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MARCH 2014

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VOLUME 2

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ISSUE 3

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WHATNOWMAG. c o m

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MARCH 2014

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JUBILEE FESTIVAL: Where The Arts Come Alive 30 BELIEVE: The Story of Immaculée Ilibagiza of Rwanda 25 PREPARING TO SELL 40

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EVENTS


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FIND OUT

MORE WHATNOWMAG.COM

PHOTO BY Brian Waitz

FACEBOOK.COM/ WHATNOWMAG

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OUR DESK TO YOURS

MARCH 2014

A LETTER FROM OUR EDITOR: Ben Jones Jr. @WHATNOWMAG

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@WHATNOWMAG

HAPPY ANNIVERSARY, WHAT NOW!

I

’d like to start by acknowledging that this month marks a year since What Now Magazine has hit the streets! Although Fathom Media was started in January of 2013, our first issue of What Now hadn’t published till March 2013. We are forever grateful for the opportunity that you have given us to serve the area with ways and events to keep you from getting bored around town. How are you enjoying What Now? Let us know. We love hearing reviews from our loyal readers and want to make sure we can keep you guys up-to-date and entertained with what’s going on locally. In this issue, check out many of the great events going on. Mardi Gras will finish off in the beginning of March with many more events in the weeks to follow – so don’t get discouraged!

SEND US YOUR FLASHBACK PICTURES FROM THIS MONTH AND SEE YOUR PHOTOS IN NEXT MONTH'S ISSUE!

Our cover story follows the Jubilee Festival at Nicholls State University. Nobody could pull off the passion and dedication of the festival other than our wonderful front cover this month, Mrs. Angela , Nicholls dance instructor and Jubilee Festival supporter. Also in this issue of What Now we got to chat with Paul Labat, a local person in Houma who has given back to the community and how he stays so involved. Keep your eyes sharp on this section each issue; you may recognize your friend or neighbor! If you also haven’t noticed, we’ve decided to part ways with our calendar section of What Now Magazine. Instead, we have highlights of certain events that we’ve chosen to give you an idea of when, where, and what they are. Our calendar index will give you the list of the majority of the events going on in Terrebonne, Lafourche, and the surrounding areas. For more information on these particular events, you can visit our website, whatnowmag.com. If you would like to submit an event to be featured as a highlight or in the calendar section, feel free to visit our website and submit your event. It’s free! Also, no matter what the event or occasion, email your pictures from things you do and places you visit in March to info@fathomla.com. We are more than happy to feature recitals, birthdays, weddings, concerts, and anything you can think of. We hope you are enjoying What Now Magazine and all that it has to offer the area. We look forward to continuing our mission of promoting local events and happenings as well as things to do. What now? Never be bored again.


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MARCH 2014 PUBLISHERS/EDITORS Ben Jones Jr Cody J. Blanchard

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CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Kassie Barrancotto Emily Hubbell Stuart Percle Celeste Roberts

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CONTRIBUTING COLUMNISTS Ginger Gaubert jasmine Richard Chas Guidry Katherine Toups Dr. Todd Kennedy Laura Valenti Niki Landry Andrew Walters Jeffery Markel DESIGN Justin Babin MARKETING AMBASSADORS Kara Domangue Elizabeth Porche PHOTOGRAPHY Jacob Jennings Misty Leigh McElroy

FROM OUR DESK 4 LETTER FROM THE EDITOR Happy Anniversary, What Now

INTERNS Alistair Moussa Alex Moye

EXTRAS 8 HOROSCOPES

How are the stars aligned for you this month?

Copyright Š 2014 by Fathom Media, LLC. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part without permission is strictly prohibited.

BUSINESS ADDRESS Fathom Media, LLC 629 East First Street Thibodaux, LA 70301 What Now Magazine cannot be responsible for the return of unsolicited material such as manuscripts or photographs, with or without the inclusion of a stamped, self-addressed envelope. Information in this publication is gathered from sources considered to be reliable, but the accuracy and completeness of the information cannot be guaranteed.

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FLASHBACK

A look at your submitted photos from February.

STAYING IN

Take a look at our top picks from this month!

MARCH HIGHLIGHTS

Summaries of some of this month's events.

WHAT SAYING?

Solve the puzzles to win a $50 gift card!

FLASHFORWARD

A look at upcoming events next month!

The opinions expressed in What Now Magazine are those of the authors and do not necessarily represent the opinions of Fathom Media, our employees or any of our advertisers.

ON THE COVER: Tysman Charpentier

Photo: Misty Leigh McElroy


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13 FEATURES YOUR ART ON 13 GET AT ARTWORKS

The Nicholls State University Art Department puts on their first annual Art Works Fundraiser

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BELIEVE

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COME TO LEARN, LEARN TO SERVE

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The Story of Immaculée Ilibagiza

Bayou Community Academy’s 2nd Annual Building Fund Gala

WHERE THE ARTS COME ALIVE

Nicholls State University hosts the monthlong Jubilee Festival for the 16th year.

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DOWN ON MAIN STREET

Meet Paul Labat

The Town of Lockport hosts their annual Main Street Market and Arts & Crafts Show

25 COLUMNS 40 HOUSE TO HOME 41 HEALTH & WELLNESS 42 UP IN YA BUSINESS 43 ONE TANK TRIP 44 THE PAGE TURNER PREPARING TO SELL

GET BACK ON THE BANDWAGON

JUST SAY "NO" TO BUSINESS CARDS. BE 3D.

STAYING LOCAL - EXPERIENCE THIBODAUX

BLOOD, BONES, AND BUTTER: THE INADVERTENT EDUCATION OF A RELUCTANT CHEF

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LIGHTS! CAMERA! ACTION! A REVIEW OF THE FILM 12 YEARS A SLAVE

THE DISH RAG

DOWN DA BAYOU DINING

BOTTOMS UP!

LUCK O' THE IRISH WHISKEY

LAGNIAPPE

PLANNING YOUR FUTURE


HOROSCOPES ARIES Mar 21 – Apr 20

You are on your way up. Keep your dedication to get the job done with the highest fulfillment and achievements will soon follow.

TAURUS Apr 21 – May 21

Someone will try to influence you to give a bold performance. This could lead to a risky situation, so be very cautious.

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GEMINI May 22 – Jun 22

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You may constantly doubt your thoughts and choices concerning someone you want to get to know better and this may cause frustration. Hang in there and delay your encounter if you aren’t up to it this month.

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CANCER Jun 23 – Jul 23

You will have the natural presence of intuitive instinct tossed into your thoughts. Believe in instincts; they are trying to tell you something.

LEO Jul 24 – Aug 23

You can find that you create guarantees you really can't keep. Appreciate everything you do this month, but do be cautious of where you are at all time.

VIRGO Aug 24 – Sept 23

You are advised to create changes in your clothing collection and cosmetics plus your hairstyle. Create a first impression! This is the you that individuals see within the first few seconds of meeting you.

LIBRA Sept 24 – Oct 23

People will keep you very active with extreme tasks. Don't ignore your health however. Nervousness will cause you to be psychologically tired and depressed. Try yoga exercises, relaxation and use natural medication. Discover someone who provides you with guidance on how to reduce stress in your life.

SCORPIO Oct 24 – Nov 22

Your home of health will desire you to modify your diet, workout program, and television viewing routines. Get ready to make changes this month.

SAGITTARIUS Nov 23 – Dec 22

Your power will carry enjoyment in your lifestyle. Genuine excitement will generate through your goals and activities. Do something completely out of the standard.

CAPRICORN Dec 23 – Jan 19

You may discover an economic predicament is under the elements during this month. Don't fear. You know how to reduce costs for stormy times when necessary.

AQUARIUS Jan 20 – Feb 19

Amazing activities are coming for you this month. You will really like every moment of your new place in both your personal and professional life. Your wish to reduce costs may be very attainable this month.

PISCES Feb 20 – Mar 20

Discuss your joy with those around you. Someone from previous years may come back into your life. It is so surprising, and the enticement to ignore all the bad periods you had will be challenging to avoid.


FLASHBACK

A look at your submitted photos from February.

Walking the What Now red carpet at Women, Wine & Fashion sponsored by WBA

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The LOOP Team Participating at the Souper Bowl cook-off benefiting United Way at the Courtyard Marriott in Houma.

Members of the Thibodaux community gathered for a ribbon cutting signifying the official opening of the Norman Swanner Dog Park

The Haydel Pharmacy family at the Downtown Chili Cook-Off in downtown Houma.

Meggie Benoit and Shannon Rhodes pose on the Red Carpet at Women, Wine & Fashion at Bar Roussell.


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Residents of the Lafourche Home for the Aged enjoyed a Mardi Gras parade by the students at eLearningk12 of Thibodaux.

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The lovely ladies from Urban Loft stepped onto the red carpet at Women, Wine & Fashion at Bar Roussell

Aubrey Gautreaux of Bourg Elementary School was January Student of the Month for Mrs. Pellegrin's Kindergarten Class!


The Synergy Bank team takes time to pose for a photo at the Souper Bowl cook-off benefiting United Way at the Courtyard Marriott in Houma.

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The beautiful ladies of Queeny’s Boutique strolled the red carpet at WBA’s Women, Wine & Fashion.

Autumn High performs at the Downtown Houma Chili Cook-Off.

Women, Wine & Fashion event organizers take a break to have their photo taken on the red carpet.

Les Danseur de Bonne Terre, a senior citizen dance team, after their performance at the Schriever Senior Center's monthly party.


STAYING IN

Take a look at our top picks this month. BOOK: Fluent in 3 Months

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Benny Lewis, who speaks ten languages and counting—all self-taught—runs the largest language-learning blog in the world. Lewis is a full-time "language hacker," someone who devotes all of his time to finding better, faster, and more efficient ways to learn languages. His approach is different from other language programs as he encourages readers to avoid studying, ignore grammar, and start speaking from day one. Check out this release on March 11 and see if you can pick up a thing or two. Que?

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MOVIE: Frozen

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A prophecy traps a kingdom in eternal winter, so Anna (voice of Kirsten Bell) must team up with Kristoff, a daring mountain man, on the grandest of journeys to find the Snow Queen (voice of Idina Menzel) and put an end to the icy spell. Encountering Everest-like extremes, mystical creatures and magic at every turn, Anna and Kristoff battle the elements in a race to save the kingdom from destruction. Check out this soon-to-be Disney classic coming to DVD and Blu-ray on March 18.

MUSIC: Out Among The

Stars by Johnny Cash

Out Among the Stars is a posthumous studio album from Johnny Cash, set to be released on March 25. The recordings come from lost 1980s sessions with famed

GAME: Harry Potter Clue Discover the secrets of Hogwarts in this version of the classic mystery game. Enjoy new game play features and a moving Hogwarts game board. Play as Harry, Ron, Hermione, Ginny, Luna or Neville and try to discover who attacked a student, what spell or item they used, and where the student was attacked. Was it Draco Malfoy with a Sleeping Draught in the Owlery?

SNACK: Pistachios Originally from Western Asia, but known for thousands of years throughout the Mediterranean, the pistachio has been cultivated commercially in the English speaking world in Australia, New Mexico and in California where it was introduced in 1854 as a garden tree. The pistachio is one of two nuts mentioned in the Bible and these days another delicious, nutritious nut to snack on and benefit from.


GET YOUR ART ON AT ART WORKS The Nicholls State University Art Department puts on their first annual Art Works Fundraiser WORK IT Michael Williams, Assistant Professor of Sculpture at Nicholls State University wants to know, “Have you ever seen 1500 degree molten metal being poured from a crucible or a 1700 degree piece of pottery being taken red-hot from a kiln? You can at our Art Works fundraiser!” “Art Works” is an Art Program Enhancement fundraiser for the Nicholls State University’s vibrant Art Department. “We are planning a very entertaining evening with good food, exciting art experiences and an opportunity to explore the studios of the Department of Art, “explains Jean Donegan, Department Head. The “Art Works” fundraiser was the idea of local businessman Jerome Boudreaux of Old Estate who traveled with the Department of Art’s study abroad program this past summer. “Seeing the students photograph and write about their experiences was inspiring,” says Boudreaux, “I wanted to do something to help more of the students take advantage of travel opportunities or those students who are having trouble paying for tuition or supplies.”

Kassie Barrancotto

Boudreaux brought the idea before several of his fellow travelers at a lunch get together, and the fundraiser was off and running. “Artists are people who enhance all of our lives, and in the long run we all benefit by helping students and supporting the arts,” said Boudreaux. Attendees are encouraged to come casual and comfortable to experience hands-on art activities and art demonstrations including pouring hot metal, photo development in a darkroom, block printing, throwing clay on a potter’s wheel and more. Studio visits will provide a “behind the scenes” glimpse at the Art department and the students who study the fine arts. Faculty and staff will be on hand to talk about their work and the process. All of the studios of the Art Department will be open for visits, demonstrations or hands-on activities. The department has studios in painting, drawing, graphic design, printmaking, ceramics, sculpture and photography. “If you have ever wondered what clay feels like as it turns on a potter’s wheel, or how a photograph seems to magically appear in the darkroom chemicals, then this is the event for you,” says Jean Donegan.

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Photo: submitted

An artist expresses creativity through drawing.

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APR 1 | TUE | 6PM-9PM TALBOT HALL THIBODAUX

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Photo: submitted

Artists prepare for Art Works.

