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AUGUST 2015 MAY 2015

FUNCTIONAL FOLK ART AT ITS FINEST PG 24 FLOURISH BY THE FOUNTAIN PG 35

A MAN AMONG THE CLOUDS COVER STORY: TAKE A LOOK INSIDE THE LIFE OF AN AERONAUTICAL ENTHUSIAST PG 11


TAKE US WITH YOU!

ANY TIME, ANY PLACE. WWW.WHATNOWMAG.COM

V I S IT W W W.W HATN O W MAG.C O M TO AC C E SS D I G ITAL I SSU E S O N YO U R S MARTP H O N E O R TAB LET.


AUGUST

11 COVER STORY

IN EVERY ISSUE| p g 22 Cal en d ar p g 40 Fl ash b ack p g 41 Wh at Sayi n g ?

17 GROW COVER STORY| pg 09 A Man A m ong The Clouds

24 EXPERIENCE

DISCOVER| LAGNIAPPE p g 8 Th ese Total l y E xi st

29 THRIVE

GROW| HOME + GARDEN pg 17 H om e A w ay From H om e p g 20 H ou se t o H om e

EXPERIENCE| CULTURE

35 INDULGE PHOTO G R A PHY B Y | JA COB JENNI NG S

pg 24 Functional Folk A rt at its Finest p g 27 Th e Pag e Tu r n er p g 28 Si l v er Scr een

THRIVE| HEALTH + WELLNESS pg 29 R unning Dow n A D ream p g 32 Wh at’ s Cooki n g ? p g 34 J u st For Th e H eal t h O f It

INDULGE| DINING + NIGHTLIFE pg 35 Flourish By The Fountain p g 39 A Li t t l e Taste

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2015

IN THIS ISSUE


SHOP. DINE. DANCE. WWW.DOWNTOWNTHIBODAUX.ORG

ON THE QUIET BANKS OF WINDING BAYOU LAFOURCHE LIES HISTORIC DOWNTOWN THIBODAUX. VISITORS AND LOCALS ALIKE COME TO DOWNTOWN THIBODAUX TO EXPERIENCE ITS UNIQUE BLEND OF BEAUTIFUL HISTORIC ARCHITECTURE, QUANT BOUTIQUES, FINE DINING, AND SPIRITED NIGHTLIFE.

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Gowns. Tuxedos. Gifts. 985.446.5224

Clothing for the Southern Gentleman 985.446.1144

Events, Seated Dinners, Parties, Cafe, Bar or Hotel. www.dansereauhouse.com

Facial Treatments, Full Boutique, & MUCH more. 985.448.5999 WHA TNOW M A G.com

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EDITOR’S NOTE

TAKING IT UP A KNOTCH N

oticed anything different while flipping through the pages? We’ve decided to give What Now a facelift based on your thoughts and suggestions. Our content, imagery, and layout have all changed to give you a better experience when you pick up your copy each month. Our issue has been broken up into five key sections. Experience will focus on culture, arts, music, and your local events. Thrive will give you health and wellness stories and a healthy recipe for the month. Grow will feature our home and garden section with design advice and special areas of local homes that stand out in the crowd. Indulge will host our dining and drinks columnists and features, showcasing great places to eat and grab a drink (or drinks depending on what kind of night you are going for)! Discover will contain our popular What Saying? Game and other fun knick-knacks for you to enjoy. Our calendar will be moved to the center of the magazine where you can always have easy access to what’s going on each month.

Is there a person you know who stands out in the crowd? Maybe they have a unique hobby or interesting job they’d like to share with the community? Have you been astonished by someone’s outdoor kitchen or master bathroom or any other room in the house? We are always looking for interesting people, places, and events to introduce to our readers each month. If someone or something comes across your mind, don’t hesitate to email me at benj@fathomla.com. I don’t bite. We hope you enjoy this new experience with What Now. Let us know what your favorite new section is or what your favorite feature was this month by liking our Facebook page and writing on our wall! Once again, welcome to What Now and have a happy August!

Ben Jones Jr, Editor @sirbenjaminjr

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THESE TOTALLY EXIST

FEAST YOUR EYES ON THESE AMAZING ITEMS YOU NEVER KNEW WERE REAL. WRIT T E N B Y | B EN JONES J R

MUSTACHE GUARD CUP I ‘mustache’ you a question. Are you sick and tired of getting anything and everything all over your mustache? Well now there is finally a solution for all you manly men out there. The mustache guard mug has a built in ceramic bridge that fits perfectly over any kind of mustache, to keep it clean and dry when drinking any kind of beverage.

AUGUST 2015 VOLUME 3 | ISSUE 7

PUBLISHERS + EDITORS Ben Jones Jr Cody J. Blanchard CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Elise Michel LeBoeuf, Brittney Courteaux, Celeste Roberts Bergeron CONTRIBUTING COLUMNISTS Ginger Gaubert, Todd Kennedy, Niki Landry, Katherine Toups, Jasmine Richard ACCOUNT MANAGERS Kara Domangue Leon Hutchinson EXECUTIVE DESIGNER Emily Knobloch GRAPHIC DESIGNER Kathryn Johnson PHOTOGRAPHY Jacob Jennings

DIAMOND SHAPED ICE CUBE TRAY

COLUMNIST PHOTOGRAPHY Juliana Pennison

Look like a million bucks as you sip your Cristal with these diamond shaped ice cubes. The ice cube mold comes with a bunch of different shapes of diamonds, so it gives off the real effect of actually having a handful of diamonds at the bottom of your drink.

Copyright © 2015 by Fathom Media, LLC. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part without permission is strictly prohibited. BUSINESS ADDRESS Fathom Media, LLC 985.441.7073 P.O. Box 5702 | 1214 Canal Boulevard Thibodaux, LA 70302

SPOCK EAR iPHONE CASE

Source: yupthatexists.com

Feel the Vulcan genius flow through your body every single time you bring your phone to your ear with the Spock Ear iPhone case. Live long and prosper, my friends. WN

What Now Magazine cannot be responsible for the return of unsolicited material such as manuscripts or photographs, with or without the inclusion of a stamped, self-addressed envelope. Information in this publication is gathered from sources considered to be reliable, but the accuracy and completeness of the information cannot be guaranteed. The opinions expressed in What Now Magazine are those of the authors and do not necessarily represent the opinions of Fathom Media, our employees or any of our advertisers. WHA TNOW M A G.com

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Catch The Hatch! We’re roasting New Mexico’s famous Hatch Chiles in August.

