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Vol. 18 / No.41/ July 5-12, 2017

Page 6

Color the work of artist Carlos Lopez Page 5 .......................................

Summer reads: ‘The Champions Game,’ ‘Superman on the Roof’

Meet El Paso’s Belleza Latinas

Page 10 .......................................

Songwriter David Dondero heads to The Perch

Page 12 ..............................................

Page 8-9 ..............................................

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ARTIST

Photos by Jorge Salgado

The Duranguito neighborhood of the Union Plaza District has been a site of contention since October of last year. In a pingpong debate between the City of El Paso and Duranguito advocates, plans to build a $180 multi-purpose arena at the Union Plaza have recently been halted by a temporary restraining order. There’s also a push to formally designate Duranguito a historic neighborhood. With all this in mind, we sent photographer Jorge Salgado Downtown to get the perspective of a few locals and ask:

WHAT DO YOU THINK WOULD HAPPEN TO DURANGUITO IF THE CITY CHOSE A DIFFERENT LOCATION FOR THE ARENA?

In December 2016, architectural historian Max Grossman led nearly 60 people on a tour of Duranguito buildings. Photo by David Crowder

ARI YARA:

That’s really hard to tell. Everybody could be like, “Oh, well, it’s a sh*tt* neighborhood, there’s cheap housing and stuff.” But for the people living there, it’s important to them. So it really depends on who has more of a say. I hope it stays. I know how hard it is to find housing in general.

JOSE LUIS VARELA:

People are going to get mad because they’re going to have to move places and there could be a lot of changes. I don’t think the people will be able to stay there.

LAURA SALAS:

If it was chosen for a different area, they would be okay for now. But I think eventually, El Paso is getting bigger, and we’re wanting to build more. Eventually, they’re going to try to push them out again. Something else is going to come up. They may win this round, but they’re going to have to fight again for something else.

:

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By Victoria Guadalupe Molinar comment: @whatsupweekly

For Juarez-born artist Carlos Alejandro Lopez, joining Osaple – that’s El Paso spelled backwards – was a no-brainer. The collective embraces all things of Juarez’s sister city with its 915 pride campaign and merch. “The bicultural environment that we live in and how they mix when it comes to food, when it comes to language and the way we think – with Osaple, we want to represent that in the art that we do,” Lopez said. Osaple began in 2010, selling red T-shirts reminiscent of the Coca Cola brand, but instead with the words reading “Chuco Chula.” El Paso natives can appreciate buttons that list our parts of town. There’s the “West & Upper Valley & Downtown & Segundo” option or the “Northeast & Central & East & Lower Valley” one. One of Osaple’s latest projects is the “I (star) EP” mural the collective did with Diego “Robot” Martinez and other artists. It adorns the wall of The Venue, formerly called The Garden. The design of course calls to mind the famous “I (heart) New York” T-shirts, but instead with one of El Paso’s most prominent landmarks – the star on the Franklin mountains. “We’re honoring other brands and other kinds of designs by marrying it with a very unique sense of humor that only El Pasoans will understand,”

JULY 5-12, 2017

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Carlos Alejandro Lopez

Lopez said. “It’s about the fun and the joyfulness and the pride we have for this city.” What’s missing from the mural is the “I” in “I (star) EP” – that’s where local passers-by come in. “This way, they can take a pic in front of it and literally be a part of the design to show their pride for the city,” Osaple co-founder Gabriel Acuña explained. A former military brat who lived away from El Paso throughout his childhood during the ’90s, Acuña had an appreciation for El Chuco that many didn’t at the time, to put it lightly. “It began to annoy me. Why couldn’t people see El Paso the way I saw it and love the city as much as I did?” Acuña said. “After a while, I was determined I would do something to change that mentality.” Thus, Osaple was born. Other than Acuña and Lopez, Isaac Villalpando is one of the main artists behind the collective’s designs. Outside of Osaple, Lopez is the art director for the local branch of the El Paso-Austin-New York-based ad agency, Sanders Wingo. Some of his most seen pieces are the designs he did for Sun City Craft Beer Festival, El Paso Downtown Street Festival and Coffee Box. Symbolism and simplicity drive the work he does for clients both at Sanders Wingo and as a freelancer.

ROSE WONG:

“I like clever ideas. I like how simple things can say a lot,” Lopez, a fine arts graduate of UTEP, said. “You don’t have to draw a lot to come across with a strong idea.” Lopez admits he misses drawing by hand – something he intends to make time for. His lithographs and etchings have a much different style, with darker illustrations inspired by the human form. “My hand drawings are a little more obscure,” Lopez said. “I love to draw the human body. It’s a little more complex and a beautiful shape no matter what position or what the context is.” As for the homage to El Paso’s demolished smokestack illustrated on page 5? “The new generation will never know what Asarco was,” Lopez lamented. “It’s just creating some memories of landmarks in a fun way.”

WHAT’S UP

I think the people would be very happy. Isn’t that what they’re fighting for – to stay, to have their neighborhood stay in place? I think they would try to restore it. They would be very happy if it would be designated a historical area. At least, that’s what I understand. I’m not from the area. I only know what I hear on the news.

Don’t miss our next Adult Coloring Book Night on Thursday, July 27 as part of the Last Thursdays Downtown art crawl. The fun starts at the home of our sponsor, DeadBeach Brewery, on 406 Durango St. at 5 p.m.! We’ll also color the work of Osaple artist Isaac Villalpando (pictured above). Visit WhatsUpPub.com to see more of Lopez’s work. Osaple T-shirts can be purchased at Proper Printshop.

XANDER BOHLER:

If they don’t put the arena there, I’m pretty sure that would be the end of that. And then I think they would go through with the historical district kind of thing.

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Read about artist Carlos Lopez on page 4

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YOUNG EL PASOANS EMBRACE DOWNTOWN LIVING By Denise Nelson-Prieto comment: @whatsupweekly

In the last decade, millennials have been flocking to urban centers, eschewing the notion of suburban dwelling and personal vehicles. Urban centers across the country have seen a resurgence of residential areas co-mingled with entertainment districts. Data collected by the U.S. Census Bureau showed a more than 12 percent growth in urban populations from 2000 to 2010. Reflecting the same trend, a Time magazine article titled “The New American Dream Is Living in a City, Not Owning a House in the Suburbs” reported that metro population growth outpaced the country as a whole between 2012 and 2013. “For millennials today, leaving Levittown for the bright lights of downtown has become a rite of passage,” wrote Sam Frizell. Take a drive to Downtown El Paso – where new life has been breathed into a slew of old buildings – and you’ll see that the city is no exception to the trend. Some of these historic structures have been rehabbed into hip, new dwelling spaces, retail establishments, bars and restaurants. Owner of the 40-unit Martin Lofts, Lane Gaddy, recognized a niche that needed to be filled and was presented an opportunity to do so. “I saw a need for higher-end apart-

Local artists started moving into the new Roderick Artspace Lofts late last year. Photo by Angela Saavedra

ments Downtown and decided the timing was right,” he said. “It’s something that’s standard fair in any other vibrant, relevant downtown.” The units are housed in the historic, nearly 100-year-old Martin Building on the corner of Texas and Stanton. Residents started moving into the lofts in the spring of last year. For Gaddy, the concept behind these apartments fits into the smart-growth urban development matrix – key components of which are investing in existing infrastructure and fostering community ties. “The idea behind urban living is making connections and networking a much easier process,” he said. “If you’re going to

In April, El Paso’s Downtown Management District led a residential tour that included food from nearby eateries. Photo courtesy of El Paso Downtown Management District

live Downtown, you’re going to sacrifice a little extra space for convenience and social interaction.” The swell in urban living seems to resonate with millennials and young professionals for particular reasons: social interaction, convenience and walkability. As

many of this generation opt to forego their vehicles, choosing instead to use mass transit, Uber or bikes, having access to food, drink, entertainment and their workplace is a priority. Continued on 7


JULY 5-12, 2017

7

Locals get a tour of the Savoy Lofts’ rooftop at 120 S. Stanton St. In 2012, The Mix retail and housing complex breathed new life into Downtown’s Union Plaza District.