HARD WORK The Department of Art at Nicholls State University is accredited by the National Association of Schools of Art and Design (NASAD) and is dedicated to providing quality studies in all visual media. Department students participate in service learning, undergraduate research, and take a leadership role in community service initiatives. Established in the 1960’s, the Department of Art offers a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree with areas of emphasis available in graphic design, drawing, painting, photography, sculpture, ceramics, printmaking and art history. The Department currently has 150 students. The Department of Art provides cultural enrichment to university students, faculty, staff, and to the community through curricular offerings, art exhibitions, visiting artist lectures and workshops that are free of charge. The Department also has a strong studies abroad program that is open to students and members of the community. “The Department of Art collaborates regularly with non-profit businesses and organizations in the community through service learning projects,” explains Donegan, “Among the groups that the Department has worked with is The

Children’s Museum, CASA of Terrebonne, Hope for Animals, Arts and Cultural Development of Arnaudville, LA and St. John Cemetery Association. In 2012, the department collaborated with the City of Thibodaux to produce the “Play Together” mural that can now be seen in Peltier Park. The Department has taken leadership in the campus-wide community service project NICHOLLS CAN food drive. Department faculty and students provide leadership, organization, and manpower to help make this food drive a success. In three drives, NICHOLLS CAN has collected over 32,000 items for donation to local food banks.”

THE WORKS “Art Works” will be the Art Department���s inaugural fundraiser with proceeds going to scholarships, student development, and equipment to enhance the art program at Nicholls. Event-goers can look forward to a great selection of hors d’oeuvres, a cash bar, unique art experiences and an opportunity to create their own work. “(You can) create a photographic image of your own using a historical photo process called cyanotype. You will even be able to take this home with you before the end of the evening,” explains Deborah Lillie, Associate Professor of Photography. The Silent Auction at Art Works will not be your


Say What!? The earliest cast iron artifacts date to the 5th century BC, and were discovered by archaeologists in what is now modern Luhe County, Jiangsu in China. Cast iron was used in ancient China for warfare, agriculture, and architecture.

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The Silent Auction will also feature a cast iron pot created by sculptor Michael Williams that is decorated with the Nicholls “N”. This 10-gallon limited edition pot was created at the Annual Down the Bayou Iron Pour held at the Nichols Farm. A competitive student exhibition will also be shown in the gallery, with all works for sale at $50. You never know. You may be purchasing the works of the next George Rodrigue or Picasso for only $50! Art Works will be sure to fulfill all of your artful curiosity desires and show off the amazing art department we are lucky to have in our backyards at Nicholls State University. “I have worked with many committees in my time as Alumni Director but I have never seen a faculty more engaged with their students or more willing to work for a cause that will benefit their students and program. The faculty will be leading the demonstrations for the “Art Works” fundraiser and they are planning on putting on quite a show,” said Debbie Raziano, Director Emeritus of Alumni Affairs at Nicholls State. “We are excited about the party we have planned to showcase these talented artists and the different kinds of art they produce. Our guests will see that in the Nicholls Department of Art - Art Works!” stated committee member Janie Block of Thibodaux.

WHAT NOW Tickets are $50.00 each. In lieu of a ticket, you may donate a 4”x 6” piece of your own original artwork to be displayed and sold during the evening for $50. All 4” x 6” works must be received by the Department of Art or by Old Estate Gallery (202 E 7th St., Thibodaux) by March 27. Work may be in any media and must be signed on the back only. Please include name and contact information. The “Art Works” fundraiser will be held in the studios and gallery of the Department of Art in Talbot Hall on Tuesday, April 1 from 6:00 to 9:00 PM. Metal is used as a tool to express creativity in the NSU Art Department. Submitted

Photo: submitted

For tickets contact the Department of Art, 985-448-4597, connie.doran@nicholls.edu. Checks can be made payable to the Nicholls Foundation. WN

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typical Silent Auction. The items are all original fine art works created by faculty, alumni, local artists and students. Some of our featured artists include David Horton and Gaither Pope (oil painting), Ross Jahnke (fine art printmaking), Jean Donegan and Gale Navarre (ceramics), Deborah Lillie and Jacob Jennings (photography) and Ellen McCord (paper pulp painting). They will also have a duck decoy by Robbie Matherne.


MARCH HIGHLIGHTS RACE FOR THE CHILD MAR 8 | SAT | 2PM PELTIER PARK, THIBODAUX

BETTIE PAGE REVEALS ALL ONE-TIME SCREENING MAR 13 | THURS | 7:30 PM AMC HOUMA PALACE 10, HOUMA $12 PER TICKET

"I was not trying to be shocking, or to be a pioneer. I wasn't trying to change society, or to be ahead of my time. I didn't think of myself as liberated, and I don't believe that I did anything important. I was just myself. I didn't know any other way to be, or any other way to live."

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Twenty-something Bettie Page forged her path as America's most famous pin-up in the highly reserved era of the 1950s. Born into poverty in Nashville, Tennessee, Page experienced a difficult childhood of abuse and separated parents. After divorcing her first husband in 1949, Page made her way to New York City and found work as a secretary. In 1950, her career as a pin-up model began with a few pictures on the beach.

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Racers prepare for last year's race.

Photo: submitted

CASA (Court Appointed Special Advocates) of Lafourche is organizing a 5K run and 40K bike race to benefit their work for abused or forgotten children. As a not-for-profit organization, CASA members and volunteers “speak up for foster children” and “advocate for them in court and in school,” according to Jolet Chappell, a program coordinator for CASA. The event features several aspects, from a run/walk, to a Kids’ Fun Run, a 40K bike race and an after-race party. It is the first year that this event will have a bike race. “It’s very rewarding and we’re just excited to get our name out,” Chappel said. Community members can begin running, racing, and biking in Peltier Park on Saturday, March 8. On-site registration begins at 2:00 PM with the Kids’ Fun Run starting at 3:00 PM. The child’s fee is $12. The bike race starts at 3:30 PM for those at least 18 years of age. The 40K bike race fee is $30. The 5K walk/run starts at 5:30 PM for a fee of $25 per person. For those participants who want to register for both the bike race and the 5K, the fee is discounted to $40 per person. Finally, the event will end with an after party of crafts, food, drinks, and live entertainment from “Natural Satisfaction,” a Morgan City band. The fee for the after party is $10 per person.


In director Mark Mori's Bettie Page Reveals All, Page herself narrates her life's story, both the tragic and the thrilling. The rated R film features Dita von Teese, Hugh Hefner, Rebecca Romijn, Perez Hilton, and other famous faces whom Page influenced and inspired. Interested in learning more about this beauty's fascinating story? Go to www.tugg.com/events/7629 to reserve your ticket for the one-time-only screening of Bettie Page Reveals All at AMC Houma Palace 10 on Thursday, March 13th, at 7:30 PM. The film is rated R. Hurry! 85 tickets are required for this film to air. Contact Celeste Roberts at celeste_m_roberts@hotmail.com for more information.

The CF Foundation is an accredited charity of the Better Business Bureau’s Wise Giving Alliance. To help fight CF, get involved by calling Louisiana Chapter of the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation at 504.455.5194. About the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation The Cystic Fibrosis Foundation is the world’s leader in the search for a cure for cystic fibrosis. The Foundation funds more CF research than any other organization, and nearly every CF drug available today was made possible because of Foundation support. Based in Bethesda, Md., the Foundation also supports and accredits a national care center network that has been recognized by the National Institutes of Health as a model of care for a chronic disease. For more information, go to www.cff.org.

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Known for her jet-black bangs, blue come-hither eyes, beautiful smile, and uninhibited love for the camera, the late Page created scandal and intrigue as she expressed joy and fun with her sexuality. After years in the spotlight, she suddenly disappeared, only to leave a loyal cult following that continues to this day with fashion, modeling, makeup, music, and more.

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CROSBY TUGS BOBBY HEBERT CYSTIC FIBROSIS FOUNDATION GOLF CLASSIC MAR | 14 | FRI 8AM LA TOUR GOLF CLUB MATTHEWS

On Friday, March 14, the 4th Annual Crosby Tugs Bobby Hebert Cystic Fibrosis Golf Classic presented by L&M Botruc Rental and Express Weld will be held at La Tour Golf Club in Matthews, La. The anticipated 250 plus golfers will take to the course in two flights at 8:00 AM and 1:00 PM. Sponsorship opportunities are available with all proceeds being donated to the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation to help find a cure for the disease. To register a team or for sponsorship packages, contact Cheryl Lemoine at 504-4555194 or visit Louisiana.cff.org. In addition to 18 holes of golf, participants will enjoy tasty cuisine and beverages courtesy of our sponsors including Crosby Tugs, Scurlock Electric and Falck Safety Services. Additionally, each golfer will also get a chance to chat with Bobby Hebert and take home a commemorative shirt and foursome photo. The event will also feature a silent auction. “We still lose precious young to this disease every day. It’s more important than ever that we rally our community to fight CF,” said Bobby Hebert. “We are grateful for every sponsor, volunteer and donor who supports the tournament.” Funds raised by the golf tournament have helped spur dramatic progress in the lives of those who have cystic fibrosis. Fifty years ago, most children with CF did not live long enough to attend elementary school. Today, people with CF are living into their 30s, 40s and beyond. Cystic Fibrosis affects about 30,000 adults and children in the United States and 70,000 people worldwide. It causes debilitating lung infections that lead to premature death. More than 10 million Americans are symptomless carriers of a defective CF gene.

Bobby Hebert and Avery Adams at last year's tournament.

Photo: submitted


BAYOU LAFOURCHE CLEANUP

CATFISH MOON MAR 21-APR 13 | FRI & SAT | 7:30PM | SUN | 2:30PM

MAR 15 | SAT | 8AM-12PM

BAYOU PLAYHOUSE LOCKPORT

BAYOU LAFOURCHE

What are you doing Saturday, March 15 from 8:00 AM – 12:00 PM? The Barataria-Terrebonne National Estuary Program (BTNEP) is looking for you to volunteer at the annual Bayou Lafourche Cleanup! “The Bayou Lafourche Clean-Up is all about getting the trash out of our drinking water supply,” said Alma Robichaux, BTNEP Cleanup Coordinator. “We are looking forward to hopefully finding less trash than we have the past two years.”

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Photo: submitted

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March 21 through April 13, Fridays and Saturdays at 7:30 PM and Sundays at 2:30 PM, head down the bayou to the Bayou Playhouse in Lockport to enjoy the performance of Catfish Moon! “It's a hilarious Southern comedy by a relatively new Southern Playwrite. It's an all-professional cast with many returning favorites to the Bayou Playhouse stage. An evening of belly laughs as we celebrate Southern culture.” Said Perry Martin, Artistic Director and Founder of the Bayou Playhouse. “I'm always on the look out for plays that celebrate the Southern mystic. Catfish Moon satisfies our mission to showcase our culture while entertaining our patrons. This is a play perfect for the intimacy of our stage. It also allows me to direct a cast of very talented stage and film actors.” Catfish Moon is the tale of an old fishing pier out on Cypress Bayou that has fallen under the magic of another Catfish Moon. It was the favorite hangout for three best friends when they were kids skipping school, skinny-dipping and even experiencing the mysteries of kissing girls. Now that Curley, Gordon and Frog are older, and have tasted the bitterness of life as well as the sweetness, the pressures and problems that come with middle age are eroding the closeness between them. In an attempt to recapture their friendship, the guys decide that one last overnight fishing trip is exactly what is needed. On the pier, the weight of adulthood is lifted by laughter and their love of fishing. The three guys discover that their friendship was never lost at all. The poignant resolution of this hilarious southern comedy brings them to the realization that life is too precious and too short to let true friendship get away.

Volunteers at last year's cleanup.

Photo: submitted

“The Bayou Lafourche Cleanup is a great way to gather together as a community and service the bayou that has been a symbol of our town and area for generations.”

“This is an Off Broadway quality production brought to Lafourche Parish. I hope folks take advantage of this opportunity to come and laugh out loud for an evening. We offer a brief escape from the stress of every day life,” said Martin. “There's no finer place to see professional theatre than the Bayou Playhouse, the only professional theatre south of New Orleans.”

The event is open to the public for participation and your involvement with the cleanup will get you a free t-shirt. “We find the most unusual things in Bayou Lafourche,” said Robichaux. “The day is fun and there is something for everyone to help with.”

Catfish Moon tickets are $23 in advance and $25 at the door. You can find more information or get your tickets for the event at bayouplayhouse.com or call 888.992.2968.

For more information on how you can be a part of the Bayou Lafourche Cleanup, visit btnep.org or call 985.447.0868. Show your bayou some love!


LOUISIANA SWAMP STOMP FESTIVAL MAR 21 | FRI | 3:30AM NICHOLLS STATE UNIVERSITY

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Photo: Misty Leigh McElroy

Ryan Brunet at Swamp Stomp. Named to the “Top 20 Events in the Southeast” list for March from the Southeast Tourism Society, the successful Swamp Stomp is back for a 6th year of celebration. Swamp Stomp is a 3-day festival featuring Cajun and Zydeco music and dancing, lots of food and local vendors selling homemade wares and crafts. “Visitors are invited to experience south Louisiana’s unique Cajun, Zydeco and Swamp Pop music, a variety of regional foods and presentations on local history, culture and economic development,” Kristen Anselmi, marketing/communication specialist at Nicholls, says. Youngsters will get a special opportunity to learn about Cajun culture through a free program for nearby schools funded by local organizations including the Barataria-Terrebonne National Estuary Program. “There’s […] the Tresors du Bayou Educational Program, a popular attraction for thousands of primary and secondary school students,” Anselmi explains. Local students begin their cultural experience at 8:30 AM on Friday, March 21 and spend the day learning about different aspects of Louisiana wildlife, culture and craftsmanship, including net making, storytelling, and sampling Cajun cuisine.

Amanda Shaw and the Cute Guys will join the kids for lunch to perform and start the musical portion of the learning experience. The stompin’ kicks off on Friday, March 21 at 3:30 PM, on Saturday at 9:30 AM, and on Sunday at 10:00 AM. Each day begins with free Zydeco dance lessons courtesy of ZydecoCajun Dance Productions. Practicing those new dance moves will be easy with new live entertainment every day, including the Treater Band, Waylon Thibodeaux, Chubby Carrier and the Bayou Swamp Band, Ryan Brunet and the Malfecteurs, Cameron Dupuy and the Cajun Troubadors, and many more. Weekend passes for Swamp Stomp are $25 dollars. Visit www. nicholls.edu/swamp-stomp for more information about events throughout the weekend.


