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May 17, 2017 Issue #528

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A memorial for Socorro (Cory) Alfonso

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by Linda Johnson

M

ay is Asian Heritage Month. We recognize Socorro (Cory) Alfonso, who came to the Yukon in 1986 as one of the first Filipino nannies to work here. She was an adventurer, willing to leave the familiar for unknown challenges and the hope of a better life. Members of the Hidden Histories Society of the Yukon got to know Cory in her retirement years, when she recorded memories of hope, persistence and courage as lived throughout her life. Cory fondly remembered her birthplace on the small island of Bacacay Albay with her large extended family, following subsistence lifeways by the ocean. Cory recalled idyllic childhood days, running through sand and waves with siblings and cousins, eating delicious fresh fruit and seafood, cooled by soft breezes drifting through their home built of woven grasses and palm fronds. Most of all she cherished the love of her family and her whole community. The family moved to a city called Papanga near Manila in the early 1950s when Cory was two years old. Cory remembers her mother telling her: “Socorro means ‘help’ in Spanish.” From a young age she lived up to her name, helping at home, going to school and working parttime as she got older. The city was more taxing than island life and school fees were expensive. Losses compounded their problems when Cory’s mother died and her father fell ill. Cory made the first of many moves to improve her situation, relocating to Manila at 14 to live with relatives who paid her high school fees in exchange for domestic work. She returned to Papanga to look after her father for several years, moving back to Manila after he died. After a decade of struggle at low paying government jobs, she launched into foreign adventures – working as a caregiver in Singapore for an elderly couple. Then Canada beckoned, and she accepted a job as a nanny in the Yukon! A devout Roman Catholic, Cory had prayed for help and she thought: “…this is the answer, coming here in Canada. I lived in Singapore for two years… but if you have a dream… come to Canada. Nothing to stop me, so I came here.” At first the Yukon was cold and strange, but Cory was determined to pursue her dreams. She lived with several families, caring for their children, while studying to

Socorro (Cory) Alfonso pictured in Whitehorse, Yukon. At first the Yukon was cold and strange, but Cory was determined to pursue her dreams.

PHOTOS: Courtesy of Hidden Histories Society Yukon

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improve her English. Cory firmly believed in education, advising young people: “Just work and study hard, that’s it… finish university or college… At the end, you don’t [say] to yourself, ‘I wish I went to school.’ No, not like that. Go to school while you’re young.” The Philippines always remained close to Cory’s heart. She sent money and goods home to support her family. She adopted a young girl and paid for her school fees. She always returned to her island home to soak up the sunshine and warmth of family. “Oh yeah. I love it,” she says. “If you’ve got lots of kids in the Philippines, you know, a neighbour will be looking after you… lots of people there know you… So, they don’t need daycares there because everybody can help.” Cory was a pioneer of the Filipino community here, bringing her gifts of love, humour and boundless optimism to all who met her. She was one of only six Filipinos living in the Yukon in the mid-1980s. Despite hardships brought on by cancer a few years later, Cory never gave up – persevering through long and difficult treatments. Then she went back to work for many more years caring for others. She valued friendships and family above all, giving thanks to “all the people that helped me when I was sick… you can find a lot of money, but friends that love you

Socorro (Cory) Alfonso pictured as a young girl in the Philippines. Cory fondly remembered her birthplace on the small island of Bacacay Albay in the Bicol Region of the Philippines.

so much, is very seldom. So, treasure [them].” One of her favourite pastimes was karaoke – Celine Dion was her idol, singing along with her, especially the high notes! Cory battled cancer again in the last years of her life. She returned to the Philippines, knowing her time was limited and wanting to be near her family. She passed away on March 9, 2017, mourned by hundreds of people in both countries. Her gift to Hidden Histories Society of the Yukon – and to all who hear her stories through our recordings and displays – is the gift of joie de vivre – her joyful embrace of life with all its challenges and changes, her steadfast faith in her Christian beliefs, her devotion to caring for others, and her generous contributions to our community and the world. Her parents named her well at birth – Socorro – she spent a lifetime helping all who came her way. We send our heartfelt thanks to her for sharing her stories with us, and condolences to all her family and friends in the loss of this very special person. See the Socorro Alfonso exhibit at the Whitehorse Public Library this month. Linda Johnson, with excerpts from Cory Alfonso’s oral history recorded in August 2014 for Hidden Histories Society Yukon. For more information about the society, go to www.hhsy.org.


May 17, 2017

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When the Land Has a Character

On the Cover Man panning for gold at Gold Bottom Creek Photo:Gov't of Yukon/J Kennedy

Award winning Canadian author Lawrence Hill travels the Alaska Highway connecting with Yukon communities

What’s Inside

by Michael Bramadat-Willcock the chance to start writing because of my other projects… Now I’m free to go at it.” It’s not his first time in the Yukon and Hill says that he has an affinity for the North. “The North itself has to be a character,” Hill says. “It’s possible to write a story about Toronto without experiencing the weather, but in the Yukon the land, weather and climate are going to affect the protagonist. You need to think about the place as a character.” He says that the quality of one’s experience in the North is affected by the weather in a unique way and sees it as imperative that, while researching and writing the book, he immerse himself in the conditions that these soldiers lived in. To whatever extent possible. Hill is driving in the rain on his way to a meeting somewhere in Northern B.C. as we speak. “It’s a very demanding landscape,” he says over the hands free phone. “I feel like I should experience a time when the bugs are really bad,” Hill says jokingly. Hill says that the soldiers called the mosquitoes “dive bombers” because they would dive down at you. “I’d like to experience that. For a day.” Hill’s journey is a prelude to his upcoming 2018 residency in Dawson City, where he will continue his research from a northerly location during the colder months. “The soldiers had to build this highway and (the Canol) pipeline in the winter. Since they knew all seasons, I want to have a sense of

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Northwest Territories, linking it up to an oil refinery in Whitehorse. Hill will be stopping in various locations along the Highway and he’s he’s open to research tips

Michael Bramadat-Willcock is editor at What’s Up Yukon. He’s a journalist based in Whitehorse. Lifestory available on request.

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them in all seasons.” Hill will be in Dawson from Jan. 1 to March 31, 2018 and I don’t doubt that he’ll enjoy the weather. Hill also takes a keen interest in the cultural issues surrounding the Highway’s construction. “Building the Lawrence Hill is an award winning, best highway revolutionselling Canadian writer. He’s in the Yukon ized the lives of the researching a book project about the role of people living next to it. Indigenous African American soldiers in the construction people’s lives were of the Alaska Highway. His latest book, The especially altered. Illegal, is a fictional musing on the life of an I’m very interested in these social and undocumented immigrant. He is the author cultural issues.” of the 2013 Massey Lecture Blood: The Stuff Asked if he thinks of Life, the 2007 novel The Book of Negroes that the the history and the 2001 memoir Black Berry, Sweet of the Second World War in Northern Juice: On Being Black and White in Canada. Canada is an understudied subject, Hill says that he’s here to popularize from the public on the topic of the a part of history that isn’t well Alaska Highway’s construction. known enough. In this case the Having just passed through Watcontribution of African Americans son Lake, Hill will be making stops to an important part of our history. at the Burwash Landing Library at A little known fact is that the 12 noon on May 17th, the Haines soldiers working on the Highway Junction Library at 7p.m. on May were largely African American. 18 and the Odd Fellows Hall in “The soldiers were racially segDawson City at 7 p.m. on May 23rd. regated with inferior living condiHe’ll be wrapping it up at 7:30 tions (compared) to whites,” says p.m. on the 24th at the Kwanlin Hill. Over the nine month initial con- Dün Cultural Centre in Whitehorse. Hill will talk about his ongoing struction period hundreds of these soldiers – 500 or so of them black project and take research leads – toiled under harsh conditions in from local residents. He will also the Canadian wilderness of North- discuss his most recent novel, The ern B.C. and the Yukon across to Illegal, a fictional story about the Alaska. They were also instrumen- life of an undocumented refugee. tal in building the now defunct The events are all free and open to Canol oil pipeline, which ran from the public. Norman Wells in the Northwest For more information or to atTerritories, through the Yukon, to tend one of Lawrence Hill’s talks Alaska during the Second World you can visit the Yukon Public LiWar. The project included the conbraries Facebook page or call them struction of Canol Road from Johnson’s Crossing in the Yukon to the at (867) 667-5239.

PHOTO: Lisa Sakulensky

B

estselling Canadian author Lawrence Hill pursues a lifelong interest in African diaspora narratives. As a part of the research for a book he’s writing about the contribution of African American soldiers to the construction of the Alaska Highway, Hill is travelling the Highway from northern B.C. through the Yukon. His first Yukon stop was in Watson Lake and he finishes in Whitehorse on May 24th. The construction of the Alaska Highway is what some call the North’s historical equivalent to the Trans Canada Railway. “It’s a similar story,” says Hill. The initial construction of the Alaska Highway was completed between March and November in 1942 by American troops looking for easier transport between the American mainland and Alaska. At the time, the United States and Canada were worried about the threat of a Japanese invasion in the Northwest. “Alaska was the weakest link,” says Hill. The soldiers’ stories strike a personal note for Hill. “My father and grandfather were both named Daniel Grafton Hill. Both were in the U.S. Army, my father Daniel G. Hill III was stationed with U.S. army bases in the United States in World War II, and Daniel Hill Jr. was in the trenches of France in World War I.” Hill is glad to finally have the time on his hands to pursue this longtime interest. “It’s the kind of story that speaks to me,” says Hill. “I’ve been reading about it for about five years, but I didn’t have

Laurence Hill .................... 2 A memorial........................... 3 Thorin Loeks Album................ 4 Canada 150 .......................... 5 Cafe Voix ............................ 6 Baseball Book ....................... 7 Geezerville ........................ 8 Didee & Didoo ................... 10 Son of a trickster ................ 12 Jack in a Sack ..................... 13 Alphabet soup ................... 14 Early Greens ..................... 15 Music and Friendship ............ 16 Dawson Gold Show............... 17 Eye on the Outdoors............. 19 Living with Wildlife .............. 23 Take my jeans................. 26-27 Gypsy goulash ..................... 29 Arts in the Park ................... 30

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May 17, 2017

A Shining Star Born and raised Yukon musician Thorin Loeks is releasing his second album this month by Maria Gruninger

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his was the second time that I have had the pleasure of doing an interview with Thorin Loeks. The first time, which was in June last year, he had just released his first album, Thirsty Hearts. Since then he has been writing more music and working hard on his second album, Shine Through The Dark. It’s now a year later, and he is gearing up to release it. Along with taking five courses in the Communications program at Capilano University in North Vancouver; working at the Lookout Society, a charitable organization who support adults with no or a low income who have few or no housing or support options; and spending around 20 hours in the studio, Loeks has a full calendar. But he says that if you are busy doing the things you love, that’s a meaningful use of time. The first album was an all indiefolk album. With the second album, the main genre is still going to be indie-folk, but he is adding more genres, instruments and sounds – he is expanding and exploring new areas. “I really think it’s building off the momentum of the first album,” he says. “But even with the indie-folk, I’m incorporating a lot more instruments.” The album is going to have five indie-folk songs, two blues songs and one “kind of electronica, sort of soulful alternative song,” as Loeks calls it. “Blues is something that has always spoken to me, so being able to share that with a greater audience will be exciting and then also kind of showing ‘Hey, I’m interested in other genres and this is something that has been on my mind.’” The circumstance under which his electronica song, “Letting it Go,” was written, is a story of it’s own. Loeks said he had the lyrics in his head for the last couple of months, but didn’t finish writing the lyrics until he was on the bus heading to the studio. “And I got to the studio, and recorded the vocal track – I had just finished writing it as I walked into the recording booth,” he says. “The thing that I find with creativity – especially with my music – is that it’s constantly evolving. So each song is like a living thing that will continue to take shape. And sometimes the foundation will always be there, but then other elements and lyrics will sort of evolve over time a little bit and become more refined.” Loeks said that the songs are almost like children, having a little life of their own. He is excited to bring a bunch of contributing musicians into the stu-

PHOTO courtesy of Thorin Loeks

Thorin Loeks paddling the Wind River in 2015 dio with him for this album. Joining him will be Ben Ryan on the electric guitar, who is also releasing an album with the same producer, David Tallarico. Ryan’s roommate, Brandon Christie, will play the drums and Loeks friend, Johnson Cheung who is from Singapore, will be playing the violin. Loeks has also been involving his two sisters with his album. His sister Kaija will be singing the background vocals on his song “Coming Home.” His other sister Kita, will be doing the album art. “So I have both my siblings involved,” Loeks says. Along with adding more genres, instrument contributing artists, Loeks will also be adding soundscapes. “I’m also going to be adding some soundscapes, so there is going to be some nature sounds, to kind of add more of a four-dimensional feel,” Loeks says. Some of the songs, for example, will have ocean sounds and the sound of wind through the leaves. “I’m just excited to pour my heart and soul into this and continue the journey,” he says. “As far as I can tell, there is no one song in the same key on this album. So my voice really changes through each song. You can still tell it’s my voice, but I think I really explore vocally with my voice, like all kinds of different styles and sounds. And there is going to be a lot more throat singing, which I think will interest a lot of people.” Loeks started to teach himself how to throat sing about 10 years ago after seeing an episode on National Geographic where he heard “Tuvan” throat singing (which is the style he is singing) for the first time. He says that he was spellbound and knew that he wanted to learn this.

So, he listened to recordings, watched videos and spent many hours experimenting before figuring out how to produce and play with the overtones. Someday, he says, he would like to go to Mongolia and learn properly and more expansively from some of the masters there. He feels like he has always had a calling for doing music. “I knew that I had something meaningful to share and I always knew that I needed to do something like this, and now that I am doing it, it feels like I’m supposed to be doing it,” Loeks says. “It really is a sense of such deep satisfaction to integrate my music, I mean, it’s such a seamless whole, my adventures and the music and my passions in regard to philosophy, life and society and all those things, really are cohesive in my writing and photography. “Music is a way that can really bring people together, regardless of language barriers, regardless of distances and differences between us, we can find that around the world there is some incredible common bond we have with music. Yet, at the same time, incredible variation and that is a beautiful thing about it.” Loeks is going to be releasing his album May 18th, with a album release show in Vancouver at the Anza Club. The evening is going to start with a songwriter circle which then will be followed by Loeks performing music from his new album with a full band. If everything goes according to plan, albums will be ready to for purchase online two days before the release party. For more information on Thorin Loeks’ music or to buy the new album, go to www.ThorinLoeks.com or his Facebook page. Maria Gruninger is a Whitehorsebased Freelance Writer

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May 17, 2017

A Feast of Jazz PHOTO: Courtesy of Elaine Schiman

Check out local singers at the Café des Voix nights May 29 at the Westmark Whitehorse Hotel by Elaine Schiman

J

azz lovers in Whitehorse often look at each other and say, “There’s so much music going on. And so much jazz!” And there is. We are blessed with an embarrassment of riches when it comes to the arts. However, jazz pianist Grant Simpson noticed a gap. After several vocal jazz workshops held by Jazz Yukon and the Yukon Summer Music Camp, there was a growing group of jazz vocalists, but few venues to sing. “After a workshop, there would be a rush of enthusiasm, inspiration and excitement, but it would soon die off,” says Simpson. “There was no outlet for the singers to practice what they’d learned.” So, Grant dreamed up the idea of Café des Voix. It’s a recurring event that takes place at Antoinette’s Restaurant and the Westmark Whitehorse, with more venues to come. The Café des Voix features a potpourri of voices, some well-known and others new and emerging, with Simpson accompanying most on piano. The jazz café setting offers a warm ambiance and some surprises. People you never imagined were singers are suddenly onstage wowing the crowd. “I’d been practicing singing jazz with a friend and we performed at some open mics, but with Café des Voix I’ve been so excited to sing at an actual venue,” says vocalist Deb Jutra. “It’s so nice to work with an amazing musician like Grant, and the cafés are delightful get-togethers. It’s inspiring to hear

other singers who are so great.” Café des Voix is similar to an open mic, but the unique feature is that singers don’t have to bring a band or acA few of the Cafe des Voix singers and players after a performance at the Westmark companist with them. Instead, Simpson meets Whitehorse Lounge. Left to right: Leith Hill, Coralie Langevin, Erin Evangeline Brost, with each singer for a Shauna Jones, Harold Sher, Malorie Gendreau, Sylvie Painchaud, Lillian Strauss, brief rehearsal before Olivier de Colombel, and Elaine Schiman, with Grant Simpson at piano, centre. each Café, allowing for more polished performances. about a half dozen Café des Voix and loves event with Simpson, sometimes with guest “This experience has been fantastic,” the opportunity. “You can try new songs and players on piano, guitar, saxophone or ukusays singer James McCullough. “It’s a great gain confidence. Café des Voix is the place to lele. At first, singers joined because of the way to develop a repertoire, get comfort- try your hand, or voice, at singing jazz. It’s vocal jazz workshops held in recent years, able with a microphone and play around. supportive and friendly. Plus a lot of fun.” but now the Café des Voix is creating a buzz Having Grant as a resource is key. He sugSylvie Painchaud is one of several franco- of its own and other singers are signing up gests great songs and is fun to work with. phone singers who are part of Café des Voix. Simpson sums it up this way: “It’s been a I’ve been surprised by the breadth of music “I used to think jazz was not for me, that I joy to watch people develop as singers and being sung. It’s not just jazz, it’s a great didn’t have the right kind of voice. But I’ve performers. The more they do it, the betnight out.” become passionate about jazz composers ter they get. I’m impressed with the level Brooke McLean Rudolph is a long time and want to learn more. The fact that Grant of challenge these singers continue to give jazz fan, singer and musician, but hadn’t Simpson rehearses with us, suggests songs themselves – and throw at me!” sung much jazz since university, until the and provides advice is crucial. He and all the If you’re interested in singing or atCafé des Voix started. singers are very supportive. The feeling in tending Café des Voix, check out their Face“It’s a wonderful way to get up and sing a the venue is hard to describe, but I will try: book page, or email CafedesVoix@gmail.com few jazz tunes in a supportive atmosphere,” imagine yourself, after singing your songs, for more information. she says. “It’s a friendly, encouraging and like a runner at the end of a marathon, Upcoming Café des Voix events include professional group of people who love good with many people waiting for you, hands 29 at the Westmark Whitehorse Lounge, old standards. Jazz doesn’t have to be crazy extended, to celebrate your effort. That’s and July 9 in Atlin, during the Atlin Arts and or experimental; most of the songs are very Café des Voix.” Music Festival. familiar.” Café des Voix has about 25 singers on its Elaine Schiman is a writer Singer Sophia Marnik has performed at roster. Between six and 12 perform at each based in Whitehorse

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May 17, 2017

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Grandpa’s Baseball Book

Part 1

Written for Lucas, age 7, for Christmas 2016

I

t occurred to me while watching the 2016 World Series between the Chicago Cubs and Cleveland Indians with my grandchildren – their first World Series – that I wasn’t doing a very good job of explaining the game to them because we were all too busy watching the historical action while eating bad food and there was too much to learn in too short of a timespan. Not that they didn’t learn a lot watching and asking a lot of good questions, but the sheer immensity of what they didn’t know yet

Grandpa’s Baseball Book Chapter 1: Origins of the Game Although the game we now call baseball is certainly a North American invention that started in the mid-19th century on the east coast of America, it is actually a marriage of two rural children’s games, Rounders and Cricket, played in England, Ireland and Scotland. The first time the word “baseball” appeared written in the English language is in 1744; it is found in a children’s book called A Little Pretty Pocket-Book.

