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FR EE

Vol. 18 / No.34/ MAY 17-24, 2017

Finance 101: Student Loans Page 9

Gabriel Iglesias fluffs up Don Haskins Page 10

Dance with the walking dead Page 11

El Paso Show season preview Page 12

Band of Horses heads to Tricky Page 14

Page 6


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4

Question of the Week: WHAT CAN ADULTS LEARN FROM KIDS? Photos by Andrea Sandoval

JONAS CASILLAS:

Adults can learn how to be kids – how they act. Learn how to get more active. The kids bring the joy out in them.

ALEXIS REYES:

How to stay a kid for as long as possible by just playing with their kids and reading children’s books.

BIANCA CARDOZA:

They could learn to dress up with new styles. They should dress more colorful.

KENNETH JOHNSON:

To recycle to protect the planet Earth. It’s good to do that. They can recycle paper, bottles and glass.

120 PORFIRIO DIAZ El Paso, TX 79902 ph: (915) 534-4422 fax: (915) 534-7919 www.whatsuppub.com facebook.com/whatsupweekly Twitter: @whatsupweekly PUBLISHER Secret F. Wherrett (x114) • secret@whatsuppub.com EDITOR Victoria G. Molinar (x140) • editor@whatsuppub.com

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MAY 17-24, 2017

FROM THE EDITOR

VICTORIA G. MOLINAR comment: @whatsupweekly Last Wednesday, KCOS, our local PBS station, held a celebration for the winners of the PBS Kids Writers Contest. First through fourth place winners read their stories aloud while their illustrations were projected behind them. The little contestants ranged from kindergarten through fifth grade. I attended the event and was immediately reminded of my early days of storytelling. Before I could even write, I would illustrate stories, ask my grandpa to write down what I wanted (to this day, his penmanship trumps mine) and would ask teachers if they could read it to the class. In fourth grade, I also entered a writing contest, where I placed third. It was a big deal for me, not only because it was rare that I was praised for anything academic, as a student who struggled with math among other things, but also because my name was announced over the school intercom. What made that moment especially memorable was the fact that the story came from a hard place. That year, I lost my grandma to cancer. I was her chiplona – that’s Mexican slang for spoiled girl – and to lose her was to lose my second mom. While her health was depleting, my family and I were fortunate enough to be around her until her last days. Those days were especially tough because she was in a coma. We were at her house, and a staple of ours for scrapes and burns was a good ol’ tub of Vaseline. One day while at my grandma’s, my little cousin Austin, who was probably about 2 years old, found it and decided it was there to help him sculpt his

hair into spikey perfection. He ran about looking like a toddler out of “SLC Punk!” Austin’s gift of comedic relief was the inspiration behind my “award” winning essay. It’s funny how experiences like that, and all of those precious moments with my writing partner/grandpa, helped sculpt who I am today. Looking at the room full of kids, I was filled with so much hope. We’re constantly told that the passion to read and write is diminishing thanks to the abundance of videos and video games. But in that room packed with kids and their parents, it was evident that technology can actually encourage children’s storytelling abilities. I was also filled with hope, because in times of political turmoil and inevitable anger coming from adults, I acknowledge that these little guys often have wise old souls. We spend so much time teaching them, but how much time do we take to learn from them? For our question of the week, I decided to take the opportunity to learn from kids, both at the KCOS event and while taking a stroll at San Jacinto Plaza. The resounding answer that nearly all of them had? We should all learn to have a little more fun and play. No surprise there! I hope our roundup of free summer concerts inspires you to spend more fun time outdoors – but most importantly – I hope that you find that every day is an opportunity to find that inner kid.

PRODUCTION MANAGER / GRAPHIC ARTIST Edgar B. Gonzalez (x130) graphics3@elpasoinc.com

EDITORIAL ASSISTANT Angela Saavedra • asaavedra@elpasoinc.com

PROOFREADER Miguel De Santiago

GRAPHIC ARTIST Xanthe Miller xmiller@elpasoinc.com

CONTRIBUTORS Denise Nelson-Prieto, Steve Kaplowitz, Steve Escajeda, Eric Acosta, Isabel A. Walters, John del Rosario, Austin Savage, Luis Gonzalez, Alan Sculley, Lisa Martinez, Lisa Amaya, Khayla Golucke, Bethany Blundell, Xcelzin Pena

PHOTOGRAPHER (x138) photos@elpasoinc.com

CALENDAR Eric M. Acosta calendar@whatsuppub.com *Deadline Monday, noon

ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES Hector Ramirez (x111) • Judy Ramirez (x110) • Christian Pistella (x134) • Tod Wells (x135) • Deborah Grado (x104)

Evan A. Rivera erivera@elpasoinc.com EVENT SALES AND MARKETING Erin Pfirman (x133) • erin@elpasoinc.com SOCIAL MEDIA PROMOTIONS Deborah Grado dgrado@elpasoinc.com (x104)

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MAY 17-24, 2017

5

KAPPY’S CORNER By Steve Kaplowitz / Comment: @whatsupweekly

Last Wednesday marked the one-year anniversary since my public press conference confrontation with UTEP men’s basketball head coach Tim Floyd. Looking back on that day, I had never attended a press conference in my 22 years in broadcasting where the agenda was personal. Floyd was under the impression that I had been hammering him on my 600 ESPN El Paso sports radio show for the sudden departures inside his men’s basketball program at UTEP. I posed a question on-air days before that press conference, and wondered if he was losing control of his team. What bothered me at the time was that multiple players were announcing on social media that they were transferring from UTEP, but the university would not comment nor return phone calls or texts. At his press conference a week later, Floyd made it a point to address the increasing number of transfers in college basketball and how it directly impacted his team. While he gave out information to the media on transfers and players turning pro, he focused his anger directly on me. If you take away the confrontation and analyze the information he disseminated, it was some very good material. However, the big takeaway from that afternoon was that he got personal with a member of the local media. It seems like I still get people coming up to me all the time and asking about that day. They wonder if Coach Floyd and I have patched things up between us. The truth is, we have not spoken a word to each other since May 10 last year. We did sit across from each other at a funeral last November, but that has been it. I did make multiple efforts to try and meet with him behind closed doors, but nothing ever came out of it. What surprised me most of all was some of the people who wanted to help get the two of us together to settle our differences. I appreciate the efforts from all of those who have tried to help, but don’t

expect any on-air interviews any time soon. Floyd has no interest in patching things up. Some of my radio listeners wonder why I continue to praise Floyd after what happened between us last year. The answer is easy, he is a good coach who unfortunately is in a bad situation at UTEP. The Miners and 13 other teams are competing each season for one spot in the NCAA Tournament. C-USA gets little to no respect by anyone in college basketball, especially the NCAA Selection Committee. The only thing that matters is which team wins the C-USA Tournament and gets the automatic bid to the NCAAs. Floyd’s Miners came closest during his first season with UTEP, when they led Memphis by 12 points with six minutes left to play. Since then, Floyd has not been able to win the games that matter most in the conference postseason tournament, and the inability to advance to the Big Dance has led to a frustrated fan base. When I look at the coaching job he did with the Miners over the last two months of the 2016-17 season, I thought it was worthy of C-USA recognition. After all, he took a team that was ranked next to last in RPI in January and nearly finished third in conference play. Most of the fans who were calling for his head earlier in the season, praised him for the team’s turnaround and are back in his corner again. It seems like Floyd and his staff do their best coaching jobs when they are dealing with the most adversity. As we prepare for the 2017-18 season, Floyd took the opposite approach with his team. He recruited a large class to prepare for the potential losses of transfers. At the same time, he kept his core talent in place (although Deon Barrett announced last week that he would transfer), and hopes to finally build a lasting foundation that will contend for an NCAA Tournament appearance. I hope he finally has the right pieces in place to deliver on what he promised fans eight years ago when he came back to UTEP. Since 1997, Steve Kaplowitz has hosted “Sportstalk” weekday afternoons 4-7 p.m. on 600 ESPN El Paso. Over the last 17 years, he has also worked for UTEP and NMSU as a play-byplay broadcaster, for UTEP telecasts on Time Warner Cable and for KDBC-TV and KTSM-TV as a sports anchor/reporter. You can contact Steve by emailing him at skaplowitz@krod.com.