DOWNTOWN

Continued from 6

Performance artist Jazmin Ortega has lived at the Roderick Artspace Lofts, which quietly starting leasing rooms late last year, for several months. The main reason she chose to set down roots there was convenience. “I work one block from there,” she said. “I love living Downtown. I can walk or bike everywhere.” Another attractive quality for her is the proximity of restaurants, bars and an outdoor market, as well as the short distance to Juarez, where she goes to visit family and friends and to get medical care. For Downtowner Anguelo Salgado, forgoing a vehicle and all of the attendant costs and hassle is the main benefit of living in the area. “I’m part of a community that’s trying to use cars less and be more environmentally friendly,” he said. “I skateboard everywhere and [since] I work Downtown, I can walk to work. I don’t have to deal with traffic anymore and completely cut off my car.

Photo by Angela Saavedra

That’s the best part of living Downtown.” Salgado also lives in one of the 52 units of the Artspace Lofts. The apartments are part of a national project that seeks to provide affordable housing for artists. Joe Gudenrath, director of the Downtown Management District, sees the move to the smart growth, mixed-use concept as a win-win. “What you have is an opportunity to repurpose existing buildings,” he said. “The market can’t necessarily bear an unlimited amount of commercial office space, so when you repurpose some of these buildings and diversify their use, it gives the new lease on life.” Such development has been a key component of urban planning for the last few years and caught on in El Paso with areas like Kern Place, Montecillo and now various locales Downtown. Gudenrath pointed out the benefits of mixed-use planning. “These developments bode very well within a Downtown, urban setting [because] you have multiple uses for these properties

The new Franklin Avenue Apartments behind the baseball stadium are set to open later this year. Photo by Jorge Salgado

– retail, restaurants, bars,” he said. “What we’ve seen across the country is this renewed interest by young professionals to live in an active urban environment where there’s opportunities to work, play and enjoy yourself all within walking distance of your apartment.” A prime example of maximizing the mixed-use design is The Mix at Union Plaza. Entrepreneur Octavio Gomez, the driving force behind ultra-popular spots like Crave and TI:ME at Montecillo, revitalized a century-old structure to create 14 residential units and eight retail spaces. “There’s a little bit of everything,” Gomez said. “Literally, you can live upstairs, go downstairs, have a drink, or have dinner across the street at Tabla. It’s what Downtown living’s all about.” Similarly, the Franklin Avenue Apartments, located behind Southwest University Park, will offer the quintessential urban living experience. The 14-unit, $1.2 million

Photo by Angela Saavedra

project is slated for completion this year. Already, hundreds of people have expressed interest in leasing the units, a fact that, for developer Renard Johnson, shows a resurgence of interest in Downtown dwelling. “This is true urban living and I’m very excited about them,” Johnson said. “You can see our community is really embracing urban living where people have the ability to live, work and play within a small footprint, and it’s good to be a part of it.” An essential element of the Franklin Avenue Apartments is mobility. The building is within walking distance of the Rio Grande Campus of El Paso Community College, UTEP, Blackbird Cantina and Later, Later, making the one-to-three bedroom units ideal for college students and young professionals. Downtown El Paso is arguably on its way to becoming a social, economic and cultural mecca, giving residents a chance to be a part of an exciting shift in the way locals live.


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NEW BOOK SPOTLIGHTS SEGUNDO BARRIO’S YOUNG CHESS CHAMPS

By Luis Carlos Lopez comment: @whatsupweekly

Henderson Middle School art teacher and chess coach Saul Ramirez is no stranger to changing a culture. He has taken children who have been counted out and molded them into chess champions. He has prompted a community of socioeconomic misfits to come together and support a team – not a soccer team, not a basketball team, but a chess team. Chess, a game whose accolades and praises are often reserved to those from affluent neighborhoods, has crowned itself king in Segundo Barrio all thanks to the vision of one teacher. Ramirez used what he calls a “gentleman’s game,” one of sophistication, strategy and grit, to lift and recognize students who are often forgotten about. The 32-year-old soft-spoken art teacher is not one for showboating. Instead, he prefers that his actions do the talking – actions he said he learned by playing the game he loves. That love has yielded countless awards for the Henderson team. It has also led him to write his new book “The Champions’ Game,” a true story about his students’ historic run to become national champions in 2015. The recognition has also propelled Ramirez to become El Paso Independent School District 2017 Teacher of the Year. Ramirez’s mantra, “Go big or go home,” helped him seize the moment in chess, life and teaching. It is also the theme of his book and what he uses to inspire his students. “The story of our kids had to be known,” Ramirez said. “The difficulties they go through and the problems they face as stu-

dents and persons. I feel like their lives are more difficult than anyone else’s and that makes this more meaningful. “The book is about our students, their great hearts and great passions for everything that they do.” Ramirez’s 195-page book chronicles the 2015 journey of 12 Henderson students and their quest to capture the National Junior High Championship novice division in Kentucky. It was co-written by Irving, Texas native, author and educator John Seidlitz. The book took the duo approximately two years to complete. Its storyline is filled with heartwarming anecdotes from the dozen Henderson students. The antics of these middle school champions described in the book are filled with determination, laughter and even some tears. “It has highs and lows,” said physical education coach Adrian Herrera. The Henderson athletic director served as Ramirez’s right-hand man during the team’s historic run in 2015. He helped galvanize the team when they were on the brink of losing and motivated Lirio Gomez, the only girl on the team, to shine on the biggest stage. He even made prank calls pretending to be “Corporal Brown from the Looville Po-leece department” to ensure that victory celebrations would not get out of hand. “It’s been a great experience,” Herrera

said. “It’s emotionally and physically draining. You know, the kids have highs and lows. It’s hard to see them when they are sad because they lost the round. It’s great to see them win.” Herrera said the book celebrates a special moment frozen in time, not only for Ramirez and his coaching staff, but for the kids as well. The students who went to nationals two years ago are now part of history, he said, and they’re using that platform to be a positive role model to others. Looking back at the stories illustrated in the book, he said it’s hard to pick one above the rest. “These guys – every single one of these stories is compelling,” Herrera said. “This marks a time when El Paso became the national champions in chess. You are playing against the best of the best in the nation. This just proves that no matter who you are, or where you are from, opportunity is there if you work for it.” Outgoing 8th grader Eduardo Retana said the opportunity to play chess at nationals and being coached by Ramirez made all the difference. Before joining the chess team, Retana was very quiet and would get into trouble. Retana plans to attend Jefferson High School and later join the army. He said it was Ramirez’s tutelage that helped him change.

“Before I was in chess, I would be a troublemaker,” Retana said. “Now I don’t do bad things.” Ramirez said the most important thing about the book and any accolades that might come from chess are the kids. He added that making a human connection and getting his students to see opportunity is the most important. “Whether it’s English, math, science or art,” Ramirez said. “Unless you connect with the student and you bring discipline and structure, you won’t be able to teach. Once you build that connection, that student will learn calculus in the 6th grade if you teach them. That’s when the student opens up their heart and their brain to learn.”