PHOTO: Pixabay

I decided these kids needed to take a course called “Baseball 101” before their second World Series in a year and it was my duty, as a 70-year-old retired sportswriter, to author it for them. must have mystified them, particularly Ruby, 5, who kept asking “When can we go down and feed the horses?” I told her “during the 7th inning stretch,” and she replied, “What’s THAT?” And all that her older brothers really knew about baseball was that it meant tossing a ball back and forth on the front lawn. This might be baseball at it’s purest, but that isn’t what was on display during the World Series – which is baseball at it’s ultimate finest. I decided these kids needed to take a course called “Baseball 101” before their second World Series in a year and it was my duty, as a 70-year-old retired sportswriter, to author it for them. Since all three are able to read and write now they should be able to comprehend so long as I don’t get into too much ubiquitous serendipity (two of my favourites) and other big words. Thus was born the idea of a kiddie book about baseball, a work in progress.

Rounders had a bat, ball, four bases run counter-clockwise and nine players on each team – but no pitcher and catcher like cricket. When they combined the two games into one, baseball was born, although nobody seems to know exactly when and where that happened. A good guess is a schoolyard at recess. We do know factually teams and leagues were quite common by 1850, the first purely professional team was the Cincinnati Red Stockings in 1869 and the first World Series was played in 1903. Chapter 2: Numbers At it’s core, baseball is a game of numbers and the two most important numbers are nine and three. Nine There are nine players on the field at all times on a baseball team and they play nine innings against another team with nine players. Without the number “9”, baseball games would be athletic chaos… like hockey.

Three This is the second most important number in baseball because a batter gets three swings at pitches over the home plate and if he or she misses the ball all three times, the umpire bellows “YER OUT!” and you have to go back and sit on the bench until your next try at getting a hit. Remember, there is no crying in baseball. And each team gets three outs before you change places with the other team and have to go out in the field so they can come in and take their turn trying to get hits and runs. Without three strikes and three outs, a baseball game might go on forever… like Rounders and Cricket, baseball’s grandparents. People got tired of missing meals and not sleeping at night during a cricket match, so they invented three strikes and three outs to speed things up and get everybody home in time for supper. Four This is another important number because if a pitcher throws four balls NOT over home plate before three strikes, the batter gets a free pass to first base which is called a “walk,” although nobody actually walks down to first. Usually they trot so it probably should be called a “trot.” But it isn’t. It is what it is, which long ago caused a popular saying in baseball: “A walk is as good as a hit,” which is true because, either way you wind up on first base, which is the whole point of the exercise. Speaking of which: 1-2-3-Home These numbers refer to the bases a player has to cross to score a run although they are called: “first, second, third and home.” It is a really good thing to score a run for your team, because everybody totally likes you for a while and pats you on the back or attacks you with high fives and other silly expressions of enthusiasm. The team that scores the most runs, of course, wins the game. Dogue Sack is a retired writing junkie who can’t seem to kick the habit. He lives in Whitehorse. This is the first of a four part series about “Baseball 101” as taught by Yukoner and former sportswriter Dogue Sack to his young grandchildren.

WHITEHORSE PHYSIOTHERAPY | KRISTY LERCH AND ASSOCIATES Kristy Lerch

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Celebrate Spring, Yukon style! Open daily 9:30am - 6:00pm Guided Bus Tours 10am, 12pm, 2pm & 4pm Walk, ride, or skip anytime!

The next deadline for Touring Artist Fund is:

June 15, 2017

Touring Artist Fund

supports professional artists, ensembles and companies to present their work outside Yukon. There are four deadlines per year: 15th March, June, September and December.

Application form and guidelines are available on our website. Applicants are encouraged to consult an Arts Advisor before applying.

phone: 867-667-8789 toll free: 1-800-661-0408 ext. 8789 artsfund@gov.yk.ca www.tc.gov.yk.ca/taf @insideyukon


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May 17, 2017

Wasting Away in Geezerville with Ken Bolton

Shake Out Those Memories and Shine ’em Up U ntil fairly recently, I had no interest whatever in the idea of writing a book of memoirs. Like most people, I assumed nobody would care to read about the life journey of a nobody-in-particular. After all, autobiography is the purview of politicians, movie stars, generals and other colourful scoundrels. If I ever had the hubris to write an autobiography, I rea-

soned, it would probably be called something like, “My Little Life and Other Lies”. But I’m a storyteller by trade, and storytelling relies heavily on the ability to access memories, to turn, twist, interpret and shape them. I’m also a Geezer, officially in my 75th year by the time this column sees print. Lord knows, one characteristic of Geezerhood

SUMMER KID CAMPS Nature Art Camp

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Explore creatures real and imaginary in the great outdoors. Then run back to Arts Underground and discover how to recreate them through drawing, painting, printmaking, collage and sculpture! $325 + GST

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is a propensity to live in the past, and blab about it ad nauseam. Strange, isn’t it, that the world’s most prolific storytellers tend to be either the very young or the very old? Youngsters tell stories because their imaginations are not yet corrupted by a world that seems to value conformity more than creativity. Yarn-spinning is a child’s way to capture and make sense of the elusive thing called reality. Oldsters spin yarns for a similar reason: they help retrofit reality with a personal meaning that often gets lost during the years of scrabbling for a living, raising children, and trying to meet the expectations of whatever society we inhabit. One of the delicious things about memory is that it is totally subjective. How you recall that day a skunk perfumed the family dog may be completely different from how your kid sister, Ruby, remembers it. The hero in your memory of an event may be the villain, or a mere

Shelley MacDonald jewellery

PHOTO: Pixabay

One of the delicious things about memory is that it is totally subjective.

bystander, in someone else’s. vourite writing mentor, the late Unlike the academic telling of William Zinsser. history, memoir-writing doesn’t First, use all your senses and depend for its validity on a foun- any other trick that helps tap into dation of documented fact. Much your treasure-chest of memory. of the twaddle I write in this par- Second, tell your own truth; if ticular space Ruby has a difis nothing ferent take on more or less things, she can than memwrite her own oir, with no damned memStrange, isn’t it, guarantee of oirs. accuracy. Finally, think that the world’s A few small. Fordays from get about trymost prolific now, I’ll be ing to write a storytellers tend to conducting magnum opus. a workshop Focus on probe either the very on memoirducing honest, writing in a well-polished young or the very small city pearls, one at east of Geea time. Before old? zerville. I you know it, intend to ofyou’ll have a fer the parhefty string-full ticipants the as your personal same advice gift to future I would give anyone contemplat- generations. ing a plunge into this art form. You can contact our It’s drawn from a splendid esresident Geezer via Editor@ say on memoir-writing by my fawhatsupyukon.com.


May 17, 2017

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Join us for another great summer of performing and visual arts, starting MAY 23!

MONDAY to FRIDAY, noon to 1pm in LEPAGE PARK (corner of 3 Ave & Wood St) rd

Don’t miss out on our

EVENING SHOWS: Wednesdays 7-8 pm & KIDS DAY: Wednesdays at noon! All events are completely free! Everyone is welcome!

artsintheparkyukon.com @artsinpark facebook.com/arts-in-the-Park Photo credit: Alistair Maitland Photography

Thank you to our season sponsors: Java Connection, Vector Research, Inanda Images, Unitech Sound and Lighting, North End Gallery, The Frame Shop, Jazz Yukon, Folk Society of Whitehorse, Hougen Group of Companies, Dean’s Strings, What’s Up Yukon

Education


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THEY’RE HIGHLY COMPETITIVE I HAVE TO HAVE THE BEST ORGANIC DIET. I HAVE TO HAVE THE BEST AND LIGHTEST EQUIPMENT. I HAVE TO BE KNOWLEDGEABLE ON TRAINING METHODS. I HAVE TO HAVE A COACH. I HAVE TO HAVE A SPORTS PSYCHOLOGIST. I HAVE TO HAVE TIME AND BE COMMITTED. I HAVE TO HAVE THE BEST TRAINING ENVIRONMENT. I HAVE TO HAVE A MASSEUSE. I HAVE TO HAVE COMPETITION IN TRAINING.

I HAVE TO HAVE TRAVEL. I CAN’T SMOKE, DRINK OR EAT JUNK FOOD. I CAN’T BE LAZY. I HAVE TO DO ELEVATION TRAINING. I HAVE TO BE A GOOD SPORTSMAN. I HAVE TO HAVE THE RIGHT PHYSIQUE. I HAVE TO BE A HUSTLER. I HAVE TO BE ADAPTABLE. I HAVE TO HAVE WILL POWER. I HAVE TO HAVE DREAMS. I HAVE TO BELIEVE IN MYSELF. I HAVE TO RESPECT MYSELF. I HAVE TO SPEND MONEY. MOST OF ALL I HAVE TO HAVE GOD.

PHOTO: J. Simon

A cautionary tale: Fairbanks, Alaska resident Jeff Oatley found himself in hot water last year with immigration officials as he rode his bike off-road from Fairbanks to Whitehorse along the Yukon Quest trail.

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May 17, 2017

whatsupyukon.com

"She's wasted. I'm gonna get lucky tonight."

"She's wasted. We're not gonna hook up tonight." 

Someone who is intoxicated cannot consent. It's your responsibility to know where to draw the line.  Find out more at: endviolenceyukon.com  May is Sexualized Assault Prevention Month.

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May 17, 2017

AuRoaring Reviews Klondike Institute of Art and Culture Dawson City, YT

April 28 - May 9 YUKON SCHOOL OF VISUAL ARTS END OF YEAR EXHIBITIONS April 28th: 6-8pm SOVA Gallery | 8-10pm ODD Gallery May 18 – June 22, 2017 TOMOYO IHAYA (VANCOUVER, BC) EYES WATER FIRE Opening reception Thursday May 19, 7:30pm Thursday, May 4 at 7:30 PM - 10 PM BAD SINGER: AN EVENING WITH TIM FALCONER & LANA WELCHMAN “The Surprising Science of Tone Deafness and How We Hear Music” Tuesday, May 16 at 6:00 GWAANDAK THEATRE PRESENTS: MAP OF THE LAND, MAP OF THE STARS Yukon peoples travelled their rivers and trails, guided by the stars. The gold rush and the highway broke connections

between land and

Tel: (867) 993-5005 Fax: (867) 993-5838 Website: www.kiac.ca

Exhibi� ons FOCUS GALLERY

John Steins: Work >> in the Yukon Art New Society Gallery: THE SEVEN TEXTILE ARTISTS On until May 27 “How Does it Felt” Exhibi�on closes December 1st, 2012

GALLERY >> in theEDGE Hougen Heritage Gallery: MaeveYUKON O’Neill ARCHIVES Sanger: Tree Line

Archival Gold: Favourites from the Vault On until May 27 Exhibi�on closes January 26, 2013

Open Studio Sessions

CLASSES

>> Ceramic Open Studio Sessions << Sundays from 2:30 to 6pm $5 per hour INTERMEDIATE ACRYLICS >> Acrylic Pain� ng GRAHAM Open Studio << WITH NEIL with Neil Graham Friday June 9 and Saturday 10of every first and third Wednesday Friday 7-10pm, each monthSaturday 7 to 9pm10am$10 per 24pm hour session

$150 + GST (students bring their To register call: 867-667-4080 Email: recep�on@artsunderground.ca own paint + brushes + lunch on Day 2. Canvases/paper included)

by Vanessa Ratjen

Playing in the Dark

Son of a Trickster by Haisla Nation member Eden Robinson illuminates empathy in unlikely heroes

“T

hink of magic as a tree. The root of supernatural ability is simply the realization that all time exists simultaneously. Humans experience time as a progression of sequential events in much the same way we see the horizon as flat: our reality is shaped by our limitations.” --excerpt from Son of a Trickster by Eden Robinson Rumbling with dark humour, real life and bewitching characters, Eden Robinson’s latest novel, Son of a Trickster, is a confident coming-of-age story with a beautifully rhythmic cadence. Set in Kitimat, British Columbia, which is the town adjacent to the Haisla Nation territory where she grew up, Robinson explores the physical and metaphysical, and inner and outer realms of Jared, “the burnout kid in highschool who sells weed cookies.” Jared lives a recognizably hard life. At 16 he’s financially and emotionally supporting family members. He drinks and swears with the learned nature of someone who has grown into those habits and he’s not always sure where he’ll wake up. The turbulence is palpable. “The world is hard. You have to be harder,” Jared’s forceful mother repeats to him throughout the novel. So Jared shoulders his responsibilities and his reckless activities with the same unruffled, at times pragmatic, and generally well-seasoned attitude. He errs on the side of unemotional (except for his dead dog, Baby Killer), and people react by calling him “a dick” to his face.

PHOTO: Amazon.ca

Witty and dark, Robinson has written an exceptionally lively novel. It’s unconventional for a “coming-ofage story” and carries some disturbingly honest observations about growing up in grim conditions. Then, without dropping a beat, Robinson introduces Wee’git, the trickster — who takes different shapes and forms in many indigenous stories, in this one: a transforming raven. Initially, Jared refuses to acknowledge Wee’git’s existence. He evades explaining or explor-

ing why ravens are talking to him, why his dreams seem to fade into real life, why he can hear Baby Killer barking in the forest, or why he sees an old woman’s face shift shape. Jared wants to remain ignorant, so the reader also remains in the dark. But at some point his denial is overwhelmed and, as his

Vanessa Ratjen is a reader and a writer. She’s done both in Nova Scotia, the Yukon, and on Vancouver Island, where she currently resides in a yurt.

Highlights

DESIGN A SUMMER SKIRT WITH JACQUELYN VAN KAMPEN

Saturdays, June 17 10am-2pm & June 24 10am-4pm $150 + GST (fabric not included, bring your own sewing machine)

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SUMMER KID CAMPS NATURE ART CAMP WITH HELEN O’CONNOR

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Ages 7-12 (5 days) July 3-7, 9am-4pm $325 + GST

Free Teen Drop In Ages 11 to 18 Free snack and meal

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Ages 7-12 (5 days) July 17-21, 9am-4pm $325 + GST

Where: 306A Alexander Street Look for the big green door!

STORIES ARTFULLY TOLD WITH MESHELL MELVIN Ages 7-12 (5 days) August 7-11, 9am-4pm $325 + GST

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perspective changes, we’re right alongside him to watch it happen. “Everyone knows a kid like Jared…” says the synopsis of the book, but part of the novel’s magic is that it seems to have a bit of that trickster personality in itself. Maybe we do know a kid like Jared, but we don’t really know Jared. Under his rough exterior, Jared is an exceptional human, and if even he doesn’t know it yet. The world is hard and Jared has many lessons to learn, however, they won’t all come to fruition in this book. Published by Penguin Random House Canada in February this year, Son of a Trickster is the first novel in her trickster trilogy. Witty and dark, Robinson has written an exceptionally lively novel. It’s unconventional for a “coming-of-age story” and carries some disturbingly honest observations about growing up in grim conditions. Robinson arrests these by keeping a delightfully anecdotal and irreverent tone. Keep an eye out for this wonderfully magnetic book and its future counterparts; like trickster, they’re sure to break all the rules. Son of a Trickster by Eden Robinson is available through the Yukon Public Library system. To borrow a copy, go to the Whitehorse Public Library, call them, or make a request online through www.YPL.gov.yk.ca.

Contact: Web: bgcyukon.com Facebook: bgcyukon Twitter: @bgcyukon zik-o-baked.afy.yk.ca

Ph. (867) 393-2824

Industrial Sewing Wood Shop Orientation May 18 @ 7:00 am - 9:00 pm Group Build: Pride 2017 Roaring 20s Gin & Jazz Event Decor May 21 @ 1:00 pm - 5:00 pm Weekly Open House May 23 @ 7:00 pm - 9:00 pm Welding 101 May 23 @ 7:00 pm - 9:00 pm HOURS Monday Closed, Tues. - Fri. 11am - 9pm Sat. & Sun. 1 - 9pm

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Jack ‘n Sack

Part 1

Caddying for Jack Nicklaus Before and After

by Doug Sack

A

lthough I can’t absolutely verify the factual accuracy of the following “claim to fame,” if I’m not the only person who had the unique opportunity to caddy for Jack Nicklaus both before he won his first professional major (1962 U.S. Open) and after his last (1986 Masters), I’m certainly one of the very few fortunate enough to do so. And, although I’ll be 70 years old on my next birthday, I recall both (with the help of some very old notes) as if they happened yesterday. Here is how both transpired: THE FIRST I was 14 years old on the weekend of Sept. 23-24, 1961 in Pleasant Ridge, an old suburb of Cincinnati, Ohio, where I was born and raised and near where my ancestors had lived since 1853. I started caddying at Losantiville CC at the age of 8-10, as soon as I was big enough to lug clubs around 18 hilly holes, because it was a better option than the other jobs available for a kid to pick up some spending money and I had tried them all: mowing lawns, washing cars, bagging groceries, setting pins and delivering newspapers. Caddying was like a paid walk in the park compared to the others and the money was better, $1.25 for nine holes or $2.75 for 18, no tips permitted.

