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Kaitiaki Wai Wellington Water’s official magazine | Summer 2019

Reducing our water footprint Reminding our community how to love every drop

Working towards a sustainable water supply A sustainable water society is fundamental to the region’s wellbeing

Wellington Water in South Wairarapa Talking to the team


A female pĹŤtangitangi (paradise shelduck) on the Tauherenikau River.


contents

Replenishing the mauri of the river............................................................................. 2 Community connections.................................................................................................. 3 Wellington Water in South Wairarapa........................................................................ 7 Climate change or climate crisis?.................................................................................. 9 Working towards a sustainable water supply......................................................... 11 Think before you dispose of wet wipes.................................................................... 15 A grand tour..................................................................................................................... 16 Reducing our water footprint...................................................................................... 18 Changing behaviours.................................................................................................... 20 News in brief....................................................................................................................22 Safety through multiple barriers................................................................................26 Our water, our future.....................................................................................................29 Service goals....................................................................................................................33 Tracking our performance............................................................................................ 37

Cover image: The Waiohine River, South Wairarapa. [Photo: Jim McNaughton]

Te Kaitiaki Wai | Summer 2019

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KIA ORA

replenishing the mauri of the river – Colin Crampton, Chief Executive, Wellington Water

One of my favourite things is kayaking around Matiu/Somes Island. I like the experience of leaving the land, paddling around the island and returning to the land again. Just about every time I go out I spot a kororā, or little blue penguin, I see the nesting southern black backed gulls, or karoro, the diving petrel, or kuaka, and multiple varieties of shag. Kawau pu is the black shag.

He wai, he wai He wai herenga tāngata He wai herenga whenua He waiora He wairua Tis water, tis water Water that joins us Water that necessitates the land Soul of life Life forever

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t's a marvel to me that here, in the middle of Te Whanganui-a-Tara, there is all this incredible nature. Then I think, well that’s a funny way to think about it. Surely, this shouldn’t be the exception but what we should all get to experience, every day. Us, water, land and other creatures all living in balance. So when I look at the water I try to see the whole thing, ki uta ki tai, from the mountains to the sea. Or as I look at it, when I’m paddling from the sea to the mountains. To have a healthy harbour we need to protect it from the potential pollution sources our society is responsible for. Such pollutants are carried by the wind, the streams and rivers and via our pipes. One of the pollutants we are responsible for is the leaking wastewater pipes which allow wastewater to leak into the environment via seepage in the ground, via leaks into stormwater pipes, or because our customers have inadvertently mixed up the plumbing at home and connected a pipe into the wrong wastewater or stormwater system. Council-owned Wellington Water is focused on this and we are making inroads, slowly. It’s a big problem so we don’t want to be scared by it, rather just keep plugging away year on year making small incremental improvements. You would be surprised about what would make a significant gain though. Right up in the Tararuas we take Te Awa Kairangi water and run it through our drinking water treatment system to you at home. Some people would argue that we use twice as much water as we need to in our homes. Imagine if we could change this, then 50% more water would flow down the river, replenishing the mauri of the river, reducing wastewater overflows into the river and improving the quality of our harbour. So when I go paddling I think about what I’m doing at home. I’m really working hard on not running the water when I brush my teeth, I water my herbs with a watering can and when I wash my kayak I do it fast and efficiently. I’m still working on other initiatives. What about you?

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Te Kaitiaki Wai | Summer 2019

Colin kayaking on Te Whanganui-a-Tara.


community connections Onslow Residents Community Association – Emergency Preparedness Expo The three year anniversary of the Kaikoura earthquake has been a good time to continue our resilience messages and remind people that it’s important to get prepared. The Onslow Residents Community Association held their first emergency preparedness expo at the Khandallah Town Hall. Despite a very cold and windy Sunday, over 80 people turned out for an afternoon of sharing tips, question and answer sessions and learning about real life experiences from a number of emergency management experts. The afternoon started with a presentation from WREMO detailing the types of hazards Wellingtonians may be faced with during a large scale emergency. These included knowing which access routes to take to get home if roads are closed, how long it may take you to get home if you’re forced to walk, the importance of having plans in place so you know where to meet up with family members, and the roles the emergency hubs (old Civil Defence stations) play during and after the emergency. Staff from the emergency management office explained the importance of knowing who can operate VHF radios and places where they are stored. We emphasised the importance of storing water and reminded

everyone that the recommended amount of water to store was 20L per person per day for up to seven days. The function of the 22 community emergency water stations located throughout the

region was addressed and how they work in conjunction with the bladders and tap stands in providing water to the public from day eight onwards.