Go to www.rouses.com for roasting schedule. 10

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COVER STORY

A MAN AMONG THE CLOUDS

THE LIFE OF AN AERONAUTICAL ENTHUSIAST WRITTEN BY | BRITTNEY COURTEAUX

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PHOT OGRA PH Y BY | JA COB JEN N I N G S

o summarize Mr. Charlie Hammonds’ life proverb would be words stated by Jim Valvano, “How do you go from where you are to where you wanna be? And I think you have to have an enthusiasm for life. You have to have a dream, a goal. And you have to be willing to work for it.” A dream, a goal and a will is exactly what is intertwined in Hammonds’ soul. The dreams of a child as he watched the vintage planes of WWII fly over his home during the early 1940s. As a young boy, Hammonds had a goal in mind. He said to himself while gazed at the fighter plane flying overhead, “One day I’ll make flying my life’s work.” With the dream envisioned, goal in mind WHA TNOW M A G.com

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AVIATION COMPLETELY DOMINATES MY LIFE.

WHAT NOW | August 2015

—CHARLIE HAMMONDS


C O V E R S T OR Y

and will at work, Hammonds is the perfect example of a life and aviation enthusiast.

DAY DREAMING While working at the local golf course to help make ends meet at home, Hammonds would observe the numerous airplanes constantly flying over. Dreaming of the day he would actually fly the P51 Mustang fighter as an aviator. As fate may have it, Hammonds’ stepfather relocated their family to Houma. They settled in a home only a few blocks from the Geist’s Seaplane base on the Intracoastal Canal. Falling short of his dream, he was not allowed on the property of the seaplane base for safety reasons. However, as time went on he was offered a job that consisted of him washing the airplanes for Mr. Geist after school. Finally, Hammonds dream was one step closer to becoming reality and a foot forward to reaching his goal. He dreamed it, he can do it too.

ONE STEP CLOSER With the dream in mind, and working towards his goal, Hammonds wasted no time in reaching the achievable milestone. The dream and goal of being an aviator began to become reality for him not long after he began washing the planes for Mr. Geist. He states, “[My] interest in aviation was so intense that Mr. Lloyd Geist solo’ed [me] in a seaplane at the age of 16, getting [my] private license for both land and seaplanes at 17 years and [my] commercial and flight instructor ratings for both land and sea in [my] late teens.” Hammonds worked to earn these licenses and ratings. Coming from a poor background, reminiscing swatting mosquitos off in

the night, he knew accomplishing his dream goal would take hard work and dedication. Nothing short of either would assist him in accomplishing his dream of being an aviator. Before long, at the young age of 21, he borrowed $9,000 to buy his first seaplane to start his own business.

GROWTH AND UNEXPECTED TURNS Hammonds’ business began to grow at a rapid rate due to the demand of the local oilfield businesses. He spent both days and nights for years flying seaplanes all over south Louisiana transporting parts and personnel to distant locations for the oilfield business. His business expanded from flying out of the Intracoastal to owning a commute airline that flew four times daily from Houma, to Houston, Lafayette, Patterson and eventually Baton Rouge, New Orleans, and Florida cities. “The airline grew at a rapid rate, I ending up flying several thousand passengers per month.” Along with the commute airline, there eventually came a flight school. Hammonds began teaching citizens how to fly like Mr. Geist taught him. The oilfield industry was not the most promising for Hammonds’ air services. The oilfield met a downturn in the mid-eighties that changed his mind about continuing to service the industry. He had to let go of 187 employees from mechanics to pilots to telephone operators. He states, “I finally met something I couldn’t control, the oilfield industry.” As many south Louisiana residents can relate, the oilfield industry can bust or boom at any time. However, the business didn’t lose a toothpick. Hammonds credits his wife for keeping them on track, “She’s a lot better at business than I am.”

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CO VER STO R Y

GENERATIONAL TIES Mrs. Hammonds and their two daughters handle the business side, while Hammonds and their two sons handle the aviation side of the business. Both Hammonds sons followed in his footsteps. Hammonds earned a degree from Embry Riddle Aeronautical University in Daytona Beach, Florida. His eldest son Ricky Hammonds is a graduate of the United States Naval Academy in Annapolis, Maryland. Ricky is now a captain for Delta Airlines flying internationally on the Boeing 767. Interestingly enough, he is also one of the pilots in the Hollywood film, Top Gun. Lindy Hammonds, the younger son, is a graduate of Spartan School of Aeronautics in Tulsa, Oklahoma. Lindy has flown all over the world for the Saudi Arabian Royal family for several years. He is also a commercial pilot. Alongside his father, he is now running Hammonds Aircraft Maintenance facility and instructing both land and sea flight lessons at Hammonds School of Flight in Houma. The flight school hangar houses a museum that highlights Hammonds’ and his family’s aviation heritage. Some of the most unique memorabilia is showcased at the museum. It is a private museum, but visitors are welcomed if they would just call before arriving at the museum.

SO MANY REASONS TO BE THE ENTHUSIAST HE IS Most of all, Hammonds is living his dream come true. He had a dream; he conquered his goal using the will his life taught him over his early, rough years. Every day he wakes up, he is enthusiastic about going to work—a feeling most people dream of being able to experience. Still to this day, after having flown over 40,000 hours, he is still motivated about his career. He has no plan to retire in the near future.. Hammonds’ states, “Aviation completely dominates [my] life.” When talking about how he had made it this far, he states, “And lastly the one that has had the most profound shaping of my life is Jesus. I told him as a young boy in the country of southwest Louisiana that I wanted to be a pilot. It seemed impossible then but I kept the faith that he would lead me and he did.”