On a good weekend you could get two loops of doubles, which came to $11, and all your money problems for the following week were solved since Dad’s $5 a week allowance was mandated by parental authority to be used solely for weekday lunches at school. Losantiville was a private country club and 95 per cent of the golfers were hopeless hackers – except for one foursome of single digits: Milt Schloss, Bernie Dave, Louie Gutmann and Dick Marcus – and it’s amazing I still recall their names. If you didn’t get one of the “Big Four” you knew it was going to be a hackarama and the best you could hope for was a lady golfer wearing a black bra under a white golf shirt. However, every September, near the autumn equinox, the club hosted a small Pro-Am, which was big enough and good enough to attract PGA pros and their amateur partners for a two-day 36 holer, which we caddies anticipated every season as our only chance to make big money before the course closed for the winter. All the caddies had numbers, based on their attendance the previous season and got to select the players they wanted, starting, of course, with #1. There were about 30 pros en-

tered, and my number that season was 33, which meant I would wind up with an amateur and be lucky to make $10 for the weekend. Sure enough, all the pros were taken when #33 was called so I logically selected the best available amateur in the field, Jack Nicklaus from just up the road aways in Columbus, Ohio and the current star of the Ohio State golf team. Nicklaus was also the reigning U.S. Amateur Champion at the time and a bit of a young hero in Ohio. Everybody pretty much knew he would eventually become a good PGA pro someday, but I doubt if anybody expected him to become the greatest golfer of all time. From my myopic point of view, I was sorely disappointed to be stuck with an amateur since the pros were well known to pay as much as $25 to a caddy if they scored well and you did a good job for them. There weren’t any stories around the caddyshack of anybody copping a good payday from an amateur, even if he was the best amateur in the country. But a funny thing happened on Sept. 23, 1961. At the end of the first day, we were winning and I was thinking about getting excited, except somebody came up to Jack when he putted out on 18,

United States Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Joe Dye

Jack William Nicklaus (born January 21, 1940), aka The Golden Bear, is a retired American golfer. He is widely considered to be the greatest golfer in history to this day. whispered in his ear and he took off like a comet heading back to Columbus. His wife, Barbara, had just given birth to their first child, or perhaps had gone into labour, and I went home that evening feeling like I was a jockey who rode his horse to first place at the halfway point then watched as he threw me onto the ground and skedaddled back to the barn. To this day I don’t know if Jack got any sleep that night, but he was back in Cincy for our Sunday tee time and continued his prodigious pulverization of Losantiville. This time as the proud father of his first of five. And my chances of

 and counting

making $25 for the weekend were looking better, too, because he was doing things to my golf course I didn’t know were possible. Dogue Sack is a retired writing junkie who can’t seem to kick the habit. He lives in Whitehorse. This is the first in a four part series by Doug Sack about his experience as a caddy for Jack Nicklaus both before the golfer won his first professional major (1962 U.S. Open) and after his last (1986 Masters).



 Printed Pages

 Magazine Covers created

 Writers since First Issue

 Copies distributed since 2005

 Yukon Stories told

oF llow us...

 Events listed

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May 17, 2017

Alphabet Soup with Els Lundgaard

e needed to find a place to The prices, the delicious-looking go for lunch that started dishes and the speed of the service with the letter “N”. Well, drew us back to it. The waitress nodwe needed look no further than the ded her approval. She met us out front North Dragon Restaurant. We were at the display table and explained the able to park right outside and go in to choices and ingredients enthusiasticcheck out their display. ally. The staff greeted us with smiles My companion pointed to the chow and friendly hellos. They pointed out mein, the vegetables and a spring roll. the choices: wonton dumplings, deep I chose the vegetables, a spring roll fried ginger beef, ginger pork, chow and, just to be different, the chicken mein, chicken fried rice, sweet and fried rice. We carried the very full sour chicken, boneless pork, vege- plates to our table in the back room. tables, deep fried chicken, and, of Even though we were in the back, course, spring rolls. It the clean windows let all looked so delicious. in enough of the sunThe board on the shine and light from The staff and various wall behind the display outside that we had listed the prices for one no trouble admiring family members dish, two dishes or the our choices before we three dish lunch spepicked up our forks settled in at a table cial. We looked around and dove in. Delicious near us and there and saw that the porand very filling. tions were generous We decided to go was much chatter and the rates, ranging with the theme and between $14 and $23 we both had green and laughter. are affordable. tea. A large teapot What decided to sit was delivered and set in the back dining room down between the and take a look at what else is avail- two of us. We ate leisurely, respecting able on the menu. the food. And had great fun catching A very friendly young woman hur- up on the latest news. ried to our table with menus and left The staff and various family memus to look it over. The descriptions bers settled in at a table near us and were detailed and the prices, again, there was much chatter and laughter. were excellent. There are many dishWe had more tea and read each es suitable for vegetarian diets and other’s fortunes, enjoying the rethere is a whole section of spicier sulting broken cookies, as well. It Cantonese dishes. wasn’t until we were slowly collecting

our things and preparing to leave, that I realized that, other than the staff, we were the only ones left in the restaurant. As we thanked the owners and family for the delightful experience and received smiles, nods and return invitations, I glanced at the restaurant hours and realized we had overstayed by more than a half hour. But we’d had no indication from the staff and friendly family. What great service! The North Dragon Restaurant is located at 2058 Second Avenue. It is open Monday to Friday from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. and from 4 p.m. to 10:30 p.m. On Saturday and Sunday they are open from 4 p.m. to 10:30 pm. You can dine in or take out. And, if you’re so inclined, you can have service in Cantonese or Mandarin, as well as English. Els Lundgaard is a Whitehorse-based writer and food lover. Questions or comments about her articles can be sent to editor@ whatsupyukon.com. She is trying out restaurants around town according to the order of the alphabet.

PHOTO: Els Lundgaard

North Dragon Restaurant W

The North Dragon Restaurant is located at 2058 Second Avenue.

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May 17, 2017

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Edible Yukon

5 Things to do with Old Seeds

with Kim Melton

Sowing the Seeds of Spring

How to scratch the spring itch for planting before the snow is gone

T

he light returns to the Yukon long before the heat and we’re still in the prime season of huge oscillations in temperature between day and night. Mornings dawn crisp – but early – and as of yet we feel no compulsion to head outside until it warms a little. Midafternoon brings mud and even t-shirt weather and long evenings have us out working in the yard until good gracious it’s after nine and I should probably make supper. In the Klondike our thawing

versity as I peer in closer. This one has a truncated first true leaf, that a knobbly bit of stem just above the seed leaves. They show a collective curve towards one side of the tray in evidence of their orientation towards the sun yesterday, a tropism that can be reversed or accentuated today depending on how they are placed. As I was sorting seeds in my early-March enthusiasm for the onset of spring I set aside many of the ancient packets that have been replaced with newer ones in a bin of “early greens.” Instead of keeping them another year and wondering if they yet have life in them, I’ve sown them en masse in large, open flats to provide our first salads. First the seeds that like to be below the surface, then a sprinkling of fine soil and finally the lettuce and other lightloving seeds. Anything that doesn’t gerPHOTO: Kim Melton minate will be Seedlings of any kind inspire awe that overwhelmed by what does, life starts from such tiny packets. and I will have a cleaner slate for next year’s ground is still a ways from yielding seed orders. anything green and growing, howI listened to a CBC podcast on ever, so as the light wakes us from seed banks recently that reminded our dormant winter state and gets me both of the great lengths of our noses sniffing about for some- time that seeds can remain vithing fresh to eat, I start sowing able, and also of the importance flats of greens to get us off to a of “living” or “revolving” banks good start. when it comes to this kind of live Seeds never cease to amaze material – instead of being stored me. I’ve been watching our to- for perpetuity seeds take kindly mato seedlings with awe, not to being grown out and saved to mention eggplants, peppers, again, a practice which has been basil, celery and a host of flowers carried out on this continent by that fill the greenhouse shelves. First Nations for an awfully long That those tiny capsules of time, more recently by European genetic material and a little hit of settlers bringing with them seeds nutrition contain the raw materi- from the Old Country, then by the als for the leafy creatures that are back-to-the-landers in the ’60s quickly outgrowing their contain- and ’70s, who we have to thank ers blows me away. for many of our seed exchanges. I look over a flat of plants oriMost recently the trend towards ginating from seeds I smeared appreciating local has inspired across a piece of paper last fall a new wave of seed savers who and note that the uniformity seen exchange seeds and learn techfrom a distance dissolves into di- niques that are as old as agricul-

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ture, growing in vertical gardens in apartments and community-run plots in urban centers as often as on rural farms and acreages. Soon enough we will be getting our first crops in the gardens outside, but until then these little trays of greens will get a weekly haircut to provide us with our first hit of comestible spring. Happy planting!

Kim Melton is an enthusiastic forager and gardener, inspired by all things that make up good,

1. 1) Run a germination test by placing 10 seeds in a damp paper towel, pack into a Ziploc bag, and set in a warm place. 2. 2) Donate them to a seed library, like the one at Energy, Mines and Resources. 3. 3) Participate in a local seedy Saturday/ Sunday. 4. 4) Start your own seed exchange with friends and neighbours. 5. 5) Make a literal mixed bag and sow thickly for your first salad of spring. 6. 6) When all else fails, make art!

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May 17, 2017

An Evolution of Music and Friendship Longtime Yukon musicians and friends Andrea McColeman and Lucie Desaulniers look back on their years of shared musical history

by Aislinn Cornett

I

t was 30 years ago, but Andrea McColeman still remembers what Lucie Desaulniers was wearing the first time they got together to jam: neon leggings and a fitness headband (à la Olivia Newton John) propping up her permed ‘do. All Desaulniers recalls about their ’90s musical inauguration, was that she was was incredibly nervous. Desaulniers may have had the jitters, but it wasn’t apparent to anybody else in that room. “I remember the first time I heard Lucie sing,” McColeman says. “Our mouths dropped open and we went, wow, can she sing! We hadn’t been around anyone who could sing like that.” For Desaulniers, the musical attraction was mutual. “Once I heard Andrea play, I knew I was in good hands.” Fast forward to today, and these well-established, seasoned Yukon musicians are still making music together. It seems not much has changed over the years, though Desaulniers’ hair is noticeably straighter. Desaulniers grew up in a musical and performing arts family in Manitoba, so playing music is a tradition she naturally carried on. She says she was always shy, but music helped bring her out of her shell. As a child, she sang in trios and choirs with her rhythmic relatives, and started crooning to bar crowds when she was 14. “It was in my blood,” Desaulniers says. She went on to study voice, piano and guitar at The Royal Conservatory in Toronto, but was deterred from playing instruments by a punitive professor’s unorthodox approach to teaching. “She would hit my fingers with sticks and stuff, so I learned to hate playing instruments,” Desaulniers says with a laugh. “But I continued on with voice.” This soulful songstress’ path lead her north in 1985 to Faro and shortly after, she landed her first gig as the lead in the musical Fiddler on the Roof. She sang in the well-known

vaudeville show The Frantic Follies for two seasons and later started a country band with conductor, musician and friend, Rachel Grantham. It was Desaulniers’ thirst to hit the festival circuit that lead her to put a band call-out advertisement in the local paper, which is how she came to meet McColeman. Born in a small town in northern Ontario, McColeman’s musical path looked a little different. She had no musical influence in her family except for her grandmother, who McColeman describes as a brilliant piano player. “She couldn’t read music, but she could play all the songs of the day,” McColeman says. “She was a

Humber College in Toronto to study jazz piano. She moved to the Yukon in 1990, and, like Desaulniers, got her big northern break through the thriving Whitehorse theatre scene after she was asked to play music for a play. “Thank you Whitehorse theatre scene!” McColeman and Desaulniers unanimously praise. After their serendipitous first jam, the pair played together for one year in Mélange, an 11-piece jazz fusion band. The duo also played weekly at the old Loose Moose café, which is now the Legends Smokehouse and Grill. Their music took a new twist when McColeman bought an ac-

PHOTO: Christian Kuntz

Lucie D and the Immortals are Paul Lucas, left, Olivier de Colombel, Lucie Desaulniers, Lonnie Powell, Andrea McColeman and Paul Bergman. bit of a… savant that way. Maybe I got the bug from her.” Like Desaulniers, McColeman says she was quite shy, but after her dad sent her off to summer music school in Grade 6, all she wanted to do was make bands. She learned how to play drums in high school, and then went on to complete a Bachelor of Music in percussion performance at Wilfrid Laurier University in Waterloo. “All I wanted to do was to play in a cover band in crappy, northern Ontario bars,” says McColeman, laughing at her lofty, youthful goals. As it turns out, McColeman skipped the grungy bar scene, and ended up playing in a symphony orchestra instead. She later went to

cordion from a consignment shop. McColeman was intrigued by the antique squeezebox she had acquired, and wondered what type of music she might play with it. Her aha moment came while listening to cajun and zydeco world music cassettes. She shared her inspiration with Desaulniers, and this style of French rhythm and blues became the driving force behind their band, Inconnu. The five piece bilingual band featured Desaulniers as lead singersongwriter and McColeman as accordion player and percussionist. The band has recorded two albums and played the Canadian summer festival circuit for more than 10 years from 1990 to 2001. Their first

Us n What It Means d n e S oem o P TO BE CANADIAN Your Entry Deadline

June 12, 2017 by Noon

hit single, “Jigi Dou,” featured Desauln i e r s ’ songwriting. PHOTO: courtesy of Lucie Desaulniers F r o m The bilingual folk/rock/pop group Inconnu were in their heyday 2001 to 2011, the during 1990s. They are Len Osland, left, Andrea McColeman, dynamic Nick De Graff, Jay Burr and Lucie Desaulniers. duo went separate will also be putting on a songwritways, with Desaulniers moving across country ing retreat at a cabin on Tagish Lake to study counselling in New Bruns- from May 15th to 22nd, where they wick, and McColeman starting a will write their own material and hopefully, record a CD afterwards. family here in the Yukon. Despite their busy lives and the “Lucie always has a project, a many miles between them, both vision and a plan. It’s something I’m women continued their musical jealous of,” McColeman says. development, especially in the “I can say that I always trust that jazz genre. Desaulniers facilitated Andrea is going to be there and that a vocal meditation group, played she is going to second guess what weekly gigs with fellow jazz musi- I’m about to do,” Desaulniers says. cians and played jazz regularly at a “She is the most attentive side perbeach resort in Moncton. son that I have ever met and I won’t McColeman credits her jazz ad- play with anybody else. We have vancement to Jazz Yukon and in- our differences, but I always know dividuals like saxophonist Duncan that she is there. That helps me do Sinclair. what I need to do, in confidence.” “We have amazing opportunities “We’ve both become better to learn through masters with Jazz musicians and our repertoire is Yukon,” McColeman says. “We are huge now!” McColeman says. “It’s a so lucky.” thick binder, so if you want to hire Fast forward six years, and these us, we’re good for just about anylongtime friends and musicians are thing you can imagine.” now back it again. Though the pair When asked what the future are busy personally and musically – holds for their musical partnership, Desaulniers is a family and marriage the pair laugh. counsellor and McColeman is a pri“We’ll be in the old folks’ home vate teacher and elementary school playing music together,” McColemusic teacher – they always make man says with a laugh. time for their craft. “You don’t stop playing music, McColeman and Desaulniers peryou hopefully just get better the form as a duo playing mostly covers, and their most recent endeav- older you get,” Desaulniers says. “If our, as of 2016, is an R&B and bossa there are good musicians around, nova band called Lucie D and the it’s not something you give up.” For Immortals, alongside fellow musi- more information about upcoming cians Paul Lucas, Lonnie Powell, events you can contact Lucie D and Paul Bergman and Olivier de Co- the Immortals through their Facebook page. lombel. Aislinn Cornett is a freelance The fusion band have a few sumwriter, artist and art therapist mer shows lined up. will be playfrom Whitehorse, Yukon. She is ing a house concert for 85 people currently writing and living on the on June 10th, as well as shows in Haines Junction this summer. They beach in Mexico.

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May 17, 2017

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A Klondike Korner with Dan Davidson

The Rush is On

The 31st Dawson City International Gold Show takes place May 19, 20

E

arly in May, with the deadlines for the 2017 edition of the Dawson City International Gold Show approaching, Coralee Rudachyk was busy, but calm. As the General Manager of the Dawson City Chamber of Commerce, she has the primary responsibility for making sure everything works out according to plan. The plan is a pretty solid one, having evolved over the last 31 years, and being able to draw on a couple of decades worth of experience from Mark Mather, owner of the Dawson City General Store, is very helpful.

The Gold Show is an industry and consumer trade show encompassing the diverse and interconnected sectors of the regional economy, with mining at its hub. Miners are invited to chat, network, buy and sell, in a relaxed and social atmosphere, which makes it a pleasure to do business. While the Klondike Placer Miners Association holds its annual general meeting in the fall, the Gold Show weekend is always the time for its spring meeting. Parks Canada will hold a “Doors Open” event during the weekend, during which people will be encour-

Gold Show inside 1.jpg – Booths inside the arena feature information and smaller technologies. Exhibitors will be setting up their displays on May 18 and by May 19 to 20 everything will be in place and ready to open. Begun in 1986, the Gold Show celebrates Dawson’s gold rush heritage as well as contemporary mining in the Klondike. It is the unofficial beginning of the summer season, by which time the ice has left the river to make way for the George Black Ferry, and the Top of the World Highway has been opened to the joint U.S./Canada border station.

aged to tour buildings that are usually closed to the public. The Dawson City Museum will have a lecture and book signing with Michael Gates, promoting his latest book From the Klondike to Berlin: The Yukon in World War I. The late Bill Bowie was one of the founders of the show, and the annual Bill Bowie Dinner and Auction will be held on Friday evening in the new event tent that the chamber has purchased as a result of the Palace Grand Theatre being

PHOTOS: Dan Davidson out of service during its renovations for the second year. This year the local ladies will also be offering their popular Boardwalk Burlesque show at this event. The new tent will also be the venue for a children’s show on Saturday morning with Will Stroet, the star of Will’s Jams on Kids’ CBC television, who is billed as an award-winning bilingual children’s musician and educator from Vancouver, B.C. The trade show is continuing last year’s practice of extending the location of the outdoor booths along Fourth Ave and out on Queen Street from the Masonic Lodge to Fifth Avenue. There are 27 outdoor booths and all had been rented by May 2. The outdoor booths feature larger mining equipment and vehicles, as well as the ever-popular selection of bedding plants, potted plants and hanging baskets that cause Dawson’s homes and businesses to leap into bloom the very next week. The 65 indoor booths in the Art and Margaret Fry Recreation Centre had been selling steadily at the time of this interview, with 70 per

The Gold Show outdoor venues are for larger mining equipment. cent of them taken. Indoor booths feature information displays by a lot of government agencies and nonprofit groups, as well as information technology booths and smaller mining related equipment. The venues are open to the public from 10 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. on both Friday and Saturday, with other events happening at other times during the two days. Both exhibitors and visitors are cautioned that the arena is unheat-

ed and can be chilly in the mornings, but that really doesn’t seem to keep people away. For more information you can visit the Dawson City Chamber of Commerce website or email office@dawsoncitychamberofcommer.ca Dan Davidson retired from 32 years of teaching in rural Yukon schools, but continues writing about life in Dawson City. Please send comments about his stories to dawson@whatsupyukon.com.

House plant sales are very popular at the Gold Show in Dawson City.

The next deadline for Arts Fund is:

June 15, 2017

Arts Fund supports group projects in literary, visual and performing arts that foster creative development and engage public participation.

There are four deadlines per year: 15th March, June, September and December. Application form and guidelines are available on our website. Applicants are encouraged to consult an Arts Advisor before applying.

phone: 867-667-3535 toll free: 1-800-661-0408 ext. 3535 artsfund@gov.yk.ca www.tc.gov.yk.ca/af @insideyukon

Performers. Storytellers. Promoters. There is a community of people just like you at MacEwan University – an active community passionate about the arts, engaged in research and innovators in their fields. The Faculty of Fine Arts and Communications has seven unique programs in the fields of fine art, design, music, theatre, arts management and communications. Don’t stop doing what you love. It’s about to take you places. Apply now and explore your creativity in our new Centre for Arts and Culture – opening September 2017.