WHAT’S UP

Catch ‘The Champions’ Game’ Book Signing

Henderson Middle School teacher Saul Ramirez helped instill confidence in his students through chess, teaching them the art of critical thinking and perseverance. Photo by Luis Carlos Lopez

With Authors Saul Ramirez, John Seidlitz and Henderson Middle School National Champions Saturday, July 8, 2-4 P.m. Barnes & Noble (The Fountains At Farah), 8889 Gateway Blvd W. More Info At 915-594-3024 ‘The Champions’ Game’ Is Available On Amazon At Barnes & Noble. Learn More About The Book, Authors And Students At Championsgame.com


JULY 5-12, 2017

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COMING-OF-AGE BOOK ‘SUPERMAN ON THE ROOF’ EXPLORES GUILT, GRIEF

By Eric Acosta comment: @whatsupweekly

In UTEP creative writing professor Lex Williford’s “Superman on the Roof,” a narrator grieves over the childhood death of his brother in ten short shorts. The chapbook earned him the 2015 10th Annual Rose Metal Flash Fiction Chapbook Award. “In 2002, at an artist residency, I decided to write 40 stories in 40 days,” said, Williford, the founding director of UTEP’s online creative writing MFA program. He’s also the chair of the on-campus bilingual MFA program. “Almost all the stories [in ‘Superman on the Roof’] came out of that. I didn’t get a sense of how the book might evolve – or get to a place of forgiveness for some of the people – to write with empathy. That basically started when I had kids.” In his book, the narrator’s family first

Lex Williford, founding director of UTEP’s online creative writing MFA program. Photo courtesy of Lex Williford

finds out his little brother is ill after the narrator punches him in the nose. His nosebleed doesn’t stop, and soon he receives blood transfusions that keep him alive for only a few hours at a time. “I never hit him,” Williford said about that scene. “I was his biggest protector. Creating that dramatic situation was a way of being able to describe things like survivor’s guilt. When you have kids who are grieving, it’s pretty irrational. They tend to blame themselves. [That scene] was an effort to move beyond that and give him a real reason for feeling guilt.” “Short short” is another word for “flash fiction,” which are writings of less than

1,200 words. The length of each story in “Superman on the Roof,” recreates the surreal feeling of absence with a family member’s premature death. “I read a book of stories by Jayne Anne Phillips called ‘Black Tickets,’ and that’s where I fell in love with the form,” Williford said. “I met her in New York, and she said, ‘These stories began as autobiography and ended in dream.’” The term “short short” is often used over “flash fiction” to emphasize that it can be creative nonfiction as well. “Certain things in the book come close to things that really happened,” Williford said. Like the narrator in, “Superman on the Roof,” his brother died at a young age from Leukemia. That story takes place long after the brother’s death. The siblings, now older and with their own families, remember the Superman outfit their brother refused to remove near the end of his life. Their mother pulls out a box containing the Superman suit, still stained with blood. “My mother actually did show us our brother’s pajamas,” Williford said. “They were completely covered in blood.” Williford is familiar with both creative nonfiction and prose. He is co-editor, with Michael Maritone, of the “Scribner Anthology of Contemporary Short Fiction,” and the “Touchstone Anthology of Contemporary Nonfiction.” “There is something about the imagi-

nation working on the raw material of our lives,” Williford said.” “We can make these huge imaginative leaps writing fiction that we may not necessarily be able to make in nonfiction.”

WHAT’S UP

Find “Superman on the Roof” on Amazon and RoseMetalPress.com

DID YOU KNOW?

Please remember that all plastic bottles, aluminum cans, or another container that may have liquids or food residue must be rinsed. • Empty and rinsed containers help prevent other recyclables from getting contaminated with food and liquids, and it prevents your blue recycling container from getting dirty and producing foul odors. • If you recycle correctly, your blue bin should be free of liquids and residue. Check your recycling container today? Is it clean? Do you place un-bagged recyclables in your blue container?

Citizens may call 311 (915-212-6000) or visit www.recyclerightEP.com for more information


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MEET TWO BELLEZA LATINA INTERNATIONAL CONTESTANTS By Isabel A. Walters / comment: @whatsupweekly

Erika Graham and Diana Estrada are not unlike most of their peers; they work, spend time with their family and friends and volunteer on behalf of causes that matter to them. Both women also happen to be the owners of a couple of tiaras – courtesy of their titles as Miss Texas Belleza Latina and Ms. Mexico Belleza Latina, respectively. The two El Paso beauty queens recently competed in Austin for the state titles and are now advancing to the Belleza Latina International pageant, which takes place July 14 in Orlando, Florida. With deep roots in the El Paso community, they’re hoping to show others that there’s more to beauty pageants than what meets the eye. The title of Miss El Paso Belleza Latina was the first win for Graham, who has been competing in beauty pageants for 15 years. She began modeling at the age of 4. “It has made me more confident and helped me be a little bit more social,” Graham said of her experience in beauty pageants. “I was kind of shy, so now I’m a lot better when it comes to public speaking and making new friends.” A graduate of Eastwood High School, Graham is a student at the University of Texas at El Paso studying forensic accounting and an administrative assistant with the El Paso County District Attorney. Born and raised in El Paso, Graham says this is where she wants to establish her pro-

Erika Graham, Miss Texas Belleza Latina

Photo by AB Gonzalez

fessional career. Her aspirations include becoming a police officer – an ambition she’s well on her way to fulfilling, having already been accepted into the El Paso Police Academy. “Ever since I was a little girl, I wanted to be a police officer,” she said. “There was just something about me that wanted to help protect and serve the community and be a role model for others, especially women. My life ambition is to make a difference and break stereotypes.” Although there’s no shortage of criminal justice career opportunities around the country, Graham chooses to stay here. “Of course, I love traveling and seeing different places, but there’s something about the culture here,” Graham said. “Being a border city, you get the best of both worlds. We have an airport that takes us anywhere we want to go.” The pageantry circuit also has its downsides; namely, its competitive nature. However, Graham says her experiences have been mostly positive. “One of the biggest misconceptions about beauty pageants is that many people think it’s just about a pretty face, but it goes beyond that,” she said. “[Deshauna Barber], the 2016 Miss USA, for example, was an officer in United States Army Reserve. You have to be involved in the community and do a lot of volunteer work.” Civic engagement is a highly stressed factor when it comes to beauty pageant contestants. “I’m an advocate for the Child Crisis Center, and I like to volunteer for anything involving children and animals,” Graham said. “I also do volunteer work with the El Pasoans Fighting Hunger Food Bank. I try to stay as involved as I can.” Estrada is a wife, mother and registered nurse who first competed in beauty pageants as a child and reentered the pageantry circuit after her three kids had left the nest. She has previously held the title of Mrs. El Paso and Ms. El Paso Belleza Latina and has earned awards for best interview and best performance in evening gown. “The interviews are basically about being yourself and telling your story,” she explains, adding that the most rewarding part about participating in beauty pageants is meeting other women and getting to know their stories. “You become friends and start to encourage each other.”

Entering beauty pageants a little later in life was a bit of a challenge for Estrada, but also taught her to push herself outside her comfort zone. “I’m 41, so sometimes I feel like I’m competing against a lot of younger girls, but I can still catch up,” Estrada said. “You don’t have to be a particular age or size. Latinas have a different body figure, so I’m grateful for the Belleza Latina pageant, because it doesn’t just portray one type of girl. It’s very diverse.” Like Graham, Estrada was born and raised in El Paso. Her Mexican heritage makes her proud to carry her title. “My heart is in El Paso,” she said. “This is where my family is. My family immigrated from Mexico, and this is my hometown. I don’t think I would ever leave.” Estrada, too, is a volunteer with the Child Crisis Center, but as a nurse, other causes close to her heart are health issues and preventative care, especially for women. Her goals include continuing to be active in the local pageant scene – this time as a director. “My advice to young girls is to get educated and always remain humble,” she said when asked about the legacy she’d like to leave behind. “As a teenage mom, I got stereotyped, and I felt like people thought I wasn’t going to amount to anything. Anything is possible. You determine what you want to do. “I get nothing but support from my kids and my husband,” she added. “I’m their role model now. I’m proud of that. It’s a team effort.”