UTEP men’s basketball head coach Tim Floyd.

Photo by Jorge Salgado


6

WWW.WHATSUPPUB.COM

MAY 17-24, 2017 atsupweekly

By Isabel A. Walters comment: @wh

fun to do k very far to find something El Pasoans don’t have to loo t here in righ nd fou be t entertainment can this summer. Some of the bes our own backyard. town oy plenty of live music around Adults and kids alike can enj for free. throughout this summer – all also made nt organizers around the city eve Going the extra mile, . From nity mu com the positive impact on sure that the events have a free the d, nee in se tho ents to donating to including educational compon beyond music. events we’ve outlined go far

e State Line

Series at Th 1. Shamaley Ford Live Music

Source: The State Line Facebook

The free concert series at the barbecue eatery on 1222 Sunland Park Dr. is already underway and will continue through August. Catch the shows on Wednesdays at 8 p.m. as you chow down on brisket and coleslaw. Attendees are encouraged to donate non-perishable food items to benefit the El Pasoans Fighting Hunger Food Bank. “We actually started [the music series] at one of our locations in San Antonio,” said Scott Ziskosky, director of marketing. “We came up with the idea to give something back to our community. It was just a great opportunity to have live mu-

sic and benefit the local food bank. Then after a few years of doing that, we thought it was a great idea to do it in El Paso, too.” Last year alone, the music series helped collect 1,265 pounds of food and raised almost $4,000 in monetary donations for the food bank. Since it started the free music series 12 years ago, The State Line has helped collect more than 18,000 pounds of food. “It’s kind of a natural fit, since that’s what we do. We’re a restaurant; we feed people,” Ziskosky said. “Working with the food bank is a win-win. I know we’ve helped feed thousands of people.”

2. Cool Canyon Nights Thursday nights just got more exciting with live tunes accompanied by a picturesque sunset thanks to Cool Canyon Nights. The series continues at the McKelligon Canyon Amphitheatre through July 27. “We believe that in order to give back to the community, it’s important to offer these events,” said Veronica Hernandez, live events manager for Townsquare Media, the main company behind the event. “We feature artists of different types, and it’s great to showcase them so that everyone has the opportunity to hear them.” The show brings in more than 17,000 attendees throughout the free series. VIP tickets are available for $10 at NeonTicket.com and include reserved seating in the amphitheater, access to the VIP lounge with a private cash bar and mini appetizers while supplies last.

The concerts also include live performances on the patio, while the featured artist performs on the main stage. Audiences can purchase craft beer and food from food trucks.

Upcoming shows: May 18 – El Paso Band May 25 – Los 202 June 01 – Windy City June 08 – Ooh La La June 15 – Los Arrieros June 22 – Joe Barron June 29 – Main Street July 06 – Fungi Mungle (Military Tribute Night) July 13 – Soul Sacrifice July 20 – Frontera Bugalu July 27 – Brown Betty For more info, visit facebook.com/CoolCanyonNights or call 915- 534-0600. ook

Source: Cool Canyon Nights Faceb

Upcoming shows: May 17 – Mike Ryan May 24 – Koe Wetzel May 31 – Maddison Livingston June 7 – Alice Wallace June 14 – TBA June 21 – TBA June 28 – Ooh La La July 5 – Brian Mars July 12 – TBA

July 19 – Valerie Ponzio July 26 – Whitney Rose August 2 – Joe Barron Band August 9 – Chuco Soul Project August 16 – Fungi Mungle August 23 – Bri Bagwell For more info, visit facebook.com/TheStateLineBBQ or call 915-581-3371.

Continued on 7


MAY 17-24, 2017

7

3. Alfresco! Fridays El Paso Live partnered with FirstLight Federal Credit Union to present Alfresco! Fridays for its 15th year. Performances are held Fridays at 6 p.m. at the Convention Center Plaza on 1 Civic Center Plz. “We truly feel that Alfresco! Fridays

Continued from 6

Photo by Angela Saavedra

4. Let Freedom Sing

puts the beat in the heart of Downtown El Paso during the summer,” said Ryan Lympus, assistant general manager of El Paso Live. “We have very loyal concertgoers. We see them almost every Friday during the series with their foldout chairs and fans. We love them!”

Upcoming shows: May 19 – Brown Betty (classic rock) May 26 – La Sonora Blu (cumbia) June 2 – Azucar (salsa) June 9 – Dusty Low (alternative rock) June 16 – PT & The Cruisers (classic rock)

June 30 – Ooh La La (’70s disco) July 7 – Joe King Carrasco (Tex Mex) July 14 – Sayverse (Mexican pop) July 21 – Soul & Sacrifice (Santana tribute) July 28 – Prime 80z (’80s rock) August 4 – Mariachi Paso Del Norte (mariachi) August 11 – Windy City (Chicago tribute) August 18 – Twisted Hams (classic rock) August 25 – Fixed Idea (ska) September 1 – Radio La Chusma (reggae) Photo by Victoria G. Molinar

The free concert series held at Freedom Crossing at Fort Bliss recently kicked off its seventh season last Friday, May 13 with performances by Brett Young and openers Mitchell Tenpenny and Valerie Ponzio. Upcoming performances will include country artist Joe Nichols and Grammy Award-winning hip-hop group Naughty by Nature. “We offer these events to the entire community to encourage interaction with the military and El Paso residents,” explained Bianca Cervantes, director of marketing for Freedom Crossing. “We are, after all, neighbors and El Paso is the perfect melting pot location to introduce new people and cultures that the troops bring to Fort Bliss. “Attendance can reach up to 15,000 people, but we are anticipating a spike this year as we work to

spread the word out further about free, live entertainment at Freedom Crossing.” Outside of the Let Freedom Sing series, which is held at the event lawn, Freedom Crossing also hosts Friday at the Fire, free concerts in front of the fireplace on the promenade area. The series will spotlight local acts like country singer Brian Mars and the discolicious Ooh La La. Attendees must have a government-issued ID to gain entrance to Fort Bliss. Visitors can get a pass at one of the visitor control centers, which you can learn more about at bliss.army.mil.