MacEwan.ca/Creativity


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Eye on the Outdoors with Murray Martin PHOTO: Pixabay

Thunder and Lightning After a few minutes the clouds became darker and lightning was visible in the distance, but not far away.

T

hunder and lightning do not many people in various activities. seem to be as common here Last summer I was on a lake fishing in the Yukon as in southern from my boat and accompanied by Canada. However, lightning strikes another boat. It clouded over – alare probably the most common though no obvious thunderheads cause of our forest fires. were nearby – and it started to Lightning is a gigantic spark rain. Gently at first, then more jumping between a charged cloud heavily. After a few minutes the and the earth, but what actually clouds became darker and lightcauses lightning was visning is still an ible in the disitem of detance, but not bate. far away. Between To me, disLightning is a 2006 and 2013, cretion is the 26 anglers gigantic spark better part were struck of valor so jumping between and killed by I started to lightning in head to the a charged cloud the U.S.A. boat launch Anglers still and the earth, as quickly as hold the top my boat could but what actually position as far get us out of as deaths by causes lightning there. The lightning. Just other boat did is still an item of realize you likewise – or are standing debate. at least that there with a 7' was what I to 10' graphite thought until lightening rod he stopped in your hand. where the Consider that river went out of the lake and he you, in a boat, with your rod, are started to slowly troll back tothe tallest point out on that body wards the boat launch. of water. I thought that was pretty careAs a result you will be the less behaviour, but I was not going logical target if lightning happens to make myself more of a target in the area. A person struck by for lightning by stopping and suglightning is often killed instantly, gesting he get back to the boat but severe burns are also comlaunch. mon. It is a rare situation where The power and sight of a real the lightning bolt that struck a thunder and lightning storm is person is a bolt out of the blue – certainly one of nature’s greatest where it is the only sign of lightvisual treats, but we need to rening in the area. spect nature’s sometimes deadly The lightning strike on a person power. or boat has usually been preceded by other lightning in the area, Murray Martin is a but the victim was too slow about former Ontario Conservation leaving the area or worse was conOfficer and a long standing vinced that it couldn’t happen to member of The Outdoor Writers them. of Canada. Questions about his The can’t-happen-to-me synstories can be sent to drome has lead to the deaths of editor@whatsupyukon.com

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FIGHTING PROSTATE CANCER

May 17, 2017

FRIDAY, JUNE

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FRIDAY NIGHT Shipyards Park 4-8 PM Pre-registration, Music, Food & Entertainment SATURDAY: Shipyards Park 9-11 AM Registration and free breakfast by Antoinette's Shipyards Park 11:00-11:30 AM From Shipyards Park we'll parade through downtown to the Miles Canyon Lookout Head out on the Highway 11:30 AM-4 PM Ride the highways and pick up you prize run tickets Shipyards Park 4-6 PM Dinner, prizes and awards. You'll be on your way home by 6 PM, all while helping to raise money to fight prostate cancer in our local community! You could WIN this Honda Rebel valued at $4,799 Register to ride for the 1st time, you get a chance to win! Get a friend to register for the 1st time, you get a chance to win! For every $100 you raise, you get a chance to win!

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Whitehorse EVENTS ART SHOWS Until May, 26, L’école Émilie-Tremblay Primary Students Yukon Arts Centre In the Youth Gallery, the works of art were made throughout the 2016-2017 school year and explore different mediums and techniques that encourage creativity! Until, May, 26 Art Exhibit - Joyce Majiski Opening - Perambulations Yukon Artists at Work Gallery Perambulations, a show of new works by Joyce Majiski at Yukon Artists at Work Gallery. The show runs until May 26th. 333-9877 Until May, 31, Mark Preston - White Space Yukon Arts Centre Mark is a multidisciplinary artist who works in a variety of mediums. His contemporary pieces are inspired by minimalism and abstraction. Until Jun, 1, Art Exhibit: Maeve O’Neill Sanger - Tree Line Arts Underground Tree Line in the Edge Gallery, Each image is taken from an excursion in regions near to Whitehorse. Each watercolour has been framed by the artist. Until Jun, 1, Art Exhibition - John Steins: New Work Arts Underground Until Jun, 28, Art Exhibit - George Black and the Yukon Boys Arts Underground In the Hougen Heritage Gallery LIVE MUSIC Wed, May, 17 Whitewater Wednesday 7:00 PM Epic Pizza goes till we are done! Wed, May, 17 Jamaoke With Jackie 10:00 PM Jarvis Street Saloon Thu, May, 18 Jam Night with Scott Maynard 7:30 PM Best Western Gold Rush Inn Thu, May, 18 Peter Jickling Reads from Downtown Flirt, with Scott Maynard 8:00 PM Woodcutter’s Blanket Peter will read from his yet to be published poetry collection, Downtown Flirt. Scott Maynard will play music. Admission by donation. Thu, May, 18 Yukon Jack Live! 10:00 PM Jarvis Street Saloon Thu, May, 18 Yukon Live Music - Ginger Jam 10:00 PM Yukon Inn in the Boiler room fully electric jam session with PA system, drum kit and guitars provided to musicians. Featuring guest co-hosts and performers. Fri, May, 19 Yukon Musician: Anne Turner 6:00 PM Westmark Whitehorse Jazz and Easy Listening Fri, May, 19 Winter Trio - Spring Concert 7:00 PM Hamilton and Son Guitar Shop A concert of jazz & improvised music to welcome in the warmer weather. Tickets at the door Fri, May, 19 Open Mic with Patrick Jacobson 8:30 PM Town & Mountain Hotel Fri, May, 19 80s Night Tight & Bright w/ Ukes of Hazard 9:00 PM Jarvis Street Saloon Playing nothing but upbeat original songs all night long and your favorite 80’s jams! There will be a designated photo booth to capture your ridiculous new (yet old) outfits! Fri, May, 19 Karaoke 9:00 PM Yukon Inn in the Boiler Room Sat, May, 20 Karaoke 9:00 PM Yukon Inn in the Boiler Room Sat, May, 20 Yukon Jack Live! 10:00 PM Jarvis Street Saloon Sun, May, 21 Open Mic Night 3:00 PM 98 Hotel Mon, May, 22 Ladies Night with DJ Carlo 9:00 PM Jarvis Street Saloon Tue, May, 23 Arts in the Park - 21st Season Launch 11:30 AM LePage Park Come a little early or stay a little later and take a walk through our Resource Centre, meet our staff, and check out our rehearsal space. Tue, May, 23 Arts in the Park - Jazz Band 11:30 AM LePage Park Free lunch hour concert at the park Tue, May, 23 Top 40 Dance Tunz with Jon Steel 9:00 PM Jarvis Street Saloon Tue, May, 23 Yukon Live Music - Ginger Jam 10:00 PM Yukon Inn in the Boiler room fully electric jam session with PA system, drum kit and guitars provided to musicians. Featuring guest co-hosts and performers. Wed, May, 24 Whitewater Wednesday 7:00 PM Epic Pizza goes till we are done! Wed, May, 24 Karaoke with DJ Carlo 9:00 PM Jarvis Street Saloon GENERAL EVENTS Wed, May, 17, Spanish Conversation Group 12:00 PM Yukon Government Administration Building Join us inside the Bridges Café 6336081 Terry or Michèle

YES!

Wed, May, 17, Lawrence Hill at Yukon Public Libraries 12:00 PM Burwash Landing The Illegal: Refugees in the Imagination and in the Real World, author Lawrence Hill describes the research he is undertaking this year and in 2018, and welcomes all research tips. Wed, May, 17, From Dublin to New York City with Teresa Vander Meer-Chasse 5:00 PM Yukon Transportation Museum A presentation on initiatives such as the Laundromat Project and other communitybased/oriented initiatives. All are welcome, particularly those in the arts and culture sector. Wed, May, 17, Chamber Choir Rehearsal 7:45 PM Vanier Catholic Secondary Spring 2017 session for this auditioned a capella choir for mixed voices, call, or email to schedule an audition or for more information. 667-7049 Wed, May, 17, Dreamers Often Lie 8:00 PM Wood Street School A MADD production of a tale of a young teenage girl who after suffering from a dangerous skiing accident faces from disturbing dreams which is hard to distinguish on whether they are real or not. Wed, May, 17, Indigenous Film Night 8:00 PM Kwanlin Dun Cultural Centre A selection of short films and the feature film, Empire of Dirt. Wed, May, 17, Hump Day Trivia 9:00 PM Yukon Inn in the Boiler Room Thu, May, 18, See the Spectrum Differently Conference 9:00 AM Yukon Arts Centre The conference will address a range of issues and feature keynote speaker, Temple Grandin and Aspie-Comic, Michael McCreary. Thu, May, 18, Fireweed Community Market Outdoor Market 3:00 PM Shipyards Park Local produce, baked goods, live plants, local meats, Yukon art, crafted treasures and more Thu, May, 18, Jump Into Spring Wellness Workshop 6:00 PM Make IT Workspace Learn how to naturally detoxify your body for Spring using whole foods and lifestyle strategies, as well as explore how to increase your energy and curb cravings. Call 333-9662 or email contact@getdowntoearthwellness. com for more information. Thu, May, 18, Chess Corner 6:30 PM Whitehorse Public Library Chess played upstairs at the Library, beginners welcome, welcome to bring your own ‘lucky’ board. Everyone welcome to sit in on this game of strategy. Thu, May, 18, An Evening with Dr. Temple Grandin 7:00 PM Yukon Arts Centre Call 6676406 for more information. Thu, May, 18, Dreamers Often Lie 8:00 PM Wood Street School A MADD production of a tale of a young teenage girl who after suffering from a dangerous skiing accident faces from disturbing dreams which is hard to distinguish on whether they are real or not. Fri, May, 19, Beginner Guitar Whitehorse, Yukon A 4-week course for beginners and learn easy chords, simple scales & melodies. Along with sight reading and tablature reading, And the basics of fingerpicking! To register or for more information email Krista at: kristaaustad@gmail.com Fri, May, 19, - 22, Work Bee 2017 Camp Yukon Enjoy the weekend, and make a contribution that could change a child’s life forever. Fri, May, 19, Dusk’a Friday Language Lunches 12:00 PM Duska Head Start and Family Learning Center Bring a bag lunch and come learn Southern Tutchone with our special guest speakers. Call Erin Pauls for more information 633-7816. All Kwanlin citizens and staff are welcome! Fri, May, 19, Dreamers Often Lie 8:00 PM Wood Street School A MADD production of a tale of a young teenage girl who after suffering from a dangerous skiing accident faces from disturbing dreams which is hard to distinguish on whether they are real or not. Sat, May, 20, Ukes of Hazard Garage Sale Fundraiser 9:00 AM Northland Trailer Park A wild tour fundraiser garage sale.Featuring lots of clothes, music gear, nick nacks and more! there will be live music and food! Bring your spare change. #139 Sat, May, 20, Dog Wash Fundraiser 10:00

ENTER YOUR EVENTS ON-LINE It’s Free. It’s Fast. It’s Easy. Or email them to: events@whatsupyukon.com

AM The Feed Store Pet Junction All profit goes to Mae Bachur Animal Shelter Sat, May, 20, Crib Tournament 6:15 PM Royal Canadian Legion - Branch 254 Crib tournaments every Saturday - Member and non-members welcome. Sat, May, 20, Dreamers Often Lie 8:00 PM Wood Street School A MADD production of a tale of a young teenage girl who after suffering from a dangerous skiing accident faces from disturbing dreams which is hard to distinguish on whether they are real or not. Sun, May, 21, Find Your Call: Bringing the Truth & Reconciliation Calls to Action to Life 12:00 PM Mount McIntyre Recreation Centre Participants to translate the TRC’s recommendations and Calls to Action into meaningful action steps in the workplace and the community.Register by May 21. Email humanrights@yhrc.yk.ca for more information. Sun, May, 21, Whitehorse Scrabble Club 1:00 PM Best Western Gold Rush Inn Are you a wordy person, put your words to the test and join the Scrabble Club. Must be 19+ Sun, May, 21, Dreamers Often Lie 2:00 PM Wood Street School A MADD production of a tale of a young teenage girl who after suffering from a dangerous skiing accident faces from disturbing dreams which is hard to distinguish on whether they are real or not. Sun, May, 21, Ceramics Open Studio 2:30 PM Arts Underground Non-instructed open studio. Participants are welcome to use the studio’s tools and equipment; clay and some tools are available for purchase. Every Sunday except long weekends. $5/hour. Sun, May, 21, 25th Birthday Party feat. Will Stroet 3:00 PM Yukon Arts Centre Free, for all ages party, A special concert by JUNOnominee Will Stroet from CBC Kids Wills Jams. a free barbecue, games, music, arts and crafts, and local band Soda Pony. Sun, May, 21, Dreamers Often Lie 8:00 PM Wood Street School A MADD production of a tale of a young teenage girl who after suffering from a dangerous skiing accident faces from disturbing dreams which is hard to distinguish on whether they are real or not. Mon, May, 22, Free drop-in computer labs 10:00 AM Yukon Learn Free Drop-In Computer Lab for Self Directed Studies A tutor/Instructor will be available on site to assist you. 867-668-6280 or toll free: 888668-6280 Fax: 867-633-4576 Mon, May, 22, GO The Surrounding Game 6:00 PM Starbucks Chilkoot Centre Simple Game Deep Strategy. Beginners & Visitors Welcome. For more information email: tjbowlby@gmail.com Mon, May, 22, Euchre Night 6:00 PM Royal Canadian Legion - Branch 254 667-2802 Tue, May, 23, The Under Achievers 6:30 PM Arts Underground A club for painters of all skill levels. Bring your own supplies, we have easels and plenty of space. There is no instruction. Cost is free with a membership. Wed, May, 24, Painting Party! 10:00 AM CPAWS Volunteer and help paint to the CPAWS office. No painting experience is necessary, and we’ll provide all the supplies you’ll need. Lunch provided. Wed, May, 24, Spanish Conversation Group 12:00 PM Yukon Government Administration Building Join us inside the Bridges Café 6336081 Terry or Michèle Wed, May, 24, Centennial Dinner 6:00 PM MacBride Museum In celebration of 50 years of the W.D, 1967 Centennial Dinner re-creation. Dress in 1960s attire. Wed, May, 24, Lawrence Hill at Yukon Public Libraries 7:30 PM Kwanlin Dun Cultural Centre The Illegal: Refugees in the Imagination and in the Real World, author Lawrence Hill describes the research he is undertaking this year and in 2018, and welcomes all research tips. Wed, May, 24, Chamber Choir Rehearsal 7:45 PM Vanier Catholic Secondary Spring 2017 session for this auditioned a capella choir for mixed voices, call, or email to schedule an audition or for more information. 667-7049 Wed, May, 24, Hump Day Trivia 9:00 PM Yukon Inn in the Boiler Room

KIDS & FAMILIES Mondays - Friday Family Free Play Dropin 12:30pm Saturdays 10-2pm. Family Literacy Centre 668-8698 /668-6535 This drop-in includes reading time, free play and interactive activities. All Ages Welcome.. Wed, May, 17, Toddler Story Time 10:30 AM Whitehorse Public Library Appropriate for 2 - 4 yrs. of age & caregiver, Free drop-in. Wed, May, 17, Yukon Imagination Library’s 10th Birthday Party & Fundraiser 5:00 PM Whitehorse, Yukon A big-time birthday celebration with fun, games, and a mystery destination. RSVP by email to info@ yukonimaginationlibrary.ca Sat, May, 20, Family Free Play Drop-in 10:00 AM Family Literacy Centre 668-8698 /668-6535 This drop-in includes story time, free play and interactive activities. All Ages Welcome Mon, May, 22, Baby Story Time 10:30 AM Whitehorse Public Library Appropriate for ages 6 - 24 months & caregiver, Free drop-in. Tue, May, 23, Science Magic Shipyards Park All ages. Have fun with science, technology, engineering, art and mathematics. Lets stretch our minds and grow, free and drop in! Two times during the day at 1:30 - 2:30 pm and 3:15 - 4:00 pm. Tue, May, 23, Southern Tutchone Classes 8:45 AM Champagne And Aishihik First Nation - Whitehorse Office These are Free classes open to everyone. Classes are at 8.45 – 10 am, 10.45-12 pm and 12.10-12.45 pm. Call Luke at 667-5992 for more information. Tue, May, 23, Youth Silk Screen Workshop 4:00 PM Splintered Craft Create your own designs and printing your own shirts, bring your own shirt to work on or some will be available for purchase. Tue, May, 23, Youth Birders 6:00 PM Super A Porter Creek Call Jim Hawkings at 668-2639 or email yukonbirdclub@gmail.com Wed, May, 24, Toddler Story Time 10:30 AM Whitehorse Public Library Appropriate for 2 - 4 yrs. of age & caregiver, Free drop-in. MEETINGS & WORKSHOPS Wed, May, 17, Northern Voices Toastmasters 7:00 AM Sport Yukon Supportive members will help you develop your public speaking, communication and leadership skills. Drop-ins welcome. 867689-6363 toastmastersyukon@gmail.com Wed, May, 17, Lunch & Learn: Brain Aerobics for Creativity 12:00 PM Yukon Carpenters Union This mini workshop will give you tools to spark creative thinking and jump-start problem-solving in your workplace. Lunch will be provided. Wed, May, 17, YDEC AGM with Guest Speaker Trish Newport 6:30 PM The Old Fire Hall Trish will be speaking about her time in Iraq and her projects providing healthcare to Syrian refugees. Wed, May, 17, Yukon Development Education Centre AGM 6:30 PM The Old Fire Hall A special presentation by Trish Newport, Doctors without Boarders, will follow AGM. New board members welcome. Thu, May, 18, Sundogs Toastmasters Club 12:00 PM Sport Yukon A lunch time session to learn the skills, practice the speaking, receive the feedback to improve your public speaking, communication and leadership skills. Drop-ins welcome. 867-689-6363 toastmastersyukon@gmail.com Thu, May, 18, Austism Yukon AGM 12:30 PM Yukon Arts Centre In the Studio Thu, May, 18, Shut Up and Write! 2:00 PM (co)space coworking space` This event helps spike individual productivity by using the Pomodoro Technique as a group, to keep ourselves accountable. We’ll do 4 rounds of 25 minute focused sessions followed by a 5-minute break. Thu, May, 18, Monthly Coalition Meeting 5:00 PM CYO Hall Monthly Coalition (Yukon Anti-Poverty Coalition) meetings are held every third Thursday. Everyone is welcome! Thu, May, 18, Midnight Sun Toastmasters Club 5:30 PM Yukon College Room A2714. An after work meeting to help you gain confidence in public speaking, improve communication and add to your leadership skills. Drop-ins welcome. 867-689-6363 toastmastersyukon@gmail.com Thu, May, 18, Family Law Workshop Series - Managing Conflict after Separation or Divorce 5:30 PM Westmark Whitehorse