BOOGIE ON THE BAYOU/ DOWNTOWN THIBODAUX ARTS WALK

Boogie on the Bayou will take place at the intersection of West 3rd Street and Green Street on Friday, March 28 from 6:00 PM to 10:00 PM. The Downtown Arts Walk takes place in conjunction the same day, starting at 4:00 PM and ending at 10:00 PM.

MAR 28 | FRI | 6PM-10PM DOWNTOWN THIBODAUX

Boogie down in Downtown Thibodaux with a free concert and art walk. According to Ryan Perque, director of community outreach for Thibodaux Main Street, the event supports the creativity and beauty of local musicians and artists. “Not only does it promote and display downtown Thibodaux, but it also serves as a fundraiser for Thibodaux Main Street,” Perque says.

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The first part of the event is the Boogie on the Bayou, a free-tothe-public concert. This year, the entertainment will be provided by Russ Cheramie, Cameron Richard, and the Good Feelin’ Band. The art walk, the second part of the event, will feature local artists and community members selling their pieces of art at booths set up along West 3rd Street. “Downtown Thibodaux Arts Walk is an opportunity for local artist and authors to display and sell their wares,” Perque says. Thibodaux Main Street members and sponsors hope that community members will attend to enjoy the music, the art and the town of Thibodaux. “We take pride in the fact that it is truly a ‘family friendly’ event and is attended by people of all ages,” Perque says.

Last year's Boogie on The Bayou in Downtown Thibodaux.

Photo: submitted


RACE FOR THEIR FUTURE 5K RUN/WALK

KAUSE 4 CRITTERS MAR 30 | SUN | 1PM DOWNTOWN THIBODAUX

MAR 29 | SAT | 9:30AM NICHOLLS STATE UNIVERSITY

Humane Organization for the Protection and Education (HOPE) for Animals is organizing their 4th annual 5K race/walk and silent auction to benefit the organization as well as the K.C. Toups LSU School of Veterinary Medicine Endowment Fund. “Not only is it an actual ‘walk in the park,’ [but] registrants will enjoy face painting, jambalaya, snacks and drinks after the race,” Claire Cheramie, HOPE volunteer, says. “Adoptable dogs will be present for those looking to add extra love to their home.”

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HOPE for Animals, a local non-profit, works to rescue lost or abandoned pets as well as providing no-kill shelter to animals, Cheramie explains. The scholarship fund that the race will profit was created in honor of Lafourche parish veterinarian Toups,

Runners partake in Race for Their Future.

Photo: submitted

MAX Charter School is holding a fundraiser for their students with a 5K run/walk, an event begun five years ago. The purpose for the race, according to the school board, is to “help meet the unique educational needs of children with dyslexia and other language-related learning differences,” in keeping with MAX Charter’s mission statement. Proceeds from the event will pay for educational aids such as library books, physical education equipment, teaching software and instructor training. “The event, sponsored by the school’s PTA, is really a fun-filled family gathering catering to both adults and children alike,” Carol “Boo” Broussard, the school’s vice president, says. Broussard enjoys the participation of the community, whether it’s on the school level, town level or even state level. “Some participants come from as far as Slidell and New Orleans,” Broussard says. “It’s a good time to join with family, friends and fellow school mates who look forward to the gathering each year.” The event does not only comprise of a run/walk, but will include several fun booths and activities. “A post-race party will follow with awards, special prizes, music, food, drinks, face painting, a bounce house, crafts, balloon art, a silent auction for children and adults and more,” Broussard explains. There will even be a raffle for a Disney World Vacation Package, valued at $5,000.

Support HOPE for Animals at this event.

Photo: submitted

who died in a car crash in 2011 while moving pet patients for the Lafourche Parish Animal Hospital. “In addition to supporting two wonderful, local causes, this event offers entertainment for everyone, including pets,” Cheramie says. “It is so much fun to watch families and friends join together as they get moving and show off their cutest critters. I can’t think of a better way to spend a Sunday afternoon.”

So join in the fun and games on Saturday, March 29 at 9:30 AM at John L. Guidry Stadium at Nicholls and support MAX Charter. Race registration before March 10 is $20 and day-of registration is $25, while non-race tickets to the event are $5, all of which are available at the school, 100 Afton Drive in Thibodaux across from Nicholls.

This family and animal-friendly affair will take place in Peltier Park in Thibodaux on Sunday, March 30 with registration beginning at 1:00 PM, the dog walk at 2:00 PM, and the 5K at 3:00 PM. Early registration for the race/walk is $20 for adults (16 years old and up) and $15 for kids. Early registration ends on Friday, March 14, after which registration fees go up to $25 for adults and $20 for kids.

For more information, contact the school at (985) 227-9500 or Race Chairperson Vanessa Benoit at (985) 414-0058 or visit mymaxcharterschool.org.

For more information on the event, including becoming sponsor, call (985) 447-6100 or (985) 859-4875. To register for the race/ walk, visit www.hopeforanimals.com or www.active.com.


CALENDAR INDEX: March TAKE A LOOK AT THIS MONTH'S EVENTS!

WEEK 1 MAR 1 | SAT | 8AM-12PM

LAFOURCHE CENTRAL MARKET Bayou Lafourche Visitor Center, Raceland No Entrance Fee

MAR 1 | SAT | 12PM

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KREWE OF APOLLO PARADE Lockport

MAR 1 | SAT | 12PM

MARCH 2014

KREWE OF ATLANTIS PARADE Golden Meadow

MAR 1 | SAT | 6PM

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KREWE OF BABYLON PARADE Larose

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MAR 1 |SAT | 5:50PM

LE KREWE DU BON TEMPS PARADE Larose

MAR 1 | SAT | 10PM

CLUSTAFUNK BAND L’Esprit Lounge, Larose $7.00

MAR 1 | SAT | 1PM

NSU WOMEN’S BASKETBALL VS UIW CARDINALS Nicholls State University, Thibodaux

MAR 1 | SAT | 3PM

NSU MEN’S BASKETBALL VS UIW CARDINALS Nicholls State University, Thibodaux

MAR 2 | SUN

INDEPENDENT MARDI GRAS PARADE Grand Isle

MAR 2 | SUN | 12:30PM

KREWE OF CLEOPHAS PARADE Thibodaux

MAR 2 | SUN | FOLLOWS CLEOPHAS

KREWE OF CHRONOS PARADE Thibodaux

MAR 2 | SUN | 6PM

KREWE OF NEREIDS PARADE Golden Meadow

MAR 3 | MON | 8PM

KREWE OF CHRISTOPHER TABLEAU Thibodaux Civic Center

MAR 4 | TUE | 1PM

KREWE OF GHANA PARADE Thibodaux

MAR 4 | TUE | 11AM

KREWE OF GHEENS PARADE Gheens

MAR 4 | TUE | 12PM

KREWE OF NEPTUNE PARADE Galliano/Golden Meadow

MAR 4 | TUE | 2PM

KREWE OF CHOUPIC PARADE Choupic

MAR 4 | TUE | 6PM

NSU BASEBALL VS SACRED HEART PIONEERS Nicholls State University, Thibodaux

MAR 6 | THU | 6:30PM

LIVE MUSIC AT THE DRINKERY The Dansereau House, Downtown Thibodaux No Cover

MAR 6 | THU | 6:30PM

NSU BASEBALL VS BYU COUGARS Nicholls State University, Thibodaux

MAR 7 | FRI | 6:30PM

NSU BASEBALL VS BYU COUGARS Nicholls State University, Thibodaux

MAR 7 | FRI | 5PM– MAR 8 | SAT | 3:30PM

TREASURES OF OUR FAITH WITH IMACULEE ILIBAGIZA RETREAT St. Genevieve Church, Thibodaux $57 per person

MAR 8 | SAT | 8AM–12PM

LAFOURCHE CENTRAL MARKET Bayou Lafourche Visitor Center, Raceland No Entrance Fee

MAR 8 | SAT | 8AM

CASA OF LAFOURCHE 5K RUN/40K BIKE RACE Peltier Park, Thibodaux

MARCH 8 | SAT | 6PM

NSU BASEBALL VS BYU COUGARS Nicholls State University, Thibodaux

WEEK 2 MAR 9 | SUN | 11AM

DANSEREAU SUNDAY BRUNCH The Dansereau House, Downtown Thibodaux Reservations Needed

MAR 10 | MON | 5:30PM

CASA OF LAFOURCHE SPRING TRAINING 603 Jackson Street, Suite C, Thibodaux No Cost

MAR 10 | MON– APR 30 | WED

16TH ANNUAL JUBILEE FESTIVAL OF THE ARTS & HUMANITIES Nicholls State University

MAR 13 | THU | 4PM–7PM

CINDERELLA’S CLOSET Thibodaux High School Donations can be made

MAR 13 | THU | 6:30PM

LIVE MUSIC AT THE DRINKERY The Dansereau House, Downtown Thibodaux No Cover

MARCH 15 | SAT | 3PM

NSU SOFTBALL VS LAMAR CARDINALS Nicholls State University, Thibodaux

MAR 15 | SAT | 2PM

THE ARISTOCATS KIDS Thibodaux Playhouse

MARCH 15 | SAT | 6PM

MAR 13 | THU | 7:30PM

NSU BASEBALL VS HBU HUSKIES Nicholls State University, Thibodaux

MAR 14 | FRI | 5PM– MAR 15 | SAT | 6PM

CATFISH MOON Bayou Playhouse, Lockport $12-$25

BETTIE PAGE REVEALS ALL ONETIME SCREENING AMC Houma Palace 10, Houma $12 per ticket

WOMAN OF GOD CONFERENCE Diocesan Pastoral Center Conference Hall, Schriever $60-$80

MAR 14 | FRI | 6PM

NSU BASEBALL VS HBU HUSKIES Nicholls State University, Thibodaux

MAR 14 | FRI | 7PM

THE ARISTOCATS KIDS Thibodaux Playhouse

MAR 14 | FRI | 7:30PM

CATFISH MOON Bayou Playhouse, Lockport $12-$25

MAR 15 | SAT | 8AM

MARSH MAD DASH FOR LIFE Nicholls State University, Thibodaux $25 Registration Fee

MAR 15 | SAT | 8AM–12PM

LAFOURCHE CENTRAL MARKET Bayou Lafourche Visitor Center, Raceland No Entrance Fee

MAR 15 | SAT | 7:30PM

WEEK 3 MAR 16 | SUN

BAYOU HOME SHOW HOUMA-TERREBONNE CIVIC CENTER

MAR 16 | SAT | 1PM

NSU SOFTBALL VS LAMAR CARDINALS Nicholls State University, Thibodaux

MAR 16 | SUN | 1PM

NSU BASEBALL VS HBU HUSKIES NICHOLLS STATE UNIVERSITY, THIBODAUX

MAR 16 | SUN | 2PM

THE ARISTOCATS KIDS Thibodaux Playhouse

MAR 16 | SUN | 2:30PM

CATFISH MOON Bayou Playhouse, Lockport $12-$25

MAR 19 | WED | 6:00PM

MAR 15 | SAT | 10AM

NSU BASEBALL VS ULL RAGIN’ CAJUNS Nicholls State University, Thibodaux

MAR 15 | SAT

NSU SOFTBALL VS LSU TIGERS Nicholls State University, Thibodaux

SCHRIEVER LIONS CLUB PAGEANT Evergreen Cajun Center $5.00 per person

BAYOU HOME SHOW Houma-Terrebonne Civic Center

MAR 15 | SAT | 9AM–4PM

14TH ANNUAL LOCKPORT MAIN STREET & BAYOUSIDE ARTS & CRAFTS SHOW Lockport Bayouside Park, Lockport No Gate Fee

MARCH 15 | SAT | 1PM

NSU SOFTBALL VS LAMAR CARDINALS Nicholls State University, Thibodaux

MAR 19 | WED | 6PM

MAR 20 | THU | 6:30PM

LIVE MUSIC AT THE DRINKERY The Dansereau House, Downtown Thibodaux No Cover

MAR 21 | FRI | 3:30PM – 10:30PM

LOUISIANA SWAMP STOMP FESTIVAL Nicholls State University $10.00 Admission Fee

FOR MORE INFORMATION OR TO SUBMIT YOUR EVENTS, GO TO WHATNOWMAG.COM


LAFOURCHE CENTRAL MARKET Bayou Lafourche Visitor Center, Raceland No Entrance Fee

MAR 22 | SAT | 9:30AM – 10:30PM

LOUISIANA SWAMP STOMP FESTIVAL Nicholls State University $10.00 Admission Fee

MAR 22 | SAT | 7:30PM

CATFISH MOON Bayou Playhouse, Lockport $12-$25

WEEK 4 MAR 23 | SUN | 1PM–3PM

JUNIOR AUXILIARY SECOND ANNUAL EASTER EGGSTRAVAGANZA Grand Bayou Noir | 1143 Bayou Black Drive $35 for adults | $25 for kids

CATFISH MOON Bayou Playhouse, Lockport $12-$25

MAR 24 | SAT | 7:30AM

6TH ANNUAL CHAMBER GOLF CLASSIC Ellendale Country Club, Houma $150-$500

MAR 28 | FRI | 5PM– MAR 29 | SAT | 6PM

MAN OF GOD CONFERENCE Diocesan Pastoral Center Conference Hall, Schriever $60-$80

MAR 29 | SAT | 10AM–6PM

CATFISH MOON Bayou Playhouse, Lockport $12-$25

MAR 28 | FRI | 7:30PM

LEEVILLE ARTS & HERITAGE FESTIVAL 24214 Highway 1, Leeville

MAR 29 | SAT | 9:30AM

RACE FOR THEIR FUTURE 5K RUN/WALK

MAR 28 | FRI | 6PM

Nicholls State University Stadium, Thibodaux $20-$25

MAR 28 | FRI | 6:30PM–10PM

NSU BASEBALL VS ORU GOLDEN EAGLES Nicholls State University, Thibodaux

NSU BASEBALL VS ORU GOLDEN EAGLES Nicholls State University, Thibodaux

BCA MOONLIGHT ON THE BAYOU GALA Thibodaux Civic Center $25/person

MAR 30 | SUN | 1PM

NSU BASEBALL VS ORU GOLDEN EAGLES Nicholls State University, Thibodaux

MAR 27 | THU | 6:30PM

CATFISH MOON Bayou Playhouse, Lockport $12-$25

MAR 30 | SUN | 1PM

KAUSE 4 CRITTERS DOW WALK AND 5K Peltier Park, Thibodaux $15

MAR 29 | SAT | 8AM–12PM

LAFOURCHE CENTRAL MARKET Bayou Lafourche Visitors Center, Raceland No Entrance Fee

LIVE MUSIC AT THE DRINKERY The Dansereau House, Downtown Thibodaux No Entrance Fee

MAR 29 | SAT | 7:30PM

CATFISH MOON Bayou Playhouse, Lockport $12-$25

MAR 29 | SAT | 6PM

MAR 30 | SUN | 2:30PM

DON'T FORGET TO SUBMIT YOUR EVENTS TO WHATNOWMAG.COM TO SEE IT LISTED HERE!