WHAT NOW One can take flight lessons at Hammonds School of Flight located at 194 Aviation Road in Houma. Give Charlie Hammonds a call at (985) 876-0584 if interested in visiting the museum of the aviator historian or interested in learning to fly. Most importantly, the message Hammonds would like every reader to obtain is, “[It is] important [for one] to make a way. You have to make it happen.” He means making one’s dream come true by working hard, being dedicated, and being motivated to be successful in whatever one does. Overall Hammonds believes: “I believe in the American dream for I have lived it, but the formula for realizing it is dedication and hard work. If you don’t put out the effort you’re only [going to] get small pieces of that dream.” WN 14

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G R O W | H O ME + GARDE N

HOME AWAY FROM HOME WELCOME TO FAMILY AND FIN’S IN GRAND ISLE WRITTEN BY | BRITTNEY COURTEAUX

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here is no better place to create nostalgic memories than on the bright back porch of Family and Fin’s in Queen Bess on the bay in Grand Isle. Two Hohensee families from Thibodaux are shared owners of the bright, lively camp that was created in part of creating memories and enjoying quality family time. So many different elements of the Hohensee’s camp allow the family and visitors to take in sunrises and sunsets like never before.

DECADE ON THE ISLE The family has celebrated Easter on the island for the past ten years; a time of the year when the weather is beautiful. Before the Hohensee’s decided to build their utmost beautiful scenic camp in Queen Bess, they spent their Easter holiday at their previous beachfront camp

in Grand Isle. They now enjoy the scenery and convenience the bay has to offer. “The convenience of having the boat right next to the camp to come and go as you please is so nice,” a luxury they did not have at the beachfront home. The beauty of Queen Bess is described as “a tropical island,” which is only short of one hundred miles from Thibodaux. Along with the tropical island feel the bay has to offer, the Hohensee’s enjoy taking their party barge out in the late afternoon to watch the dolphins play among the horizon. “You forget you are in Louisiana when you are here.” The family enjoys the short drive from their hometown to their “home away from home,” which has been such for the past ten years. Established in 2014, Family and Fins was built to suit. It also allows the family

PHOT OGRA PH Y BY | JA COB JEN N I N G S WHA TNOW M A G.com

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many more years to create more family memories in their paradise. Laurie Hohensee states, “The camp is a place to enjoy quality time with our children, family, and friends. A place to make memories to last a lifetime.”

PORCHIN’ IT The Hohensee’s favorite place to create the memories is the back porch facing the bay. The veranda porch, highlighted with bright blue hues similar to the sky that provides a relaxed feel to the already relaxing scenery, is the gathering place for the family. While watching the sunset on the cheery, yellow outlined porch, the usual crowd of family and friends share laughs and stories about days past. The most highlighted and popular area of the porch is the bed swing, described as “a place to relax and enjoy the paradise of the bay.” Many afternoons at Family and Fins are spent porchin’ it with all the visitors.

DESIGN DIME Maybe not a dime, but .97 cents is not much more! A solid wood, hand painted fish used as the center piece for

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the dining table in this extravagant vacation home was purchased for a whopping .97 cents. It was the best deal out of all the island themed décor in the camp. Most of the décor throughout the camp was purchased from Kirkland’s. Hohensee was lucky enough that Kirkland’s had a new island-themed decoration collection they put out just before the camp was finished being built. Along with the Kirkland’s décor are some palm trees that help guests get into a tropical mindset necessary to enjoy the breathtaking views from the back porch.

THE DESIGN TEAM Hohensee designed the opened floor plan that enables everyone to enjoy the views and company from anywhere in the room. The kitchen, dining, and living room are all facing the back porch, which is seen through six large windows and the backdoor. Through the windows and open area the guest can also enjoy the breathtaking views of the sunrise and the sunset from one location in the camp. The colors that are featured throughout the open area and the back porch were chosen to blend with the


G R O W | HOME + GARDE N

colors of the sky. She described it as, “When you sit in the living room and watch the sunrise, the colors disappear into the horizon. It is absolutely beautiful.” The beach hues also help visitors relax and experience the serenity feeling the sky has to offer. With the help of Architect Mike Bourgeois with Duplantis Design Group, Hohensee’s envision was successfully completed. She stated, “He did an amazing job to create exactly what I had envisioned. He has an amazing eye for detail and use of space,” which allowed the camp to be so wonderfully relaxing. The logo and design of the camp’s title: Family and Fins was created and designed by Architect Ashley Webre. WN

YOU FORGET YOU ARE IN LOUISIANA WHEN YOU ARE HERE. —LAURIE HOHENSEE

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Feature your real estate listing here! FORMULA FOR STYLING A NIGHTSTAND C O L U MN W R I T T E N B Y | N I K I L A N D R Y

M

Feature three of your homes for sale each month in our GROW section and get more knocks on your door!

Interested in advertising your listing here? Please Contact: info@fathomla.com

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WHAT NOW | August 2015

aking a space your own can feel like a never-ending task. Once you decide on furniture, you still have to add artwork and décor to polish off your room. It’s doesn’t always need to be difficult, there are tricks to styling that make it easy to go from a bare table to perfectly curated and functional. A nightstand for example, needs to contain a few essentials. Besides a charging phone, the basics are reading material, clock, tray or dish, and bedside lamp. You can add a few other decorative pieces like artwork, a candle, flowers, and a unique or special accessory. When selecting your décor, it all really comes down to balance and proportions. These are the two most important principles in designing any space, whether it is a whole room or just a nightstand. Starting with the largest piece, usually a lamp, will give you a jumping off point on scale and color. I use the size of the lamp to add height or weight as needed. Sometimes a lower headboard will require a taller lamp and vice versa. Unlike a side table nightstands are usually anchored onto a wall, so it’s a great place to showcase artwork. Lean it on the surface for a compact look, or hang art on the wall to fill up space. Once the lamp and art are selected, the other pieces should fall into place. Stacked books can add color and a metal dish or trinket brings shine. Select pieces that specifically fit the aesthetic needs of the area or that hint towards your style or personality. Just remember to keep the textures, finishes, and proportions mixed, but balanced for added interest. If your lamp base is tall and skinny, use a low and round vase to counter. Fresh flowers or indoor plants soften any table and add a bit of life to a vignette. Polishing off your rooms doesn’t have to be a headache. A little planning and keeping a few tips in mind can go a long way in helping to make the process simple. Niki is the owner of Niki Landry Art & Design. To be inspired, vist her website at www.nikilandry.com. WN