Understand the process of separation Learn how to help children cope with conflict and how to renegotiate personal boundaries and develop parenting strategies Call 667-3066 to register. Sat, May, 20, Yukon Amateur Radio Association: Coffee Discussion Group 9:30 AM Emergency Measures Organization YARA’s breakfast at the A&W. Casual event. Hams from outside the Yukon often join. Sat, May, 20, PFLAG Meeting 7:00 PM Yukon College Support for those struggling with sexual orientation and gender identity in themselves or someone they know. Everyone welcome Tue, May, 23, Amnesty International Writing Circle 7:00 PM Whitehorse United Church Writing letters to support and protect human rights worldwide. 667-2389 Wed, May, 24, Northern Voices Toastmasters 7:00 AM Sport Yukon Supportive members will help you develop your public speaking, communication and leadership skills. Drop-ins welcome. 867689-6363 toastmastersyukon@gmail.com Wed, May, 24, Grief and Frontline Professions 9:00 AM Yukon Archives This two day workshop offers an in-depth look at how we grieve Skills and resources for supporting others through loss, practical tools for reducing stress and finding balance in your professional life. Email administrator@hospiceyukon.net or call 667-7429 to register. Wed, May, 24, Tennis Yukon AGM 6:00 PM Sport Yukon Help us grow tennis in the territory! Tennis Yukon is looking for new board members and volunteers. All are welcome to attend. Wed, May, 24, Planning Meeting 7:00 PM Whitehorse United Church 50th Anniversary of Braeburn Lake Christian Camp,Planning meeting, We’d love to have your ideas. Info 668-4629. Alcoholics Anonymous Wednesday The Joy Of Living group (OM, NS) 12:00 noon 305 Wood Street -Back Entrance Porter Creek Step meeting (CM) 8:00 PM Our Lady of Victory No Puffin (CM, NS) 8:00 PM 6210 - 6th Ave Thursday The Joy Of Living group (OM, NS) 12:00 noon 305 Wood Street -Back Entrance. Polar Group (OM) 7:30 PM Sarah Steele Building, 66210 - 6th Ave Friday The Joy Of Living group (OM, NS) 12:00 noon 305 Wood Street -Back Entrance Yukon Unity Group Meeting 1:30 PM #4 Hospital Road Whitehorse Group (OM, NS) 8:00 PM 305 Wood Street - Back Entrance. Saturday Detox Meeting (OM, NS) 1:00 PM Sarah Steele Building, 609 Steele St., Main Entrance Women’s Meeting (CM, NS) 2:30 PM Whitehorse General Hospital (across from emergency) Hospital Meeting Whitehorse General Hospital (OM NS) 7:00 pm - Hospital Board Meeting. Sunday Detox Meeting (OM NS) 1:00 PM Sarah Steel Bldg. 609 Steele St., Main Entrance Hospital Meeting (OM NS) 7:00 PM Whitehorse General Hospital Monday The Joy Of Living group (OM, NS) 12:00 noon 305 Wood Street -Back Entrance New Beginnings Group (OM, NS) 8:00 PM 6210 - 6th Ave Tuesday The Joy Of Living group (OM, NS) 12:00 noon 305 Wood Street -Back Entrance Ugly Duckling Group (OM, NS) 8:00 PM 6210 - 6th Ave. Juste Pour Aujourd’hui (OM, NS) 7:00 PM 4141B 4th Ave. Phone: AA 1-877-364-7277 (24 hours a day)

We would be pleased to show you our meeting & conference facilities We would be happy to host you, we have… 98 comfortable rooms, kitchenettes & jacuzzi suites, free high-speed internet, guest laundry,

Happy Hour 4:30-7 pm Week days & all day Sunday Open Daily at Noon

irons / boards, complimentary coffee / tea, fridges and microwaves in all rooms and airconditioning throughout.

Toll Free: 1-800-661-0454 | Phone: (867) 667-2527 | Fax: (867) 668-7643 | 4220 – 4th Avenue, Whitehorse | Email: reservations@yukoninn.com | yukoninn.com


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May 17, 2017

voices across the water des voix planant sur les eaux Kwanlin Dün Cultural Centre June 1 – July 6, 2017 Witness the construction of four northern boats including a birch bark canoe, a spruce dugout canoe, a seal skin qayaq and a moose skin boat.

BIRCH BARK CANOE

MOOSE SKIN BOAT

SPRUCE DUGOUT CANOE

INUIT QAYAQ

Enjoy workshops, storytelling, cultural presentations and more throughout the entire month of June and early July! PRESENTED BY:

VISIT OUR WEBSITE FOR DAILY EVENTS. Visitez notre site Web pour des informations en français.


May 17, 2017

Living with

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Hurlburt Enterprises Inc.

9

Log lengths or stove lengths, we can take care of you. In fact, we’ll even deliver right to your location.

• Beetle-killed spruce from Haines Junction, quality guaranteed • Single & emergency half cord delivery

Hello Everybody, We invite you to share your photos of Yukon wildlife. Email your high-resolution images with a description of what’s going on and what camera equipment you used to Editor@WhatsUpYukon.com

• You cut and you pick-up available • Everything over 8” split • Prices as low as $245 per cord • Scheduled or next day delivery

We have more than firewood, we can supply wood processing equipment you need like splitters and chippers.

867-633-3276 Toll Free: 1-866-449-5192 • Mon-Fri 8 am - 6 pm, Sat 9 am - 3 pm hurlburtei@gmail.com 11 Burns Rd., Whitehorse, YT, Y1A 4Z3 Cheque,Cash, S.A.Vouchers accepted

hurlburt.ca

We will earn your satisfaction GUARANTEED!

Tell us about wine Tell us about beer Tell us about yourself

We’re looking for Columnists With Spirit!

By Laura Hill

T

he Northern Goshawk was spotted south of Watson Lake on an old logging road. The murder of crows was taken near the Yukon River in Whitehorse. The squirrel was taken in Watson Lake near the First Wye Lake.

Please email our editor: editor@whatsupyukon.com

Call For Reader Submissions

Yukoners Living With Wildlife Send us your high resolution photos with a description of what’s happening in the photo, and the camera equipment you used. Editor@WhatsUpYukon.com

FOLLOW US ON www.whatsupyukon.com


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ENTER YOUR EVENTS ON-LINE It’s Free. It’s Fast. It’s Easy.

Community EVENTS ATLIN

Wed, May, 17, Ladies’ Lunch & Carpet Bowling 7:00 PM Atlin Rec Centre Wed, May, 24, Ladies’ Lunch & Carpet Bowling 7:00 PM Atlin Rec Centre

BEAVER CREEK

Fri, May, 19, Tot Time 9:30 AM Nelnah Bessie John School Sat, May, 20, Women’s Yoga 9:00 AM Nelnah Bessie John School Just yourself in comfortable clothing Sat, May, 20, Volleyball 8:00 PM Beaver Creek Community Club Mon, May, 22, Tot Time 9:30 AM Nelnah Bessie John School Tue, May, 23, Women’s Yoga 7:00 PM Nelnah Bessie John School Just yourself in comfortable clothing Tue, May, 23, Volleyball 8:00 PM Beaver Creek Community Club

CARCROSS

Wed, May, 17, Lawrence Hill at Yukon Public Libraries 12:00 PM Burwash Landing The Illegal: Refugees in the Imagination and in the Real World, author Lawrence Hill describes the research he is undertaking this year and in 2018, and welcomes all research tips. Wed, May, 17, Healthy Choices & Nutrition Activities 9:00 AM Carcross/Tagish First Nation Building Wed, May, 17, Canada Prenatal Nutrition Program Lunch 12:00 PM Ghùch Tlâ Community School For more info:kathleen.cranfield@ctfn.ca 821-4251 Wed, May, 17, Hiroshikai Judo 6:00 PM Ghùch Tlâ Community School 332-1031 Wed, May, 17, AA Carcross 6:30 PM Carcross/Tagish First Nation Building Thu, May, 18, Executive Council Carcross/Tagish First Nation Building Thu, May, 18, CPNP Lunch 12:00 PM Carcross/Tagish First Nation Building Thu, May, 18, Pottery with Claudia MacPhee 3:30 PM Ghùch Tlâ Community School Every Tuesday and Thursday, please enter by side door. Everyone welcome! no fee for community members 8673993321 Thu, May, 18, Map of the Land, Map of the Stars 6:00 PM Ghùch Tlâ Community School In Map of the Land, Map of the Stars you’ll experience Yukon’s rivers, trails, and the people who travel them, from First Peoples to waves of newcomers. Thu, May, 18, Sewing Nights 6:30 PM Carcross/ Tagish First Nation Building Thu, May, 18, Prenatal Classes for Mothers and Fathers to be 7:00 PM Ghùch Tlâ Community School With Kathleen Cranfield, Registered Midwife and CPNP coordinator Sat, May, 20, Community Flea Market 10:00 AM Ghùch Tlâ Community School No table fee, come and set up and sell Sat, May, 20, Carcross Commons Grand Opening 10:00 AM Carcross Commons Special discounts on selected items, music from 11 to 3 with Kevin Barr and more! Sat, May, 20, Traditional Handgames 1:00 PM Carcross/Tagish First Nation Building Sun, May, 21, St. Saviours Church Service 11:00 AM St. Saviour’s Church 867-668-3129 Mon, May, 22, Art at the Carving Shed 5:00 PM Carcross/Tagish First Nation Building Mon, May, 22, AA - Tagish 7:30 PM Carcross/Tagish First Nation Building Tue, May, 23, Elders Breakfast 10:00 AM Carcross/ Tagish First Nation Building Tue, May, 23, Pottery with Claudia MacPhee 3:30 PM Ghùch Tlâ Community School Every Tuesday and Thursday, please enter by side door. Everyone welcome! no fee for community members 8673993321 Tue, May, 23, Tlingit Language classes 5:00 PM CTFN Capacity Building Tue, May, 23, Excellence Group 5:00 PM Carcross/ Tagish First Nation Building Tue, May, 23, Sports Night 6:00 PM Ghùch Tlâ Community School Tue, May, 23, Tlingit Language Game Nights 6:00 PM Carcross/Tagish First Nation Building Tue, May, 23, Women’s Group 7:00 PM Carcross Community Campus 821-4251 Wed, May, 24, Healthy Choices & Nutrition Activities 9:00 AM Carcross/Tagish First Nation Building Wed, May, 24, Canada Prenatal Nutrition Program Lunch 12:00 PM Ghùch Tlâ Community School For more info:kathleen.cranfield@ctfn.ca 821-4251 Wed, May, 24, Hiroshikai Judo 6:00 PM Ghùch Tlâ Community School 332-1031 Wed, May, 24, AA Carcross 6:30 PM Carcross/Tagish First Nation Building

CARMACKS

Mondays-Fridays Kids Club After School Program 3:30 pm Carmacks Recreation Centre Ages 5-12, snacks provided.

DAWSON CITY

Wed, May, 17, CFYT Trivia 8:00 PM The Billy Goat A fundraiser for CFYT local radio. Thu, May, 18, Art Opening: Tomoyo Ihaya 7:30 PM KIAC Klondike Institute of Art & Culture This mixed media installation and suite of drawings express

thoughts and feelings about the suffering of people who have lost their homelands and dignity through forced migration. Thu, May, 18, Open Mic In The Lounge 9:00 PM Westminster Hotel Hosted by Jonathan Howe Fri, May, 19, - 20, Dawson City Gold Show Dawson City An industry and consumer tradeshow and springtime tradition that celebrates Dawson’s Gold Rush heritage as well as the modern mining industry in the area. 993-5274 office@ dawsoncitychamberofcommerce.ca Fri, May, 19, Super Seniors Weights 55+ 11:00 AM Dawson City Fitness Centre Fri, May, 19, Women & Weights (Ladies Only) 12:00 PM Dawson City Fitness Centre Fri, May, 19, Tr’ondëk Hwëch’in Youth Centre 3:00 PM Tr’ondek Hwech’in Youth Centre Fri, May, 19, Harmonica George McConkey 6:00 PM Westminster Hotel In the Tavern Fri, May, 19, Happy Hour with Jesse Smith 6:00 PM Westminster Hotel Sat, May, 20, - 22, Centre open Saturday, Sunday, Monday 9am-5pm May 20-26 Tombstone Territorial Park Sat, May, 20, Painting 1:00 PM KIAC Klondike Institute of Art & Culture Inspire and be inspired by other artists. Bring your own ideas and painting surfaces. Paints, brushes and easels are supplied, no instruction offered. Sat, May, 20, Tr’ondëk Hwëch’in Youth Centre 3:00 PM Tr’ondek Hwech’in Youth Centre Sun, May, 21, St. Paul’s Church Service 10:30 AM St Paul’s Church 867-993-5381 Mon, May, 22, Super Seniors Weights 55+ 11:00 AM Dawson City Fitness Centre Mon, May, 22, Women & Weights (Ladies Only) 12:00 PM Dawson City Fitness Centre Tue, May, 23, Lawrence Hill at Yukon Public Libraries 7:00 PM Oddfellows Hall The Illegal: Refugees in the Imagination and in the Real World, author Lawrence Hill describes the research he is undertaking this year and in 2018, and welcomes all research tips. Tue, May, 23, Step n Strong 7:00 PM Robert Service School For more information email: getrealfit(at) me.com 867-993-2520 Wed, May, 24, CFYT Trivia 8:00 PM The Billy Goat A fundraiser for CFYT local radio.

FARO

Wed, May, 17, Yoga in the Sportsmans Lounge 4:30 PM Faro Recreation Centre No previous yoga experience needed! Led by Cathrine McCormick, Ages 15+ Wed, May, 17, Faro Fire Department Meeting 7:00 PM Faro Recreation Centre Faro Fire Department Wednesday Meeting. Thu, May, 18, Environment Club 3:45 PM Del Van Gorder School Fri, May, 19, Seniors Crib and Cards 2:00 PM Faro Recreation Centre Email recreation@faroyukon.ca or call 994-2575 for more details. Fri, May, 19, Teen Drop in Gym 7:00 PM Del Van Gorder School Sun, May, 21, Faro Church of Apostles Mass 10:00 AM Church of Apostles Sun, May, 21, Faro Bible Chapel Sunday Service 10:30 AM Faro Bible Chapel with Pastor Ted Baker 994-2442 994-2442 Mon, May, 22, Kids in the Kitchen 3:30 PM Del Van Gorder School Email recreation@faroyukon.ca Tue, May, 23, Parent & Tot Storytime 10:00 AM Faro Community Library For babies to age 4. Stories & crafts will be provided Wed, May, 24, Faro Fire Department Meeting 7:00 PM Faro Recreation Centre Faro Fire Department Wednesday Meeting.

HAINES JUNCTION

Wed, May, 17, Seniors - Drop-In and Activities 1:30 PM Haines Junction Seniors Apartments Arts, craft, fitness, pool tournaments, shuffleboard, carpet bowling, and card and board games. Refreshments. Wed, May, 17, Kids T-Ball 3:30 PM Haines Junction Ages 5-7 Good running shoes are required! For more information please call Dana MacKinnon 634-2363 or email dana.mack@outlook.com Wed, May, 17, Adult Volleyball 6:30 PM St. Elias Community School Wed, May, 17, Village of Haines Junction Council Meeting 7:00 PM St Elias Convention Centre Thu, May, 18, Elders’ Tea & Fitness Lunch 11:00 AM Mun Ku Thu, May, 18, Seniors - Carpet Bowling 1:30 PM St Elias Convention Centre All Seniors and Elders welcome! Thu, May, 18, Chair Yoga For Seniors 3:00 PM Haines Junction Seniors Apartments Thu, May, 18, Women’s Circle 5:30 PM Mun Ku Bringing women from the community together to build each other up while having dinner and doing activities. Thu, May, 18, Lawrence Hill at Yukon Public Libraries 7:00 PM Haines Junction Community Library The Illegal: Refugees in the Imagination and in the Real World, author Lawrence Hill describes the research he is undertaking this year and in 2018, and welcomes all research tips. Thu, May, 18, Open Mic 7:30 PM St Elias Convention Centre Thu, May, 18, Adult Soccer 7:30 PM St. Elias Community School Fri, May, 19, Story Hour 10:00 AM Haines Junction

May 17, 2017

Or email them to: events@whatsupyukon.com

Community Library Fri, May, 19, Friday Night Salmon Bake 6:00 PM Village Bakery and Deli Delicious food, live music, call 634-2867 or email villagebakeryyukon@gmail.com for more information. Sun, May, 21, St Christopher’s Church Service 10:30 AM St Christopher’s Church Licensed Lay Leader: Lynn De Brabandere 867-634-2360 Mon, May, 22, Yoga with Lia (Pilates Mat) - Free 12:00 PM Yukon College Haines Junction Campus Mon, May, 22, Fitness Classes - Pilates & Yoga 5:15 PM Da Ku Cultural Centre Mon, May, 22, Yoga with Marguerite 5:15 PM Yukon College Haines Junction Campus Mon, May, 22, Kickboxing 6:00 PM Da Ku Cultural Centre Kickboxing with Lee Randall is Back. For 4 Mondays. All are welcome! Tue, May, 23, Southern Tutchone Classes 12:00 PM Da Ku Cultural Centre Tue, May, 23, Takhini Family Game Night 7:00 PM Takhini Hall Wed, May, 24, Southern Tutchone Classes 8:30 AM Da Ku Cultural Centre These are free classes open to everyone. Class times are 8.40 – 10.10 am (Dákų̀ culture centre classroom) 10.30 – 12 pm (CAFN Council chambers) 1.45-2.45pm (Nätsèkhį Kù )̨ . Call Luke at 667-5992 for more information. Wed, May, 24, Seniors - Drop-In and Activities 1:30 PM Haines Junction Seniors Apartments Arts, craft, fitness, pool tournaments, shuffleboard, carpet bowling, and card and board games. Refreshments. Wed, May, 24, Kids T-Ball 3:30 PM Haines Junction Ages 5-7 Good running shoes are required! For more information please call Dana MacKinnon 634-2363 or email dana.mack@outlook.com Wed, May, 24, Adult Volleyball 6:30 PM St. Elias Community School

MARSH LAKE

Wed, May, 17, Spring Litter Campaign 6:30 PM Marsh Lake Community Centre If you would like to volunteer and help keep our highways clean just drop us a line @ 660-4999 or email managermarshlake@gmail.com Thu, May, 18, Judas Creek Migration Spectacular 6:15 PM Marsh Lake Community Centre Call Jim Hawkings at 668-2639 or email yukonbirdclub@ gmail.com Fri, May, 19, Jackalope Friday Dinners 7:00 PM Marsh Lake Community Centre Fri, May, 19, Drop-in Volleyball 8:30 PM Marsh Lake Community Centre 660-4999 managermarshlake@ gmail.com Sat, May, 20, Tot Group 10:00 AM Marsh Lake Community Centre Sat, May, 20, PUMP Bootcamp 11:00 AM Marsh Lake Community Centre 660-4999 managermarshlake@ gmail.com Sat, May, 20, Knitting Circle 1:00 PM Marsh Lake Community Centre 660-4999 managermarshlake@ gmail.com Sat, May, 20, Pickleball 2:00 PM Marsh Lake Community Centre Sun, May, 21, Drop in Badminton 11:00 AM Marsh Lake Community Centre Tue, May, 23, North of 60 Seniors Cafe 2:00 PM Marsh Lake Community Centre Tue, May, 23, Tot Group 2:00 PM Marsh Lake Community Centre Tue, May, 23, Yoga with Richard 5:30 PM Marsh Lake Community Centre 660-4999 managermarshlake@ gmail.com Tue, May, 23, Yoga 5:30 PM Marsh Lake Community Centre Drop in Yoga info@yogawhitehorse.ca