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MAR 22 | SAT | 8AM–12PM

MAR 23 | SUN | 2:30PM

MAR 28 | FRI

BOOGIE ON THE BAYOU Downtown Thibodaux Open to the Public

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MAR 21 | FRI

TGMC LADIES NIGHT OUT Houma-Terrebonne Civic Center

MAR 23 | SUN | 10AM–8PM

LOUISIANA SWAMP STOMP FESTIVAL Nicholls State University $10.00 Admission Fee

MARCH 2014

MAR 21 | FRI | 7:30PM

CATFISH MOON Bayou Playhouse, Lockport $12-$25


The newest member of the Fathom Media family, going home with all pre-k through sixth graders in all Terrebonne and Lafourche parish schools.

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February 2014

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VOLUME 1 NUMBER 4

Mardi Gras Child Friendly Zones

The Toy Box

Insights from the inside 1


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Photo: Brian Waitz

Immaculée Ilibagiza tells her life-changing story at the EDW Chapel.

BELIEVE

The Story of Immaculée Ilibagiza of Rwanda

I

mmaculée Ilibagiza’s life was not unlike most of ours. She was born and raised in a small village in the African country of Rwanda. She lived with her parents and three brothers; their parents were devout Catholics who raised their children to have faith and pray.

“Seventy-two percent of Rwanda is Catholic,” Immaculée says. “We lived in a culture in which we cared for one another. We were devoted to Mary, the Mother of God. Someone in my own country who did not believe in Christ and practice his teachings was a stranger to me.” The weather was “beautiful and like an eternal spring,” she adds. “We thought we had everything. We were close with our neighbors and gathered together to talk in the evenings. My family prayed every night.” Immaculée performed well in school and studied electrical and mechanical engineering at the National University of Rwanda. When she went home to her village for Easter break in 1994, she had no idea that her life would change.

Celeste Roberts

A TIME OF TERROR Do you remember hearing about the massive genocide in Rwanda in 1994? The conflict between Tutsi and Hutu tribes lasted for nearly 100 days from April to July. Conservative Hutu activists known as akazu felt threatened by the Tutsis and strongly opposed the peace agreement between the Hutu-led government and the Tutsi Rwandan Patriotic Front, which was comprised of Tutsi refugees who had fled Uganda after enduring attacks from Hutus. “Things started to change slowly,” Immaculée says. “The Hutus would shame Tutsis, creating gossip that would create hatred. The genocide was caused by politics; any war and any genocide starts there. It is a disease for a whole country. Nothing prepared me for what was coming.” After the Hutu government’s president Juvénal Habyarimana’s plane was shot down, the tension between the Hutu and Tutsi tribes ignited a nightmare. “Everything changed overnight,” Immaculée recalls. “My brother woke me up. He and my father said, ‘Someone is going to kill us tonight.’ A friend said it was


Say What!? The languages spoken in Rwanda are French, English, Kiswahili, and Kinyanwanda.

a rumor. Anytime I think about it, I think that we could have been saved. In 1981, Mary said horrible things will happen to our country when she appeared to three teenagers in Kibeho, Rwanda.”

Immaculée believes that Our Lady of Kibeho’s message of violence and hatred in Rwanda foretold the genocide of the Tutsi tribe members. The three teenagers whom she appeared to said that the Virgin Mary begged them to pray and encourage others to pray to prevent a terrible war.

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Immaculée’s father was a prominent figure of the Tutsi tribe in their area and also a director of local Catholic schools. Her father urged her to flee from their home and to the local pastor’s small dwelling; he gave his daughter a rosary before she left.

brothers. Although she had endured trials of suffering, grief, and confusion, she told him, “I forgive you.” “I went through many steps of forgiving,” she admits. “My whole face was twisted in anger. I didn’t like the way I felt. When we’re angry that much, do we truly believe in God? If you believe, He can heal you. I don’t have to carry my anger anymore. God gives us His commandments; they are not a request. Submit first to God; He will explain everything to you.” Immaculée mourned for her family and her fallen neighbors, but a sense of peace has overcome her heart and soul. “I heard God tell me, ‘I gave you your parents as your guardians on Earth.’ My brother died

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23-year-old Immaculée hid in the pastor’s 3-by-4 square foot bathroom with seven other women for 91 days. She often heard Hutu tribe members calling her name and saying, “We know she is around here!” “I never got a chance to get to know the people I was hiding with,” she says. "When we met, we spent three months together. I keep in touch with two of them. When I see them, I wonder, ‘Do you remember?’”

ADVICE FROM IMMACULÉE “Take suffering as a gift. We can accept others as brothers and sisters.” “Take one day at a time. Give your best today.” “Don’t worry about tomorrow; it may never come. See today as a gift.” “Pray for strength.” “People are good; we all have the capacity to change. We only need the right grace.”

“The Creed came to life during the genocide for me,” Immaculée says. “I believed that God would make sure we were defended. God knows the pieces of each person’s heart. I studied English with a French-English dictionary in case I would need it in the future, and I said the rosary each day, 27 rosaries a day and 40 Chaplets of Divine Mercy. From the moment I woke up, I prayed.”

When Immaculée was released from her hiding “Don’t be ashamed of loving God.” place, she learned that her entire family—except “We must teach love and forgiveness.” her brother who was studying abroad—had been slaughtered by Hutu tribe members. Despite her fear and anger, Immaculée prayed for her enemies, too. “The Holy Spirit works in each of us. My heart was open, and I said, ‘Forgive them, Father; they know not what they do.’”

TO FORGIVE IS DIVINE Immaculée is now in her forties and is living an American dream in the United States. She has written six books and travels around the world to share her powerful story and inspirational message of hope, love, prayer, and forgiveness. “Mother Mary says that she will heal your heart. She will help you,” Immaculée explains. “The rosary is the best way to come to God. One time, I was in darkness. I saw my family in light, and my brothers and my parents were in a better place.” After the genocide, Immaculée met the man who had killed her mother and one of her

Immaculée Ilibagiza tells her lifechanging story at the EDW Chapel.


“All are welcome, Catholic Protestant, non-Christian,” Immaculée says. “I think to pray the rosary with people helps you to think about the mysteries and understand God, Jesus, and Mary better.

According to a testimonial from a sixteen-year-old girl, Immaculée’s retreat changed her mind about aborting her unborn child. “I had an appointment to have an abortion, but after the retreat, I decide to keep my child.” “[My experience] was another level of knowing him,” Immaculée says. “It is convenient to love God, but now I really feel it in my heart. No matter what, remember that with God, all things are possible. If I can forgive, anyone can.” WN

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On March 7th starting at 5:00 PM and March 8th starting at 8:00 AM, Immaculée will be at St. Genevieve Catholic Church to provide a two-day retreat. During this time, she will tell her personal story and experiences during the genocide in Rwanda and the steps she took to fight her anger and learn to accept peace into her heart. She will also pray the rosary with those who attend.

To order tickets for this retreat, visit www.Immaculée.com and look under the “Events” tab. Contact Renee Helmer at renee4Immaculée@aol.com or call or text 337-278-9257 for more information on Immaculée and this retreat. To register for this retreat, contact Cathy McLaughlin at cwmc27@gmail.com. No one will leave this retreat the same as when they arrived.

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I want to share it with people and pray together.”

MARCH 2014

shortly after receiving his Master’s degree. He was ready to start living after school, but I don’t think his life was cut short. His work to defend and protect others was an act of love. He worked every day as a purpose of love. If we are truly Christian, we want to be better. I hope in my work I can show people why I believe what I believe. No matter what happens, I have a reason to forgive.”

MAR 7 | SAT | 5PM ST. GENEVIEVE CATHOLIC CHURCH THIBODAUX LOCKPORT

Photo: Brian Waitz


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Photo: submitted

BCA Teachers posed for a group photo at last year's event.

COME TO LEARN, LEARN TO SERVE Bayou Community Academy’s 2nd Annual Building Fund Gala

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n Friday, March 28th, from 6:30 PM to 10:00 PM, the Bayou Community Academy will host its second annual Building Fund Gala at the Warren J. Harang, Jr. Municipal Auditorium.

Located at 800 East 7th Street in Thibodaux, the Bayou Community Academy is a charter school that currently teaches grades pre-kindergarten to 6th grade and plans to add a grade each year up until 8th grade. Its mission is “to educate community servants for the future of our society.” The school places its students in an environment that will “promote a spirit of compassion for others, loyalty within the community, and sacrifice.”

WORK HARD, LEARN HARD Bayou Community Academy is unique in that it is a charter school, which means that it is a publicly funded yet independent school that has been established by administration, teachers, parents, and community groups who share the same vision for this learning center. The curriculum plan for each grade level can be found

Celeste Roberts

at the school’s Website (www.bcacharter.org/curriculum-plan). The curriculum includes Core Knowledge Foundation (aligned with Common Core State Standards), Great Books Foundation (Classic Literature), Singapore Math (sometimes called Primary Mathematics Curriculum), Student Information System (called JPAMs), French program, and much more. Sandy Holloway, the director of the school, has worked tirelessly to promote the Bayou Community Academy to the area. “Our school building is estimated to cost between 14 to 17 million dollars,” she explains. “It has been challenging to promote a larger support base each year, but the parents have been very cooperative and helpful in making Bayou Community Academy better.” Ms. Holloway and the Board of Trustees have high expectations for the students at the school, who are referred to as “scholars.” “As a college preparatory school, [. . .] the mission of BCA is to focus on scholars' achievements,” she says. “We are about learning well and setting high expectations and high standards in the foundation of a safe, orderly, and encouraging school environment. Our academic program is rigorous; however, we are


and contributing citizens, and prepares them for college and career readiness.”

MAR 28 | SAT | 6:30PM-10PM

The school also has multiple clubs to encourage leadership and community within the school: Beta Club, Girls on Track, Girls on the Run, 4-H Club, Chess Club, Choir, Earlyact Club, French Club, and Library Club.

WARREN J. HARANG, JR. AUDITORIUM THIBODAUX

IT TAKES A VILLAGE With plans for a new building and anticipation of land donation to serve 550-600 scholars for the Bayou Community Academy, the faculty and Board of Trustees have kept themselves busy with promoting their school’s mission.

The Bayou Community Academy is seeking as much help as possible in ensuring that its second-annual gala is a success. In addition to purchasing tickets and sharing the information with family and friends, parents and the community may secure silent auction items and sponsorships.

BCA staff members in a photobooth session at last year's event.

Photo: submitted

also interested in character development, which is embedded in our educational environment. Our scholars and professionals and staff come from a rich variety of cultures from throughout Lafourche Parish.” Ms. Holloway is originally from Lafayette and has lived in Thibodaux for the past 37 years. She holds a Masters of Education degree and has 37 years of education experience as a teacher, assistant principal, principal, and supervisor of the Lafourche Parish school system. “InApril of 2011, [the] Bayou Community Academy Board of Trustees and the Lafourche Parish School Board entered into a charter agreement that resulted in the development of BCA (Type 1 Public Charter School),” Ms. Holloway explains. “This charter provides our certified and highly qualified professionals with the opportunity to guide scholars through an enriching and challenging humanities, fine arts, technology, mathematics, science and social studies curriculum. It is designed to prepare scholars for an ever changing future, to be great communicators

Say What!? A Charter School is a publicly funded independent school established by teachers, parents, or community groups under the terms of a charter with a local or national authority.

WHAT NOW? If you would like to enjoy an evening of food, drinks, musical entertainment, and a silent auction, reserve your ticket for the Bayou Community Gala by visiting the school or by visiting Amy’s Country Candles at Rouse’s Epicurean Market at 204 North Canal Boulevard in Thibodaux. Tickets are $25 per person. If you would like to sponsor this gala, visit www.bcacharter.org and fill out the sponsor form. All entries are due by March 14th in order for your business or organization to appear in the gala’s program. Of course, donations are still welcome after this date! WN

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Ms. Holloway believes that the silent auction has been an extraordinary help with the gala. “We will have the silent auction items set up on tables in the auditorium, and you can view the items and make bids on items of your interest. We will have announcements made throughout the evening about the silent auction, and we will have volunteers available to answer any questions you may have that evening. Auction bidding will begin at 6:30 PM and finish at 9:00 PM.”