G R O W | HOME + GARDE N

HOUSE TO HOME

BURLAP DRUM LAMP SHADE Bleached, $59.00 VINCE TABLE LAMP BASE Gold, $220.00 www.potterybarn.com

Anemone Arrangement Print By Caitlin McGauley, $365.00 www.potterybarn.com

EDUARDO GARZA CRYSTAL BOX White Marbel, $69.00 www.westelm.com

NARROW-LEG END TABLE Chocolate, $249.00 www.westelm.com

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18TH ANNUAL FRIENDS OF THE NRA BANQUET AUGUST 6, 6:00 PM - 10:30 PM EVERGREEN CAJUN CENTER, HOUMA

ANNUAL HERCULES FISHING RODEO AUGUST 7 AGRICULTURAL BUILDING, HOUMA AIRBASE

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$10 cover charge

$25 for adults, $40 per couple, $10 for children ages 12 and under

CEREBRAL PALSY TELETHON AUGUST 1, 12:00 PM - 10:00 PM AUGUST 2, 12 PM - 6:00 PM HOUMA-TERREBONE CIVIC CENTER

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DOWNTOWN LIVE AFTER FIVE AUGUST 28, 5:30 PM COURTHOUSE SQUARE, HOUMA

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Open to the public

The Larose Civic Center Bayou Civic Club Inc. is honoring Sidney Triche for his years of service to the community. He has helped raise millions of dollars locally for numerous charities, churches, organizations, and families. Corporate Tables are $1000 for 12 tickets. This includes preferential seating, a bottle of wine, and sponsorship recognition in the program. This also includes 4 tickets to the VIP meet and greet pre-event at 6:00 PM. Individual tickets are $50 per person. There will be a cash bar benefitting the Larose Civic Center Bayou Civic Club, Inc., Fish the Bayou (Dusty Richard Scholarship Fund), and Holy Rosary Catholic School. For more information you can visit bayoucivicclub.org or call the Larose Civic Center at (985) 693-7355.

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Don’t miss this month’s God Bless America dining and performance going on August 6, 7, 8, and 9 at the Marriot Hotel in Houma. The show supports our armed forces and promotes patriotism in our country. Dinner and the show will cost $70 per person with the show beginning an hour after dinner has been served. The show will also feature resounding songs and letters read from soldiers on the front lines. For more information on this event or reservations call (985) 227-7574. God Bless America!

GOD BLESS AMERICA AUGUST 6, 7, 8, 7:00 PM / AUGUST 9, 1:00 PM MARRIOT HOTEL, 142 LIBRARY DRIVE HOUMA

SNIPPETS

ROAST, TOAST, & BOAST: A TRIBUTE TO SIDNEY TRICHE AUGUST 6, 7:00 PM THE LAROSE CIVIC CENTER

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BAYOU COUNTRY COOK-OFF AUGUST 21, 6:00 PM - 12:00 AM AUGUST 22, 10:00 AM - 12:00 AM HOUMA AIRBASE, HOUMA

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For more information, call 985.448.4141

LANNY D. LEDET CULINARY ARTS BUILDING GRAND OPENING / AUGUST 20, 10:00 AM NICHOLLS STATE UNIVERSITY

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Tickets are $100

WOMEN’S NIGHT OUT FOR NICHOLLS WOMEN’S ATHLETICS AUGUST 13, 6:30 - 9:00 PM CYPRESS COLUMNS, 157 TOURIST DRIVE, GRAY

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PHOT OGRA PH Y BY | JA COB JEN N I N G S

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E X P E R I EN CE | CULTURE

FUNCTIONAL FOLK ART AT ITS FINEST CAJUN CORNERSTONES OF MUSIC AND FOOD COMBINE TO MAKE UNIQUE INSTRUMENT

WRIT T E N B Y | ELI SE MI CH EL L EB O EU F

CAJUN CORNERSTONES OF MUSIC AND FOOD COMBINE rmond Cheramie never would have A imagined one of hisINSTRUpaddle guitars TO MAKEhaving UNIQUE used on the set of a national television show, but when his friend first sent him a screenshot of the MENT

set of NCIS: New Orleans, one of Cheramie’s instruments could be seen on top the piano in Dwayne Pride’s (played by Scott Bakula) office. This Thibodaux resident began making citgarbox guitars and other improvised, alternative instruments in October 2014. “I liked the concept that you could take almost anything, things that didn’t really belong together, and make music with it,” Cheramie said. This developed into his current focus, which is a traditional wooden cooking paddle that Cheramie fashions into a functional guitar.

TRULY CAJUN Cheramie grew up in the Galliano-Golden Meadow area with his Cajun French family, and he continues to incorporate his Cajun heritage in all aspects of his life. “I can’t really separate [my Cajun identity] from myself,” Cheramie said. “In a way, it influences most of the things I do.” Music is, of course, a huge part of the Cajun culture, and this hold’s true in Cheramie’s life. Cheramie first learned to play the guitar when he was around 13 years old and has since learned to play a variety of instruments, including bass, banjo, piano, harmonica, mandolin, and accordion. “I’ve always been interested in music and the idea of making music,” he said. Cheramie plays with the Cajun Music Preservation Society, which is a non-profit organization that focuses on promoting and continuing traditional Cajun music. “I’ve been playing with them on and off since they began over a year ago,” Cheramie explained. “They play at different functions in the area and also host a jam session every other Wednesday, usually at the Venetian in Thibodaux.” WHA TNOW M A G.com

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EXPER I EN CE | CULT UR E

To Cheramie, his paddle-turned-guitars are functional folk art. “I think the combination of a gumbo or crawfish stir paddle and musical instrument is symbolic of the Cajun culture — cooking and music,” he said.