Upcoming shows:

May 19 – Brian Mars (Friday at the Fire) May 26 – Ooh La La (Friday at the Fire) June 30 – Joe Nichols (Let Freedom Sing) July 22 - Naughty by Nature (Let Freedom Sing) Fore more info, visit facebook.com/FreedomCrossingAtFortBliss or call 915-564-5311. Continued on 8

JUNE 3, 2017

P R I Z E S

FORT BLISS BOWLING CENTER

EL PASO ELECTRIC

For more information call 915.772.5566

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O F F E R E D

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BEST DRESSED

Champs

To be eligible, you need a team of 5 bowlers. The winning team will be announced on June 23rd on the JA El Paso Facebook page.

Team

To be eligible, teams (with all 5 members) must dress like it's the 80s and post a group photo on Facebook, prior to the bowling session. The team with the most likes and shares wins!


8

WWW.WHATSUPPUB.COM Continued from 7

5. Music Under the Stars Back for its 34th season, Music Under the Stars recently announced their concert lineup, which will include Grammy award-winning Latin rock/funk/hip-hop fusion Ozomatli on June 4 at the Cohen Stadium. The rest of the lineup includes locally and internationally known acts that bring reggae, salsa and jazz to both locations. The 4th of July concert will

also see a fun change-up; veering from the usual symphony act, this year’s concert will feature Brooks & Dunn tribute Neon Circus. A firework show will still be a part of the celebration. All June performances will be held at Cohen Stadium while the free series will continue at the Chamizal National Memorial in July. Last summer, MUTS attracted nearly 10,000 people throughout its run. “One of the really cool things about this program is that as part of it, we’ll also have a couple of the bands do workshops at the El Paso

County Juvenile Detention Center or La Fe Preparatory School,” said Erin Ritter, public information coordinator for the Museums and Cultural Affairs Department. “For many of the kids, it’s the first time they’re exposed to this kind of arts and culture event.” While food trucks and vendors will be on site, families can still bring their own food. This year will also include new special additions to coincide with the series, which Ritter said will be announced soon.

MAY 17-24, 2017

Upcoming shows: Concerts are on Sundays from 7:30-9:30 p.m. with the exception of the July 4 concert, which starts at 7 p.m. Cohen Stadium, 9700 Gateway North Blvd. June 4 – Ozomatli (Latin rock/hip-hop/funk) June 11– Departure (Journey tribute) June 18 – Sayverse (Latin pop-rock) June 25 – Magic (reggae/pop) Chamizal National Memorial, 5800 San Marcial Street July 4 – Neon Circus (Brooks & Dunn tribute) with fireworks finale July 9 – Team Havana (salsa night) July 16 – Chuco Soul Project (jazz/funk/reggae) July 23 – Los Arrieros (noche ranchera) For more info, visit facebook.com/MusicUnderTheStars or 915-212-0110.

Photo courtesy of MCAD

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9

FINANCE 101 THE INS AND OUTS OF STUDENT LOANS Presented by

evolve.fcu.org

For today’s students, pursuing the career of your dreams often means taking out college loans. After graduation, making on-time monthly loan payments boosts your credit score and shows future lenders that you’re a responsible borrower. But navigating the world of student loans can be confusing and overwhelming. How do you get started? Should you go with federal or private loans? What is the difference between unsubsidized and subsidized lending? This article takes a look at the basics of student loans just in time for those considering college in the fall. And to those who just graduated – congratulations! This article also takes a look at different repayment options as well as ways to find relief if you’re in a financial bind. In the words of the government’s student aid website, “Federal student loans are an investment in your future. You should not be afraid to take out federal student loans, but you should be smart about it.“ Getting started Indeed, borrowing money for college is a serious undertaking, and one that shouldn’t be taken lightly. According to forbes.com, the average U.S. student leaves college with around $30,000 of debt, with over two million students owing $100,000 or more. But with foresight and responsible planning, loans can help students reach the academic and financial goals they’ve set for themselves. Two types of loans are available to students: federal and private. Federal loans are administered through your college’s financial aid office. Students fill out a FAFSA (Free Application for Federal Student Aid) form in order to see what kind of loans they qualify for. The results outline available federal loans, but may suggest private loans as well. “Federal loans are set up to assist people with no income or a low credit rating, such as students,” said Jason Beaver, a financial analyst with Guerra Investment Advisors. Federal loans generally offer fixed or lower interest rates than private loans, have longer grace periods before repayment is required and offer greater flexibility for deferring payments. Many federal loans do not require the student to start paying until after college is over, Beaver added, although interest will accumulate.

There are a few kinds of federal loans. Perkins loans are given to students based on financial need, while Stafford loans are available to any student. PLUS loans are loans given to a student’s parents, or in some cases, graduate students. Students also have the option of taking out private loans through commercial lenders, which typically have higher (and variable) interest rates, but fewer limits on the amount that can be borrowed. In many cases, the amount you can borrow depends on your personal credit score, as does the interest rate on the loan. Some private loans require payments while the borrower is still a student. Loans can be subsidized or unsubsidized. “Subsidized” means that the government pays the interest on the loan while the student is in college. However, some loans are unsubsidized, meaning that the borrower is responsible for the interest a loan accumulates even when the student is not required to make payments. Many federal loans are subsidized, though this can depend on a student’s demonstrated financial need. Because incoming college students are often too young to have built up decent credit, many private loans require a cosigner. Cosigning on a loan will provide young borrowers access to money, but it also means that the cosigner’s credit can be negatively affected if the student misses payments or defaults on a loan. Repayment options While in school, rigorous coursework should take precedence. Many federal loans understand this and don’t require borrowers to begin making payments until after they’ve left college or drop below a half-time schedule. But following graduation, former students are thrown into the real world, which includes paying back the money borrowed for school. Federal loans generally employ a tenyear payment plan. Students make monthly payments on the loans, the amount of which increases over time to reflect a presumably increasing salary. In some cases, students may have 25 years to pay back loans. Borrowers can also set up a repayment plan based on income in which monthly payments reflect your current earnings. “If your income is less than the amount you have in student loans, then I really encourage you to sign up for an income-driven repayment option,” said Sophia Bera, a certified financial planner and founder of Gen Y Planning.

Fortunately, most federal loans allow recent grads some time to get on their feet before they are required to start making payments. The particulars vary with each loan, but this grace period can be anywhere from 45 days to nine months. (Though, as with death and taxes, interest on loans is a sure bet in life, and will keep building even when you aren’t required to pay.) Some federal loans, like Perkins loans, offer students the chance to have some of their loans cancelled in exchange for some form of public service. According to the government’s financial aid website, time in the military or civil service or certain jobs, like teaching, can negate some of what you owe. If the need arises, borrowers may have the option to take some time off from paying back loans. Students can apply for a deferment, which means delaying the start of paying back loans, or go into forbearance, which is a period of months or even years in which a borrower is not required to make payments. Conditions vary according to the loan, and of course, interest will almost certainly still accumulate. “Going into forbearance or deferring your student loan payments will not hurt your credit or your credit score,” said Russell Sheid, a financial advisor at Evolve Federal Credit Union. “But making late payments or missing payments will negatively effect your score.” Strategies to minimize debt It is important to note that students can borrow less than the amount offered to them. Some federal and private loans allow the borrower enough money for tuition, room and board, books and living expenses. However, borrowing only what you need means less to pay back later, and less of your hard-earned money that will go to paying off interest. One strategy to minimize debt is to take out loans proportionate with the salary of the job you hope to get, Sheid said. Researching jobs in your chosen field can help you get an idea of how much money you stand to make. In other words, those majoring in creative writing – while certainly a worthwhile pursuit – may not want to borrow $150,000. “I always recommend determining beforehand what is appropriate for you to handle,” Sheid said. “As long as your total debt is less than your starting salary coming out of college, you should be able to pay your loans back in 10 years.” Beaver also suggests exploring less-expensive education options, such as communi-