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“We have had a 5K walk/run in November for the past two years, which both raised $15,000 each,” Ms. Holloway says. “Last year was our first gala, which was very well-received. We raised over $34,000! Guests and supporters had a wonderful time. Local restaurants donated food and drinks. Businesses and the community donated items for the silent auction.”


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Dancers enjoying Swamp Stomp, part of the Jubilee Festival at Nicholls State University

Photo: Misty Leigh McElroy


A

s springtime approaches, Nicholls State University is prepared to kick off the Jubilee Festival, which is a month-and-a-half celebration to raise awareness for the arts and humanities in the area.

Since its inception, almost 90,000 people have attended Jubilee events. This is the 16th year this festival has taken place, and it originated as a 50th anniversary for the university that opened in 1948. Before Jubilee, Nicholls coordinated an event called “Artists and Lectures” that hosted a few events simultaneously, but waned in comparison to what Jubilee has to offer.

CULTURAL PERFORMANCES Angela Hammerli, the former coordinator of Artists and Lectures and the current coordinator of Jubilee, works on planning this series of events for months out of the year. “We decided in 1998 to make a presentation for Nicholls in a new way that was different from a former program that I coordinated,” Hammerli said. “In the early years, we would host a few events at the same time and now, I organize a variety of events. We decided to celebrate Nicholls State University, and at that time I thought it would be a one-time event. But then they told us to keep working to plan the following year’s festival.” One of the most popular events of Jubilee would be the performances by the Singers of United Lands. They are a quartet of international singers who unite in December to begin learning songs from each of their four native countries. This year’s cast is made up of three men and one woman, and they are representing Croatia, Nigeria, Uruguay and Taiwan. “They perform here at Nicholls, but they also attend all of the local elementary schools to sing for the children, whom love to watch them perform,” Hammerli said. “They also talk about their world and their culture.” During the festival, several guest speakers will lead a series of lectures. Most notably, Mrs. Jeanne Murphy will lead the Bonnie

Bourg Lecture Series and will also be the honorary guest speaker at the Women’s History Luncheon and Award Presentation. Murphy is a former collegiate and international athlete and is a retired U.S. Army colonel. She also served as a member of the U.S. Olympic Committee and was in charge of the U.S. delegation to the 2004 Paralympic Games in Athens, Greece. Her presentation in affiliation with the Bonnie Bourg Lecture Series will address students and community members on reasons to not give up in life. “Several opportunities I had in life were the result of taking opportunity and running with it,” Murphy said. “There are challenges in life that you have to stand up for, and I plan to use my own personal experiences to show how beneficial moving forward can be. I hope that my talks can be the catalyst for someone in their own life.”

WHAT TO EXPECT Most of the events are free to the public and held on campus, except for a handful of activities that are clearly denoted on the event’s calendar and brochure. Spanning from March 9th until April 27th, the festival encompasses art, music, and food that is almost exclusively full of Nicholls’ talent. However, Jubilee appeals to all walks of life because of its variety in entertainment. One popular event on the calendar is the sixth annual Swamp Stomp, which is a huge event that epitomizes Cajun culture that surrounds us. This festival offers the best food South Louisiana has to offer, several presentations of this area’s history and development, along with the selling of arts and crafts made by local vendors. There are several theater performances scheduled by the Nicholls Players and the Thibodaux Playhouse. The Nicholls Players are performing the classic thriller The Crucible. Thibodaux Playhouse will have two different performances, one being a child’s play entitled The Aristocats KIDS and the other is Harvey, a very popular theatre comedy that portrays a man’s friendship with his six-foot-tall imaginary rabbit.

WHATNOW

Nicholls State University hosts the month-long Jubilee Festival for the 16th year.

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Stuart Percle

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MARCH 2014

Where The Arts Come Alive


Say What!? Jubilation "Jubilee" Lee is a fictional character, a Marvel Comics superheroine associated with the X-Men, who has a superhuman power to generate "sparkles" out of her hands, consisting of explosive plasma.

32 MARCH 2014

Dr. Carol Britt, the music department head is leading an organ recital that will begin the musical events of Jubilee. The festival will also showcase several student concerts and recitals and faculty member Dr. Valerie Francis will perform with the Nicholls Gospel Choir.

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“The Jubilee Festival gives us so much more exposure,” Britt said. “Even though our calendar is online and is also advertised by University Relations, Jubilee further spreads word of our performances to those who might have not heard yet. Jubilee has an impact on the whole University because it brings so many people to our campus for different events, but in particular, the music department.” Another large component of the festival is the eighth annual research week that is presented by the university’s colleges, which cover an assortment of topics. There will also be a trio of film screenings that will explore the struggle behind the road to civil rights. The three documentaries are part of the Bridging Cultures Initiative of the National Endowment for the Humanities. In a similar way, the City of Thibodaux and Thibodaux Main Street are sponsoring “Boogie on the Bayou,” which is also a free event. Located in Downtown Thibodaux, local artists and authors will be selling their works as Good Feelings performs.

WHAT NOW? Considering these events have been planned months in advance, they are subject to possible change. So before you make the effort to an attend any of the events, be sure to check the Jubilee Festival page that can be accessed through nicholls.edu for any alterations made to the schedule. Talbot Hall, the site of the majority of the music performances on campus is handicap accessible, so do not allow fear of entrance from interfering with an evening of incredible performances. Interested parties should not be concerned with campus parking because all they need to do is register their vehicle with parking services which is located in Calecas Hall. All information pertaining to Jubilee Festival can be found at www.nicholls.edu/jubilee/. Brochures lined with the calendar of events and emblazoned with cover artwork from former Nicholls graduate Ellen McCord can be found around campus. This is the third consecutive year that McCord’s art graces the cover of the festival’s brochure. This unofficial summary does not list all of the scheduled events, so please consult the Jubilee Festival website and calendar to find all the events you and your family are interested in. What now? Enjoy the 2014 Jubilee Festival! WN

Angela Hammerli, Coordinator of Jubilee Festival

Photo: Jacob Jennings


JUBILEE'S FESTIVITIES

MONDAY, MARCH 10

RESEARCH WEEK: POSTER VIEWING Bollinger Memorial Student Union 8:00 AM – 4:30 PM

MONDAY, MARCH 10

RESEARCH WEEK: COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES BROWN BAG SPEAKER SERIES Bollinger Memorial Student Union 10:45 AM – 1:30 PM

MONDAY, MARCH 10

LAFOURCHE HERITAGE SOCIETY PRESENTATION Ellender Memorial Library 6:30 PM

TUESDAY, MARCH 11

RESEARCH WEEK: POSTER VIEWING AND JUDGING Bollinger Memorial Student Union 8:00 AM – 4:30 PM, Judging from 2:00 PM – 4:00 PM

TUESDAY, MARCH 11

RESEARCH WEEK: CHEF JOHN FOLSE CULINARY INSTITUTE COOKING DEMONSTRATIONS Carmel Inn, Thibodaux 9:00 AM – 4:00 PM

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 12

RESEARCH WEEK: COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION BROWN BAG SPEAKER SERIES 209 Powell Hall 11:30 AM – 1:30 PM

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 12

RESEARCH WEEK: STUDENT RECEPTION Bollinger Memorial Student Union 4:30 PM – 5:30 PM

THURSDAY, MARCH 13

RESEARCH WEEK: COLLEGE OF NURSING AND ALLIED HEALTH SCIENCES BROWN BAG SPEAKER SERIES 152 Ayo Hall 8:30 AM – 9:45 AM

THURSDAY, MARCH 13

RESEARCH WEEK: COLLEGE OF EDUCATION BROWN BAG SPEAKER SERIES 125 Polk Hall Noon – 1:15 PM

FRIDAY, MARCH 14

RESEARCH WEEK: ELLENDER MEMORIAL LIBRARY AND UNIVERSITY COLLEGE BROWN BAG SPEAKER SERIES Ellender Memorial Library Noon – 2:35 PM

MONDAY, MARCH 17 TUESDAY, MARCH 18 WEDNESDAY, MARCH 19 THURSDAY, MARCH 20

SINGERS OF UNITED LANDS Bollinger Memorial Student Union 9:40 AM, 10:45 AM, 11:50 AM, 12:15 PM, 1:35 PM

TUESDAY, MARCH 18

LECTURE: “POVERTY POINT: BAKED CLAY OBJECTS AND THEIR SYMBOLISM” Fletcher Technical Community College Noon

TUESDAY, MARCH 18 MONDAY, MARCH 31

SENIOR RECITAL Talbot Hall, Danos Theater 7:30 PM

THURSDAY, MARCH 20

LOUISIANA SWAMP STOMP FESTIVAL

THURSDAY, MARCH 20

LOUISIANA SWAMP STOMP FESTIVAL: LECTURE AND CONCERT SERIES Lecture - Bollinger Memorial Student Union – 10:30 AM Free concert and dance lessons – Bollinger Memorial Student Union – 11:30 AM

THURSDAY, MARCH 20

RELATE TO FORGIVENESS Bollinger Memorial Student Union 7:00 PM

FRIDAY, MARCH 21

SINGERS OF UNITED LANDS W.S. Lafargue Elementary School – 9:30 AM Bollinger Memorial Student Union – 10:45 AM Thibodaux Elementary School – 12:15 PM, 1:15 PM, and 2:15 PM

FRIDAY, MARCH 21

LOUISIANA SWAMP STOMP FESTIVAL: TRESORS DU BAYOU EDUCATION PROGRAM John L. Guidry Stadium 8:30 AM – 2:20 PM

SATURDAY, MARCH 22

JAMBALAYA WRITERS’ CONFERENCE AND BOOK FAIR TERREBONNE PARISH MAIN LIBRARY 8:30 AM – 5:00 PM $35 per person

SATURDAY, MARCH 22

LOUISIANA SWAMP STOMP FESTIVAL: 5K CAN-CAN AND 1-MILE WHITE BOOT WADDLE John L. Guidry Stadium 8:30 AM $20-$30 per person

SATURDAY, MARCH 22

FAMILY FUN DAY AND JUMBO GUMBO & BAYOU BEST COOK-OFF John L. Guidry Stadium 8:30 AM – 10:30 PM $10 daily or $25 for the weekend | Free for Children 12 and under

SUNDAY, MARCH 23

CAJUN FAIS-DO-DO DAY John L. Guidry Stadium 10:00 AM – 6:00 PM $10 daily or $25 for the weekend | Free for Children 12 and under

TUESDAY, MARCH 25

BONNIE BOURG LECTURE SERIES Peltier Auditorium 10:30 AM

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 26

LECTURE: “THE DREHER-LEBOEUF AFFAIR” St. Mary Parish Library 5:30 PM

FRIDAY, MARCH 28

ARTS WALK AND BOOGIE ON THE BAYOU Downtown Thibodaux 3:00 PM – 10:00 PM

FOR EVENTS HELD IN APRIL FOR THE JUBILEE FESTIVAL, LOOK FOR APRIL’S ISSUE OF WHAT NOW MAGAZINE! FOR MORE INFORMATION OR TO SUBMIT YOUR EVENTS, GO TO WHATNOWMAG.COM

33 WHATNOW

FACULTY RECITAL St. John’s Episcopal Church, Thibodaux 3:00 PM

NICHOLLS PLAYERS PRESENT THE CRUCIBLE Talbot Hall, Danos Theater 7:00 PM $10 per ticket/ $5 for NSU Students

FRIDAY, MARCH 21

LOUISIANA SWAMP STOMP FESTIVAL: DOWN THE BAYOU BLOCK PARTY John L. Guidry Stadium 3:30 PM – 10:30 PM $10 daily or $25 for the weekend | Free for Children 12 and under

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SUNDAY, MARCH 9

THURSDAY, MARCH 13 FRIDAY, MARCH 14 SATURDAY, MARCH 15 SUNDAY, MARCH 16

MARCH 2014

ONGOING EXHIBIT

“A HISTORY OF VALENTINE, LOUISIANA: SUGAR PLANTATION AND PULP AND PAPER MILL” Ellender Memorial Library Monday-Friday 8:00 AM – 4:30 PM


34 MARCH 2014

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WHAT NOW? MEET PAUL LABAT Paul Labat of Houma

Celeste Roberts

Photo: Brian Waitz


W

hen it comes to serving his community and city that he loves, Paul Labat is no stranger to Houma natives. His involvement with Terrebonne Parish Government, Terrebonne General Medical Center, and Le Petit Theater De Terrebonne, along with numerous other events and fundraisers has given him the opportunity to be involved and mingle with other people who give back to their community. What now? Meet Paul Labat.

WHERE ARE YOU FROM?

Terrebonne Parish. This parish goes four generations back in my family. I was born in Houma, and my parents moved to Montegut while I was in school. I then moved back to Houma when I was older.

DO YOU HAVE ANY SIBLINGS?

I have two brothers: one lives in Thibodaux, one lives in Bayou Blue.

DO YOU HAVE ANY MEMORIES OF YOUR PARENTS THAT YOU TREASURE?

Not one in particular, but they were great parents. Both of them were wonderful. They were both supportive of everything I did.

WHERE DID YOU GO TO SCHOOL?

I went to Montegut Elementary, South Terrebonne, Nicholls, and then LSU.

WHAT DID YOU STUDY IN COLLEGE?

Journalism. I do write a lot, so that has been very important to me.

WHAT DID YOU DO FRESH OUT OF COLLEGE?

My first job was with the Terrebonne Parish government. I worked in the public works department. It was just a starter thing, but they promoted me. I kept telling myself, “I’m going to leave, I’m going to leave,” but I never did. So I worked there for 38 years. You just get to that point where you know it’s time to move on and face new challenges.

WOW, YOU’VE BEEN BUSY! WHAT DO YOU DO TO RELAX?

Garden. I love to garden. Plants listen to you, you make them grow, and they don’t talk back. I consider this recent freeze God’s way of saying, “It’s time to landscape!” I also like goldfish in my ponds because they can pretty much take care of themselves.