THE BUILDING PROCESS Not formally trained in woodwork, Cheramie’s adventure into creating his paddle guitars has served as a learning experience for him in woodworking. While he worked minimally as a child with some of his relatives on various wood projects, Cheramie described his skills going into this project as rudimentary. “I’ve developed pretty good skills in the last few months. I’m always trying to learn something new and trying to get better,” he said. After working on several types of alternative instruments, he started seeing possibilities in other objects when he ran across the paddles in a store. “I thought, ‘Hey, I can put strings on this.’ So I went home and did it,” Cheramie remembered. Cheramie has made a variety of the paddle guitars, including electric ones. “I got hooked on the process and started making more,” he said. His love for his artwork was clearly contagious, and soon his instruments’ popularity grew. “People seemed to really like them and wanted one for themselves, even just as wall pieces.”

A PICTURE PERFECT PROP Cheramie had just begun making his paddle guitars when something unexpected came about. “The NCIS thing just kind of happened as a fluke,” Cheramie said. After selling two of his early paddle guitars to a member of the show’s crew, who took them to 26

WHAT NOW | August 2015

the set the next day, the show decided to commission one for use as a prop in Scott Bakula’s character’s office. “They eventually asked me to go down to the set with a batch of guitars because a few of the other crew and cast members wanted to buy some for themselves,” Cheramie said. Cheramie even made a paddle-guitar specifically for Scott Bakula, whom he got to meet and give the paddle to in person. “He was a gracious, down-to-earth person. I’ve always liked him as an actor,” he explained. “I had just started making [the guitars] and had barely figured out the process, so it was a big confidence boost early on as well as an indicator that people really thought these were a cool idea and wanted to have one for themselves,” Cheramie said.

WHAT NOW? Cheramie’s guitars are sold through his company Cheramie Swamp Music. The guitars can be seen on the company’s Facebook page as well as in his Etsy store under the same name. The guitars start at $120 and include a free slide and pick up for the option of making them electric. Cheramie plans to make other instruments with the same theme as the paddles and to start showcasing and selling them at festivals and art events in the fall. He currently does the Magazine Street Art Market in New Orleans, which takes place on Friday nights and Saturday mornings at Dat Dog. WN


E X P E R I E N C E | CULTURE

THE PAGE TURNER CAFFEINATED: HOW OUR DAILY HABIT HELPS, HURTS, AND HOOKS US COLUM N WRI TTEN BY | JAS M I N E R I C H AR D

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he author, Murray Carpenter, is a freelance radio and news reporter from Maine with a background in psychology and environmental science who has written for the New York Times, Boston Globe, and National Geographic. A self-described happy addict of caffeine, Carpenter states that he decided to research the substance that stimulates him daily. In the book’s acknowledgements, Mr. Carpenter thanks “the bitter white powder that inspired this book and provided the focus and stamina to write it.” This journalistic account uses statistics, first-hand accounts, made-up units of measurement, and quirky facts to take the reader through the history, cultivation, dangers, and delights of caffeine throughout the world. The physiology, psychology, and commerce of the stimulant are discussed at length. The book is divided into four parts: Traditional Caffeine, Modern Caffeine, Caffeinated Body/Caffeinated Brain, and Corralling Caffeine. Caffeine is consumed by billions daily as described in the second part of the book. Most of the caffeine that is used today as an ingredient in soft drinks, energy drinks, and headache medicine comes in a powdered form that can be purchased by the pound. Carpenter travels to coffee farms in Guatemala, a synthetic caffeine factory in China, and an energy shot bottler in New Jersey to research

the manufacturing process. Caffeine is also used as a performance enhancer in sports and military training and is even included in drug testing in certain amounts in the National Collegiate Athletic Association. Caffeine works by blocking the uptake of adenosine, a Neurotransmitter that tells the brain we are drowsy. The resulting benefits of wakefulness, alertness, and a boost in mood have led to a massive industry for caffeinated products. That simple adenosine blockage makes caffeine America’s favorite drug. Physiological and psychological manipulations are described, as are the negative side effects that may follow such as anxiety and withdrawal. While not a concise informational reference, this book is entertaining as well as informative for a quick read. Using science, personal accounts, and history, Carpenter takes the reader on a journey exploring a substance that is used daily on a global scale. For more interesting facts, figures, and methods regarding the most widely used drug in the world, pick up Caffeinated: How Our Daily Habit Helps, Hurts, and Hooks Us at your Lafourche Parish Public Library. Jasmine is a Technology and Media Librarian at the Lafourche Parish Library. Explore the library at lafourche.org. WN

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EX PER I EN CE | CULTURE

SILVER SCREEN SWIMMING POOL (2003) WRIT T E N BY | TO D D KENN ED Y

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ver the past couple of decades summer movies have become entirely too predictable. I’m not a snob who needs every movie to be a great work of art; I like suspense and action as much as anyone. But poor writing, undeveloped characters, bad CGI/special effects (technology isn’t always your friend), and predictable plot devices have just about killed summer movies for me. So what to do when the weather gets hot and one craves suspense? This summer, more than a decade after mildly liking French director François Ozon’s first English language film Swimming Pool (2003), I’ve been drawn back to it. And good gosh does he have something to teach Hollywood. The film is far from perfect, but it is original, suspenseful, and full of the unexpected. The acting is strong and the scenery, well, French. More than anything, even at film’s end I’m not sure precisely how to feel about it, and that is usually a good thing in my book. On its surface, the plot seems like a tired rehash. A middle-aged British murder novelist (played by Charlotte Rampling) is suffering from writer’s block, so she accepts the offer of her publisher’s

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French vacation house to seek solitude and inspiration. Before she can get started, however, she is interrupted by her publisher’s twentyone year old French daughter, who expected the house to be hers. The novelist is too uptight, ordered, neat, and conservative, and the daughter is too frivolous, irresponsible, and carefree, so they don’t really get along, yet, there is an odd mother/daughter dynamic at the same time. Throw in the daughter bedding the very café owner the novelist has been flirting with in her own conservative manner, and you think you know what is coming. But Agatha Christie this is not. In the end you get questions about repression— both emotional and sexual—and our desire to be voyeurs to the unacceptable (think the very genre of murder mystery itself). But more than anything, you get 102 minutes of twists and turns you don’t see coming. That’s too rare in Hollywood. So grab a cocktail, crank up the AC, and take a dip in Ozon’s pool. Todd is an assistant professor in English at Nicholls State University. Contact him at todd.kennedy@nicholls.edu. WN


T H R I V E | H E ALTH + W E LLNE SS

RUNNING DOWN A DREAM THIBODAUX NATIVE FINDS RELAXATION IN RUNNING W RI T T E N B Y | E LI S E M I C H E L LE B O E U F

“IT DOESN’T MATTER HOW FAST YOU GO, YOU’RE ALREADY LAPPING EVERYONE ON A COUCH!” This is one mantra that has kept Erika Esteve, an elementary school teacher in Thibodaux running during the frequently hot and humid days that South Louisiana brings.