ty college, to take care of prerequisites before transferring to a larger university. If you’re “aggressively paying down your loans and your interest rates are above five percent,” Bera suggests refinancing. “You can pick and choose which loans you refinance,” she said, “so just choose the ones with the highest interest rates.” But if you choose to refinance, “be aware that you’ll lose access to the federal student loan benefits like income-driven repayment options, loan forgiveness and forbearance,” Bera cautioned. “If you think you’ll use one of those programs in the future, then you shouldn’t refinance through a private lender.” Borrowers may also consider consolidating many loans into one monthly payment, which can make the payment process easier but can also make for potentially lower overall interest rates and lower fixed monthly payments. However, Bera advises that if you want to get rid of your student loans quickly and you have the ability to pay extra every month, don’t consolidate. Instead, she said, start by paying the minimums on all your loans and pay extra towards the one with the highest interest rate. Additionally, like refinancing, consolidating loans sometimes cancels out the benefits that come with money lent by the federal government, as loans are often consolidated through a commercial lender who sets its own terms for repayment. Moreover, you cannot consolidate private loans, Sheid added, and you can only consolidate your loans once. “No do-overs,” he said. Financial foresight It can’t be stated enough that student loans are an enormous responsibility. Contrary to popular belief, (most) student loans don’t follow you around after you die (though they can, especially private loans and those guaranteed by a cosigner). Students loans are impervious to declarations of bankruptcy, and at the very least, missing payments can affect your future ability to finance a car or a house. “Loans may be the best outlet for going to school, but you do need to understand that once the grace period is over, the loans are going to have to be paid back,” Beaver said. “No matter what.” But with the foresight and intelligence befitting someone with a college degree, debt can be manageable and paid off in a way that works for you. Making payments as soon as possible, creating a budget and living within your means, and hunting for jobs that have loan forgiveness programs can mitigate the debt’s intrusion into your life, Sheid said. Many resources are available for those considering taking out loans and those in the midst of paying them back. “Don’t be afraid to ask your lenders for advice,” he said. “They are there to help you.”


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MAY 17-24, 2017

DON HASKINS CENTER IS ABOUT TO GET ‘FLUFFY’ By Isabel A. Walters comment: @whatsupweekly

Gabriel Iglesias – aka Fluffy aka El Paso’s favorite funnyman – returns to the Sun City this Friday, May 19, bringing with him his latest comedy show, FluffyMania. The comedian, who once starred in commercials for our local

Photo by Anthony Nunez

water utility and previously shot one of his comedy specials at the Plaza Theatre, has called El Paso one of his favorite cities to perform in. The love is mutual: in 2012, local nonprofit Operation H.O.P.E. recognized Iglesias as its Beacon of H.O.P.E. award recipient. During that awards ceremony, he also received the key to the city. Since his last show here several years ago, Iglesias has stayed busy working on expanding his comedic empire by starring in hit movies and TV shows, including a few of his own. He’s also taken some time off from touring to focus on himself. Earlier this year, he announced the cancellation of several shows, citing “serious health and emotional issues.” Fortunately, El Paso was not among the cancellations and now Fluffy is back to doing what he does best: making people laugh. Iglesias has resumed his tour and his TV show, “Fluffy’s Food Adventures,” which premieres on the Fuse network this summer. Iglesias talked to What’s Up via email about how he’s doing now and other projects his fans can look forward to. Q. It’s been a few years since you were last here. What have you been up to in addition to touring? I have taken up boxing and I try to work out five times a week at Ten Goose Boxing gym. I’m doing a few voiceover roles for animated movies and hanging out with my dogs. Q. In the last few years, you and your voice have starred in a few movies – most recently, a voice cameo in “Smurfs: The Lost Village.” Is that something you always want-

ed to do, or did it just sort of happen? It just happened and I found that I really liked it, so I asked to get more voiceover roles. It’s easy and fun work. You sit in a booth and read lines and they feed you! Q. What else do you still hope to accomplish? I would like to star in my own TV show. I’ve had a few shots, and I’ve got another shot on the horizon. Q. You’ve talked a little bit about your journey to get healthier; how is that going? It’s been a journey to get my diabetes in check. Like I mentioned before, I have taken up boxing, which is great exercise as well as stress relief. Q. How do you prepare yourself before a show? After years of doing live shows, has it become more difficult to find inspiration for your comedy? I like to nap as long as I can before I get on stage. The material comes from friends and family and those rivers are always flowing. Q. Is there anything in particular you’re especially looking forward to seeing or doing here? I love the food in El Paso and the audiences are always great. El Paso is one of my favorite cities to perform in!

WHAT’S UP

Gabriel Iglesias:FluffyMania Tour

Friday, May 19, 8 p.m. Don Haskins Center, 151 Glory Rd. $55-$90 plus fees Tickets available at UTEP Ticket Center, online at TicketMaster.com and by phone at 915-747-5234

DID YOU KNOW? Please remember that clothing, shoes, or other textiles should NOT go into the blue recycling bin. • These type of items are RESUABLE, not recyclable. If your clothing is in good or average condition, please give it to a neighbor or take those items to a local charity such as Goodwill or Candle Lighters. If the items are bad condition, those items can be thrown into your gray recycling bin.

Citizens may call 311 (915-212-6000) or visit www.recyclerightEP.com for more information


CALENDAR MAY 17-24, 2017

11

CALENDAR

WED. MAY 17

Mr. Elevator & the Brain Hotel Psychedelic rock music performance with local openers Nico & the Silent Films. Age 21+ Monarch, 204 E. Rio Grande Ave., 9 p.m., free, facebook. com/monarchep. EP Bike Month – Ride for Silence Six mile beginner ride in silence. Honors and raises awareness of bikers injured or killed on the road. Old City Hall, 300 N. Campbell St., 6:30 p.m., free, elpasobikemonth.com. Mesilla Valley Film Society: ‘Un Padre No Tan Padre’ Don Servando Villegas is expelled from his retirement home and his younger son takes him in. Event runs May 12-18, 7:30 p.m. Additional screenings: 1:30 p.m. Sat., 2:30 p.m. Sunday matinee. Fountain Theatre, 2469 Calle de Guadalupe, 7:30 p.m., $7, $6 matinee/senior/ military/student, $5 Wed., mesillavalleyfilm.org. State Line Music Series: Mike Ryan Country music performance. Must make food or monetary donation to El Pasoans Fighting Hunger. For ages 21+ The State Line, 1222 Sunland Park Dr., 8 p.m., free, 915-581-3371, countyline.com/StateLineMusic. html. PRSW May Luncheon Networking opp. for public relations professionals. This month’s theme: “Managing perception and protecting your brand: Lessons from Pepsi, United and beyond.” El Paso Club, 201 E. Main St., 18th floor, 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m., $30, RSVP recommended, prswelpaso@ gmail.com. El Paso Triple-A Baseball Chihuahuas vs. Colorado Springs Sky Socks. Event runs May 15-18, 6:35 p.m. Mon.-Tues., 11:05 a.m. Wed., 6:35 p.m. Thurs. Southwest University Ballpark, 1 Ballpark Plaza, 11:05 a.m., $5-$25, 915-533-BASE, facebook.com/ epchihuahuas. Steve Kramer Standup comedy with opener Ziggy Klett. Event runs May 17-21, 7:30 p.m. Additional late performances 9:30 p.m. Fri.-Sat. Age 17+ El Paso Comic Strip, 1201 Airway Blvd., 7:30 p.m., $6-$12, 915779-5233, laff2nite.com. Mesilla Valley Film Society: ‘Growing Up Smith’ An Indian family chock full of the American dream moves to America and gets the truth of it. Event runs May 19-25, 7:30 p.m. Additional screenings: 2:30 p.m. Sunday matinee. Fountain Theatre, 2469 Calle de Guadalupe, 7:30 p.m., $7, $6 matinee/senior/military/student, $5 Wed., mesillavalleyfilm.org.