From left: Erika Graham, El Paso County Judge Veronica Escobar and Diana Estrada shine their pearly whites during the El Paso Sun City Pride Parade. Photo courtesy of Diana Estrada

Diana Estrada, Ms. Mexico Belleza Latina

Photo by Raul Hernandez (RaVisuals)


CALENDAR JULY 5-12, 2017

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CALENDAR

WED. JULY 5

Wacky Wednesday: Comedy Open Mic Open to all jesters. Age 21+ 5 Points Bistro, 3019 Montana Ave, 9 p.m., free, facebook.com/ epucomedy. State Line Music Series: Brian Mars Music performance. Must make food or monetary donation to El Pasoans Fighting Hunger. For ages 21+ The State Line, 1222 Sunland Park Dr., 8 p.m., free, 915-581-3371, countyline. com/StateLineMusic.html.

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JULY 2017

JULY 7-23

UTEP DINNER THEATRE PRESENTS ‘SISTER ACT’

El Paso Ghost Tours Real paranormal investigation of downtown El Paso. Equipment provided. Not a point and talk tour. Age 14+ Nolita Corner Bistro, 420 E San Antonio Ave, 8-10:30 p.m., $20, discount on Facebook, 915-4906769, elpasoghosttours.com. Yarn Addicts Crochet Guild of El Paso Each meeting, a new skill, project or stitch is shared by a member or guest. Happens every first Wednesday of the month. JoAnn Fabric and Craft Store, 10501 Gateway Blvd. W., Bldg. 9, 6-8 p.m., facebook.com/ CrochetElPasoYarnAddicts. Computer Classes Information to become computer literate. All El Paso Libraries, 5:30 p.m., free, 915-212READ, elpasolibrary.org. Rock N’ Roll Happy Hour at Hope and Anchor Needles and Pins presents: DJs The Ripper & D-Rex(Sluur,Souldies) spinning classic Rock n’ Roll records. Hope & Anchor, 4012 N. Mesa, 5-9 p.m., free, 915-3830123. Make Your Own Doughnut Kids and bigger people make custom doughnuts. Hillside Coffee & Doughnuts, 4935 N. Mesa St., Ste. 1B, 2-4 p.m., free, 915-474-3453. Story Time Stories, crafts and activities. All El Paso Libraries, 11 a.m., free, 915-212-READ, elpasolibrary.org. 1 Million Cups Community program for entrepreneurs and innovators offers business owners the opportunity to present their startups to a diverse group of mentors, advisors, and entrepreneurs. Happens every Wed. The Hub of Human Innovation, 500 West Overland, Suite 230, 9-10 a.m., free, 915-321-3123, 1millioncups. com/elpaso.

THURS. JULY 6 Live Jazz Locals perform music. The Tap Bar & Restaurant, 408 E. San Antonio Ave., 10 p.m., 915-532-1848, facebook.com/TheTapBarEP. Jupiter’s Junkies Soul-jazz music performance with openers nate, Young Millz, Basquiat, Young Rob and Julz. Doors open at 9 p.m. All ages. The Lowbrow Palace, 111 E. Robinson Ave., 9:30 p.m., lowbrowpalace.com. So Loud Thursdays: King Louie Rap music performance. Age 21+ Born and Raised, 2106 N. Zaragoza Rd., 9 p.m., $15-$25, 915-996-1066, jandkpresent.com.

After wannabe diva Deloris Van Cartier (famously played by Whoopi Goldberg) witnesses a mob crime, what better place to find protection than a convent? Luis Coronel, Prince Royce Mexican pop music performance. El Paso County Coliseum, 4100 E. Paisano Dr., 8 p.m., $15-$204, ticketmaster. com. El Paso Ghost Tours Real paranormal investigation of downtown El Paso. Equipment provided. Not a point and talk tour. Age 14+ For details see Wed., July 5. Backyard Sessions: Blessed Be Man Trippy acoustic music with other locals: Courtney Sherwood, Sara Rebecca and Daniel Villasenor. Love Buzz, 3011 Pershing Dr., 8 p.m., free, 915-2573118. Born of Osiris Deathcore music performances with openers Volumes, Betraying the Martyrs, Widowmaker and Summoning the Wretched. Tickets at All That Music, Eloise and Golden Goose Tattoos. Online tickets at ticketfly.com. Doors open at 6:30 p.m. Tricky Falls, 209 S. El Paso St, 7:30 p.m., $19 adv., $21 door, trickyfalls. com. ‘Baggage’ Two annoying thirtysomethings accidentally take each other’s bags at JFK airport, then start dating. Event runs June 23-July 9, 7 p.m. Thurs., July 6. 8 p.m. Fri.-Sat., 2:30 p.m. Sun., 7 p.m. on July 6. Blackbox Theatre, 430 N. Main St., 7 p.m., $15, $12 student/senior, $10 Thurs., 575523-1223, no-strings.org. Cool Canyon Nights Weekly, free outdoor music performance by local bands. McKelligon Canyon Amphitheatre, 1500 McKelligon Canyon Dr., 6-9 p.m., free, $10 VIP, elpasolive.com/coolcanyonnights.

Fronteriza Food, Cuisine Cooking Class Seasonal cooking class offered every Thursday. Today’s lesson is chiles rellenos with beans and rice. Cafe Mayapan, 2000 Texas Ave., 6 p.m., $35 , 915-217-1126, eventbrite. com. Teen Hangout Activities for teenagers. All El Paso Libraries, 4 p.m., free, 915-212-READ, elpasolibrarys.org. Computer Classes Information to become computer literate. All El Paso Libraries, 10 a.m., free, 915-212READ, elpasolibrary.org. David Dondero Former lead singer of Sunbrain performs some singersongwriter indie stuff. Openers are KT Neely, Omar Cuellar and Gytrash. Doors open at 7 p.m. The Perch, 209 S. El Paso St., 8 p.m., $8 , trickyfalls. com.

FRI. JULY 7 UTEP Dinner Theatre – ‘Sister Act’ A lounge singer is put in protective custody in a San Francisco convent. Runs July 7-23. Dinner performances at 7 p.m. on July 7-15, 19-22. Matinee dinner performance at 1:30 p.m. on July 9. No dinner matinee at 2:30 p.m. on July 16 and 23. UTEP Dinner Theatre, 500 W. University Ave., 7 p.m., $46.50, 915-747-6060, utep.edu/udt. “Funny F*ckin Fridays” Comedy Open Mic Music spun by DJ Kasual. Doors open at 9 p.m. Age 21+ Dr. Bombay’s Nice Dreams Hookah Lounge, 9828 Montana Ave., Ste. F, 10 p.m., free, facebook.com/ epucomed.

Photo courtesy of UTEP Dinner Theatre


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T h u r s d a y, J u l y 6 , 8 p . m .

THE HUMBLE PONDERINGS OF SINGER-SONGWRITER DAVID DONDERO By Bill Forman comment: @whatsupweekly

Cordova Rock music performance with openers Hot Shot Kixxx and The Lucky Machetes. King’s X, 4191 N. Mesa St, 10 p.m., 915-544-4795.

Story Time Stories, crafts and activities. All El Paso Libraries, 11 a.m., free, 915-212-READ, elpasolibrary.org.

Lunas Indie rock music with openers Medvedi, Penumbra Rabia and Pilots of Venus. Doors open at 9 p.m. Ages 18+ The Lowbrow Palace, 111 E. Robinson Ave., 9:30 p.m., free, lowbrowpalace. com.

Minus the Bear Indi alt. rock. Ages 18+ Speaking Rock Entertainment Center, 122 S. Old Pueblo Rd., 8-10 p.m., free, speakingrockentertainment. com.