More than 80 residents came along to learn how to be better prepared.

People learned about walking routes and emergency hub locations.

Advice was given on what to include in emergency kit bags.

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Red Cross encouraged everyone to download the Hazards App on their phone and reminded people to think about what they need in their emergency kits. Did you know prescription medicines are one of the most commonly forgotten items in an emergency kit?  rban Search and Rescue and NZ U Police shared their knowledge and experience following the Christchurch earthquake and some of the hazards they faced such as raw sewerage due to broken wastewater pipes.

Tawa volunteer fire brigade open/display day The Tawa Volunteer Fire Brigade celebrated its 75th Jubilee on 26 October. With one of the emergency water stations close by, it was a great opportunity for us to open up the station and promote the above ground emergency network to the public. Throughout the day there were demonstrations from the Wellington Airport Crash Unit, the Coastguard, Rural Fire, the SPCA and the Police and a number of activities for kids to enjoy, in particular learning about becoming a volunteer fire person and managing the hose. These events continue to be a great opportunity to share our resilience messages, reminding people to store enough water for an emergency and to have a plan for their wees and poos!

 urvive-it provided detailed S information on what essential items should be stored in your emergency kit, for example small denominations of cash, batteries, what sort of food to store including food for pets Following the event a number of attendees commented how informative the expo was and that it was a great way to jog memories about getting prepared. The Onslow Residents Community Association are aiming to make this a key annual emergency expo event, which we will aim to support in the future. A Wellington Water bladder deployed at the community water station.

Community engagement raises awareness of emergency procedures.

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Te Kaitiaki Wai | Summer 2019


Treatment plant tours Treatment plant tours are a fantastic way of engaging with our communities, as well as educating them on where their water comes from and how it’s treated. We currently operate tours at the Wainuiomata and Te Marua Treatment Plants, with many tour requests coming to us from community groups, businesses and schools.

Government officials from Sri Lanka on a tour.

The Sri Lankan group found the plant a bit cold but very interesting.

Tours provide an overview of water treatment processes as well as a look at the operations.

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Due to the popularity of these tours, we’ve decided to make them a regular occurrence, with the first Tuesday of every month dedicated to providing tours.

having a detailed explanation of the processes involved in what our drinking water goes through before it reaches homes and flows from the tap.

In late September we spent a day showing Sri Lankan government officials around some of Wellington Water’s assets.

If you’re interested in a treatment plant tour, please contact info@ wellingtonwater.co.nz.

In the morning, the group visited the emergency water station in Korokoro, where they were given a detailed explanation of how our emergency network was established and how it will operate in an emergency. As the group were all water related employees, a tour of our Wainuiomata Water Treatment Plant went down a treat. The group were incredibly impressed with the technology used to run our treatment plants and they enjoyed

The Waterloo Probus Group on a tour of the Wainuiomata treatment plant.

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Te Kaitiaki Wai | Summer 2019

2019-22 Statement of Intent measure update Our customers will be resilient in the event of a natural disaster because we’ll improve the number of households that drinking water stored and a have a plan for the safe disposal of their wastewater (SOI measure 9).


Wellington Water in South Wairarapa – Jim McNaughton, Community Engagement Advocate

Dan Paulo multi-tasking [photo Fine Aisea].

Talking to the Team

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n 1 October 2019, South Wairarapa District Council (SWDC) became a shareholder of Wellington Water, becoming the sixth council, along with Greater Wellington Regional Council and the Lower Hutt, Porirua, Upper Hutt and Wellington city councils to benefit from Wellington Water’s management services.

service pipe on Greytown’s main road. Dan cheerfully answered my questions while prone on the road, with his arms submerged in muddy water as he cleared the area by touch and fitted a 15 mL clip on the corroded copper pipe. Fine took the photo above while I was interviewing Dan.

To find out what things are looking like on the ground, I left Wellington on a fairly non-descript day to talk to a couple of our team members in South Wairarapa. Arriving there, I had the familiar feeling of it being several degrees warmer and greener. Expanses opened up. With wineries in them.

Dan lives in Masterton but South Wairarapa is his home away from home. He joined Citycare seven years ago, new to the industry, and got his Water Reticulation level 3 certificate. He said he’d like to give his beautiful wife a shout out for standing behind him on his journey in the industry. He joined Wellington Water on the 1 October 2019 and hasn’t looked back since.