“I CAN DO THIS!”

Esteve made the decision to start running at the Louisiana Half Marathon in 2013. “[This is] coming from the mouth of someone who hated to run and couldn’t do it,” Esteve said, describing her shock at her own resolve to begin this activity. “The pivotal moment, the chiming of the bells, as you say, was…when my then boyfriend,

now fiancé, and dad ran the half marathon, and watching all those people push themselves and run 13.1 and 26.2 miles made me think, ‘I can do this!’” As many people kick starting a fitness journey do, Esteve turned to a popular app to help her maintain focus. “I downloaded the ‘Couch to 5K’ app and slowly starting working my way up to running a 5K,” she said. This quickly progressed to a 10K and then her first half marathon. Esteve’s first half-marathon was the 2014 Louisiana Half Marathon, exactly one year after she decided to join the ranks of runners. “Within that year, my dad and I went a little crazy and ran eight half marathons.”

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PHOT OGRA PH Y BY | JA COB JEN N I N G S

“FOCUSING ON ME” Running isn’t the only form of exercise that Esteve partakes in. “I usually exercise about five days a week and love it,” she said. From P90X with a friend to Body Pump classes at the Nicholls Rec Center to yoga at 409 Fitness, Esteve uses exercise as a way to make time for herself. “It’s my ‘me’ time, and I don’t have to worry about anything for the time that I’m focusing on me,” she explained. In addition to her running, Esteve also bikes with her parents in events such as the Bayou Country Cyclists Spring Ride. “Basically, I am up for anything in the exercising department because it makes me feel good and allows me to focus and relax,” Esteve said.

“FIND YOUR NICHE.” While so many people struggle in terms of personal fitness, there seems to have been an increase in the popularity of running events such as marathons and half marathons in recent years. “I think that being healthy is a trend right now, which is not a bad thing,” Esteve said. “This leads to running races.” It is certainly easier for some more than others, and one of the 30

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most often-used reasons for not exercising is a lack of time. Esteve explains that it is about making time for what you need. “Exercising is something that you need, and when you put it right up there with eating and sleeping, you will see that you can find time for it.” Esteve recommends using exercise classes to help hold yourself accountable, waking up an hour earlier to fit in a workout session, or watching a favorite TV show while exercising. “You deserve to be healthy and active, but you have to make the effort. There is alway time if you make it work, but there is no perfect formula. Do what works for you. Find your niche.”

“ANYONE CAN JOIN.” Esteve’s enjoyment for running has transformed into the Thibodaux Running Group, which is a group of runners of varying skills and speeds that get together to run twice a week in Thibodaux. “I always saw people running and thought what a great thing it would be if we had a running club,” Esteve said. Drawing inspiration from Happy’s Running Club in Baton Rouge and New


T H R I V E | H E ALTH + W E LLNE SS

I THINK THAT BEING HEALTHY IS A TREND RIGHT NOW, WHICH IS NOT A BAD THING. —ERIKA ESTEVE

Orleans, Esteve’s group meets on Mondays and Wednesdays to complete a 3-mile course. Walkers start at 6:15 PM, joggers begin at 6:30 PM, and runners take off at 6:45 PM. “The route is about 3 miles, but we encourage everyone to do what they can. We have a ton of running gurus who will run the route two to three times and some who walk half of the route,” Esteve explained. Starting at The Foundry on the Bayou, the route takes runners, walkers, and joggers to Peltier Park, down Canal Street, and back to the Foundry. “Anyone can join. Our goal is to get people active and healthy and meeting those who are interested in the same thing.” More information about the Thibodaux Running Group can be found at runthibodaux.com. WN

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THRIVE | HEALTH + W ELLNESS

WHAT’S COOKING? | MI-CUIT SALMON WITH VEGETABLE TARTARE, AND CITRUS CHEESE CRACKER 4-8 OZ. SALMON FILET (SKIN ON) TARTARE OF VEGETABLES 1 Fresh Zucchini 1 Cucumber 2 Tomatoes 1 Bunch Cilantro 1 Spring Onion 1 Yellow Bell Pepper ¼ cup Olive Oil Salt Pepper to taste CITRUS CHEESE CRACKER 1.7 oz. Flour 1.4 oz. Butter 0.90 oz. Parmesan Cheese Lemon Zest from 1 lemon 3.5 oz. Citrus Thyme (Regular Thyme will work as well) DILL SAUCE 1 bunch Fresh Dill 1 small Jar 8 oz. Dijon Mustard 1 cup Sugar Syrup/ sugar water Salt Pepper to taste

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First, start with your citrus cheese cracker. Combine all ingredients in a bowl using cold butter, grated Parmesan and flour, lemon zest and citrus thyme. Mix together to form dough, and roll into a ball. Place in the fridge for one hour to let the dough rest. Remove from the fridge and use a rolling pin to make a flat sheet. From this point you can use cookie cutters to pick your shape. Next, place the crackers on parchment paper lined sheet tray and bake in the oven at 320-degrees for 10 minutes or until golden brown. For the tartare, dice yellow bell pepper, zucchini, cucumber, tomato, and spring onion into small cubes (approximately 1/8” by 1/6” in size). Once cut, place in a strainer to let the excess water drip from the vegetables. Once strained, toss in olive oil, salt, and pepper. Place in the refrigerator to cool. For the dill sauce, pick approximately 3 tablespoons of the fresh dill, and finely chop. Mix the chopped dill with the Dijon mustard, simple syrup, and salt and pepper and place in the refrigerator.