Cool Canyon Nights Weekly, free outdoor music performance by local bands. McKelligon Canyon Amphitheatre, 1500 McKelligon Canyon Dr., 6 p.m.-9 p.m., free, $10 VIP, elpasolive.com/ coolcanyonnights. All levels yoga Whole Foods Market, 100 Pitt St., 6 p.m., free, wholefoodsmarket.com.

Mesilla Valley Film Society: ‘Un Padre No Tan Padre’ For details see Wed., May 17. Vampyre, Oozer Noise-punk music performance with local opener Lunas. Age 21+ Monarch, 204 E. Rio Grande Ave., 9 p.m., facebook.com/ monarchep. Moonchild Neo-soul jazz music performance. Doors open at 7 p.m. Tricky Falls, 209 S. El Paso St, 8 p.m., $10 adv., $12 door, ticketfly. com. Conor Oberst Singer-songwriter from Bright Eyes performs solo. Opener be Phoebe Bridgers. Doors at 7 p.m. One dollar from every ticket supports Planned Parenthood. Tricky Falls, 209 S. El Paso St, 8 p.m., $27, ticketfly. com. El Paso Triple-A Baseball For details see Wed., May 17. Coding with Brew: CSS, HTML, Javascript Coding class for adults. Hands-on projects, networking with professionals and peers and a complimentary beer/wine/tea/coffee from NOMU Cafe. No exp. necessary. Event runs May 9-June 1, every Tues. and Thurs., 6-8 p.m. Fab Lab El Paso, 601 N. Oregon St., 6-8 p.m., $250, 915-209-2656, fablabelpaso.org. Bumpswing Dance Party House music sets by Luisa, Maci, Jason O and Worldpeace. Club Here I Love You, 115 S. Durango St., 9 p.m., free, facebook.com/bumpswing. Icon For Hire Rock music with openers Assuming We Survive and October Sky. Doors open at 7 p.m. All ages. Tickets at ticketfly.com. The Lowbrow Palace, 111 E. Robinson Ave., 8 p.m., $12 adv., $15 door, lowbrowpalace. com. Mesilla Valley Film Society: ‘Growing Up Smith’ For details see Wed., May 17. EP Bike Month – Green Drinks Downtown bike ride stops at building projects that illustrate adaptive reuse or sustainable building design. Deadbeach Brewery, 406 Durango St., 5:30 p.m., free, elpasobikemonth. com.

THURS. MAY 18 FRI. MAY 19 Q Connected: Into The Storm Seattle metal-doom music performance with local openers Dinosaurs on a Spaceship, The Fallen and SH*TB**R. Doors open at 7 p.m., ages 18+ Rockhouse Bar & Grill, 9828 Montana Ave., 9 p.m., free, 915-591-7625, facebook.com/ rockhouserdivebarkitchen

‘Seussical the Musical’ Based on the books of Dr. Seuss. Event runs May 12-28, 7:30 p.m. Fri., 2:30 & 7:30 p.m. Sat., 2:30 p.m. Sun. Sun City Musical Theatre, 3733 Shell St., 7:30 p.m., $25, $15 under age 12, suncitymusicaltheatre.com. Gabriel Iglesias Standup comedy performance. Don Haskins Center, 151 Glory Rd., 8 p.m., $55-$90, 915747-5234, fluffyguy.com.

MAY 2017 F R I D AY- S AT U R D AY, M AY 1 9 - 2 0

CREATURES OF THE NIGHT: ZOMBIE PROM CREEPS UP TRICKY FALLS

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s zombie fever continues to sweep the country, the undead will descend on Downtown’s Tricky Falls this Saturday, May 20 for El Paso’s first-ever Zombie Prom. “We have tons of concerts and festivals which are great, but I really felt El Paso needed something different,” said Michelle Padilla, event organizer and Deady Page Productions founder. Zombie Proms are a popular theme throughout the country, happening in places like Austin, Philadelphia and Chicago. Padilla hopes her love of horror and the macabre will infect everyone and encourages fellow zombiephiles to join in the party. “I’m super fascinated with all types of horror films, and I do a lot of cosplay,” she said. “I wanted to create this event where people can actually dress up and make a whole weekend of it.” The gory gala kicks off Friday, May 19 at the Rockhouse Café & Gallery on 400 W. Overland Ave. Roamers and rotters will gather at the reception to prey and prowl amongst each other. Zombie-themed artwork and vendors will show off their wares, and all ghouls are encouraged to have the moment captured with a picture. Heather Shade, paranormal historian of Ghosts 915 and curator at The Wigwam Museum, helped Padilla coordinate the event. “We’re bringing an authentic wooden casket from our museum and we’ll set that up with a balloon arch,” Shade said. “People can get some twisted, Zombie Prom pictures.”

Shade said the Rock House event is meant to get everyone amped up for the party the next night. A professional face painter will also be on-hand to help create a ghoulish effect. Eighties zombie flicks will be screened throughout the night. “We’re having a complete art show with all mediums,” Shade said. “We have a collection of great local artists, and the Rock House has its own collective of dancers, artisans and poets. Everyone’s really excited.” Retro mix master DJ Joe Dorgan will lay down his famous beats, along with local retro band Prime 80z. In keeping with the spirit of the prom tradition, a king and queen will be crowned. The panel of judges includes Monika from KISS FM and folks from El Paso Comic Con. Padilla stressed that zombie attire is required. She herself will host the event, dressed in her signature kitschy style a la Miss Argentina in cult classic “Beetlejuice.” Not sure how to turn ordinary prom wear into a costume worthy of any zombie party? Artists at the Rockhouse have you covered at their Zombie-fying stations on Friday night where they will rip, twist and stain your outfits to create costumes to die for. The following night, festivities get underway at San Jacinto Plaza, where the flesh mob is invited to a little “meat” and greet session before creeping and crawling its way to Tricky Falls. “I’m sure it will be a sight,” Padilla said, laughing. “People across the street at Anson 11 will probably be like, ‘What the hell’s going on?’ and that’s the whole idea.”