Everyone seemed happier over there in the sunshine, including Senior Serviceman Dan Paulo and Service Person Fine Aisea, who were repairing a pinhole leak in a

“I like the physicality of the job,” Dan said. “And there’s lots of variety with three waters. I like to get out and about and meet different people. It’s good talking to the

public and hearing their views on infrastructure and what needs to be done.” If there was a magic wand, he thinks people would like to see the oldest networks in South Wairarapa replaced. “Some pipes have been repaired multiple times. Yeah, it’d be great to replace the networks in Featherston and Martinborough. It’ll happen!” He said that Wellington Water is receiving good feedback. “We’re getting into leaks quickly and leaving sites tidy. We leave the site as it was, if not better. Council workers have been impressed by our work and timeframes, too.” ADR is doing a leak check in the region, checking all water points, like tobies, valves and hydrants. SWDC then generates a job for Wellington Water. “As the weather improves, the ground dries and pipes move. So we’ve been flat-out lately.”

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Dan particularly enjoys the rural jobs that occasionally come along. “We do the odd water race blockage. We’re not dealing with traffic like we are here, but we still do health and safety pre-start checks and hazard identification. It’s nice out there. Very peaceful.” With that, Dan fitted the clamp. Customer Technical Advisor Martin Gronback was at the Waiohine River Treatment Plant, making sure alarms were working as they should. “There’s a lot of aging infrastructure,” he said. “We’re making sure it’s up to regulatory standards.” Martin started out in the water industry as a reticulation fitter for Waipa District Council in 2008. He was then a treatment technician at Hamilton City Council before working in South Wairarapa as a treatment operator for Citycare for four years. Wanting to study, he started working for SWDC as a utilities engineer during summer breaks from Open-Polytech, before making the transition to Wellington Water on 1 October.

“I’d known some people from Wellington Water or a while, and we worked with them after E. coli was detected in Martinborough’s water supply. We had to implement a reticulated flushing plan, which means we had to flush any potential contamination out of the pipe network. The network covers a large area with a lot of different flows, so we partitioned it into segments and had to make sure water was coming in from the treatment plant only after a flush and not drawn from another zone, which might be contaminated. Backflow prevention was a big job. On top of that was the community’s concern that the water was unsafe. It was a huge challenge.”

He doesn’t see much difference between urban and rural supply. “We’re dealing with irrigators drawing from urban networks, but it’s not really an issue. Demand and use is just a bit different.” Martin’s third child was born the day after SWDC transitioned to Wellington Water. He laughed. “I’ve been nose down and doing what’s in front of me.”

He appreciates Wellington Water’s flexibility as an employer, as he continues to study for a degree of Civil Engineering Technology, and is happy to be part of the Wellington Water whānau. “Our work is important. It’s taken seriously and our focus is welldefined. We have a lot of specialist knowledge. We focus on critical

Dan Paulo and Fine Aisea, having just fixed the leak on State Highway 2 through Greytown.

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issues and core services that need to be done well. And our work is appreciated.”

Te Kaitiaki Wai | Summer 2019

Martin Gronback.


The sun shining over Earth’s horizon through the two lowermost layers of the atmosphere: the troposphere and the stratosphere. Photo taken from the International Space Station.

climate change or climate crisis? How Al Gore changed my life – a personal perspective – Rob Blakemore, Chief Advisor, Service Planning

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or many years the irrefutable evidence of the reality of climate change has worried me. The worst part is feeling that that the scale of issue is out of my control. It has felt like a global issue I couldn’t influence. I have felt powerless.

the picture above shows, this atmosphere is not very big and needs to be protected. The next day, I applied to the Climate Reality Project, to be part of a climate leadership training programme founded by Al Gore. www.climaterealityproject.org

How have I changed?

But after spending three days in Brisbane this year, my sense of powerlessness has gone. I feel compelled to act and influence. The reality is that we have no choice but to act – climate change is now climate crisis.

I was one of 700 people accepted into this training at the Brisbane Convention Centre and participated in three days of intensive and inspirational work. We listened to debates, participated in group discussions and learned how to give meaningful presentations. We heard from people of the Pacific Islands, Australian farmers and guardians of the Great Barrier Reef who are already suffering from the effects of sea level rise, drought, and water temperature rise. But we also heard of the potential of new technology that could enable Australia to become a renewable solar energy superpower.