Logan Parker, a Farmerville, Louisiana native,

In a non-stick pan, high heat with a tablespoon of olive oil, cook the salmon skin side down for about one minute. Remove from the pan and let cool. Next, peel the skin off very gently, and keep it in one piece. Sprinkle the skin with salt. Place the skin between two pieces of parchment paper, and between two flat sheet trays. Place in a 300-degree oven for 10 minutes or until the skin is crunchy. You can finish cooking the fish in a skillet until medium, or roast in a 350-degree oven for three to five minutes. Salt as desired.

is a soon-to-be graduate of Nicholls State

To plate, put a bit of the dill sauce below the fish, and a little on the side for extra dipping. For garnish, place a few extra dill sprigs, and lemon wedges on the finished plate. WN

studying in France.

University with a concentration in Culinary Arts and Business. Logan was chosen as one of thirty-five students from fifteen different countries around the world to participate in a summer externship program at Institute Paul Bocuse in Lyon, France. This program aims to perfect the art of classical French Cuisine. Try out this recipe that Logan has cooked while


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THRIVE | HEALTH + W ELLNESS

JUST FOR THE HEALTH OF IT BACK TO ROUTINE! ARE YOU READY? WRIT T E N B Y | KA TH ER I NE TO U P S

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ummer is the time of year when our schedules can get thrown off with kids being out of school and all of their summer activities! This can cause us to veer away from the healthy bandwagon. Read more about some different tips for you to try to get back on the right track, as well as some meal ideas that won’t break the bank! In order to eat healthy, you must PLAN. Set aside one day of the week to do your grocery shopping, and create your grocery list before leaving your house. This will help you to stay on track while shopping. Buy only what is on your list! Many people believe that healthy eating is expensive, and it can be if you don’t plan! Healthy eating does not have to break your bank. When creating your grocery list, do some research. Find fruits and vegetables that are in season (fall = apples, broccoli, cauliflower, sweet potatoes and more) and create your meals using those. They will taste better and be cheaper if they are in season. Brown rice is a great, healthy food item to have in your house. A serving size of brown rice cost approximately $0.18, and there are so many options when cooking with brown rice. Throw in some red beans at $0.25 a serving and you have a meal that cost $0.43 per person! This is much cheaper than picking up take-out! Below are examples of a week of healthy, inexpensive options:

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On Monday try having red beans with brown rice ($0.43/person). On Tuesday, have a grilled cheese sandwich with wheat bread, low fat cheese, spinach, tomatoes, and red onions ($1.13/person). On Wednesday, aim for an omelet with onions, cheese, spinach, and mushrooms ($0.99/person). For Thursday’s meal, enjoy baked chicken breasts with steamed cauliflower ($0.52/person). Treat yourself on Friday with spaghetti and meatballs on wheat pasta ($1.55/person). All of these prices are approximations, but it shows that you can eat healthy while on a budget. For a family of four, this menu would cost approximately $18.48 for five dinners. You would probably spend more than that at McDonald’s just for one meal! The major difference is not just about the money, but about the nutritional value of your meals. Not only is this menu inexpensive, but it is much healthier than a box of macaroni and cheese, canned ravioli, or fast food. Think of it as an investment for your health and the health of your family! As you gear up for another school year, another busy fall, another holiday season, and all the other many things on your calendar, here are some simple tips that have helped me get back into a routine. Katherine is a local certified wellness consultant with Fusion Wellness Solutions. Contact her at ktoups@wellfusion.com. WN


I N D U L G E | DINING + NIGHTLIFE

FLOURISH BY THE FOUNTAIN

AN EVENING AT THE FOUNDRY ON THE BAYOU

W R I TTEN B Y | C EL ES TE R O B E R T S B E R G E R O N

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n 1974, a former chemical company, wholesale grocery store, and iron-work facility was transformed into The Foundry, a popular nightclub where teenagers and young adults could dance and visit with friends. Although it looks a bit different from its inception, the Foundry re-opened in June 2011 with its original bricks, archways, and concrete flooring.

THE HEART OF THIBODAUX Boasting a total of 15,000 square feet, the Foundry offers plenty of room for multiple types of events. In early 2015, the facility was remodeled to create the new 1,200-square foot Fountain Lounge upstairs, the gentle ambiance of the 2,000-square foot Italian restaurant downstairs, and the 4,000-square foot Event Hall on the main floor. Connected to the Fountain Lounge is a 1,500-square foot patio that features a water fountain and patio furniture to allow patrons to enjoy relaxing evenings with friends and family while viewing Bayou Lafourche. “We have changed our bar style menu into a Creole Italian Restaurant where you can come and enjoy a fine dining experience,� Linden Crochet, WHA TNOW M A G.com

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sales manager, explains. “Some of our popular menu items are the Oyster Trio, Fried Eggplant, Eggplant Lasagna, Duck Foundry, and our signature Turtle Soup. We want to make you feel relaxed in a truly indulgent setting. A meal here is designed to enhance a celebration or to just add something special to an otherwise ordinary week day. In every dish, you’ll enjoy Creole Italian inspiration made by our our chefs and Kitchen Manager, Dean Gehbauer.” The upstairs also experienced an opulent makeover. “Our Fountain Lounge was originally a sports bar,” Linden says. “We hired an outside consultant to give us ideas on how we could improve and entice new customers. We created a classier but casual lounge that can appeal to younger and older patrons alike. Patrons can come in suits, jeans, t-shirts, shorts, dresses—whatever they would like! Businesses and groups are welcome to conduct meetings here, too.”

PHOT OGRA PH Y BY | JA COB JEN N I N G S

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WHAT NOW | August 2015

Live music also creates a fun and lively atmosphere at the Fountain Lounge. “We have live entertainment every Friday and Saturday night, and we are always looking for new bands and musicians,” Linden explains. “We want to support local talent and encourage people to contact us if they are interested in playing here. People have the option of dancing and enjoying music or to just sit back and enjoy a drink with friends. Unlike many bars in downtown Thibodaux, we’re smoke-free indoors. Patrons may go outside on the patio if they wish to smoke.” John Daigle, Steve Junot, Frank Ball, and Russ Cheramie are but a few popular performers. The Fountain Lounge also boasts a large projection screen and outdoor televisions that allows patrons to enjoy sports games during football season. “People can come over in their Saints or LSU jerseys and watch the game with their friends,” Linden

says. “Our appetizer menu can be served upstairs, which allows sports fans to enjoy them in a group setting while cheering on their favorite teams.”