Yung Jung Hip-hop/rap music performance with openers Eddy Boy and Verse. Club Here I Love You, 115 S. Durango St., 9 p.m., free, facebook. com/clubhereiloveyou. Kaos Rock covers music performance. Iron Horse, 4930 Hondo Pass, 9 p.m., 915-751-6064, Facebook.com/Kaosep1. We B Fore Local cover band performs. Bowl El Paso – Lane 41, 11144 Pellicano Dr., 9 p.m., free, 915-240-3667. La Parada Local music and art. Music performances: Nocando, Myrlin, Bloodshot bandits, The Fifth Estate, Ralph the Ruckus. Art by Dead Punk. 9 p.m., $5 before 11 p.m., $10 after. Movies on the Lawn: ‘Sing’ Humanoid animals attempt to save their theater with a singing competition. Centennial Plaza, 500 W. University Ave., 8:30 p.m., free, news.utep.edu. Clay Walker Country music. Inn of the Mountain Gods, 287 Carrizo Canyon Rd., 8 p.m., $30, innofthemountaingods.com.

Photo courtesy of David Dondero

WHAT’S UP

David Dondero

With KT Neely, Omar Cuellar, Gytrash Thursday, July 6, 8 p.m. The Perch (above Tricky Falls), 209 S. El Paso St. $8 plus fees, tickets at TicketFly.com More info at TrickyFalls.com

M

ost artists would kill to have NPR put them on its list of the 10 Best Living Songwriters. But David Dondero – who’s stopping at The Perch this Thursday, July 6 – kind of hates it. “I wish they never would have written that,” said the altogether unpretentious Minnesota native. He was listed among the likes of Bob Dylan, Tom Waits, Bruce Springsteen and Sufjan Stevens. “People say like, ‘Oh wow, how great that you could get that kind of press.’ But then some people come out to shows thinking it’s going to be like that, and it’s not, and then they’re highly disappointed. And it kind of makes me ashamed of myself, because I can’t play like those guys. I just do what I do very simply, and that’s it.” In some ways, Dondero – a former carpenter, trucker and bartender – doesn’t even sound that much like himself on his new collection “Inside the Cat’s Eye.” It’s his latest release in a career that’s spanned nearly two decades and a dozen albums, three of them on Conor Oberst’s Team Love label. For one thing, his vocals sound less strained and shouty than in years past, with a deeper resonance that suits the album’s more reflective songs. “Maybe I’m a late bloomer or something,” he said of his newfound depth. “I try to get into the pocket of the song a little more.” Dondero’s electrified acoustic, with min-

imal backing by bassist John Winsor and drummer Cully Symington, leaves plenty of room for lyrics that manage to reference Hermann Hesse without sounding contrived: “It’s coming full circle, your own Siddhartha/Chased your tail for years, all around the country.” Dondero’s current 15-date jaunt is the latest in a seemingly endless series of cross-country solo tours. How does the country that Dondero tours today compare to the one he remembers from his earlier days? “It didn’t seem as volatile in the past as it is right now,” he said. “I never remembered it being so class segregated, or divided along party lines with people being so angry with either side. It’s divided my family and a lot of friends I know, and it seems like it just creates these walls of bitterness.” Even so, Dondero is resolute in his belief that there’s still cause for optimism. “It has to start on an individual level, just continually trying,” he said. “I can’t see the polarization and picking sides working.” In the meantime, the songwriter has his own personal plan, and it’s one that just might work. “I’m just trying to enjoy this life and sing,” he said, “to get to a happy song, somehow, down the road.”

JULY 5-12, 2017

Sam O.B. Soul-funk-smooth jams with openers The Swell Kids and Amy G. Dala. Doors open at 9 p.m. The Lowbrow Palace, 111 E. Robinson Ave., 10 p.m., $10 adv., $12 door, lowbrowpalace.com. King Octopus Rock cover group performs. Sunland Park Racetrack & Casino, 1200 Futurity Dr., 9 p.m., free. We B Fore Local cover band performs. House of Rock, 931 N. Resler, 9 p.m., free, 915-240-3667. Defleshed and Gutted, Heinous Mutation Local metal with openers Steel Lake and Beyond Ash. Age 18+ Rockhouse Bar & Grill, 9828 Montana Ave., 9 p.m., free 21+, $5 age 18-20. Banda MS Banda music performance. Estadio de Beisbol Juarez Vive, 32380 Calle Reforma, Cd. Juárez, MX, 8 p.m., $12-$59, $83 VIP, 656-6130100, donboleton.com. ‘Pippin’ Musical about a young boy searching for meaning. Event runs June 23-July 9, 8 p.m. Thur.Sat., 2 p.m. Sun. For details see Fri., July 7.

‘Baggage’ Two annoying thirty-somethings accidentally take each other’s bags at JFK airport, then start dating. For details see Thurs., July 6.

‘Baggage’ Two annoying thirty-somethings accidentally take each other’s bags at JFK airport, then start dating. Event runs June 23-July 9, 8 p.m. Fri.-Sat., 2:30 p.m. Sun., 7 p.m. on July 6. For details see Thurs., July 6.

Viva El Paso Musical that celebrates the four major cultures that have influenced El Paso. Event runs June 16-July 29, 8 p.m. Fri.-Sat. McKelligon Canyon Amphitheatre, 1500 McKelligon Canyon Dr., 8 p.m., $9, vivaelpaso.org.

Viva El Paso Musical that celebrates the four major cultures that have influenced El Paso. Event runs June 16-July 29, 8 p.m. Fri.-Sat. McKelligon Canyon Amphitheatre, 1500 McKelligon Canyon Dr., 8 p.m., $9 , vivaelpaso.org.

‘A Masterpiece of Comic...Timing’ New comedy. Part of EPCC Summer Theatre program. Dig it hard, like Boris Karloff in “The Body Snatcher.” Event’s going to run Fri.-Sun., June 30-July 9. 8 p.m. Fri.-Sat., 2:30 p.m. Sun. EPCC Forum Theatre, 9570 Gateway Blvd. North, 8 p.m., $15, $10 non-EPCC students and military, $7 EPCC staff/student/senior, 915-831-5056, forumtheater.com.wix.com/epcc.

‘A Masterpiece of Comic...Timing’ New comedy. Part of EPCC Summer Theatre program. Dig it hard, like Boris Karloff in “The Body Snatcher.” Event’s going to run Fri.-Sun., June 30-July 9. 8 p.m. Fri.-Sat., 2:30 p.m. Sun. For details see Fri., July 7.

‘Pippin’ Musical about a young boy searching for meaning. Event runs June 23-July 9, 8 p.m. Thur.-Sat., 2 p.m. Sun. Las Cruces Community Theater, 313 N. Main St., 8 p.m., $9-$12, 575523-1200, lcctnm.org. El Paso Ghost Tours Real paranormal investigation of downtown El Paso. Equipment provided. Not a point and talk tour. Age 14+ For details see Wed., July 5. ‘Baggage’ A woman accidentally takes a dude’s bag at the airport and then they fall in love. For details see Thurs., July 6. El Paso Triple-A Baseball Chihuahuas vs. Salt Lake Bees. Event runs July 7-9, 7:05 p.m. Fri.Sat., 10:05 a.m. Sun. Southwest University Ballpark, 1 Ballpark Plaza, 7:05 p.m., $5-$25, 915-533-BASE, facebook.com/epchihuahuas. Alfresco Fridays: Joe King Carrasco Weekly outdoor concert series. This week is Tex Mex. Judson F. Williams Convention Center, 1 Civic Center Plaza, 6 p.m., free, alfrescofridays.com. Ysleta Mission Festival Tex-Mex cuisine, arts and crafts, carnival-style game booth. Music performance by Azucar and Best of the Best Cover Band Fungi Mungle. Ysleta Mission, 131 S. Zaragoza Rd., 6-11 p.m., free, 915-859-9848, ysletamission.org.