It is now clear to me that:

So, what has happened to reform a “baby boomer engineer” like me? After all, doesn’t an engineer from my generation just want to build things to grow the economy and make people’s lives safer and more comfortable, whatever the cost to the environment? After watching the movie “An Inconvenient Sequel: Truth to Power”, I thought of my four grandchildren. They didn’t deserve to inherit an Earth that my generation helped to destroy. Furthermore I wasn’t proud of the way my profession has engineered a society that treats our atmosphere like an open sewer. As

There are now 20,000 people trained as Climate Reality Project Leaders around the world. Each one of us commits to “Acts of Leadership” that get supported by the Climate Reality Project organisation.

After spending three days in the company of inspirational people like Al Gore, my head was in a clear space of hope and determination, rather than powerlessness and despair. • The impacts of greenhouse gas emissions are intensifying day by day. Science is simply confirming the anecdotal evidence of intensifying melting ice, extreme drought, heat waves, hurricanes and floods. • We know these impacts come from rising greenhouse gas emissions. • There isn’t time to try to convert the climate change deniers. Denial is simply an excuse for doing nothing. These are the people we must walk around and leave in our wake. It is simply not worth spending valuable time debating with a denier who has self-interest at the core of their values. • We have a duty to give hope to young people who are going to lead us into the future.

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The 700 trainees in Brisbane, with Al Gore in the foreground

• We know there are viable technical solutions available to us to help arrest climate change impacts. For example, it is commentary like that below from Forbes magazine (July edition) that must be given air and attention if we are to give hope to the next generation.

“Later this month the LA Board of Water and Power Commissioners is expected to approve a 25-year contract that will serve 7 percent of the city's electricity demand at 1.997¢/kwh for solar energy and 1.3¢ for power from batteries. "This is the lowest solar-photovoltaic price in the United States," said James Barner, the agency's manager for strategic initiatives, "and it is the largest and lowestcost solar and high-capacity battery-storage project in the U.S. and we believe in the world today. So this is, I believe, truly revolutionary in the industry." https://www.forbes.com/sites/ jeffmcmahon/2019/07/01/ new-solar--battery-pricecrushes-fossil-fuels-buriesnuclear/#22ea83eb5971 • We also know the real impediment stems from resistance to implementing change by politicians and lobby groups with vested interests, who are reluctant to sacrifice short term financial gains and existing lifestyle. • We therefore need to force change through intensified

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lobbying and positive promotion of alternative solutions that will reduce greenhouse gas emissions. • We must accept that adaptation has to be planned for – it’s too late to reverse all the impacts. • New Zealanders are not isolated from the worldwide impacts of climate change. We will have to learn to accommodate sea level rise, more extreme climatic events, depleting world food stocks with less demand for “luxury” foods like dairy, wine and meat products. We will have to endure increased plant and animal disease, greater mental and physical healthcare challenges and the need to accommodate climate change refugees. Although the challenges may seem insurmountable, I believe that the most important step to achieving something is the first step-commitment. Fortunately, Wellington Water has committed staff who are concerned for the future and understand the need to change the way we provide water services. I no longer feel powerless. We must keep talking and we must work on change together, and we must remain positive. I am now in contact with an international group of 20,000 members who have as least as much concern for the planet as I do, and hopefully you too.

Te Kaitiaki Wai | Summer 2019

Rob Blakemore Rob is the Chief Advisor, Service Planning for Wellington Water. His team prepares water investment plans for the Wellington metropolitan region, with increasing emphasis on sustainable services, rather than asset solutions, which encourage people to be aware of the impact they have on the environment. Rob has 41 years of experience in the water industry here and overseas. He is a former Board member and President of Water New Zealand, and is a member of the Ministry of Health Drinking Water Advisory Committee. He is a life member of Water New Zealand and a Fellow of Engineering New Zealand. He is married and has three children and four grandchildren.


working towards a sustainable water supply – Jo Lucas, Senior Project Manager, Connect Water

A sustainable water society is fundamental to the region’s wellbeing

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safe, reliable and sustainable water supply is fundamental to public health and the region’s social, cultural, environmental and economic prosperity. Our drinking water, wai ora, is a limited and precious resource. It is a taonga that we need to protect and respect. As part of this, we need to ensure it is distributed and consumed in a way that avoids wastage and encourages efficient use. At current water consumption levels, and with expected population growth, water demand will soon reach levels that will increase the frequency of water restrictions

beyond targeted levels. If we don’t change the way we manage this water we will need to invest in a new dam and increased water treatment and supply capacity, at significant cost to our communities and the environment. Approaching this challenge, we need to consider water holistically. We need to consider not only the physical aspects, such as the water source and its environmental quality, the treatment systems and other infrastructure, but also our perceptions of how we value and use water.