WHAT PLANTS DO YOU LIKE TO GROW?

All kinds. I think it’s good to change it up, although I will probably always have some orchids.

Photo: Brian Waitz

WHAT DID YOU LIKE ABOUT WORKING FOR THE PARISH GOVERNMENT?

I liked working with the public a lot; I found that rewarding. I liked helping people and still do. You have to have the right attitude, a positive attitude. Some workers say, “Oh, I don’t want to deal with these complaining people!” They aren’t bad people. Most of them just have a problem, and they want you to help solve it. Not everyone can communicate very well. Most people just want an explanation. You have to be patient.

DID YOU HAVE ANY HOBBIES OR ACTIVITIES YOU WERE INVOLVED IN WHILE YOU WERE WITH THE PARISH GOVERNMENT? Oh, yeah, I have always been involved in things. I love to garden. My grandmother was a big gardener, so my brothers and I learned a lot from her. I got involved in the community theater with Le Petit Theatre de Terrebonne. I have been involved with it and on the board for 29 years. I’ve been president for four years. I’ve been and still am involved with the Terrebonne Historical & Cultural Society. When the parish government started a credit union, I got involved with that. I was president of it for a long time. I’m currently president of La Terre Federal Credit Union, which is a credit union

MARCH 2014

Celeste Roberts interviews Paul Labat at his home.

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WHATNOW

35


Say What!? There are more than 25,000 documented species of orchid, and scientists are finding more every day.

for industrial companies, TGMC, several small businesses and parish government. I have been involved with the Leadership Terrebonne Program as well.

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SO, WHAT DO YOU DO PROFESSIONALLY NOW?

I retired from the parish government in 2010,

and I started working part-time at Terrebonne General Medical Center in 2011. It’s great. The employees are kind, giving, and concerned about their charges. The first few months were just trying to get to know where things were. I helped initiate The Foundation for TGMC, but have been working on many other projects that are vital to the administration of the medical center.

WHAT IS THE MOST REWARDING PART OF GRANT WRITING?

Getting the grants! Helping an agency is great; that is the whole point. You have

to believe that what you’re writing for is a good cause. I’ve sat on panels where we gave money away. I’ve been on the United Way board since the early 1980s. Unfortunately, sometimes you don’t have the money to give away. You have to get accustomed to the fact that you’ll have to tell people, “No.” I don’t think any charitable organization will ever have enough funds to help all of the people they would like to help. People think grant writing is very difficult, but it’s fine. You just have to fill the application out and write the narrative. It’s writing skills; that’s basically what it is. You have to dig up the information and work with the technical people to help you write the technical side of the grant.

MARCH 2014

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WHAT IS THE HOSPITAL’S FOUNDATION?

WHATNOW

It really got started in 2012. We try to help provide funds for projects on the TGMC Campus that aren’t necessarily covered by the budget. The board tries to grant money for procedures, programs, and equipment, like a cardiovascular machine the Foundation just helped fund. It’s great to know that your contribution can help people have a longer and better life.

WHAT HAS BEEN A PARTICULARLY HEARTWARMING STORY WITH GRANTS FOR YOU?

I would say that this cardiovascular machine for the hospital is fantastic. If we can save lives and raise money for more projects like this, I can’t think of anything that is much more rewarding than that, saving someone’s life. We want to start getting some funds for free diabetes testing—like people can currently go in for cancer screenings. If you have a family history of diabetes, you should get checked. People don’t tend to ask their doctors about that.

WHAT HAS BEEN YOUR FAVORITE ASPECT OF LIVING IN TERREBONNE PARISH?

What now? Meet Paul Labat.

Photo: Brian Photo: Waitz

Knowing everybody. Looking at people and knowing who their family is. The weather is nice, too; I love being able to wear shorts and just short sleeves! Terrebonne is going to continue to grow quite a bit. A bunch of people are involved in the Morgana levee plan, and that is going to help so much. Fewer people will move away. People have been tired of getting flooded. Our


SO YOU DON’T THINK YOU COULD SURVIVE IN THE NORTHERN STATES?

Oh, no. I like to visit them. I was in New York for Thanksgiving, and enjoyed it because I knew was going to be there for only three days! It is too cold .

HAVE YOU EVER CONSIDERED OTHER CAREERS OR PATHS?

At one time I wanted to be an attorney, but I gave that idea up really quick.

Accept life as it comes; don’t say you need the top level right away. It’s like writers who get rejected a bunch of times and then get accepted; you can appreciate it more. You learn to work to earn things. Things all come together.

DO YOU HAVE ANY PARTICULAR SIGHTS YOU LIKE TO SEE WHILE TRAVELING?

Restaurants are always good. The language doesn’t matter—you can kind of explain the food. I was in Paris one time, and I asked the waiter about a menu item. He kept saying, “Insides.” I looked in the dictionary when I got back to the hotel, and I was eating kidneys. I thought they were mushrooms!

DO YOU HAVE A PHILOSOPHY ON LIFE THAT YOU THINK OTHERS WOULD BENEFIT FROM?

It’s an old one—“Treat others like you’d like to be treated.” If you do that, you’ll get along with anybody. At my jobs, you learn to smile and treat people kindly. The people I dealt with were usually pleasant once I talked to them. WN

37 WHATNOW

I love watching the audience and their reactions. That’s one board I will likely never get off of. People have been on the board for years. We love it. I Just started getting on stage in the last 8 or 9 years. I was in the most recent play, Beau Jest, we had our first interracial couple. No one has said anything at all since they’ve seen it. It shows a wonderful sense of acceptance in our social behavior.

DO YOU HAVE ANY ADVICE YOU’D LIKE TO OFFER TO YOUNG PEOPLE?

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WHAT ABOUT LE PETIT THEATRE DE TERREBONNE? HOW HAS THAT BEEN?

DO YOU LIKE TO TRAVEL?

Oh, yes. I’ve been to many places: I’ve been to New York, Los Angeles, Palm Springs, Seattle, Portland, San Francisco, Florida… Abroad, I have been to Paris, Venice, Mexico, Canada, and the Greek isles. I’d like to travel to more countries.

MARCH 2014

economy is booming, and the unemployment rate is so low. I read somewhere years ago that more people from Louisiana who move away return to their home state than in any other state. You can go other places, and people won’t even say hello. Here in Houma, you can walk to a store or a post office and start talking to a total stranger and try to find that common interest. It makes a huge difference in your everyday life. It’s probably one of the reasons why the crime here is so low.


38 MARCH 2014

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Items for sale at a previous Main Street Market and Arts & Crafts Show.

DOWN ON MAIN STREET

The Town of Lockport hosts their annual Main Street Market and Arts & Crafts Show

A

fter experiencing the “snowmageddon” and “polar vortex”, don’t you look forward to traditional spring activities in Louisiana? Unpacking the capris and straw hats, slipping on the flip flops and finding the nearest festival to soak up some sun, show some local support and take in all the spring scenery the bayous have to offer…the Lockport Main Street Market and Arts and Craft Show is the perfect place to do so! Bayouside Park is located in the Historic District of Lockport founded in 1835 and it is right around the corner from the Bayou Lafourche Folklife and Heritage Museum itself.

THE SCENE The Lockport Main Street Market Arts and Craft Show will feature local artists and craftsmen with the proceeds going to the Bayou Lafourche Folklife and Heritage Museum. Have you visited the Bayou Lafourche Folklife and Heritage Museum lately? If you haven’t, you are missing out!

Photo: submiutted

Kassie Barrancotto

After almost 10 years of initially being conceptualized, the Bayou Lafourche Folklife and Heritage museum took shape with the help of countless volunteer hours and other support from the community and area businesses and organizations such as Lafourche Heritage Society. Located in the former Louisiana Power and Light Building on Main Street, the museum opened its doors in 2001. It is a tribute to the days gone by and takes you as far back as 1910 which is actually the year the building was built as a bank. It now has the honor of being on the National Register of Historic Places. Through the end of this summer “Vietnam: The Bayou Experience” is on display. “Lots of people do not even realize this historic part of Lockport exists. Since the highway was re-routed and a new bridge was built over the canal in the 50s, people do not take the time to notice this part of Lockport,” explains Marge Barker, co-founder of the museum.


The smell of the delicious food wafts all the way down the bayou. The Museum itself prepares and sells the food. Thanks to numerous volunteers visitors have their choice of delicious menu items including roast beef sandwiches, hamburgers, French fries, and desserts. The most popular items are the beignets!

“When we first started this event we figured we would serve beignets in the morning before we start the hamburgers and such,” explains Marge. “Boy, were we wrong. People want their beignets all day! They Local artist and craftsmen will have booths quickly became the most popular food set up for you to peruse down Main Street item sold throughout the day. We even looking for good bargains, delicious food, have people who eat them for breakfast, and seeing old friends. The exhibits are shop the booths, eat lunch, and then take set up along a cement walkway that winds more beignets home. We sometimes make its way through the park allowing visitors up to three batches throughout the day.” to have a suitable place to walk regardless of the conditions of the grounds. There

THE ARTS AND CRAFTS

Lockport, founded in 1835, traces its history to Jacques Lamotte, who in 1790 owned a large tract of land along Bayou Lafourche.

I have a feeling the beignets alone are worth the trip down the bayou.

WHAT NOW The Lockport Main Street Market Arts and Craft Show is located in Bayouside Park in Lockport on Saturday March 15 from 9:00 AM to 4:00 PM. For more information you can email lockportmainstreetmarket@ hotmail.com. Hope to see you down the bayou for some good food and fun! WN

MAR 15 | SAT | 9AM-4PM BAYOUSIDE PARK LOCKPORT

Event goers enjoyed last year's Main Street Market and Arts & Crafts Show.

Photo: submitted

39 WHATNOW

THE FOOD

Say What!?

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“We like to think the same eagles and pelicans come back at the same time each year. The pelicans and eagles like to perch themselves on the powerline poles. I guess they have a good range and scope from up there to find food,” says Marge, “It is such a pleasant view when walking in the park.”

will also be some live demonstrations including artists painting their works and artists painting faces - which is always a popular attraction.

MARCH 2014

The Arts and Craft Show itself dates back 15 years and was initially sponsored by the Lockport Beautification Alliance, through the years the Bayou Lafourche Folklife and Heritage Museum became the sole sponsor. The show will be held in Bayouside Park on Canal Street. And who knows, you may even spot a pelican or eagle scoping the bayou and the canals for fish, their favorite fare!


House to Home PREPARING TO SELL

Niki Landry

W

hen planning to sell a home, it is normal for homeowners to consider what upgrades can be done to effectively raise the value of their home and entice buyers. Not all renovations are created equal. Many times remodel costs cannot be recouped in the final sale of a home, therefore, owners must choose wisely on where and how to spend their money. Your decisions can affect the success of a timely and profitable sale.

40 MARCH 2014

Starting early is one of the best things you can do for the future sale of your home. Oftentimes, homeowners know well in advance that their current home is only temporary. This allows you time to locate and remedy the problem areas in your home. The more time you have to plan, the better it will be on your budget and stress level, plus the added bonus that you can enjoy the upgrades before you sell.

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Another important step that many people bypass is research. The Internet if full of professionals giving free advice on every topic you could imagine. Use this endless source of information to inspire, plan, and budget your projects. It can give you ideas on what paint colors are good for selling, how to stage your home, and things to avoid. Learning what buyers want, especially in your market, will allow you to make well-informed decisions, and the whole process will go much smoother. Get a second opinion. Consulting with a local architect, designer, or real estate agent will give you an honest opinion on what impression your home will give to potential buyers. Hiring a professional for a walk through can offer valuable insight that will outweigh the costs associated with the consult. It will allow you to save time and money on projects that may not be worth the effort. The exterior of your home gives buyers their first impression of your home; therefore, it is the most important. Ensure that the overall look of your exterior entices buyers. The easiest and least expensive fix is to clean and trim your façade. A manicured lawn and well-groomed landscape will give the impression that they are easy to maintain and effortless. Cleaning windows, porches, gutters, and pressure washing can go a long way in increasing the perceived value of your home. To take it a step further, change exterior lighting, paint the entrance door, add container plants, and house numbers for relatively little cost. Minor improvements can sometimes have a big impact. Complete overhauls quickly become expensive, and your investment may not be recovered when you sell. Focusing on small changes can refresh your interior at a much lower cost. Realizing your homes weaknesses is just as important as highlighting its benefits. Locate the eyesores and work toward replacing them with clean and simple upgrades. For example, changing out hardware and cabinet door fronts can drastically change the look of a dated kitchen or bathroom without incurring the costs of a major renovation. Also, painting, especially trim and doors, can easily upgrade the overall look of your home. Chipped, dirty, or dull paint can be a deterrent, and make your home feel unwelcoming. For many buyers, it is hard to see past what’s right in front of them; so showcasing your home in it’s best light will benefit you and your investment when it comes time to sell. WN


Health & Wellness GET BACK ON THE BANDWAGON

TRY TO STAY AWAY FROM THE ALL-ORNOTHING APPROACH. If you slip and eat cake or skip a workout, don’t beat yourself up! Put the past behind you and get back on track.

CLEAN OUT YOUR PANTRY! If there is anything in your pantry or refrigerator that is unhealthy, throw it out. You don’t need the extra temptation!

PLAN AHEAD! Take some time out of your weekend to plan your meals and your workouts. Also, be sure to carry healthy snacks with you at all times, such as almonds, carrot sticks, fruit, or wheat crackers.

BE SELFISH! It can be hard to fit exercise in your schedule, especially with work, kids, and life getting in the way. It is okay to be selfish sometimes to get your workouts in, even if it’s only 15 minutes! Schedule it into your busy life as if it were an important meeting with yourself.