SAT. JULY 8 Deeperluv: Matias Aguayo DJ performs. Club Here I Love You, 115 S. Durango Ave., 9 p.m., facebook.com/latenitesocialclub.

Demi the Daredevil Rock music with opener Kat Suicide. Tricky Falls, 209 S. El Paso St, 8 p.m., $8 , trickyfalls.com. Music on the Lawn: Elia Esparza Local pop singer performs. Openers are A Billi Free, and Dréa. Fountains at Farrah, 8889 Gateway Blvd. West, 7:30-10:30 p.m., free, fountainsatfarah. com/event-calendar. El Paso Triple-A Baseball Chihuahuas vs. Salt Lake Bees. Event runs July 7-9, 7:05 p.m. Fri.Sat., 10:05 a.m. Sun. For details see Fri., July 7. UTEP Dinner Theatre – ‘Sister Act’ A lounge singer is put in protective custody in a San Francisco convent. Runs July 7-23. Dinner performances at 7 p.m. on July 7-15, 19-22. Matinee dinner performance at 1:30 p.m. on July 9. No dinner matinee at 2:30 p.m. on July 16 and 23. For details see Fri., July 7. Hueco Tanks Lecture: Tim Gibbs, Big Bend Presentation on the Prehistoric Culture of the Big Ben Region. Hueco Tanks State Park & Historic Site, 6900 Hueco Tanks Rd. #1, 2 p.m., free, 915-857-1135. Ysleta Mission Festival Tex-Mex cuisine, arts and crafts, carnival-style game booth. Music performance by Azucar and Best of the Best Cover Band Fungi Mungle. For details see Fri., July 7. Recorder Concert and Workshop A concert of Renaissance and Baroque music with historical commentary by Dr. Lindsey Macchiarella. Recorder workshop to follow. Judge Marquez Public Library , 610 N. Yarbrough St., 1-2:30 p.m., free, 915-747-6630, rgrecorders.org.


CALENDAR JULY 5-12, 2017 Archery and Atl-atl Demonstration Demos held every Saturday. Equipment provided. Marshals present. Archers welcome to bring own recurve or longbow. El Paso Museum of Archaeology, 4301 Transmountain Rd., 11 a.m.-2 p.m., free, 915-7554332., archaeology.elpasotexas.gov. Crafts, Collectibles & Antiques Show A sale and display of miscellaneous objects. Admission is good for both days. Event runs July 8-9, 9 a.m.-6 p.m. Sat., 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Sun. Las Cruces Convention Center, 680 E. University Ave., 9 a.m.-6 p.m., $5, free age 12 and under.

SUN. JULY 9 Spice1: Tupac Tribute Rap music performance. All ages. Tricky Falls, 209 S. El Paso St, 8 p.m., $13, trickyfalls.com. Music Under the Stars: Team Havana Salsa music performance. Chamizal National Memorial, 800 S. San Marcial St., 7:30 p.m., free, 915-534-0600, elpasolive.com/ musicunderthestars. UTEP Dinner Theatre – ‘Sister Act’ A lounge singer is put in protective custody in a San Francisco convent. Runs July 7-23. Dinner performances at 7 p.m. on July 7-15, 19-22. Matinee dinner performance at 1:30 p.m. on July 9. No dinner matinee at 2:30 p.m. on July 16 and 23. For details see Fri., July 7. Ysleta Mission Festival Tex-Mex cuisine, arts and crafts, carnival-style game booth. Music performance by Azucar and Best of the Best Cover Band Fungi Mungle. For details see Fri., July 7. ‘A Masterpiece of Comic...Timing’ New comedy. Part of EPCC Summer Theatre program. Dig it hard, like Boris Karloff in “The Body Snatcher.” Event’s going to run Fri.-Sun., June 30-July 9. 8 p.m. Fri.-Sat., 2:30 p.m. Sun. For details see Fri., July 7. ‘Baggage’ Two annoying thirtysomethings accidentally take each other’s bags at JFK airport, then start dating. Event runs June 23-July 9, 8 p.m. Fri.-Sat., 2:30 p.m. Sun., 7 p.m. on July 6. For details see Fri., July 7. ‘Pippin’ Musical about a young boy searching for meaning. Event runs June 23-July 9, 8 p.m. Thur.-Sat., 2 p.m. Sun. For details see Fri., July 7. Mariachi Sunday A big ‘ol dose of that classical Mexican folk. Happens every Sunday. Age 18+ Speaking Rock Entertainment Center, 122 S. Old Pueblo Rd., 12-5 p.m., free, 915-8607777, speakingrockentertainment. com. El Paso Triple-A Baseball Chihuahuas vs. Salt Lake Bees. Event runs July 7-9, 7:05 p.m. Fri.-Sat., 10:05 a.m. Sun. For details see Fri., July 7. Crafts, Collectibles & Antiques Show A sale and display of miscellaneous objects. Admission is good for both days. Event runs July 8-9, 9 a.m.-6 p.m. Sat., 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Sun. Las Cruces Convention Center, 680 E. University Ave., 10 a.m.-4 p.m., $5, free age 12 and under.

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MON. JULY 10 Maker Camp: Science of Fun S.T.E.A.M.-focused summer camps for ages 8-13. Topics covered: game design, 3D scanning, 3D modeling, 3D printing, virtual reality, augmented reality, storytelling.Event runs July 10-14. Wk 2 is Engineers and Rock Stars. Wk 3 is Designing the Earth. Fab Lab El Paso, 601 N. Oregon St., Ste. 2, 1-3:30 p.m., $150 per week, fablabelpaso.org. Vacation Bible School Lord information and Summer activities for kids. New Hope Lutheran Church, 4801 SunValley Dr., 9 a.m.-12 p.m., free, 915-821-2079.

TUES. JULY 11 Comedy Open Mic Doors open at 9 p.m. Age 21+ Coconuts Bar & Grill, 816 N. Piedras St., 10 p.m., free, facebook.com/epucomedy. Prophets and Outlaws Southern rock and soul music performance. Doors open at 8 p.m. The Lowbrow Palace, 111 E. Robinson Ave., 9 p.m., $10 adv., $12 door, lowbrowpalace.com. ‘Carole King: Tapestry – Live at Hyde Park London’ A film on an American singer-songwriter performing her Grammy award winning album with appearances by Elton John, Graham Nash, Tom Hanks, David Crosby and more. See it two places, Tinseltown or Cielo Vista Mall. 7 p.m., FathomEvents.com. Board Game Night Board and tabletop games. Bring your own. There are board games onsite, too. Game Vault, 9828 Montana Ave., 6-10 p.m., free, gamevaultelpaso.com. Citizenship Classes Information to pass the United States citizen test. All El Paso Libraries, 5 p.m., free, 915212-READ, elpasolibrary.org. Maker Camp: Science of Fun STEa.m.-focused summer camps for ages 8-13. Topics covered: game design, 3D scanning, 3D modeling, 3D printing, virtual reality, augmented reality, storytelling.Event runs July 10-14. Wk 2 is Engineers and Rock Stars. Wk 3 is Designing the Earth. For details see Mon., July 10. Story Time Stories, crafts and activities. All El Paso Libraries, 11 a.m., free, 915-212-READ, elpasolibrary.org. Vacation Bible School Lord information and Summer activities for kids. New Hope Lutheran Church, 4801 SunValley Dr., 9 a.m.-12 p.m., free, 915-821-2079.

WED. JULY 11 Wacky Wednesday: Comedy Open Mic Open to all jesters. Age 21+ 5 Points Bistro, 3019 Montana Ave, 9 p.m., free, facebook.com/ epucomedy. State Line Music Series: Max Stalling Country music performance. Must make food or monetary donation to El Pasoans Fighting Hunger. For ages 21+ For details see Wed., July 5.