WHAT’S UP

Zombie Prom

‘Bits & Pieces’ reception, Friday, May 19 at Rock House Café & Gallery, 400 W. Overland Ave. (free) Zombie Prom ‘meat’ and greet Saturday, May 20, 6-9 p.m. Zombie Prom starts at 9 p.m. at Tricky Falls, 209 S. El Paso St. Tickets: $20 in advance, $25 day of; VIP Package $50 in advance, $55 day of VIP packages include a prize pack, ‘finger’ foods, prom photo, special access to The Perch (above Tricky Falls) and other garish goodies


12 Damien Slow, doom-style metal with openers Pyne, Knowsuffer and The Stalk. The Lowbrow Palace, 111 E. Robinson Ave., 9:30 p.m., free, lowbrowpalace.com. ‘You Can’t Take it With You’ Three act comedy. A weirdo family’s daughter falls for the neighbor’s hot piece of meat, but the joining of the two clans doesn’t go well.Event runs May 5-21, 8 p.m. Thur.-Sat., 2 p.m. Sun. Las Cruces Community Theater, 313 N. Main St., 8 p.m., $9-$12, 575-523-1200, lcctnm.org. El Paso Triple-A Baseball Chihuahuas vs. Oklahoma City Dodgers. Event runs May 19-22, 7:05 p.m. Fri.-Sat., 6:05 p.m. Sun., 11:05 a.m. Mon. May 19-22 is the Chihuahuas and Whataburger Food Drive, which benefits the El Pasoans Fighting Hunger Food Bank. Donate three or more canned/boxed nonperishable food items or $1 or more to receive a coupon for a free Whataburger. Southwest University Ballpark, 1 Ballpark Plaza, 7:05 p.m., $5-$25, 915-533-BASE, facebook.com/ epchihuahuas. Friday at the Fire Music performance. Surrounding restaurants have specials on drinks and dinner. Doors open at 6 p.m. Freedom Crossing, 1611 Haan Rd., 7-9 p.m.,freedomcrossingatfortbliss.com. Movie Screening: ‘The Secret Life of Pets’ Music, food trucks, dance groups and the film about what pets do when humans stop watching them. Ascarate Park, 6900 Delta Dr., 6:30 p.m.-10 p.m., free, 915-764-3580, facebook.com/parksaftersunset. Raíces de México A live ballet folklórico celebration of the region’s dance traditions and culture. Event runs May 19-20, 6 p.m. Fri., 7 p.m. Sat. Chamizal National Memorial, 800 S. San Marcial St., 6 p.m., $6, facebook.com/CentroDeSaludFamiliarLaFe. EP Bike Month – Mortus Veloz Alleycat Race Two ride options. Competitive with 12 checkpoints + 1 bonus. Non competitive with six checkpoints. Open to all bikes. Love Buzz, 3011 Pershing Dr., 5 p.m., $10 (includes discount on drinks), elpasobikemonth.com. Glob vs. Space Captains Collective Local battle set. Grind metal vs hip-hop. Age 21+ Monarch, 204 E. Rio Grande Ave., 9 p.m., facebook.com/monarchep. Chican@/Latin@ Theatre Series Two performances honor the culture of Juarez and El Paso.Pebble Hills High School performs “Señorita Cucarachita Finds a Husband.” UTEP performs “Bocón!” Proceeds benefit Student Scholarship Fund. Event runs May 19-21, 7 p.m. Fri.-Sat., 2:30 p.m. Sun. Fri. is at La Fe Cultural Center. Sat. is at Caffe Mayapan. Sun is at UTEP Fox Fine Arts. Various Locations, 7 p.m., Donation, 915-747-6213. Alfresco Fridays: Brown Betty Weekly outdoor concert series. This week is classic rock covers. Judson F. Williams Convention Center, 1 Civic Center Plaza, 6 p.m., free, alfrescofridays.com. Play/Performance Public Forum Cuban actor/director Jazz Villa needs talent for his new play “Frontera/Beyond the Wall.” The piece is loosely based on “Romeo and Juliet.” Glasbox, 210 Poplar St., 7 p.m., free, 915-226-9528, jazzvilla.com. Rick Mardi Gras Documentary Screening Fallen KLAQ rock station DJ gets memorialized in video. Music by Ripley. Rockhouse Bar & Grill, 9828 Montana Ave., 7 p.m., free.

SAT. MAY 20 Zombie Prom DJs spin music from the ‘80s and ‘90s. Photo booth. Zombie costume required. Ages 18+ Tricky Falls, 209 S. El Paso St, 9 p.m., $20-$50 adv., $25-$55 door, ticketfly.com. Burlesque on the Rio: Panties & Pasties Local and out of towners burlesque. Opener: Special surprise guest. Featuring: Lottie LaRouge(New Mexico), Bam DiMaggio (Colorado). 18+ Touch Bar & Nightclub, 800 E. San Antonio Ave., 8 p.m.-12 a.m., $10 adv., $15 door. Piñata Protest Tex-Mex punk with opener Fixed Idea. 21+ Rockhouse Bar & Grill, 9828 Montana Ave., 8 p.m., $5, facebook.com/epaps915. EP Bike Month – No Pants Ride III A herd of pantless peeps airs out and bikes. Recommended attire: shorts, skirts, beach wear, undies. San Jacinto Plaza, 111 Mills Ave., 7 p.m., free, elpasobikemonth.com. ‘Seussical the Musical’ For details see Fri., May 19. ‘You Can’t Take it With You’ For details see Fri., May 19.

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CALENDAR MAY 17-24, 2017

ON THE TUBE: ‘THE EL PASO SHOW’ PROGRAM SPOTLIGHTS TALENT, EATS AND BEATS By Angela Saavedra comment: @whatsupweekly

Photos provided by The El Paso Show

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eason two of “The El Paso Show” is in full swing as host Ilean de Anda continues to explore the city, introducing us to diverse bands, bars and restaurants. So far, episodes one and two have taken us behind the scenes of Eastside patio bar Gringo Theory, Downtown craft beer bar and restaurant Craft and Social and West Texas Tattoo shop. We have also gotten to know Electric Social band Trost House, mellow electro duo The Swell Kids and colorful pop artist Juan Ornelas. The El Paso Show is produced by a team of five dedicated individuals and airs on El Paso’s PBS station, KCOS TV 13. Their mission can be summed up in a recent Facebook post: “El Paso is an underrated beauty filled with talented, creative and unique people and events. Let’s continue to help the world recognize EP for that.” Catch their show every first Saturday of the month at 8:30 p.m., and see what you missed on “The El Paso Show” YouTube channel. You can get your fix in between episodes by listening to the podcast “Not Just an El Paso Show” on iTunes, Google play and at elpasoshow.wordpress.com. Until then, here is a preview of what you can look forward to in the next two episodes. Stay tuned for the remaining two top-secret episodes.

Episode 3: Sweets, sick beats and literature

Rapper E$ gives us a tour of Sick Life Studio and talks about what it means to be a rapper in El Paso. Bakery Bella Cora explains their name change and invites us into their kitchen to try their creatively crafted sweets. Author Gilbert Ian Rueda talks about his children’s book, “Santosh the Little Elephant” and the importance of reading to your kids.