DO IT NOW. Don’t wait until after Mardi Gras…then after Easter…then after Cinco de Mayo, Memorial Day, and Fourth of July. Do it now and keep your consistency. There will always be an event that gets in the way. Don’t let it!

KEEP REMINDING YOURSELF OF WHAT YOUR GOALS ARE. Post them up so you can see them every day. Seeing this on a daily basis will increase your chances of being successful! For more information on wellness consulting or exercise classes, please contact me at ktoups@wellwithfusion.com. WN

41 WHATNOW

We live in South Louisiana, so telling yourself that you'll never eat fried catfish or seafood gumbo again is just not going to happen!

This is tough to overcome! Some things you can do to make yourself feel better and get back on track are: drink at least 64 ounces of water a day, eat clean foods, exercise, and get some sleep! Doing these things will help rid your body of nasty toxins, and will make you feel better after only a couple of days!

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RE-WRITE YOUR GOALS DOWN AND MAKE SURE THAT THEY ARE REALISTIC.

HAVE YOU GONE ON AN EATING BINGE LATELY?

MARCH 2014

H

ave your New Year’s resolutions already gone down the drain? Did you set a goal to lose weight or eat healthier but already threw in the towel? You are not alone! According to research, only 8% of people keep their resolutions for the whole year. You can be one of those who actually achieve their goals! See below on how to get back on the bandwagon!

Katherine Toups


Up In Your Business JUST SAY “NO” TO BUSINESS CARDS. BE 3-D.

Laura Valenti

A

means to create conversation. A branding tool. A go-to for follow up. The business card is a marketing tool that we are all advised to never leave home without. I cynically urge you: please leave them at home.

42

In the past month I’ve gone to four networking functions and speaking engagements. At each of them, at least two people gave me their business cards. And they are now somewhere – lost in the Bermuda Triangle - never to be found.

MARCH 2014

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They get lost in my purse (and become bulky in men’s wallets). This should be reason alone to not have business cards. However, so many business professionals insist on giving them to you because their company printed them by the thousands. Literally, to the point of ceasing conversation or being distracted as they pull it from their own wallets, giving the gift of a business card just to transfer it to you to take up space is like giving a fruitcake at Christmas. Business card holders to organize the madness? Yep: I have several - never to be browsed through or referred to because in the real world we have people to talk to and emails to send. A small 3x2 piece of cardboard should not brand you; you should brand yourself. We are told to use slogans, pops of color, thicker card stock, unique edges, and a unique layout on these little “miracle workers.” But if you can’t back up what you are ascertaining about yourself, or have the ability to create meaningful conversation without the nifty “here’s my business card – see – now let’s chat,” then this card isn’t going to do it for you. YOU are what is memorable in a conversation. YOU are responsible for selling yourself. Many say that business cards stand out, among the clutter of emails and text messages, because emails and text messages are too abundant. Isn’t the point of a business card to remind you of a person’s email address and phone number? Why not just save the contact in your phone, text yourself a note or set a calendar function to follow up? Think about it and ask yourself, “Why add another layer in your already busy week to what you have to do anyway: send an email and follow up?” Instead of business cards, think about how you can be effective without the cardboard. The purpose of a business card was to create conversation, brand yourself, and give means for following up. However, we have moved to a digital era with purpose, need, demand and intention. Just say “no” to business cards and personally take on the responsibility of following up, networking to create future business, and use your personal selling skills to both sell yourself and make the conversation memorable. Ditch the cardboard. Laura Valenti is an opinionated marketing professor and Jill-ofall-trades. She finds time to write about and teach workshops on personal selling and marketing skills though her nonprofit organization, SHE-Selling: Selling Her Everyday. For more information, go to www.SHE-Selling.com.WN


One Tank Trip STAYING LOCAL—EXPERIENCE THIBODAUX

After our tasting, it was time do lunch, and we decided on Weeping Willow Café at 704 3rd Street. This gem of a place serves fresh-made bakery products, breakfast, and lunch, specialty sandwiches on fresh-baked bread, homemade soups, various coffees, etc. If you haven’t been there, you need to. Our last stop during our outing was Old Estate Gallery. I adore this place. Owner Jerome Boudreaux has an eye for antiques and unique gifts. His framing of art is off the charts. Drop in and tell Jerome that I sent you. Until next month, happy travels! WN

43 WHATNOW

The first product produced by the distillery was Oryza Vodka, using locally-grown long grain rice. Rougaroux Full Moon—a dark, sipping rum—and Rougaroux Sugar Shine—a light rum, similar to moonshine—came next. Made from raw sugar from the Lafourche Sugar Mill, the two rums are truly a Louisiana product. The distillery has since added a third rum—13 Pennies Praline Rum, which is flavored with toasted pecans, local craft-made cane syrup, and Madagascar vanilla beans. Donner-Peltier Distillers has also

The Tasting Room is open from 9:00 AM – to 6:00 PM, Monday – Friday and noon – 6:00 PM on Saturday. Tours are Monday – Saturday, starting at 4:00 PM or by appointment for larger groups.

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Lance Ledet and Lisa Ray joined me on this jaunt. Our original one-tank trip was another trip to NOLA, but with the freezing weather we had at the end of February, we decided to stay close to home. So, we visited local attractions and several businesses. Our first stop was Donner-Peltier Distillers, founded and owned by Dr. Tom Donner and his wife Beth and Dr. Henry Peltier and his wife Jennifer. Located at 1635 St. Patrick Hwy in Thibodaux, the craft distillery opened in the fall of 2012. Tom Donner happened to be there when we arrived, so we were pleased to have him give us a personal tour of his brain-child.

added a “sister” product to Oryza Vodka—Oryza Gin. Made from the same base as the vodka, the Louisiana-inspired gin is handcrafted in small batches using eleven botanicals: Juniper, Satsuma, Lavender, Oris Root, Cantaloupe, Coriander, Pink Peppercorn, Angelica Root, Paradise Seed, Orange Peel, and Lemon Peel— distinctly citrus and uniquely Louisiana. The distillery’s newest product is the first aged whiskey to be legally distilled in Louisiana since Prohibition, LA 1 Whiskey. LA 1 contains corn for body, rye for spice, barley for balance, and local rice for sweetness. The first and second batches have already sold out. If you want a bottle of the third batch, you need to get on their email list.

MARCH 2014

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appy Mardi Gras, y’all! It’s hard to believe that it is already March—where did January and February go? If you live in the Thibodaux/Houma area, this month’s onetank trip won’t even take a whole tank. In fact, it won’t even take a half of a tank!

Ginger Gaubert


The Page Turner BLOOD, BONES, AND BUTTER: THE INADVERTENT EDUCATION OF A RELUCTANT CHEF

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I wrote a book in a way that I would like more people to write books,” Ms. Hamilton said. “I’m not afraid of the real truth. There is nothing you can tell me about yourself that is going to make me clutch my pearls.”

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I haven’t read many chef memoirs. I’m not much of a cook, and I don’t know anything about the hustle-bustle chaos of restaurant life other than what I’ve seen on Iron Chef and Food Network. But this book proves that even if you are like me, uninformed about this kind of life - reading a memoir as good as this one can welcome you wholeheartedly into uncharted territory and give you juicy peeks behind the scenes without making you feel like you’re out of your element.

Hamilton is a red-blooded woman who grew up in a loving family that eventually fell apart like many do. She forged her way into the competitive New York culinary scene by her own sweat and imagination, learning through years of experience in various kinds of kitchens across the country. This memoir by Chef Gabrielle Hamilton, owner of Prune Restaurant in New York City, provides a lush reading experience with details to satisfy even the pickiest of reading palettes. Hamilton’s childhood, culinary experience, and family life are written with an honest and intimate approach, admitting that Hamilton’s path to success involved the culmination of many years of discovering herself and her reluctant talents. Through

Jasmine Richard Social media Librarian many kitchens, her story encompasses the sour and candied fruits of labor, detailing savory childhood hopes, salty teenage angst, and even pickled drug-fueled stints. Her passion shined through in the making of such things as her father’s spitroasted lamb and her love of hands-on, simple preparations of edibles creating an experience to be enjoyed with a nice glass of wine, a few laughs, and a gasp. Favorite parts: learning how to kill a chicken and finding your fifteen year old lobsters drowned in the good intentions of smokeaddled youth. Hamilton’s MFA in creative writing is revealed in her quality of style. Don’t pass up a good reading experience because of the rumor it may be adapted to the big screen in the future. WN

Lights! Camera! Action! REVIEW OF THE FILM 12 YEARS A SLAVE

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hile there have been an abundance of holocaust movies in the past twenty years, Hollywood has, historically, mostly avoided depictions of our own dark, shadowed past of slavery. When Hollywood has chosen to tackle the difficult subject, the films too often end up on the side of being apologetic (Gone with the Wind), melodramatic (The Color Purple), or heavy-handed (Amistad). Even the best attempt, the television miniseries Roots, seems hopelessly dated thirty years after its debut. And while Quentin Tarantino’s Django Unchained may well go down as having some of the most interesting and compelling things to say about slavery ever attempted, realism was not its forte--nor its intention. That void has now been filled by the most unexpected of sources: the British filmmaker Steve McQueen and his film, 12 Years a Slave. In only his third feature film McQueen manages a near homerun in a film that is a brutally honest, brutally realistic depiction of slavery. The acting— both Chiwetel Ejiofor and Lupita Nyong’o deserve the Oscars they are very likely to win—and the cinematography are both

sublime. Shot in Louisiana, 12 Years a Slave manages to embody the early 19th century with a sense of realism rarely achieved in Hollywood. But what really stands out is McQueen’s restraint. The plot sounds like perfect fodder for a Hollywood cheese machine. Based on a 19th-century autobiography, the film tells the story of Solomon Northup, an upper middle-class, African-American musician living in Saratoga, New York. Northup is abducted while traveling to a gig in Washington D.C., is smuggled south, and cast into a life of slavery before a remarkable set of circumstances set him free after twelve brutal years. It sounds like a Disney movie. It isn’t. The film’s power comes from its restraint. McQueen’s camera, and his plot, never preaches, never panders, never over-plays. It doesn’t try to hit you over the head with struggle, it simply embodies it. It is seen in the restraint Solomon must use as he garners favor by using his education to stand out from other workers, while always hiding the fact that he is educated. By the end of the film, we haven’t just seen Solomon’s plight, we feel torn apart by it.

Dr. Todd Kennedy McQueen’s restraint is even more far-reaching, however. He avoids the easy pitfalls Hollywood so easily falls into, such as the “nice master” versus the “evil master” dichotomy. Solomon’s first owner is certainly a far more sympathetic figure than the second, but sympathetic he is not. Both men are complex, and the film does not attempt to over-analyze them. He shows us things that might surprise many non-history majors—a black plantation wife, a black man mingling with high society in New York, a white southerner who is an abolitionist—but he neither exploits nor glosses over these moments. He just shows them as they are—part of a complex, horrible world that should be both completely foreign and wholly familiar to every southerner in the audience. And it is the only world most slaves ever knew. Slavery, and the Civil War it helped to bring upon, is the historical event that American identity repeatedly has to grapple with. It defines who we are as a people. And it may be for that very reason that Hollywood has so often messed up its attempts to depict it. Sometimes it takes a foreigner. And that foreigner is apparently Steve McQueen. WN


The Dish Rag DOWN DA BAYOU DINING

Chas Guidry

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Jinsan Sushi is the perfect example of a small town restaurant filling an otherwise empty role in the area. With its recent expansion to include hibachi, Jinsan looks and eats much like any other Japanese restaurant, which is exactly what locals want. Sushi and hibachi are of the fun and casual variety of dining that customers shouldn't have to travel well out of their way to enjoy. Jinsan is also making it easier to convert people who normally swear off raw fish because it’s now such a common convenience rather than a rare occurrence. Aside from sushi, the appetizers are also great, especially the gyoza (pork dumplings.) La Casa also has a presence down the bayou when it comes to Mexican cuisine. Alternatives have sprung up in recent years, though, including the Los Potosinos taco truck that is always parked outside the El Primo Mexican grocery on the bayou side in Cut Off. They all serve delicious meals to contain your taco cravings when down the bayou.

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These restaurants barely scrape the surface of South Lafourche’s dining scene. And while I’ll occasionally miss some of my Thibodaux favorites, moving has only reaffirmed my assertion that we’re surrounded by great food.

Across the bayou is a delicious snack I wouldn’t think to order anywhere else. D&D Drive-In waits for you as you exit the LA 1 overpass into Larose. There's nothing fancy about the place or

For more information about the best food in Terrebonne and Lafourche, check out my blog Nomsola at nomsola.com and follow me on Facebook and Instagram by searching "Nomsola." WN

MARCH 2014

WHATNOW

Evidence of this can be found as soon as you arrive in Larose in the form of a tiny shack called Harry’s Poboys. I hear Harry's serves plenty of great food, but I wouldn't know because ordering anything other than the roast beef poboy is unthinkable. Harry's roast beef is probably the best around, not just down the bayou but in all of Lafourche, Terrebonne, and maybe anywhere. Obviously, this is a controversial statement, as even in the area some argue other roast beef poboys like the ones served at the Chill Out in Cut Off are better. While that one is certainly tasty, Harry's roast beef has an almost legendary reputation for a reason. The perfectly dark gravy oozes from the crusty bread dissolving into a sinfully delicious and messy meal that everyone should experience at least once.

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ecently, my wife and I moved back down the bayou to Cut Off from Thibodaux. What I’ll miss most after living in Thibodaux for eight years is the food. I’ve already raved about Weeping Willow and the great Mexican restaurants, but we also loved the local sushi joint Geaux Fish, burgers and roast beef from Frostop, fine dining at Fremin’s, and more. Fortunately, South Lafourche isn’t the one horse town some expect it to be. There’s great food down here.

its signature hotdogs. In fact, it's really the chili you're here for as the bun and dog are as plain as they come, all the better to enjoy the meaty chili. While it will never surpass the local legend status of the old Jet Drive-In’s chili, it’s a great snack or meal alongside a malt or cherry Coke.