El Paso Ghost Tours Real paranormal investigation of downtown El Paso. Equipment provided. Not a point and talk tour. Age 14+ For details see Wed., July 5.

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UTEP Dinner Theatre – ‘Sister Act’ A lounge singer is put in protective custody in a San Francisco convent. Runs July 7-23. Dinner performances at 7 p.m. on July 7-15, 19-22. Matinee dinner performance at 1:30 p.m. on July 9. No dinner matinee at 2:30 p.m. on July 16 and 23. For details see Fri., July 7. Coding with Brew: Web Development Booze and learning. Coding class for adults. Lessons are: create a web page using HTML elements, apply CSS, program interactive JavaScript in a web page. No prior experience needed. Event runs July 12-Aug. 3, 6-8 p.m. Wed.-Thurs. Fab Lab El Paso, 601 N. Oregon St., Ste. 2, 6-8 p.m., $250, 915-209-2656, fablabelpaso. org/calendar. Computer Classes Information to become computer literate. All El Paso Libraries, 5:30 p.m., free, 915-212READ, elpasolibrary.org. Make Your Own Doughnut Kids and bigger people make custom doughnuts. Hillside Coffee & Doughnuts, 4935 N. Mesa St., Ste. 1B, 2-4 p.m., free, 915-474-3453. Maker Camp: Science of Fun STEa.m.-focused summer camps for ages 8-13. Topics covered: game design, 3D scanning, 3D modeling, 3D printing, virtual reality, augmented reality, storytelling.Event runs July 10-14. Wk 2 is Engineers and Rock Stars. Wk 3 is Designing the Earth. For details see Mon., July 10. Story Time Stories, crafts and activities. All El Paso Libraries, 11 a.m., free, 915-212-READ, elpasolibrary.org. 1 Million Cups Community program for entrepreneurs and innovators offers business owners the opportunity to present their startups to a diverse group of mentors, advisors, and entrepreneurs. Happens every Wed. For details see Wed., July 5. Vacation Bible School Lord information and Summer activities for kids. For details see Mon., July 10.

EXHIBITS Weaving in New Mexico: The Ancestral Puebloan and Rio Grande Traditions Showcasing historical and contemporary weaving. New Mexico Farm & Ranch Heritage Museum, 4100 Dripping Springs Rd., 9 a.m.-5 p.m., 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Mon.-Sat., free, info at NMFarmAndRanchMuseum. org. Ends 7/8/17. The Archangels Michael and Raphael Different works by different artists. Museum hours: 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Tues.-Sat., 9 a.m.-9 p.m. Thurs., 12-5 p.m. Sun. El Paso Museum of Art, 1 Arts Festival Plaza, free, 915-2120300 or elpasomuseumofart.org. Ends 7/9/17.

ANIMATOR,

DON BLUTH

Photo courtesy of United Artists

In celebration of the El Paso Community Foundation’s 10th Plaza Classic Film Festival, the El Paso Museum of Art is having an exhibit based on the work of Don Bluth, an El Paso native who was the mastermind behind ‘All Dogs Go to Heaven’ (pictured here), ‘Thumbelina’ and ‘Anastasia.’ 2017 Annual Juried UTEP Student Art Exhibition Art and design by UTEP undergrads. All media taught in the department represented. Stanlee & Gerald Rubin Center, 500 W. University Ave., 10 a.m.-5 p.m., free, 915-747-6151 or rubin.utep.edu. Ends 7/28/17. Art of the Camino Real de Tierra Adentro Group art exhibit featuring 10 local artists. Golden Eagle Gallery, 1501 Main St., 12 p.m.-4 p.m. 915-8510093 or sanelizariohistoricdistrict. org. Ends 7/30/17. New Acquisitions Presenting new additions to the permanent collection including Joshua Shane Flores, Felice House, Wendy Red Star, Jim Waid and more. NMSU Art Gallery, 1390 E. University Ave., 10 a.m.-4 p.m., free, 575-646-2545, uag.nmsu.edu. Ends 8/18/17. The Red That Colored the World This art exhibit explores the use of the cochineal bug, used to create a red pigment, throughout history and places and art styles. Museum hours: 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Tues.-Sat., 9 a.m.-9 p.m. Thurs., 12-5 p.m. Sun. El Paso Museum of Art, 1 Arts Festival Plaza, 12-5 p.m., free, 915-212-0300 elpasomuseumofart.org. Ends 8/20/17. An American Animator, Don Bluth Celebration of the 10th annual Plaza Classic Film Festival. An El Paso native animator known for “Anastasia” and “All Dogs Go To Heaven.” Museum hours: 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Tues.-Sat., 9 a.m.9 p.m. Thurs., 12-5 p.m. Sun. El Paso Museum of Art, 1 Arts Festival Plaza, 9 a.m.-5 p.m., free, 915-212-0300 or elpasomuseumofart.org. Ends 9/17/17. Spirit Lines: Helen Hardin Etchings Twenty-three copper-plate etchings produced in the early 1980s by a Native American artist. Museum hours: 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Tues.-Sat., 9 a.m.-9 p.m. Thurs., 12-5 p.m. Sun. El Paso Museum of Art, 1 Arts Festival Plaza, 12-5 p.m., free, 915-212-0300 elpasomuseumofart.org. Ends 10/8/17.

Suzi Davidoff: Simplified World Explores human-wrought changes in the ecosystem. Drawings on found maps and globes with accompanying hand-drawn animation. Stanlee & Gerald Rubin Center, 500 W. University Ave., 10 a.m.-5 p.m., free, 915-747-6151 or rubin.utep.edu. Ends 12/15/17.

AUDITIONS Vendors and Volunteers Needed Skyline Optimist Youth Park Christmas in July bazaar needs arts and crafts vendors. Proceeds of fair go to building restrooms for the park. Skyline Optimist Youth Park, 5050 Yvette Dr, 10 a.m.-4 p.m., $25 (1 Table), $40 (2 Tables), $50 (3 Tables), 915-7518003. Due 7/15/17. Reel Authentico Contest El Paso’s Downtown Management District seeks videos by local filmmakers capturing the spirit of Downtown El Paso. Deadine is July 26 downtownelpaso. com/dmd. Due 7/26/17. ‘Jewel Box Series’ Applications The Jewel Box Series is designed to foster and showcase community talent in the Philanthropy Theatre. Deadline is July 28, 2017. epcf.org/jewelbox. Due 7/28/17. Dia De Los Muertos 2017 Call for Artists Original art for official t-shirt and poster of the “Dia de los Muertos on the Mesilla Plaza” event. The winner receives one free booth space for the event. Art must: reflect spirit of Dia de los Muertos, be in black and white format, easily converted to screen printing. Entries should be submitted on a CD or through e-mail as JPEG or PDF files. calaveracoalition@gmail. com. Due 8/1/17. Calling All Musicians and Vendors Need peeps for a two day craft beer and wine fest at Ft. Bliss. facebook. com/BlissTapandCork. Due 8/1/17.

MUSEUMS Aa Studios Various amounts of local art. 2645 Doña Ana Rd., Las Cruces, NM, 575-520-8752 or wysiwyg@ zianet.com. Al Borrego Studio & Gallery Original works, prints and gifts by Al Borrego. 1501C Main Street, San Elizario, Wed.-Fri. 10 a.m.-2 p.m., Sat. 10 a.m.4 p.m., Sun. 12-4 p.m., 915-851-0093, www.alborrego.com. Bert Saldana Art Gallery Original Southwestern oil paintings and prints by Bert Saldana. 1501 Main Street, San Elizario, Wed.-Fri. 10 a.m.-2 p.m., Sat. 10 a.m.-4 p.m., Sun. 12-4 p.m., 915-479-2926, bert_saldana@yahoo. com or www.bertsaldanafineart. com. Centro Municipal de las Artes Museum offers poetry readings, art exhibitions, dance performances and art classes. 16 de Septiembre, Mariscal 105, Cd. Juarez, MX, free, every Sunday 11 a.m.-1 p.m., for more info (01152656) 617-2828. Crossland Gallery & Art Junction Home of the El Paso Art Association. 500 W. Paisano, Tues.-Fri., 11 a.m.-3 p.m., Sat., 11 a.m.-3 p.m., free, 915534-7377 or elpasoartassociation. com. Dream Chasers Club Local art exhibits. 200 S. Santa Fe St., 915-3426357 or DCCDreamChasersClub. com.