MAYO

Fri, May, 19, Dinner and Movie Night 5:00 PM Mayo Community Hall And Recreation Centre Sat, May, 20, Spring Bird Walk 8:30 AM 5 mile Lake Campground Call Jim Hawkings at 668-2639 or email yukonbirdclub@gmail.com Sun, May, 21, St. Mary’s Church Service 11:00 AM St Mary’s Church (867)667-7746 Tue, May, 23, Mayo Sewing Nights 7:00 PM Yukon College Mayo Campus

MOUNT LORNE

Sun, May, 21, Northern Backyard Garden Series 2017 1:00 PM Wheaton River Gardens Seven half day workshops that will give you seasonal experience and confidence to get growing. For more info or to register please call 667-7083 or Email lmca@northwestel.net

OLD CROW

Thu, May, 18, Adult Night at the Youth Centre 7:00 PM Old Crow Community Center Sun, May, 21, St. Luke’s Church Service 11:00 AM St. Luke’s Church 867-993-5381 Tue, May, 23, Gym Night 7:00 PM Old Crow Community Center

TAGISH

Tuesday - Saturdays Tagish Treasures Thrift Store 10:00 AM Tagish Community Centre Wed, May, 17, Tagish Library 12:00 PM Tagish Community Centre 399-3418 Wed, May, 17, Foot Wellness Clinic 1:30 PM Tagish Community Centre Wed, May, 17, Coffee and Chat: Tagish Community Centre 2:00 PM Tagish Community Centre Fresh baked goods every Wednesday. Wed, May, 17, Tagish Community Association meeting 7:00 PM Tagish Community Centre Agenda posted at tagish.ca Sat, May, 20, Tagish Library 12:00 PM Tagish Community Centre 399-3418 Sat, May, 20, Come Dine with Me Tagish 6:00 PM Six MIle River Resort Meal includes cocktail, appetizer, Main course, dessert with coffee and tea service, Call Mitch at 333-4121 for more details. Sun, May, 21, Pancake Breakfast with Sunday Morning Trivia: Tagish 9:30 AM Tagish Community Centre Third Sunday of every month. September 20th - Trivia Theme is “Are You Smarter than a Fifth Grader?’ 399-3407 recreation@tagishyukon.org Sun, May, 21, Tagish Community Church of the Nazarene 4:00 PM Tagish Community Church of the Nazarene 633-4903 tagishcc@gmail.com Tue, May, 23, Pickleball 7:00 PM Tagish Community

Centre Come try Pickleball, a new sport offered which combines table tennis and regular tennis. Wed, May, 24, Tagish Library 12:00 PM Tagish Community Centre 399-3418 Wed, May, 24, Coffee and Chat: Tagish Community Centre 2:00 PM Tagish Community Centre Fresh baked goods every Wednesday.

TESLIN

Thu, May, 18, Badminton 7:00 PM Teslin Rec Center Every Thursday, bring your racket or just bring your self for some swift fun! 335-4250 teslinrec@teslin.ca Fri, May, 19, Youth Club 8:00 PM Teslin Rec Center For grades 7-12, come hang out, games, activities and snacks! Call Kelsey 335-4250 for more information. Tue, May, 23, Yoga in the Mezzanine 5:15 PM Teslin Rec Center Every Tuesday, mats provided just bring your zen. 335-4250 teslinrec@teslin.ca Tue, May, 23, Teslin Dance Group Practice 7:00 PM Teslin Healing Centre Every Tuesday evening, for more info contact Melaina at 867.390.2532 ext. 333 or Melaina.sheldon@ttc-teslin.com

PELLY CROSSING WATSON LAKE

Daily at 12-4pm & 6-8pm Yukon`s Northern Lights Showtimes -Two scheduled shows /day 1pm and 6:30 pm – will show on request for large groups as well.Northern Lights Center Features the amazing phenomena known as the ‘Northern Lights’ or ‘Aurora borealis’, the Northern Lights Centre boasts state-of-the-art panoramic video and surroundsound systems. Wed, May, 17, Handle With Care 5:30 PM Watson Lake Family Centre Thu, May, 18, Walking Group 10:00 AM Watson Lake Family Centre Dress warm meet at the office Thu, May, 18, Help and Hope Drop in for Moms and Kids 1:00 PM Watson Lake Recreation Centre Crafts and Activities together! Thu, May, 18, Handle With Care 5:30 PM Watson Lake Family Centre Thu, May, 18, Spring Birding 6:30 PM Wye Lake Park Call Jim Hawkings at 668-2639 or email yukonbirdclub@gmail.com Thu, May, 18, Body Fit 7:00 PM Watson Lake Recreation Centre Contact Meaghan for more information 536-8023 Thu, May, 18, Drop in Curling 7:00 PM Watson Lake Recreation Centre Drop in rates apply, so please stop at the front desk before you head to the ice. Fri, May, 19, Infant Massage 10:30 AM Watson Lake Family Centre Infant massage is used to help promote longer and deeper sleeping patterns, relieve symptoms of “colic” or gassy periods, improve cardiac and respiratory output, help baby develop sense of self. Oil, snack and refreshments provided. Please call Elizabeth Bauman at 536- 7202 Sat, May, 20, Ladies Time Out Breakfast 8:30 AM Andrea’s Hotel Come out for a relaxing time of inspiration, fun, and encouragement. For more information call Ruth Holt 536-7726 or Ruth Wilkinson at 536-4542” Sun, May, 21, St. John’s Church Service 10:00 AM St. John’s Church Service (867) 536-2932 Mon, May, 22, Help and Hope Drop in for Moms and Kids 1:00 PM Watson Lake Recreation Centre Crafts and Activities together! Tue, May, 23, Parents and Tots 10:00 AM Watson Lake Family Centre Join us in song, socializing, play and lots of giggles and fun. 536-2125 Tue, May, 23, Body Fit 7:00 PM Watson Lake Recreation Centre Contact Meaghan for more information 536-8023 Tue, May, 23, Drop in Curling 7:00 PM Watson Lake Recreation Centre Drop in rates apply, so please stop at the front desk before you head to the ice. Wed, May, 24, Breastfeeding Support Group 1:00 PM Watson Lake Family Centre

HAINES

Daily Everyone Welcome Swim Haines Community Centre 11:00 AM & 5:00 PM. No Swim Sundays Mon-Thu Haines Public Library Open 11:00 am Haines Borough Public Library Haines Borough Public Library Hours: Mon-Thu 10-9 | Fri 10-6 | Sat/Sun 12:30-4:30 | 766-2545 Until May, 27, White Fang: When Hollywood Came to Haines Sheldon Museum & Cultural Centre An exhibit celebrating the filming of White Fang here in the Chilkat Valley. Listen to first-hand accounts, see hundreds of photos from the filming process, and tell us your own stories! Wed, May, 17, Aqua Aerobics 8:00 AM Haines Borough Swimming Pool Wed, May, 17, Tai Chi 10:15 AM Chilkat Center For The Arts Wed, May, 17, Tlingit Language Class 3:30 PM Sheldon Museum & Cultural Centre Wed, May, 17, Game Time @ the Library 4:30 PM Haines Borough Public Library Wed, May, 17, Kids Jujutsu 5:00 PM Chilkat Center For The Arts Wed, May, 17, Homework Help @ the Library 5:30 PM Haines Borough Public Library Wed, May, 17, Sword Class 6:30 PM Chilkat Center For The Arts Wed, May, 17, Borough Trail Meeting 7:30 PM Chilkat Center For The Arts Wed, May, 17, Open Mic Nite 10:00 PM Pioneer Bar Thu, May, 18, Tai Chi 5:00 PM Chilkat Center For The Arts Fri, May, 19, Aqua Aerobics 8:00 AM Haines Borough Swimming Pool Fri, May, 19, Tai Chi 10:15 AM Chilkat Center For The Arts Fri, May, 19, Story time @ Library 12:00 PM Haines Borough Public Library Fri, May, 19, Story time 12:00 PM Haines Borough Public Library Fri, May, 19, Yoga with Mandy 1:00 PM Chilkat Center For The Arts Fri, May, 19, Game Time @ the Library 4:30 PM Haines Borough Public Library Fri, May, 19, Homework Help @ the Library 5:30 PM Haines Borough Public Library Sat, May, 20, Haines Cancer Fundraiser Dinner 4:00 PM Southeast Alaska State Fair Grounds (Harriett

Hall) Featuring the Chilkat Dancers donated show! On the Menu: Pork Shoulder, Brauts, Stuffed Meatloaf, potato salad and beans. Throughout the night a dessert auction. Sun, May, 21, Sunday Worship 11:00 AM Haines Presbyterian Church Sun, May, 21, St Michael’s - lobby 11:30 AM Chilkat Center For The Arts Mon, May, 22, Aqua Aerobics 8:00 AM Haines Borough Swimming Pool Mon, May, 22, Tai Chi 10:15 AM Chilkat Center For The Arts Mon, May, 22, Mother Goose Stories and Songs @ Library 12:00 PM Haines Borough Public Library Mon, May, 22, Yoga with Mandy 1:00 PM Chilkat Center For The Arts Mon, May, 22, Private Jujutsu Clas 4:00 PM Chilkat Center For The Arts Mon, May, 22, Kids Jujutsu 5:00 PM Chilkat Center For The Arts Mon, May, 22, Homework Help @ the Library 5:30 PM Haines Borough Public Library Mon, May, 22, Adults Jujutsu 6:30 PM Chilkat Center For The Arts Tue, May, 23, Women’s Fellowship 3:00 PM Haines Senior Center Tue, May, 23, Tai Chi 5:00 PM Chilkat Center For The Arts Wed, May, 24, Aqua Aerobics 8:00 AM Haines Borough Swimming Pool Wed, May, 24, Tai Chi 10:15 AM Chilkat Center For The Arts Wed, May, 24, OWL- Supplemental Security Income 1:00 PM Haines Borough Public Library Wed, May, 24, Tlingit Language Class 3:30 PM Sheldon Museum & Cultural Centre Wed, May, 24, Game Time @ the Library 4:30 PM Haines Borough Public Library Wed, May, 24, Kids Jujutsu 5:00 PM Chilkat Center For The Arts Wed, May, 24, Homework Help @ the Library 5:30 PM Haines Borough Public Library Wed, May, 24, CAB - 5pm conference room 6:00 PM Chilkat Center For The Arts Wed, May, 24, Sword Class 6:30 PM Chilkat Center For The Arts Wed, May, 24, Open Mic Nite 10:00 PM Pioneer Bar

SKAGWAY

Wed, May, 17, SpinFlex w/Katherine 7:00 AM Skagway Recreation Centre Wed, May, 17, TRX Suspension Training 5:15 PM Skagway Recreation Centre Sign up required Wed, May, 17, Aerial Tissue w/Renee 7:00 PM Skagway Recreation Centre Special Fee & Sign-up Wed, May, 17, Jazz Funk Class 7:30 PM Skagway Recreation Centre Students will learn the fundamentals of jazz dance, such as isolation’s, flexibility, and balance. Great for beginners, but will have more challenging movements for those more advanced 907-983-2679 k.nelson@skagway.org Thu, May, 18, Mindful Vinyasa Flow 8:00 AM Skagway Recreation Centre Thu, May, 18, Senior Chair Based Weight Training 10:30 AM Skagway Recreation Centre Chair based resistance training program that’s not just for seniors. Thu, May, 18, Dance Fusion with Kaera New Latin Hip Hop Class 5:00 PM Skagway Recreation Centre Thu, May, 18, Easy Does it Yoga- Restorative Yoga w/Jeanne- ALL Level 6:15 PM Skagway Recreation Centre Thu, May, 18, Basketball For Adults 7:00 PM Skagway Recreation Centre Fri, May, 19, Spinning w/ Dena 7:00 AM Skagway Recreation Centre Sat, May, 20, Senior Chair Based Weight Training 10:30 AM Skagway Recreation Centre Chair based resistance training program that’s not just for seniors. Sat, May, 20, Bouncy House Fun Time! 12:00 PM Skagway Recreation Centre A parent or guardian must accompany children 12 and under. Sat, May, 20, Dance Fusion with Kaera New Latin Hip Hop Class 5:00 PM Skagway Recreation Centre Sat, May, 20, Volleyball For Adults 6:00 PM Skagway Recreation Centre Sun, May, 21, Aerial Tissue w/Renee 6:00 PM Skagway Recreation Centre Special Fee & Sign-up Sun, May, 21, Talk to the Hands - Sign Language Classes 7:00 PM Skagway Recreation Centre Join Crystal Ketterman every Sunday for 5 weeks, To register call 907-983-2679 or email reccenter@ skagway.org Mon, May, 22, SpinFlex w/Katherine 7:00 AM Skagway Recreation Centre Mon, May, 22, Easy Does it Yoga- Restorative Yoga w/Jeanne- ALL Level 10:00 AM Skagway Recreation Centre Mon, May, 22, TRX Suspension Training 5:15 PM Skagway Recreation Centre Sign up required Mon, May, 22, Roller Hockey For Adults 7:00 PM Skagway Recreation Centre Mon, May, 22, Teen - Adult Hip Hop 7:30 PM Skagway Recreation Centre Students will learn the latest styles of street dancing, breaking, popping, and locking. 907-983-2679 k.nelson@skagway.org Tue, May, 23, Mindful Vinyasa Flow 8:00 AM Skagway Recreation Centre Tue, May, 23, Back/Hip Yoga with Myofascial Release and Acupressure 10:00 AM Skagway Recreation Centre Tue, May, 23, Senior Chair Based Weight Training 10:30 AM Skagway Recreation Centre Chair based resistance training program that’s not just for seniors. Tue, May, 23, Dance Fusion with Kaera New Latin Hip Hop Class 5:00 PM Skagway Recreation Centre Tue, May, 23, Basketball For Adults 7:00 PM Skagway Recreation Centre Wed, May, 24, SpinFlex w/Katherine 7:00 AM Skagway Recreation Centre Wed, May, 24, TRX Suspension Training 5:15 PM Skagway Recreation Centre Sign up required Wed, May, 24, Aerial Tissue w/Renee 7:00 PM Skagway Recreation Centre Special Fee & Sign-up Wed, May, 24, Jazz Funk Class 7:30 PM Skagway Recreation Centre Students will learn the fundamentals of jazz dance, such as isolation’s, flexibility, and balance. Great for beginners, but will have more challenging movements for those more advanced 907-983-2679 k.nelson@skagway.org


May 17, 2017

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whatsupyukon.com

MAY 31-JUNE 3, 2017 NORTH WORDS WRITERS SYMPOSIUM Acclaimed world travel and fiction writer Paul Theroux to keynote 2017 North Words Writers Symposium

A

fter writing nearly fifty books of nonfiction and fiction set in the most exotic of locales, America’s greatest travel writer is finally headed for one of Alaska’s most notorious: Skagway. Paul Theroux will lead a faculty of seven acclaimed authors at the 8th annual North Words Writers Symposium May 31-June 3 in historic Skagway, Alaska. An inordinate percentage of Alaska households (including seasonal cabins) feature a well-worn copy of Theroux on their shelves—travel classics like The Great Railway Bazaar and The Old Patagonia Express, meaty fiction ala The Mosquito Coast, or the cultural satire of Blinding Light. The places, people, and stories which arise from Theroux’s considerable literary talents define a territory in American letters that belong wholly to the master; we are honored that he would consider extending his borders to include North Words, and encourage readers and writers to join us for the celebration. When Theroux lands in Skagway, he will bring his latest published work, Mother Land (Houghton Mifflin, May 2017), “a richly detailed, darkly hilarious novel” about a narcissistic matriarch of a Cape Cod family whose affections

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and quirks drive the saga of a “vast family that bickers, colludes, connives, and ultimately overcomes the painful ties that bind them.” A maximum of 50 registrants at the 2017 North Words Symposium will also engage with a dazzling faculty of Alaskan writers that includes John Straley, Sherry Simpson, Deb Vanasse, Tom Kizzia, Andy Hall, and Lenora Bell. Former Alaska writer laureate John Straley is the celebrated author of mystery, history, and poetry. His tenth crime novel is called Baby’s First Felony. Sherry Simpson’s first book, The Way Winter Comes, has become an Alaska literary staple; her most recent book is Dominion of Bears: Living with Wildlife in Alaska. Thirty-six years in Alaska enriches the writing of Deb Vanasse, author of seventeen books, whose latest work Wealth Woman: Kate Carmack and the Klondike Race for Gold, is a deeply researched biography of a Native woman’s role in the discovering the legendary gold of ’98. Longtime Homer, Alaska journalist Tom Kizzia’s latest book, Pilgrim’s Wilderness: A True Story of Faith and Madness inhabited the New York Times bestseller list and pegged #5 on Amazon’s Top Ten Books of the Year” list. Al 10 lA % for lask o Yu a A ff ko pp ne are rs l

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Incredible people fuel the symposium panel discussions, but much of the unique spirit of North Words derives from the wild world beyond Skagway’s boardwalk. Symposium participants will ride the White Pass and Yukon Route railroad 18 fabled miles up narrowgauge tracks to the Laughton Glacier trailhead. Participants choose a guided hike to the glacier or a short walk to a rustic cabin for a guided writing experience. On another day, symposium participants are shuttled to a cookout party at Alderworks Alaska Writers & Artists Retreat near the ghost-town of Dyea. Registration also includes most meals, including an opening reception and keynote banquet.

OPEN EVERYDAY 5 th & Broadway · 907-983-2370

The North Words staff includes bon vivant Buckwheat Donahue, editor-writer Jeff Brady, publishermarketer Katrina Woolford, and teacher-writer Daniel Lee Henry. There is still time to register! North Words is open to all writers, aspiring or professional, who seek inspiration, direction, a flesh-andblood social network, and fun. One or two credit hours may be earned through University of Alaska Southeast. Sign up soon, as more than 30 were already registered by early May. See http://nwwriterss.com North Words is a non-profit event supported by its fiscal sponsor, Skagway Development Corporation – Community Development Services, with generous support from the Municipality of Skagway and other donors.

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To donate to the event, please visit the Sponsor page on the website. CONTACT: northwordsinfo@gmail.com

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Longtime editor of Alaska magazine, Andy Hall’s latest book is Denali’s Howl: The Deadliest Climbing Disaster on America’s Wildest Peak, a nonfiction account of the tragic 1967 Wilcox Expedition. Lenore Bell’s debut historical romance novel How the Duke was Won garnered the coveted Golden Heart Award from the Romance Writers of America. Her third book in the Duke series hits the stands about the time she hits Broadway in Skagway.