Episode 4: Indie tunes, hippies and burgers

Ilean de Anda takes a look at the all-natural organic products sold at Hippie Chic in the heart of Downtown, talks to indie band The Polaroids about their upcoming performance at Neon Desert Music Festival and steps inside Steven Hernandez’ kitchen, where he shows us the work he puts into a mean burger.

Follow “The El Paso Show” facebook.com/ElPasoShow/

@elpasoshow

The El Paso Show

youtube.com/user/RiosOnlineRadio Main website: ElPasoShow.com


CALENDAR MAY 17-24, 2017 Mesilla Valley Film Society: ‘Vincent Van Gogh: A New Way of Seeing’ The Van Gogh Museum of Amsterdam presents the life of an artist through his work. Fountain Theatre, 2469 Calle de Guadalupe, 1:30 p.m., $6, mesillavalleyfilm.org. Beer Festival Souvenir glass. Indoors. Live music. Free parking. Sunland Park Racetrack & Casino, 1200 Futurity Dr., 5-11 p.m., $20, sunlandpark.com/event. Sunset Film Society Screening: ‘Stepmom’ Three years after the divorce, a wife meets her husband’s new beau and is disappointed and then she gets terminal lymphoma and everything changes. International Museum of Art, 1211 Montana Ave., 2 p.m., free, 915-543-6747, internationalmuseumofart.net. El Paso Triple-A Baseball For details see Fri., May 19. Dirty Audio DJ spins. Dress code enforced. Ages 18+ 301, 301 S. Ochoa St., 10 p.m., free before 11 p.m. w/ RSVP, 915-307-5514, eventbrite. com. Anti-Bullying Car Show Snacks and refreshments. 1st, 2nd and 3rd place prizes. Ernesto Serna School, 11471 Alameda, 9 a.m.-12 p.m., 915-9374827. Archaeology Lecture Dr. Robert L. Gunn presents “Figures of Speech: Race, Indigenous Languages and the U.S Boundary Survey, 1850-53.” El Paso Museum of Archaeology, 4301 Transmountain Rd., 2 p.m., free, epas.com. No Wall Rally Local speakers talk about various aspects of the the Border Wall proposed by President Trump. There will be a DJ and mariachis, voter registration and an info booth. San Jacinto Plaza, 10 a.m.-1 p.m., free, 915-867-4261, twitter. com#IndivisibleTX16. Raíces de México. For details see Fri., May 19. If We Were Turtles Local show. Indiemathrock music performance. Openers are Soul Parade, Hot Shot Kixx and Late Phases. Doors open at 9 p.m. Age 18+ The Lowbrow Palace, 111 E. Robinson Ave., 9:30 p.m., free, lowbrowpalace.com. Yoga on the Rocks Tour Body bending near old rocks. Hueco Tanks State Park & Historic Site, 6900 Hueco Tanks Rd., 7 a.m., free, reservation required, 915-849-6684. Crooked Bangs Punk rock music with local opener Nalgadas. Age 21+ Monarch, 204 E. Rio Grande Ave., 9 p.m., facebook.com/monarchep. Wild About Wine Food and wine. Jazz, Rockabilly and EDM music. El Paso Zoo, 4001 E. Paisano Dr., 5-9 p.m., $20, $40 VIP, epzswildaboutwine. com. Samo Mexican pop singer performs. Former singer of Camila. Centro Cultural Paso del Norte, 32315 Humberto Lara Leos, Cd. Juarez, MX, 8 p.m., facebook.com/ conciertosdeciudadjuarez. Play/Performance Public Forum For details see Fri., May 19.

13 Chican@/Latin@ Theatre Series For details see Fri., May 19. Sunset Heights Block Party Fundraiser Music performances by Cans, Windows and Orange Anima. Age 21+ Boomtown, 2430 Wyoming Ave., 10 p.m., free, facebook.com/ BoomtownEP. Movie Screening: ‘Wreck it Ralph’ Music, food trucks, dance groups and the film about a video game villain who wants to be a cool guy. Gallegos Park, 7531 Bosque Rd., 6:30-10 p.m., free, 915-764-3580, facebook.com/ parksaftersunset. Noche de Ska vs. Rock’n’Roll Battle sets. Music performances. The Valley Rats vs. Mala Hierba; Despre Ciados vs. Dizz Brew. Paulina’s Badlands, 7792 Franklin Dr., 9 p.m., $3. ‘Southwest Land & Skyscapes’ Artist Reception The opening of a local photographer’s new exhibit featuring day and night images. Rokoko Art Gallery, 4901 Chippewa Trail, 4-7 p.m., free, rokokoart.com. Birding Tour Bird watching exhibition. Hueco Tanks State Park & Historic Site, 6900 Hueco Tanks Rd., 7:30 a.m., free, reservation required, 915849-6684.

SUN. MAY 21 Doc. Screening: ‘Children of Syria’ The story of four children from families from Aleppo who are trying to start anew in Germany. St. Joseph School Auditorium, 1315 Travis St., 3 p.m., free, 915-740-3962. ‘Seussical the Musical’ For details see Fri., May 19. Les Sylphides & Divertissement A performance by Olga’s Russian Ballet School. UTEP Magoffin Auditorium, 500 W. University Ave., 5 p.m., $12$16, 915-747-5234, balletelpaso. com. ‘You Can’t Take it With You’ For details see Fri., May 19.

Sunset Film Society Screening: ‘I Remember Mama’ A 1948 movie about a Norwegian woman keeps her family together and gets them through the life things that life it up too hard. Ardovino’s Desert Crossing, 1 Ardovino Dr., 12 p.m., free, 915-5436747, sunsetfilmsociety.org. El Paso Triple-A Baseball For details see Fri., May 19. Borderlands Ballet ‘Café Noir’ Contemporary ballet based on classic film noir archetypes. Rio Grande Theatre, 211 N. Main St., 7 p.m., $15, 575-523-6403, tututix.com. EP BIke Month – Binational Bike Ride Riders from El Paso and Juarez ride together. A bike ride across the border. San Jacinto Plaza, 111 Mills Ave., 5 p.m., free, elpasobikemonth. com. Jazz Unlimited Big Band Big band music performance. UTEP Fox Fine Arts, 500 W. University Ave., 4 p.m., free, 915-637-4569. David J Founding member of Bauhaus and Love and Rockets performs with opener SPSRCTA. Age 21+ Monarch, 204 E. Rio Grande Ave., 9 p.m., $15, facebook.com/monarchep. Thunderosa Rock and roll music performance. Rockhouse Bar & Grill, 9828 Montana Ave., 8 p.m., $5, 915591-7625. Retro Game Night & Dart Tournament Dart tournament, Jenga, beer pong, and “Connect 4.” Atari, NES and Sega gaming as well. Darts at 8:30 p.m., gaming at 7 p.m. The District Pub & Kitchen, 601 N. Piedras St., 7 p.m., free, 915-564-0707. Mack Goldsbury Trio Jazz music performance. Prior to the event will be a dessert social at 6:30 p.m. First Christian Church, 1809 El Paso Rd., 7 p.m., $10 non-member, $1 student, mvjazzblues.net. Chican@/Latin@ Theatre Series For details see Fri., May 19.