CLASSIFIEDS HELP WANTED Local company seeking secret shoppers for the El Paso Market. Must have computer skills and bi lingual is a plus.

Part time only Call 577-9609


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KAPPY’S CORNER By Steve Kaplowitz / Comment: @whatsupweekly

This past weekend, Jeff Horn stunned Manny Pacquiao and the rest of the boxing world to capture the WBO welterweight championship. The fight was held in Brisbane, Australia and the 29-year old former Olympian and schoolteacher was a four to one underdog despite fighting in his hometown. To just about everyone who watched and scored the fight at home, Pacquiao won the fight by landing more than double the punches to Horn according to CompuBox. However, the three judges who scored the fight saw things differently, and they gave Horn the win on all three scorecards. The Australian challenger was the aggressor throughout the fight, and a headbutt, which opened up a nasty cut on Pacquiao’s head, could have influenced the judges’ scoring. Judge Waleska Roldan (New York) scored it 117-111, while Chris Flores (Arizona) and Ramon Cerdan (Argentina) had it 115-113. The Pacquiao camp was so shocked by Roldan’s scorecard, that they demanded an investigation following the bout and even wondered if it was fixed. Over the last ten years, Roldan has scored over 500 bouts, including numerous world title fights. Most of her scorecards have been without controversy, but she had Pacquiao losing every round except the third, eighth and ninth. Teddy Atlas, who was part of the ESPN announce team seated at ringside was so incensed by the decision that he told ESPN’s SportsCenter after the fight that something was not right. “It’s only one of two things, it’s either incompetence or corruption,” Atlas admitted. “When you see 117-111, I don’t think anyone could be that incompetent. I’m sorry. If you know the sport, you watch the sport, you can’t be that incompetent. You see who’s landing clean, who’s just throwing, who’s not landing clean, who almost got knocked out, you can’t be that incompetent. So, what else could it be? Corruption. Nothing else. I’m sorry. I love this sport, it’s the greatest sport in the world. It was a great day, a great night back where you guys are. It was great for the fans out there to get it on free TV, brought back to free TV where boxing belongs. It was great! It was great theater. There’s no theater like boxing. Nothing. But the decision stunk.” Although some people worry that the Horn

upset will destroy boxing, the sport has dealt with bad decisions over the years and it has not led to a decline in ratings or fan interest. Two upcoming fights will dominate the boxing world. The first will be on August 26 when UFC superstar Connor McGregor challenges Floyd Mayweather at T Mobile Arena in Las Vegas. Despite the fact that most people see this as a one-sided affair that Mayweather will dominate, plenty of curious fans will easily cough up the $100 Showtime Pay-Per-View price tag to see if McGregor has the magic knockout punch to deliver. Then on September 16, Canelo Alvarez will meet Genedy Golovkin for the undisputed middleweight championship on HBO Pay Per View. This megafight is truly the boxing event of the year, and many fans have been waiting for this rivalry to settle in the ring for the last few years. Golovkin is the most feared boxer in the sport, with an undefeated record in 37 bouts including 33 knockouts. Meanwhile, Alvarez has won his last seven fights, including a unanimous decision over Julio Cesar Chavez in May. Unlike Mayweather and McGregor, these two boxers will most likely deliver an action-packed show, with a knockout finish highly likely. ___ Since 1997, Steve Kaplowitz has hosted “Sportstalk” weekday afternoons 4-7 p.m. on 600 ESPN El Paso. Over the last 17 years, he has also worked for UTEP and NMSU as a playby-play broadcaster, for UTEP telecasts on Time Warner Cable and for KDBC-TV and KTSM-TV as a sports anchor/ reporter. You can contact Steve by emailing him at skaplowitz@krod.com.

By Gustavo Arellano/ comment: @whatsupweekly

SPECIAL MARIJUANA EDITION

Q.

Dear Mexican: Los Marijuanos played at Seattle Hempfest years ago. Are they like the best prohemp Mexican band out there? Are there other Mexican hemp-related bands or products out there that I don’t know about? - Inquring Hempsters Want to Know! Dear Gabacho: Remember Platoon, and how the troops were broken up between the “tweakers”—those who enjoyed the ganga while singing along to “The Tracks of My Tears” by Smokey Robinson and the Miracles— and the angry drunks who were known as “juicers.” The Mexican is definitely the latter—I’m like the old men in the rancho who drink 180-proof sugarcane alcohol and can’t be bothered with herb, so my knowledge or products is limited to whatever my home newspaper plugs on potplus.com. That said, #respect to those of ustedes who do smoke—Mexican musicians have been on that bit long before “Reefer Man.” “La Cucaracha” has a line about how former President Victoriano Huerta could no longer walk because he lacked marijuana pa’ fumar—to smoke. “El Tírili” (The Reefer Man), by Don Tosti’s Pachuco Boogie Boys, warns people about the dangers of beer, wine and tequila. But el zacatito? The grass? “Ayyyy,” Tosti sighs, before scatting so furiously he makes Cab Calloway seem as restrained as Paul Robeson. But the best Mexican musical marijuana masterpiece is “Marihuana Boogie,” by the legendary Lalo Guerrero, who combined the best of Benny Goodman and Cypress Hill to sing about the pleasure of getting lit while dancing your nalgas off. Too bad narcocorridos don’t have as much grace…

Q. Jeff Horn of Australia, left, lands a right to Manny Pacquiao of the Philippines during their WBO World Welterweight title fight in Brisbane, Australia, Sunday, July 2, 2017.Photo by Tertius Pickard (AP)

JULY 5-12, 2017

Do you think legalizing marijuana in Mexico would be a good way to create jobs and better their economy? - Chapo Chupa

Dear Pocho: Mexico just legalized medicinal marijuana nationwide, which will come as news to the abuelitas that have used marijuana-infused alcohol to treat sore joints and muscles for centuries. While the Mexican is for the decriminalization of all drugs everywhere, any economy created by Mexico making marijuana a legal industry will become subservient to the real marijuanos: Americans. And we all know how well NAFTA worked out for Mexico.

Q.

I’ve heard that marijuana is a made-up name for smokeable cannabis. It comes from Maria and Juan. This pejorative term was concocted in the 1930s to stigmatize pot smoking with Mexicans in the Southwest. During the 1930s Great Depression, there was a surplus of labor in America and attempts were made to arrest Mexicans for their smoking habits and deport them. Any truth to this? - Etymology Edna Dear Gabacha: Only that there was a Great Depression. No one—not even the Real Academia Española—knows the etymology of “marijuana,” and it’s found in Mexican newspapers going back to the 19th century. Marijuana use in the United States has always been racialized, but gabachos have also stuck the demon weed to Filipinos, blacks, and “Hindoos.” But, as most illicit, wonderful things, marijuana only became acceptable when white people began using it. I’d end with a joke, but my marijuana humor begins and ends with a line that once came out in a Cheech and Chong movie: “Hey, that’s a pretty nice car, man. Better get it back to the circus before they find out it’s gone.” Um, yeah… ___ Ask the Mexican at themexican@ askamexican.net, be his fan on Facebook, follow him on Twitter @gustavoarellano or follow him on Instagram @gustavo_arellano!


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