MON-SAT 10 AM-6 PM, SUNDAY 11 AM-5 PM

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907-983-3562

Whale watching Bus tour of Juneau & Mendenhall Glacier Time for shopping, lunch, sightseeing

Continental breakfast & light dinner provided. CANADA CASH AT PAR May 14, 17, 20, 21, 22, 25, 27, 28, 29, 30 June 1, 3, 5, 6, 8, 10, 11, 12, 13, 15, 16

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May 17, 2017

Take My Jeans… Please

PHOTOS: Els Lundgaard

by Els Lundgaard I stopped by Second Show Kids Consignment at 4200C 4th Ave.

I

t’s May. The time to springclean which, for me, means emptying out my closets and passing on the gently-worn-butno-longer-fitting clothes to someone else to love. Especially my jeans, which have survived my hopes of losing weight or growing taller or simply waking up one day with a perfect body. The jeans that are like new, but taking up way too much room in my closet. Out they go! But where to? I was dismayed to discover that the Sally Ann, aka the Salvation Army Thrift Store, that had been beside Tag’s on Fourth Avenue for many years, had closed in April. I can’t really blame them when it, supposedly, cost more to provide a venue for used clothing than they brought in by selling them. Such stores in southern cities have a buyer for apparel that

doesn’t sell, companies that recycle textiles into cleaning rags or shred them for ultimate use in insulation. Can you see my jeans keeping a brand new mansion warm? Value Village stores in urban areas are laid out like large department stores, with racks of men’s, women’s and children’s clothing arranged by size, category, and season. They have paid staff who sort and cull the donations, like the stuff my mother brings to the Winnipeg store. Both Value Village and large urban Sally Ann stores also have a large customer base to draw from. Their expansive, well-lit aisles are always busy. And they have the reputation of being a site where smart shoppers go for a deal, while at the same time contributing to the needs of the organiza-

tion and their users. Whitehorse doesn’t have a big enough population to support a huge used-clothing market like Value Vil-

lage, but we do have a handful of stores that specialize in used clothing and

Claire Strauss at the Whitehorse Flea Market. I tore up there to see if it would be a viable idea to sell my jeans there.

goods. I went on a mission to see if one of them would take my jeans. Here are the options I found: Sequels Consignment I tried Sequels Consignment shop at 100, 303 Strickland St. They get around being inundated with unsellable stock by having strict criteria for accepting clothing to be sold by consignment. On the website, owner Tracy McLellan has one page devoted to what brand names they prefer: nothing from Reitmans, Mark’s, Denver Hayes, or Warehouse One, for example. If your items meet the specs, then you must make an appoint-

ment online for a 10 minute dropoff slot. You may bring up to 15 suitable items, that are clean, pressed and/or steamed and each on its own hanger. You may have only one appointment per month and if the slots are all filled you must wait until the next month. Your items must be no more than three years old. Renueva I found a new little shop at 508E Main St. called Renueva, which stocks recycled clothing. Proprietor Karin Martinez Gomez started it as a sewing and alterations service and expanded to selling vintage and reworked items. cont’d on page 27...

heritageyukon.ca

The 19th Annual Yukon/Stikine Regional Heritage Fair was held May 4, 2017 at the Yukon Transportation Museum and the Yukon Beringia Interpretive Centre in Whitehorse.

Sixty-six students from 13 schools in the Yukon and Atlin, B.C. participated, including: Atlin Community School (ACS), Chief Zzeh Gittlit School (CZGS), Christ the King Elementary School (CKES), Elijah Smith Elementary School (ESES), Eliza Van Bibber School (EVBS), Golden Horn Elementary School (GHES), Hidden Valley Elementary School (HVES), Jack Hulland Elementary School (JHES), Kluane Lake School (KLS), Robert Service Community School (RSCS), St. Elias Community School (SECS), Tantalus Community School (TCS), and Ecole Whitehorse Elementary School (EWES). Grade 4 Awards 1st Place: Who invented the life-saving suit? by Ailie Robertson (GHES) 2nd Place: How did 7 men from Dawson change Stanley Cup history forever? by Hannah Cibart (GHES) 3rd Place: What is the Yukon Quest by Leah Maclean and Sydney Sinclair (EWES)

Grade 5 Awards 1st Place: Gold Rush or Bone Rush? by Anneke Aasman (CKES) 2nd Place: Who made a great impact on Canadian Music? by Jazzen Patterson (GHES) 3rd Place: History of Traditional Herbal Medicine by Justine Bellmore-Smarch and Soraya Oliverio (TCS)

Grades 6/7 Awards 1st Place: The Frantic Follies by Cadence Milford (GHES) 2nd Place: Far from Home by Shakina Johnson (SECS) 3rd Place: Gwich’in People and their use of Dogs by Tyra Benjamin (CZGS)

Yukon History Hunter Awards

Genealogy Awards:

Best Graphic Design:

Faith Fenton by Marie Mabilog (CKES) AND Following in the Footsteps of Funston’s 1893 Chilkoot Journey by Kalie Bennett (GHES)

Short Circuit: Richard Thompson by Ethan Thompson (SECS) AND Soaring High by Brooklyn Miller (SECS)

The Franklin Expedition by Cadence Hartland (HVES)

Special Awards for exceptional research and investigation in developing a project, sponsored by Michael Gates

Palaeontology or Archaeology Award Sponsored by Yukon Government Palaeontology Department

Gold Rush or Bone Rush? by Anneke Aasman (CKES)

Oral History: projects that demonstrate

exceptional use of Oral History, sponsored by Linda Johnson and Lori Eastmure

Northern Tutchone Language and Culture by Rena Simon (EVBS)

projects related to family stories and histories, sponsored by Maggie Leary

Archives Award:

for projects that demonstrate use and citation of archival resources, both in person/or online, sponsored by Yukon Archives

How did 7 men from Dawson change Stanley Cup history forever? by Hannah Cibart (GHES)

Grades 8/9 Awards 1st Place: Northern Tutchone Language and Culture by Rena Simon (EVBS) 2nd Place: Issues Facing the Porcupine Caribou Herd by Candace Tetlichi (CZGS) 3rd Place: The Gwich’in Nation by Jocelyn Benjamin (CZGS)

Congratulations to every student who participated! for projects that demonstrate exceptional graphic design, sponsored by Patricia Halladay

Yukon Heritage Award:

sponsored by the Government of Yukon, Department of Education

Fiddling in the Snow with Style by Meena Zanger (EWES) Midnight Arts Award:

for projects that demonstrate exceptional research and writing, sponsored by Rob Ingram and Helene Dobrowolsky

Issues Facing the Porcupine Caribou Herd by Candace Tetlichi (CZGS)

First Nation History & Culture Award Sponsored by Linda Johnson and Lori Eastmure

Tlingit People by Mariella Wentzell and Janelle Virmoux-Jackson (EWES)

Parks Canada Peoples’ Choice Awards: Grades 4/5: History of Traditional Herbal Medicine by Justine Bellmore-Smarch and Soraya Oliverio (TCS) Grades 6/7: Canada’s Women, Canada’s Game by Wynne Anderson-Lindsay (EWES) Grades 8/9: Issues Facing the Porcupine Caribou Herd by Candace Tetlichi (CZGS)

Thank you to our many volunteers & organizers. Thank you to our 2017 Sponsors:


May 17, 2017

27

whatsupyukon.com

Take my jeans please... cont’d

Considered having a garage sale. Even the thought made me tired.

She calls used clothing “treasures” to be altered, recycled and loved. As a bonus, she is also a certified second level reiki therapist and speaks Spanish. I asked Karin if she would consider taking used clothing to sell and she is happy to, either on consignment or by donation. I stopped by Second Show Kids Consignment at 4200C 4th Ave., but they were closed when I did; they are open only 12 p.m. to 6 p.m. Tuesday to Saturday. But their policy for accepting clothing is clearly posted on the door. Seems another used clothing outlet was learning from experience. As well, their website says they can’t take any clothes that came from Walmart, Superstore or Target, as there would be little wiggle room in the resale value – and resulting consignment payout for the person who brought the clothes in. The Free Store

I swung by Raven Recycling to check out their free store. It was clean and almost empty – which is not surprising since their last day was May 8.

I swung by Raven Recycling to check out their free store. It was clean and almost empty – which is not surprising since their last day was May 8. I was disappointed to hear they would close, too, especially after they had just received funding to staff the free store. However, according to their website, they will take textiles (fabric, clothing, sheets and shoes) to be baled and shipped to a broker in Vancouver for reuse and recycling. All For You Consignment I called All For You Consignment, located at the bottom of the Two Mile Hill. They take furniture and wool sweaters on consignment, but all other clothing has to be donated because, as the owner lamented, everyone expects to pay only one dollar. Whitehorse Flea Market The Whitehorse Flea Mar-

I found a new little shop at 508E Main St. called Renueva, which stocks recycled clothing.

ket had its first event on May 6, next to Changing Gear, at the top of Two Mile Hill, next to ChangingGear, in the old Cliffside Gardens location on the highway, heading north. I tore up there to see if it would be a viable idea to sell my jeans there. Tables at the first sale were all taken; many folks took advantage of the opportunity. The atmosphere was jolly and the ambience friendly. The many tables boasted a variety of bright and esoteric offerings. But I couldn’t see myself sitting there pushing my jeans. Perhaps I could hire someone but that would put me in the same boat as the Sally Ann. More expense than return. Sell it Yourself? I considered having a garage sale. Even the thought made me tired. I’m not one for sitting on a kitchen chair in my driveway and negotiating the price of sentimental items. No, I will not take

I tried Sequels Consignment shop at 100, 303 Strickland St. They get around being inundated with unsellable stock by having strict criteria for accepting clothing to be sold by consignment.

a quarter. And, yes, my jeans are memorable. I tried Kijiji. It’s either feast or famine. While the site is easy to use, and free, the anticipation of a sale is crushing. Your item sells immediately or never. And, it’s difficult to photograph jeans so that they look particularly inviting. And, no, modelling them was not an option. I thought of just throwing my jeans away but that offends my sensibilities and my recycling gene. Besides, I don’t know whether they’re supposed to go in the grey garbage bin or the green compost bin. And, can you imagine having to remove the metal buttons first? So, here I sit with a pile of jeans on my lap. While the Sally Ann and the Raven Free Store are no longer an option, I can check with Sequels to see if my denim measures up – that is if I can get in

this month or the next. I can donate them to All For You so they can sell them for a dollar or donate them to Renueva to be sold as-is or reworked. I can try shrinking them so they’ll fit at Second Show (haha) or I can plan a yard sale and hope it doesn’t rain. I can book a table at the Flea Market and visit with the other vendors. I can post denim photos on Kijiji or take out an ad in one of the newspapers. Or, perhaps, I can lose weight or grow taller or wake up with the perfect body and just keep my jeans. Els Lundgaard is a Whitehorsebased writer. Questions or comments about her articles can be sent to editor@ whatsupyukon.com.

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May 17, 2017

Active Interest LISTINGS

Assisting Yukon film and video professionals in developing careers and businesses. Next application deadline:

June 1, 4:00 p.m. Applications can be picked up from the Yukon Film & Sound Commission office at 303 Alexander St., 1st Floor, Whitehorse, or online at www.reelyukon.com Completed applications can be dropped off at our office or mailed to: Yukon Film & Sound Commission Box 2703 (F-3) Whitehorse, YT Y1A 2C6 Phone: 667-5400 Toll Free: 1-800-661-0408, ext. 5400 Email: info@reelyukon.com Web: www.reelyukon.com

Wed, May, 17 Insanity Live - Mornings 6:00 AM Peak Fitness Get ready to unleash your inner athlete and reach your personal best—because progress starts outside your comfort zone. 6 Weeks Wed, May, 17 MommyFIT: New Post-Natal Bootcamp 10:30 AM N60 Combative Arts For 8 weeks, Each week will get progressively more challenging, for all fitness levels! trainmetara@gmail.com Wed, May, 17 Aikido Yukon Kids Advanced Classes 4:30 PM Aikido Yukon Dojo Level: Yellow+ belt. Sessions now has several elements, one every 4 weeks. Each element covers physical skills, techniques, cultural aspects and stories. First class is always FREE, feel free to come try anytime (we will lend you an uniform). (867) 667-4690 info@aikidoyukon.ca Wed, May, 17 Buns and Guns - with Sasha Sywulsky 5:15 PM Long Lean Mean Fitness All strength class, focusing on toning the muscles in your arms and glutes. With fun music and a high-energy instructor, you will condition, strengthen and tone some of the biggest muscle groups in your body. 334-3479 longleanmean@hotmail.ca Wed, May, 17 Scottish Country Dancing 5:30 PM Elijah Smith Elementary School Adults of any age. Families welcome. No experience necessary. For more info call Pat at 668-4976 or Kat at 334-1547. Wed, May, 17 Adult Drop In 7:45 PM Polarette’s Gymnastic Club Call 668-4794 or email info@polarettes.org for more information. Thu, May, 18 Power Core 12:15 PM Long Lean Mean Fitness Health and strength start with the core. We will help you build a more stable, powerful abdomen and lower back to improve fitness, straighten posture and provide a foundation for an active daily life. Please register

online Thu, May, 18 One Hour Drop In Classes - Barreilates 5:15 PM Long Lean Mean Fitness This class sculpts, tones, and gives you a strong core. Register online or call 334-3479 for more information. Thu, May, 18 One Hour Drop In Classes - Barre Body Blast 5:20 PM Long Lean Mean Fitness This class will take you through interval strength training, isometric holds, and deep muscle work that will all result in strong, long and beautiful muscles. Register online or call 334-3479 for more information. Thu, May, 18 Bouldering with ACC 7:30 PM Yukon College Email for location, membership details info@accyukon.ca Thu, May, 18 Youth Drop In 7:45 PM Polarette’s Gymnastic Club Ages 10 - 17 yrs. Call 668-4794 or email info@polarettes.org for more information. Limit of 25 participants, arrive early. Fri, May, 19 - 21, 2017 Yukon Development + Prospect Camp Whitehorse, Yukon Prospects Camp - Players born in 1998 to 2002, Development Clinics - Players born in 2003 & younger. For more information contact Carl Burgess Hockey Yukon President 333-4900 Fri, May, 19 Insanity Live - Mornings 6:00 AM Peak Fitness Get ready to unleash your inner athlete and reach your personal best—because progress starts outside your comfort zone. 6 Weeks Fri, May, 19 MommyFIT: New Post-Natal Bootcamp 1:30 PM N60 Combative Arts For 8 weeks, Each week will get progressively more challenging, for all fitness levels! trainmetara@gmail.com Fri, May, 19 Golden Horn Judo 3:30 PM Golden Horn Elementary Fri, May, 19 Aikido Yukon Teenager Class 13+ 4:00 PM

ENTER YOUR EVENTS ON-LINE It’s Free. It’s Fast. It’s Easy. Aikido Yukon Dojo Sessions now has several elements, one every 4 weeks. Each element covers physical skills, techniques, cultural aspects and stories. First class is always FREE, feel free to come try anytime (we will lend you an uniform). (867) 667-4690 info@aikidoyukon.ca Fri, May, 19 One Hour Drop In Classes - Pilates 5:15 PM Long Lean Mean Fitness This class strengthens and tones the entire body. Focusing on the abs and the back muscles to improve posture and alleviate back pain. Register online or call 334-3479 for more information. Sat, May, 20 Insanity 1:15 PM Long Lean Mean Fitness You’ll do cardio and plyometric drills with intervals of strength, power, resistance, and core training. It all happens in long bursts of maximum-intensity exercises with short periods of rest, so you can get crazy-good results. Please register online Sun, May, 21 Birdsong Workshop 7:30 AM Super A Porter Creek Call Jim Hawkings at 668-2639 or email yukonbirdclub@gmail.com Mon, May, 22 MommyFIT: New Post-Natal Bootcamp 1:30 PM N60 Combative Arts For 8 weeks, Each week will get progressively more challenging, for all fitness levels! trainmetara@gmail.com Mon, May, 22 Total Body Strength Classes 7:30 PM Physio Plus Class sizes are limited to 8 people, are co-ed and will go for 6 weeks. For more information call 322-7587. Tue, May, 23 Barre 5:15 PM Long Lean Mean Fitness Barre combines Pilates, yoga and ballet moves to give you beautiful, sculpted, lean muscles-without the impact from other fitness classes. Please register online Tue, May, 23 Beginner Yoga 7:30 PM Long Lean Mean Fitness Focuses on teaching basic yoga postures, healthy alignment of the spine, as well as strengthening the

musculature that supports the body. Register online or call 334-3479 for more information. Tue, May, 23 Youth Drop In 7:45 PM Polarette’s Gymnastic Club Ages 10 - 17 yrs. Call 668-4794 or email info@polarettes.org for more information. Limit of 25 participants, arrive early. Wed, May, 24 Total Body Strength Classes 6:45 AM Physio Plus Class sizes are limited to 8 people, are co-ed and will go for 6 weeks. For more information call 322-7587. Wed, May, 24 MommyFIT: New Post-Natal Bootcamp 10:30 AM N60 Combative Arts For 8 weeks, Each week will get progressively more challenging, for all fitness levels! trainmetara@gmail.com Wed, May, 24 Aikido Yukon Kids Advanced Classes 4:30 PM Aikido Yukon Dojo Level: Yellow+ belt. Sessions now has several elements, one every 4 weeks. Each element covers physical skills, techniques, cultural aspects and stories. First class is always FREE, feel free to come try anytime (we will lend you an uniform). (867) 667-4690 info@aikidoyukon.ca Wed, May, 24 Buns and Guns - with Sasha Sywulsky 5:15 PM Long Lean Mean Fitness All strength class, focusing on toning the muscles in your arms and glutes. With fun music and a high-energy instructor, you will condition, strengthen and tone some of the biggest muscle groups in your body. 334-3479 longleanmean@hotmail.ca Wed, May, 24 Scottish Country Dancing 5:30 PM Elijah Smith Elementary School Adults of any age. Families welcome. No experience necessary. For more info call Pat at 668-4976 or Kat at 334-1547. Wed, May, 24 Adult Drop In 7:45 PM Polarette’s Gymnastic Club Call 668-4794 or email info@polarettes.org for more information.