HAPPILY EVER AFTER STARTS HERE With the original exposed brick and wood, The Foundry’s Event Hall is perfect for entertaining guests at your wedding reception. “We can help brides and their grooms plan everything from start to finish,” Linden says. “Little decorating is required because of the beauty of the building itself; flowers and a centerpieces are enough, which is cost-effective. We offer different packages and types of food for receptions that fit different budgets. If you need extra help planning your reception, we can take care of everything: booking limousines, ordering flowers, finding bands or DJs . . . Whatever you need.”


I N D U L G E | D INING + NIGHTLIFE

WE CREATED A CLASSIER BUT CASUAL LOUNGE THAT CAN APPEAL TO YOUNGER AND OLDER PATRONS ALIKE. WHAT NOW?

—LINDEN CROCHET

Enjoy fine Italian cuisine at affordable prices at the Foundry on the Bayou Tuesday through Thursday from 5:00 PM to 9:00 PM or Friday and Saturday from 5:00 PM to 10:00 PM. Walk upstairs into the Fountain Lounge Thursday through Saturday from 5:00 PM until the bar closes to enjoy signature cocktails, an extensive wine list, and various other refreshments. Live music is scheduled every Friday and Saturday; check the lounge’s Facebook page (Foundry on the Bayou) to see who is playing every weekend. The Foundry is located at 715 West 1st Street in Thibodaux. You can contact the restaurant at 985-387-4070 and view the dinner and cocktail menus at its Website (www.foundryonthebayou.com). Reservations are welcome but not necessary for everyday dining. If you are interested in scheduling a rehearsal dinner, wedding reception, reunion, birthday party, or other event, contact Linden Crochet at 985-387-4070 or at foundryonthebayou2014@gmail.com to arrange an appointment. WN

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SCHWEIKI

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I N D U L G E | DINING + NIGHTLIFE

A LITTLE TASTE CARROLLTON MARKET—A MUST TRY WHEN IN NOLA WRITT E N B Y | G I NGER G AU B ER T

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ello, What Now readers, and welcome to “A Little Taste.” I am by no means a professional reviewer/critic; however, I am a “foodie,” and I do know great food and service when I experience those in a restaurant. So, each month, I will choose a restaurant at which I have dined and share with you my opinion based on my dining experience. I chose Carrollton Market for this month’s review. Carrollton Market is a small bistro, which only adds to its charm and ambiance. Its clean neutrals, burnished wood floors, and marble tabletops lend a simple elegance to the dining experience. The bistro has an open-front kitchen, where you can sit on a stool and watch the chefs prepare signature delicious dishes. Chef Goodenough (Yes, that is really his name!) and his team comb the local farmers’ markets every day to find the best ingredients that the Gulf South has to offer. The menu may change multiple times in a single week to best showcase what is available locally, although a few dishes remain year round, including the signature appetizer Oysters Goodenough. For our appetizers, we split an order of the Oysters Goodenough—flash-fried oysters served

on the half shell with creamed leeks, Benton’s bacon, and bèarnaise. Seriously incredible! Our other appetizer was the Tête de Conchon, a house-made pig’s head pâté served with peaches and other accoutrements. Entrées included a fish dish and a chicken dish. The fish dish was pan-roasted Red Snapper atop shrimp fried rice and semi-submerged in a Thai yellow curry both—an innovative nod to Asian cuisine in an A+ presentation. Chicken ‘n Dumplings (not the kind your grandma made) was our other entrée— pillowy-soft potato gnocchi combined with speck ham and shredded chicken mixed with tarragon and crème fraiche. Out of this world delicious! Chocolate Pot de Crème—an insanely delicious, rich milk chocolate tempered with Chantilly cream and served with sugared beignets—rounded out our meal. Sinful, yes, but so worth it! For a special occasion or date night, try out Carrollton Market. You won’t be disappointed! Check out their Facebook page for the latest updates. Bon Appétit! Ginger is a retired high school teacher and local food enthusiast. WN

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DISC OVE R | LAGNIAPPE

A B C D E | COLOR THE ISLAND 5K Rayna and Willie Rollins and their children, Morgan and Grayson, after attending the Grand Isle Color the Island 5K Run.

A-B | CIRCLE OF HOPE CAMPERS Campers from Circle of HOPE tour Jean Lafitte and learn about survival by trapping for food along Bayou Lafourche, and then enjoyed lunch at Sante Fe restaurant in Thibodaux. C-D | BAYOU COUNTRY CHILDREN’S MUSEUM The Central Lafourche Robotics team came out to work with campers at the Bayou Country Children Museum. They taught them to program, build robots, and they created a challenge where the students had to use robots to get beanbags into different colored tubes.

E

F | NICHOLLS BASS FISHING TEAM Nicholls Bass Fishing Team students Tyler Rivet and Allyson Marcel return to campus on July 15th after placing third in the Carhartt Bassmaster College Series Championship in Wisconsin.

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JULY FLASHBACK

G | MANNING PASSING ACADEMY Peyton Manning instructed camp attendees at the Manning Passing Academy held in July at Nicholls State University. H | YOUNG PHILANTHROPIST Hannah (age 10) used the money raised from her lemonade stand to donate dog and cat food to My Heart’s Desire Animal Rescue in Houma.

SUBMIT YOUR PHOTOS info@fathomla.com 40

WHAT NOW | August 2015


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DIS C OVE R | LAGNIAPPE

WHAT SAYING 速 WIN A $50 GIFT CARD courtesy of

MIND WORKOUT WHAT NOW? Figure out the puzzles on this page and e-mail your answers to info@ fathomla.com. A winner will be randomly selected August 16th and will receive a $50 Visa速 Gift Card.

JULY WINNER: BRAD BENOIT

____ __ ____

+

2

THE OCCASION ____ __ ___ ________

+ ______

______

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WHAT NOW | August 2015

JULY ANSWERS: lean on me, walk in the park, ball park, home run (misprint), circle of life, bucket list


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What Now Magazine | August 2015  

What Now Magazine August 2015 Issue published by Fathom Media and distributed in over 275 locations throughout Terrebonne and Lafourche pari...

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