Bottoms Up LUCK O’ THE IRISH WHISKEY

J 46 MARCH 2014

ust when you thought you’d survived all the Mardi Gras festivities and could take a break, here comes St. Patrick’s Day. Now green beer is okay if you’re into that kind of thing but I say if you want to drink to the Irish don’t do it with food coloring. Do it with whiskey! There are many excellent Irish whiskeys available these days. The two brands that immediately come to mind when most people think of Irish whiskey are Bushmills and Jameson. After a little research I found out why. It appears that up until 2007 there were only two distilleries left operating in Ireland. One was Old Bushmills, established in 1784 and is the world’s oldest licensed distillery. The other is the New Midleton Distillery established in 1975, which is where Jameson and some less well known brands are produced. Currently there are nine operating distilleries in Ireland and more under construction.

| WHATNOW

Now I’m not telling you to go out and start knocking back shots. Neither do I expect everybody to start sampling Irish whiskey on the rocks, it certainly isn’t everyone’s cup of green tea—so I decided to work out a fresh herbal cocktail featuring Bushmills Honey. With a little trial and Erin Go Braugh I came up with something pretty great. You will have to forgive me though for giving you another recipe for flavored syrup. It’s just such a great way to get a fresh component into a cocktail that I can’t resist.

Jeffery Markel

LEMON THYME INFUSED SIMPLE SYRUP

¾ cup water, preferably filtered or distilled 1 cups granulated or raw sugar Zest of one or two lemons 6-8 sprigs of thyme

Peel the fruit with a peeler to get just the outside zest off in large strips. Bring water to a boil then pour in the sugar, stirring until it dissolves. Add the thyme and lemon zest and reduce heat to simmer for about 7 minutes. Remove from heat and let cool to room temp. Strain the syrup by putting a coffee filter into a funnel and pouring it slowly into a bottle or small pitcher and refrigerate.

THYME OF THE IRISH 2 oz. Bushmills Honey 1 ½ oz. lemon thyme syrup 1 wedge of lemon Lemon twist and sprig of thyme for garnish Pour whiskey and syrup into a cocktail shaker with ice. Squeeze in the juice of a lemon wedge and shake well. Strain into a rocks glass with 1 large cube of ice. Garnish with a thyme sprig and a lemon twist. Sláinte! WN


Lagniappe

Establish and prioritize financial goals and time frames for achieving these goals. Implement strategies that address your current financial weaknesses and build on your financial strengths. Choose specific products and services that are tailored to meet your financial objectives. Monitor your plan, making adjustments as your goals, time frames, or circumstances change.

SOME OF THE THINGS YOU SHOULD CONSIDER Life insurance protection Retirement planning Education planning

Emergency fund Estate planning Tax planning

When you are setting up an emergency fund, you should keep several months’ worth of your living expenses on hand in a cash account. This money is meant to be liquid and safe. It is there for emergencies like your car needing to be repaired or an unexpected medical bill. In today’s world, education is a major expense that many parents are being faced with. It is something that if started when your kids are young enough can minimize the out of pocket expenses. You have several different options available for you to use. You can fund a 529 Plan, a Coverdell Account, or just set up a regular investment account. Each of the three has different advantages and disadvantages. Depending on your situation, one account may be more beneficial to you over another. Another very important aspect of your financial plan is estate planning. It is very important that you have a will, power of attorney, and health care directive in place. A will tells the courts when you pass away whom your beneficiaries are and whom you want to pass your possessions on to. Additionally, if you have minor children it will tell the courts who you want to be their guardians. A power of attorney gives another person the ability to make decisions on your behalf with regard to your finances and a health care directive will direct doctors as to your wishes

Andrew C. Walters is an Associate Financial Advisor with Walters, Meyer, Trosclair & Associates, a private wealth advisory practice of Ameriprise Financial Services Inc. in Thibodaux. Contact them at 225.744.4482 WN

47 WHATNOW

Develop a clear picture of your current financial situation by reviewing your income, assets, and liabilities, and evaluating your insurance coverage, your investment portfolio, your tax exposure, and yourestate plan.

if you were to become incapacitated. Try to sit down and plan ahead if you plan on taking on big expenses in 2014.

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o you picture yourself owning a new home, starting a business, or retiring comfortably? These are a few of the financial goals that may be important to you, and each comes with a price tag attached. That's where financial planning comes in. Financial planning is a process that can help you reach your goals by evaluating your whole financial picture, then outlining strategies that are tailored to your individual needs and available resources. The goals that we are trying to accomplish in doing a financial plan are:

Andrew C. Walters

MARCH 2014

PLANNING YOUR FUTURE


ADVERTISERS INDEX: March ADVERTISER ADVANCED EYE INSTITUTE

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ADVERTISER

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LAHAYE ORTHODONTICS 10

AMERIPRISE FINANCIAL 40

OFF THE HOOK

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BAYOU COUNTRY CHILDREN'S MUSEUM

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SHAVER-ROBICHAUX INSURANCE SERVICES

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BRIAN WAITZ PHOTOGRAPHY

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SOUTHLAND DODGE 41

COMMUNITY BANK 5

SOUTHLAND MALL 52

CRAIG J. LANDRY, ATTORNEY AT LAW

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SPAHR'S SEAFOOD 45

CRYSTAL SANDERSON PHOTOGRAPHY

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SPORTS MEDICINE CENTER OF THIBODAUX REGIONAL

ELEARNING 20

MARCH 2014

EMILES FURNITURE & APPLIANCES

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FELGERS FOOT WEAR 11

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JONES DERMATOLOGY 37

WHATNOW

JONES INSURANCE SERVICES

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JULIANA PENNISON PHOTOGRAPHY

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KANDY THERIOT, REALTOR

2

12

SYNERGY BANK 49 THE DANSEREAU HOUSE

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THE OLD ESTATE 19 THIBODAUX GLASS 40 TRAPP CADILLAC CHEVROLET

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WODDY FALGOUST, A LAW CORPORATION

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WHAT SAYING? 速 WIN A $50 GIFT CARD

courtesy of

WHAT NOW? Figure out the puzzles on this page and e-mail your answers to info@fathomla.com. A winner will be randomly selected MARCH 16th and will receive a $50 Visa速 Gift Card.

FEBRUARY WINNER: Sandra Luke

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WHATNOW

DEEF

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HISTORY HISTORY HISTORY HISTORY

EVALETOR ________ ___ __ _____

FEBRUARY ANSWERS: walk in the park, once in a blue moon, mountain, forgive and forget, cross stitch, go for it, bad intentions, touch up, running on empty


FLASHFORWARD: April CHECK OUT SOME OF APRIL'S UPCOMING EVENTS!

WEEK 1 APR 3-6 | THU-SUN

PADDLE BAYOU LAFOURCHE Donaldsonville to Lockport

APR 3 | THU | 6:30PM

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LIVE MUSIC AT THE DRINKERY The Dansereau House Downtown Thibodaux No Cover

APR 4 | FRI | 12PM–6PM

MARCH 2014

16TH ANNUAL PRE-49 PARADE OF RODS Ramada Inn, Houma $25 Registration Fee

| WHATNOW

APR 4 | FRI | 7:30PM APR 5 | SAT | 7:30PM APR 11 | FRI | 7:30PM APR 12 | SAT | 7:30PM APR 13 | SUN | 2PM

THIBODAUX PLAYHOUSE PRESENTS HARVEY Jean Lafitte Wetlands Acadian Cultural Center, Thibodaux Tickets Available

APR 4 | FRI | 7:30PM APR 5 | SAT | 7:30PM APR 6 | SUN | 2:30PM

BAYOU PLAYHOUSE PRESENTS CATFISH MOON The Bayou Playhouse, Lockport Tickets Available

APR 4-6 | FRI - SUN

BAYOU CAJUN FEST Larose Civic Center & Larose Regional Park No Gate Fee

APR 5 | SAT | 12PM–12AM

AMERICAN CANCER SOCIETY’S ANNUAL LAFOURCHE RELAY FOR LIFE Thibodaux High School Stadium Thibodaux

APR 5 | SAT | 10AM–3PM

ART AT ST. JOHN’S St. John’s Episcopal Church Thibodaux Free Admission

APR 5 | SAT

THE HAVEN ANNUAL SPRING GALA Houma Terrebonne Civic Center Houma

APR 5 | SAT | 6:30PM–10PM

HOME IS WHERE THE HEART IS Houma-Terrebonne Civic Center Houma

WEEK 2 APR 6 | SUN | 10AM–2PM

HOLY FAMILY BOAT BLESSING 6641 Grand Caillou Road, Houma No Gate Fee

APR 6 | SUN

ST. JOHN’S EPISCOPAL CHURCH MUSIC SERIES St. John’s Episcopal Church Thibodaux

LAFOURCHE CENTRAL MARKET Bayou Lafourche Visitor Center Raceland No Gate Fee

APR 12 | SAT | 10AM–8PM

BATEAU DE BOIS FESTIVAL CENTER FOR LOUISIANA Traditional Boat-Building, Lockport

WEEK 3 APR 17 | THU | 6:30PM

APR 11-13 | FRI –SUN

GRAND ISLE MIGRATORY BIRD CELEBRATION Grand Isle

APR 11 | FRI 7:45AM–12:45PM

26TH ANNUAL LSU FIGHTING TIGERS CELEBRITY GOLD TOURNAMENT Ellendale Country Club, Houma

APR 11 | FRI | 8AM

APR 5 | SAT | 9AM–2PM

APR 5 | SAT

APR 12 | SAT | 8AM–12PM

LAFOURCHE CENTRAL MARKET Bayou Lafourche Visitor Center Raceland No Gate Fee

COLONELS AGAINST TRAFFICKING 5K Nicholls State University Stadium Thibodaux $25 Early Registration

BOILIN’ ON DA BAYOU CRAWFISH COOK OFF Cut Off Youth Center, Cut Off $15 All You Can Eat Crawfish

AMERICAN CANCER SOCIETY’S ANNUAL TERREBONNE RELAY FOR LIFE Houma Terrebonne Civic Center Houma

APR 10 | THU | 6:30PM

LIVE MUSIC AT THE DRINKERY The Dansereau House Downtown Thibodaux No Cover

APR 5 | SAT | 8:30AM– 3PM

LADYBUG BALL CHILDREN’S FESTIVAL Southdown Plantation House Houma

APR 12 | SAT | 12PM–12AM

LIVE MUSIC AT THE DRINKERY The Dansereau House Downtown Thibodaux No Cover

4TH ANNUAL PUTT FOR THE PARK GOLF CLASSIC La Tour Golf Club, Matthews $25 - $600

40TH OVER AND UNDER TUNNEL RUN Houma Municipal Auditorium Houma

APR 12 | SAT | 8AM–4PM

SOUTHDOWN MARKETPLACE ARTS & CRAFTS FESTIVAL Southdown Plantation House Houma $5 for adults | Free under 12

APR 12 | SAT | 10AM

APR 12 | SAT | 12AM–12AM

AMERICAN CANCER SOCIETY’S ANNUAL SOUTH LAFOURCHE RELAY FOR LIFE Larose Regional Park, Larose

APR 19 | SAT | 8AM–12PM

WEEK 4 APR 20 | SUN | 7:30AM

EASTER SUNRISE SERVICE Artie’s Sport’s Bar, Grand Isle Open to the Public

APR 24 | THU | 6:30PM

LIVE MUSIC AT THE DRINKERY The Dansereau House Downtown Thibodaux No Cover

APR 25 | FRI | 7:30PM APR 26 | SAT | 7:30PM APR 27 | SUN | 2PM APR 29 | TUE | 7:30PM APR 30 | WED | 7:30PM

LE PETIT THEATRE DE TERREBONNE PRESENTS MURDER MOST FOULED UP Le Petit Theatre De Terrebonne Houma $15

APR 26 | SAT | 7AM–11AM

THIBODAUX MAIN STREET FARMER’S MARKET Jean Lafitte Park, Thibodaux No Gate Fee

APR 26 | SAT | 8AM–12PM

LAFOURCHE CENTRAL MARKET BAYOU LAFOURCHE VISITOR CENTER, RACELAND NO GATE FEE

APR 26-27 | SAT–SUN

BAYOU OUTDOOR & ADVENTURE EXPO Houma Terrebonne Civic Center Houma

WEEK 4 APR 27 | SUN | 10AM–4PM

CHAUVIN FOLK ART FESTIVAL Chauvin Sculpture Gardens Chauvin

APR 27 | SUN

BLESSING OF THE FLEET & BOAT PARADE 723 North Bayou Drive Golden Meadow No Gate Fee

APR 27 | SUN | 12PM–4PM

BLESSING OF THE SHRIMP FLEET 5232 Highway 56, Chauvin No Fee

APR 24 | THU

COASTAL CONSERVATION ASSOCIATION BAYOU CHAPTER BANQUET Houma Terrebonne Civic Center Houma

APR 25 | FRI | 7AM–11AM

THIBODAUX MAIN STREET FARMER’S MARKET Jean Lafitte Park, Thibodaux No Gate Fee

APR 5 | SAT | 8AM–12PM

LAFOURCHE CENTRAL MARKET Bayou Lafourche Visitor Center Raceland No Gate Fee

APR 25 -27 | FRI-SUN

LOCKPORT FOOD FESTIVAL “LA FETE DU MONDE” Church Street, Lockport No Gate Fee

FOR MORE INFORMATION OR TO SUBMIT YOUR EVENTS, GO TO WHATNOWMAG.COM

FOR MORE INFORMATION ON THESE EVENTS AND MORE VISIT WHATNOWMAG.COM


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What Now Magazine | March 2014