True North Massage & Yoga Tuesdays until May 30th, Suitable for all levels including those with some yoga experience.. Drop in or call 393-2628 register. Tue, May, 23, Weight Watchers 5:00 PM Yukon College Please arrive 30-minutes prior to the listed meeting time for weigh-in and registration, room A2202. 403-473-0645 blong@weightwatchers.ca Tue, May, 23, Golden Horn Yoga 6:00 PM Golden Horn Elementary Terice 668-6631 Wed, May, 24, The Counselling Drop-In Clinic 10:00 AM Many Rivers Counselling and Support Services Free Drop-In counselling is offered every Wednesday from 10am - 4pm. Wed, May, 24, Women & Children Lunch Date 11:30 AM Victoria Faulkner Women’s Centre Delicious Free Lunch for Women & Children

Friday The Joy Of Living group (OM, NS) 12:00 noon 305 Wood Street -Back Entrance Yukon Unity Group Meeting 1:30 PM #4 Hospital Road Whitehorse Group (OM, NS) 8:00 PM 305 Wood Street Back Entrance. Saturday Detox Meeting (OM, NS) 1:00 PM Sarah Steele Building, 609 Steele St., Main Entrance Women’s Meeting (CM, NS) 2:30 PM Whitehorse General Hospital (across from emergency) Hospital Meeting Whitehorse General Hospital (OM NS) 7:00 pm - Hospital Board Meeting. Sunday Detox Meeting (OM NS) 1:00 PM Sarah Steel Bldg. 609 Steele St., Main Entrance Hospital Meeting (OM NS) 7:00 PM Whitehorse General Hospital Monday The Joy Of Living group (OM, NS) 12:00 noon 305 Wood Street -Back Entrance New Beginnings Group (OM, NS) 8:00 PM 6210 - 6th Ave Tuesday The Joy Of Living group (OM, NS) 12:00 noon 305 Wood Street -Back Entrance Ugly Duckling Group (OM, NS) 8:00 PM 6210 - 6th Ave. Juste Pour Aujourd’hui (OM, NS) 7:00 PM 4141B 4th Ave. Phone: AA 1-877-364-7277 (24 hours a day)

Wellness LISTINGS Wed, May, 17, The Counselling Drop-In Clinic 10:00 AM Many Rivers Counselling and Support Services Free Drop-In counselling is offered every Wednesday from 10am - 4pm. Wed, May, 17, Women & Children Lunch Date 11:30 AM Victoria Faulkner Women’s Centre Delicious Free Lunch for Women & Children Wed, May, 17, Red Tara Meditation 6:00 PM White Swan Sanctuary Everyone welcome. For more info contact Vicky 633-3715 Thu, May, 18, Stillness Circle 5:00 PM White Swan Sanctuary Finding stillness within through mediation, conscious breathing, music and yoga. Yoga is beginners level with Margriet Blok. Please email for more information. razam70@hotmail.com Thu, May, 18, Jump Into Spring Wellness Workshop 6:00 PM Make IT Workspace Learn how to naturally detoxify your body for Spring using whole foods and lifestyle strategies, as well as explore how to increase your energy and curb cravings. Call 333-9662 or email contact@ getdowntoearthwellness.com for more information. Fri, May, 19, Sally & Sisters Lunch 12:00 PM Whitehorse Food Bank Free Hot Lunch for Women & Children 3349317 Fri, May, 19, Meditation & Movement with Amy 7:00 PM True North Massage & Yoga With instructor Amy GarciaBaker, Karma Class is free Friday nights until June 30th. A combination of meditation and yoga. Great for Beginners. Sat, May, 20, Shanti Yoga Drop-in with Sabu 10:30 AM

Montessori Borealis Preschool These classes are all levels and open to everyone. Beginners are welcome. If you have further questions please call 335-2457. Sat, May, 20, Insanity Saturdays 1:15 PM Peak Fitness Challenging, group-focused athletic training, cardio conditioning, and total-body strength drills, designed for people of ALL levels. The moves are easy to follow—but the workout WILL challenge you and change you. 3354281 BRITTYFIT@GMAIL.COM Sat, May, 20, PFLAG Meeting 7:00 PM Yukon College Support for those struggling with sexual orientation and gender identity in themselves or someone they know. Everyone welcome Mon, May, 22, Sally & Sisters Lunch 12:00 PM Whitehorse Food Bank Free Hot Lunch for Women & Children 3349317 Mon, May, 22, Calming Flow Yoga with Steph B 5:00 PM True North Massage & Yoga Mondays until May 31st, Suitable for all levels including those with some yoga experience.. Drop in or call 393-2628 register. Mon, May, 22, Shamata Meditation 5:15 PM White Swan Sanctuary Group meditation all levels welcome Mon, May, 22, Buddhist Meditation Society 5:15 PM White Swan Sanctuary All are welcome! Tue, May, 23, Morning Hatha with Kelsi 10:00 AM True North Massage & Yoga Tuesdays until May 30th, All levels with no experience including beginners. Drop in or call 393-2628 register. Tue, May, 23, Lunch Hatha Yoga with Steph B 12:00 PM

u r o s e s C g n i r p S INQUIRE ABOUT MULTI DAY AND DAY TRIPS ON THE TATSHENSHINI, TUTSHI RIVERS AND MORE

Introduction to Canoeing Course provides you with the necessary skills to maneuver through class 2 rapids. 1st course: May 5, 6, and 7th 2nd course: May 12,13 and 14th 3rd course: May 19, 20 and 21st

Advanced Canoeing Course provides you with the necessary skills to maneuver through class 3 rapids. 1st course: May 26, 27 and 28th 2nd course: June 2, 3, and 4th Introduction to Kayaking This course will give you the necessary skills to maneuver through class 2 rapids. 1st course: May 24, 25, 27 and 28th 2nd course: June 7, 8, 10 and 11th TO ALL COURSES: WE SUPPLY DRY SUITS AND ALL EQUIPMENT!

For More Information Contact:

TATSHENSHINI EXPEDITING

Alcoholics Anonymous Wednesday The Joy Of Living group (OM, NS) 12:00 noon 305 Wood Street -Back Entrance Porter Creek Step meeting (CM) 8:00 PM Our Lady of Victory No Puffin (CM, NS) 8:00 PM 6210 - 6th Ave Thursday The Joy Of Living group (OM, NS) 12:00 noon 305 Wood Street -Back Entrance. Polar Group (OM) 7:30 PM Sarah Steele Building,6210 - 6th Ave

Our years of experience, guiding nationally and internationally, plus, our extensive variety of training makes our rescue program one the best and most comprehensive in North America. Owners Bob Daffe and son Kevin Daffe are Rescue Canada & ACA instructors. For the Daffe’s, running rivers has been a family affair since 1982. Advanced Kayaking This course is designed to refine and extend the judgement and technique of intermediate paddlers on class 3 and 4 white water. July 19 & 20, July 22 & 23 Raft Guide Training Course content includes practical training for raft guides including an oar and paddle instruction June 7 & 8, June 10 & 11 River Rescue This course teaches basic rescue skills, including swimming/self-rescue, throw ropes, and boat based rescue. 1st course: May 29-31 2nd course: June 6-8 and June 10,11 3rd course: June 12-14 All Day 4th course: July 24-26 All Day Pack Raft Course Introduction to packrafting course provides you with the necessary skills to maneuver through class 2 and 3 rapids. Course is suitable for complete beginners. No prior experience necessary. May 17, 18, 20, and 21 (Boats provided) Custom Courses: Offering custom course lessons all summer to groups of 5 or more.

Call 867-633-2742 or 867-332-4252 Box 33259 Whitehorse Yukon Canada Y1A 6S1

Email: info@tatshenshiniyukon.com

Tatshenshiniyukon.com


May 17, 2017

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Backwoods Kitchen with Lori Garrison

Gypsy Goulash

This is a simple, highly adaptable dish that can be made almost anywhere, with a wide variety of ingredients.

Ingredients: 1 can of whole tomatoes 1 can kidney beans 2 eggs 1 tsp sugar 1 small onion 3 cloves of garlic 1 cup rice butter or oil ketchup or barbecue sauce 1 tsp vinegar ¼ cup wine Sriracha salt and pepper

Method: Cook rice as instructed on package. If using a camp fire, not a cook stove, I’ve found cooking over a low fire works best for this (sometimes too a hot a fire can make your rice rather… crispy). Mince the onions and garlic. Set aside. When rice is nearly ready, put a deep cast iron pan on the cookstove/grill. Let it get nice and hot, add oil or butter. Toss in the onions and garlic, stir and

Gypsy Goulash Use what you got in the backcountry

W

hen you’re in the backcountry, sometimes you don’t have a lot, but you need something fast, tasty and hot. This is a simple, highly adaptable dish that can be made almost anywhere, with a wide variety of ingredients. This version uses kidney beans,

but any kind will do. Only the eggs and tomatoes are essential. It’s based on a substantially fancier version of a Chinese peasant dish I first read about in the New York Times; this version is much simpler and designed for the cook who has very little to work with.

PHOTO: Pixabay

Serves 2-3

allow to get golden. Add in wine and vinegar now if available, then the can of tomatoes and beans. Add ketchup or barbecue sauce, salt and pepper and Sriracha to taste, then sugar. Cover and allow to reduce to a thick sauce – taste periodically. It should be sweet and a

Pour the still-runny eggs into the saucepan, stir gently, cover and cook 2 to 3 more minutes to finish the eggs. The consistency should be almost creamy with the addition of the eggs. Remove from heat. Serve over rice.

Are you planning a multicultural event?

little spicy, so add a little more sugar or Sriracha to adjust the flavour. Heat a small pan while the sauce is reducing. Crack the eggs in a bowl and beat. Oil the pan liberally, drop beaten eggs in and very lightly cook for one minute until the eggs are just barely set.

Yukon Convention Bureau Yukon Convention Bureau Annual General Meeting Annual General Meeting

Tuesday, May 23, 2017 Tuesday May 23, 2017 3-5pm

Birch & Bear Restaurant 3-5pm Waterfront Station / #120 - 2237 2nd Ave

Birch & Bear Restaurant Election of New Officers – various positions

Multicultural associations in Yukon can receive up to $5000 to hold public events or festivities which celebrate and share international cultural traditions with Yukoners. Applications can be submitted any time to the New Canadians Event Fund.

Waterfront Station / #120 - 2237 2 nd Ave Food & Beverages provided

Information:

Election of New Officers: Various Positions Alida Munro / info@ycb.ca / 867-668-3555

Food & Beverages provided

Information: Alida Munro / info@ycb.ca / 867-668-3555 More information: artsfund@gov.yk.ca or www.tc.gov.yk.ca/NewCanadians.html

867-667-8789 toll-free: 1-800-661-0408 ext. 8789 artsfund@gov.yk.ca www.tc.gov.yk.ca @insideyukon

meetingsyukon.com

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1.877.660.3555

m e e t i n g s y u ko n . c o m

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1.877.660.3555


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May 17, 2017

Grab your Lunch and Get Ready to Boogie! Arts in the Park kicks off on May 23rd by Aislinn Cornett

G

et ready, get set, and don’t forget to bring a lunch! Arts in the Park is about to head into another spectacular season of performing arts over lunch hour at Whitehorse’s LePage Park. Most locals are well acquainted with this beloved weekday tradition, where long time residents and spellbound wanderlusts gather together to enjoy music, art and community over brown bag lunches. This year marks the 21st year for the annual summer festival and will feature shows from noon to 1 p.m. Monday to Friday, as well as youth oriented shows on Wednesday evenings from 7 to 8 p.m. Arts in the Park also hosts one visual artist per week, who collaborates, interacts with and showcases their creative endeavours to show attendees. There’s a lot to love about this long running concert series. It’s free, all ages are welcome and it’s centrally located in the downtown area. The best part? You’re sure to get your fix of both established and emerging artists. This year’s lineup features 60 performing artists over 11 weeks from kickoff on Tuesday, May 23rd to close on Friday, August 4th. “The goal is to have a variety of genres, and to think about a balance between emerging versus established artists,” Producer and programmer, Geneviève Doyon says, adding that the selection process is no walk in the park. This year, over 90 performing artists applied to be part of the festival. “It’s Arts in the Park’s mandate to make room for emerging artists and bands that people don’t know

about,” says Doyon. “We want a balance of gender, age and cultural backgrounds, so there’s a lot to take into consideration.” This unique blend of raw talent and experience is what makes the festival so special. As Doyon explains, Arts in the Park features seasoned veterans with decades of songwriting experience and shows behind them, and contrastingly, musicians or bands who have never set foot on stage before. “The process has taught me, even if you think you know all the bands in town, you don’t,” says Doyon, who has been producing the summer series for three years. She had her first foray into this festival during her cheechako summer in the Yukon, where she worked as an associate producer alongside Yukon musician, Steve Slade. Slade started Arts in the Park with Dereen Hildebrand in 1996 through the Yukon Art Society. He produced the summer festival for 18 years until 2015, when Doyon took over the prestigious position. While Doyon is the face of Arts in the Park, she is quick to point out that many people are involved in making the event possible, including the Music Yukon staff and board, and the many contributing sponsors. Doyon will also be flanked by two summer interns, an associate producer and a sound technician. Though it’s her third year at the helm, the selection process doesn’t seem to be getting any easier, with the interest and quality of performers on the rise. Doyon says the process is humbling, and she learns about many “closet bands” who have jammed together for years, but perhaps never ventured out of house.

This year, Doyon is amped up and ready to produce another season of amazing music, with a personal twist. As a first time mom to a four-month-year-old, she laughs that she’s both “mortified and excited” to have her son with her at Arts in the Park. While other moms might think she’s crazy to produce a festival with baby in tow, Doyon says she’s fortunate to work with Arts in the Park and Music Yukon, and to be able to bring her son to work. “Until I was a mom I didn’t realize how easy it is to push new mothers aside,” Doyon says. “It’s about time as a community we make space for kids to be there and allow that flexibility.” She notes that Arts in the Park welcomes new parents, families and daycares. Kids day is on Wednesday in the park, where daycares roll in and take over the park with exuberant enthusiasm. Along with musicians, the lunchtime shows will also feature other art forms like dance, poetry and spoken word. While most performers are local acts, this year’s festival will showcase Chrys Salt, a poet from the United Kingdom, who will be collaborating with Whitehorse classical guitarist Nicholas Mah. Arts in the Park will also host Canadian prairie troubadour Matt Epp, who will be passing through Whitehorse on his motorbike tour (he’ll be playing at this year’s Atlin Arts and Music Festival as well). While there’s always room for new, the festival also celebrates longtime balladeers and fan favourites like The Canucks, who have been playing music together for over 50 years, and frequenting LePage Park since the festival’s inception. Doyon fondly remem-

PHOTOS: Alistair Maitland Photography

The band, The Olympic Symposium, plays to a full crowd at Arts in the Park 2016. bers her first summer in the park, when she was charmed to watch the Canucks play. Every weekday presents a different act and a new flavour for you to try. “The point of Arts in the Park is there is a built in audience of people who come to the park and eat their lunch no matter what,” Doyon says. “So it’s a cool opportunity to expose people to music or arts that they wouldn’t go out and see otherwise.” She comments that many audience members have said that unconventional shows exposed them to something new, and this expansion of horizon (and comfort) is what it’s all about. As in past summers, there will also be musical panels, a tradition started by Slade, where seven to eight songwriters are given themes and asked to create and share songs to Arts in the Park audiences. This is a unique opportunity for spectators to see songs that have never been performed before. The panel also provides a platform for seasoned and emerging performers to share the stage and their stories in songs. “There’s something to be said about performers putting themselves out there and playing songs for the first time. It’s exciting for artists and for the audience.” The Wednesday evening shows are funded by the Youth Investment Fund and promote an all ages, substance free environment to enjoy performing arts. The pro-

gramming is catered to youth and also features youth bands, and as Doyon says, is growing in popularity. “The evening show is for the louder stuff as well, the kind of stuff you wouldn’t want to eat a sandwich on your lunch break to,” Doyon says with a laugh. This year, the punk rock band Hoarfrost will be playing and taking loudness to a whole new level. As there aren’t many venues for heavy music, Doyon says she’s excited to see the turnout. Not only does Arts in the Park provide a daily social outing for many individuals, but a welcome flux of hungry clientele for local businesses in the area. Doyon emphasizes just how fortunate Yukoners are to be able to enjoy a summer packed full with talented performing and visual artists. “We are so lucky as a community to have free music every day rain or shine for 11 weeks,” Doyon says. “Sometimes I wonder why there’s not 300 people in the park everyday.” Arts in the Park takes place everyday this summer at Lepage Page in downtown Whitehorse, located at 3128 3rd Avenue. For a schedule of performing artists and visual artists, visit www. ArtsintheParkYukon.com or check out their Facebook page. Aislinn Cornett is a freelance writer, artist and art therapist currently writing and living on the beach in Mexico.

2200 2nd Ave, Whitehorse 668-6305 Mon-Sat: 9 AM-6 PM, Sun: 10 AM-5 PM

inspiredinteriorswhitehorse.ca


May 17, 2017

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Photo: Michael MacLean

summer starts here.

June 7-11

upcoming events

Three nights of music and two nights of literary readings. A series of artist/author talks, screenprinting jams and printmaking demonstrations richly fill the days between. Full details: DawsonPrintFestival.com

May May May May

Dawson Daily News Print & Publishing Festival May 19-20

Triple J Hotel

20 21 23 27

Dawson City Gold Show Parks Canada Doors Open Dawson The Gold Poke 5km Road Race Lawrence Hill Reading & Talk Tombstone Park Open Daily

KIAC

Friday, June 23 Petunia & the Vipers Live at KIAC

We have modern rooms and cabins in town with all the amenities to make your stay memorable. Enjoy the Klondike's best burger on the Klondikes best patio! (867) 993-5323

Hillbilly-flavoured-swing inflected-ragtime-goodtime-thunderously rolling-oneof-a-kind-you-don’t-want-to-miss-thissort-of-a-show.

TripleJHotel.com

KIAC.ca

The Klondike Experience

Downtown Hotel

There’s more than one way to experience the Klondike! Dempster Hwy & Dawson tours, bike rentals, bus transportation to Dawson & more. Visit our website or call (867)993-3821

Welcome to Canada’s Best Value Inn Combining newly renovated rooms and historic turn of the century atmosphere, we are located in the heart of Dawson City, Home of the “Sourtoe Cocktail”

KlondikeExperience.com

DowntownHotel.ca

Klondike Kate's CABINS & Restaurant

GREAT RIVER AIR

Stay with us while in Dawson City! Enjoy the privacy of your own cabin where rustic elegance meets modern comfort! Eat delicious food at our restaurant; inside or on our great patio.

KlondikeKates.ca

We operate fixed-wing aircraft on demand for flight-seeing tours of the Tombstone Mountains or Dawson Goldfields. Custom tours are available.

Call 867-993-4359 to inquire or book GreatRiverAir.com

Klondike national historic sites

dAWSON CITY GOLF COURSE

Pc.gc.ca/klondike

DawsonGolf@Hotmail.ca

The search for gold in the Klondike captivated the world and transformed our nation, its people, and its cultures. Come find out the stories that make Dawson's history unique! photo credit: Parks Canada /Mueller

The Yukon’s most scenic and unique golf course. Tee-off nearly any time of day under the midnight sun. Located across the Yukon River in Sunnydale. (867)993-2500

#oNLYINDAWSONcity


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May 17, 2017

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What's Up Yukon, May 17, 2017  

"THE RUSH IS ON"

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