CLASSIFIEDS Clinical Behavior Analyst (El Paso, TX) Provide behavioral consultations to clients; Conduct descriptive behavioral assessments including functional analysis and its variations; Initiate ABA (Applied Behavioral Analysis) Assessment Reports and progress reports; Interpret results and design individualized behavioral analytic interventions for clients; Develop & monitor ABA/VBA (Verbal Behavior Analysis); Develop treatment plans and reduce problems under perspective of functional communication, pro-social skills, adaptive living skills and emotional regulation skills. Work independently and remotely from home & travel to patients home. Requires Bachelor’s Degree in Psychology plus 2 years of relevant work experience. Must be a Board Certified Assistant Behavior Analyst. Mail resumes to HR Manager, Behavior Change Institute, LLC 476 3rd Street, Oakland, CA 94607.

Steve Kramer For details see Wed., May 17. Jewel Box Series: ‘Banging A Bell: A Texas Comedy in Two Acts’ Comedic play about women who plan to be the belles of the ball. Philanthropy Theatre, 125 Pioneer Plaza, 2:30 p.m., elpasolive.com/calendar.

MON. MAY 22 Band of Horses Rock gig. Tickets at 7th Layer CLothing, All That Music, Bowie Feathers and Eloise. Tricky Falls, 209 S. El Paso St, 7 p.m., $30 adv., $32 door, ticketfly.com. El Paso Triple-A Baseball For details see Fri., May 19. Stonecutters Metal music performance. Ages 18+ Rockhouse Bar & Grill, 9828 Montana Ave., 7 p.m., $5, 915-591-7625, facebook. com/rockhouserdivebarkitchen

Days-n-Daze Punk thrash with openers Bipolar Bears, Penumbra Rabia and Bug. Paulina’s Badlands, 7792 Franklin Dr., 9 p.m., $5 before 9 p.m., $8 after.

WED. MAY 24 State Line Music Series: Koe Wetzel Country music performance. Must make food or monetary donation to El Pasoans Fighting Hunger. For ages 21+ The State Line, 1222 Sunland Park Dr., 8 p.m., free, countyline. com/StateLineMusic.html. Inanimate Existence, Depths of Hatred Metal music with openers Cruces Cult and Shadows of Silence. Doors open at 7 p.m., ages 18+ Rockhouse Bar & Grill, 9828 Montana Ave., 8 p.m., $6, holdmyticket.com.

AUDITIONS, CALL TO ARTISTS AND MORE Artist Call! Need zombie-themed artwork in all mediums for undead art show. 915-503-8960, lallorona915@ yahoo.com. Due May 19. Plaza Classic Film Festival Local Flavor Need films for local film showcase. All genres considered. No works-in-progress. Projects must have been complete before Jan. 1.Deadline is June 9, 2017. 12 a.m.-11:59 p.m., free, 915-533-4020, plazaclassic. com/localflavor. Due June 9.

TUES. MAY 23 The Convalescence Metal music performance. Doors open at 7 p.m., all ages. Rockhouse Bar & Grill, 9828 Montana Ave., 8 p.m., $5, $3 minor fee, 915-591-7625. The Division Men Husband wife acoustic duo perform. Ages 21+ Love Buzz, 3011 Pershing Dr., 9 p.m., free, divisionmen.com. Coding with Brew: CSS, HTML, Javascript For details see Thurs., May 18.

By Gustavo Arellano comment: @whatsupweekly


14

WWW.WHATSUPPUB.COM

MAY 17-24, 2017

BAND OF HORSES’

Photo by Christopher Wilson

BEN BRIDWELL TALKS CHANGES By Alan Sculley comment: @whatsupweekly

B

and Of Horses singer-guitarist Ben Bridwell can promise at least one thing to people who come to see the group in concert this coming Monday, May 22. Expect the unexpected. “One thing that I do like about this band is I don’t know that we’ve ever played the same set list twice,” Bridwell said in a phone interview. “Every day brings a new opportunity or a new vibe of whatever town you’re in or whatever the venue is.” The current album “Why Are You OK” marked the third album from the same band lineup. Over the course of making the first two Band Of Horses albums – 2006’s “Everything All the Time” and 2007’s “Cease to Begin” – Bridwell cycled through a half dozen musicians, creating the impression that Band Of Horses might essentially be a solo project. Then the next two albums – 2010’s “Infinite Arms” and 2013’s “Mirage Rock” – poked plenty of holes in that notion. On “Infinite Arms,” keyboardist Ryan Monroe and guitarist Tyler Ramsey each

brought in a song, while Bridwell and Ramsey co-wrote the tune, “Older.” And the song “Blue Beard” was credited to all five band members (including drummer Creighton Barrett). Bassist Bill Reynolds, meanwhile, stepped up on “Mirage Rock,” earning co-writing credits on five songs, while Ramsey pitched in on a pair of tunes. This was exactly what Bridwell had wanted to see happen when he formed Band Of Horses in 2004. “I know my limits,” he said. “I can write songs, but my playing ability has never really matured. I’ve always known that I need a lot of help. (Finding) that great help with talent and attitude, ambition without cockiness, finding that right balance – it just took awhile.” Whether that balance continues is now an open question. At the beginning of May, after our interview with Bridwell, Ramsey and Reynolds separately announced their departures from the group. As it was, Bridwell may have signaled a shift in his creative approach on “Why Are You OK” as he took back more control over the songwriting process. “I wanted to return a bit to home base,” Bridwell said. “I talked about it with the guys and they were with me ev-

ery step of the way.’” Bridwell also went into the latest album with a decidedly different idea for how he wanted “Why Are You OK” to sound. “I wanted a denser sound,” he said. “I wanted it to be more lush. I wanted it to be poured over.” That feeling is immediately apparent on “Why Are You OK,” as it opens with “Dull Times/The Moon,” a two–part epic that starts out lush and dreamy before shifting into assertive and gritty guitar rock for “The Moon” portion of the song. The rest of “Why Are You OK” falls between those two stylistic extremes. The current run of shows will, obviously, feature a revamped and varying

band lineup. But Bridwell has found that the latest songs fit well with material from the Band Of Horses’ back catalog. “I feel like set lists have taken a turn for the better with the new album,” he said. “Having new material is a good thing, and especially because I think the songs slot well with the older material.” WHAT’S UP

Band of Horses

With The Artisanals Monday, May 22, 7 p.m. Tricky Falls, 209 S. El Paso St. $30-$32 plus fees Tickets available at TicketFly.com More info at TrickyFalls.com

PART II

BEST ANNUAL EVENT BEST BAR

PRESENTED BY

BEST CAFÉ HANGOUT BEST CITY TRAIL BEST DAY TRIP BEST DIVE BAR BEST EVENT SERIES BEST FAMILY OUTING

Nightlife and entertainment categories from best bar to events

BEST GAY BAR BEST GOLF COURSE

PART I

PART III

PART IV

BEST HAPPY HOUR

BEST PLACE TO SEE A MOVIE

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BEST KIDS BIRTHDAY SPOT

BEST SKATE PARK

BEST LIVE MUSIC VENUE BEST NEW NIGHTLIFE SPOT BEST OUTDOOR PATIO BEST OUTDOOR RECREATION BEST PLACE TO GET DOWN BEST PLACE FOR BAR GAMES BEST PLACE TO PUFF/SMOKE SHOP

VOTE

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