founder of Dancing Deer Baking Co. Catherine Keener, Academy Award—nominated actor Sandra Ohrn Moose, Chair of the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation Ellen Moran, former White House Communications Director, and former Chief of Staff at the U.S. Dept. of Commerce Thomas M. Sanderson, international security expert at CSIS Sam Sisakhti, founder and CEO of UsTrendy.com Lesley Stahl, broadcast journalist Ken Kristensen, graphic novelist, screenwriter and TV director-producer Jigme Khesar Namgyel Wangchuck, King of Bhutan Christine Todd Whitman, former Governor of New Jersey and former Administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency Alex Witchel, New York Times journalist


Non Profit Org U.S. Postage

PAID

Permit No. 402 Brockton, MA

Office of Admission Wheaton College 26 E. Main Street Norton, Massachusetts 02766-2322 Telephone: 508-286-8251 Fax: 508-286-8271 Email: admission@wheatoncollege.edu Website: wheatoncollege.edu

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Wheaton College does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, creed, disability, national or ethnic origin, age, religion, sex, sexual orientation or veteran status in its admission policy, educational policies, scholarship and loan programs, athletic and other college-administered programs. For more information, visit wheatoncollege.edu/policies/eqopp.

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The Wheaton Year in Ideas  

This viewbook for Wheaton College in Norton, Massachusetts shares facts and general knowledge about the College as well as 17 unique and inn...

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