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We use much more water than other, similar cities The Wellington metropolitan region has a gross average drinking water consumption of approximately 360 litres per person per day. This gross consumption includes both residential and non-residential consumption and water losses (leaks). Residential water consumption makes up about 60% of the gross consumption, at around 220 litres per person per day. This is well above the other “large” New Zealand cities and global references. As an example, residential usage in Melbourne is around 150 litres per person per day.

There are a range of reasons behind this comparatively high consumption level, including the extent of water loss within the network and on private property, and inefficient use of water through both the physical assets such as showers, toilets and hoses and through our behaviours as water users.

Taking action – our Sustainable Water Supply Programme Over the course of this year we have shared the sustainable water supply challenge with councils. They have endorsed an approach that favours conservation (i.e. reducing waste and increasing efficiency) over construction (building new supplies and infrastructure). Our Sustainable Water Supply programme has the objective of achieving a material reduction in total water demand by 2025. Achieving this reduction will defer or avoid the need for new water sources and be a step towards the longer term goal of achieving per

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Te Kaitiaki Wai | Summer 2019

capita consumption in line with global benchmarks. The programme of work will identify and implement improvements to the way we manage water usage, including by helping our customers use water more efficiently, and through improvements in the ways we identify and respond to leaks and other system losses. There are significant financial benefits from delaying the need for a new water source. Each year the investment is deferred is worth at least $2 million. Doing nothing is not an option – as growth progresses demand will exceed supply and result in increasingly severe water restrictions during summer.

Our first steps – pursuing some key opportunities to reduce water use Achieving a significant reduction in drinking water demand by 2025 is an ambitious but achievable target. As a first step, we have worked closely with our consultancy panel to identify and pursue five workstreams that are expected to make important contributions. We have drawn on expertise from GHD, Stantec and Connect Water (made up of WSP and Beca) and their associates using a highly collaborative approach. This work demonstrates the value of the consultancy panel, with industry experts coming together to share information, provide peer reviews and share resources. The five initial workstreams are: • Reducing water loss and usage through increased use of pressure management in the network


• Improving our knowledge of where water is being used by collecting more and better data

detection activities by focusing on the areas showing the greatest water loss.

• Renewing our approach to leakage detection and repair, including through improved data collection and analysis, and taking a consistent approach across the region

Between 12 and 16 of these monitors will be installed across Hutt City, Porirua City, Upper Hutt City and Wellington City over 2020. The data collected from will then inform our on-going sustainable water supply strategy.

• Estimating and progressively refining our understanding of the costs and benefits of leakage management, to ensure our client councils invest appropriately on an ongoing basis • Improving our management of the meters on commercial users • Identifying the highest commercial water users and working with them to reduce their consumption.

Increased use of network pressure management There is a direct correlation between network operating pressure and water usage, the frequency of pipe breakages and pipe operating lifetime. Lowering and optimising the pressure can reduce pipe breaks, extend asset life, and assist us to reduce potable water demand by reducing leakage and pressure-related consumption. Wellington’s topography makes the widespread use of pressure management techniques such as pressure reducing valves very challenging. Properties in the same water supply zone are typically at a wide range of elevations and so experience a relatively wide range of pressures depending on their location relative to the supply reservoirs. A small number of new viable pressure-managed zones have been identified across three of the four cities. These zones will be taken through design and construction and into implementation over the next year. A regional review has also identified further potential areas eligible for pressure management.

Improving our understanding of where the water is going Our combination of high-level network metering, together with commercial metering, means we have a relatively limited knowledge of where water is being used and the supply and demand balance. To improve our understanding we are going to install some additional network meters that will measure down to what is essentially the ‘neighbourhood’ level. These meters, known as small area monitors measure the volume of water used in groups of between 50 – 200 properties. Small area monitors are a cost-effective method of improving our understanding of the split between water loss and residential consumption and how these vary seasonally, and will help us to optimise our leak

We are also working with BRANZ to install 50 smart meters (supplied by BRANZ) on a cross-section of residential properties. BRANZ will collect data from these meters, with appropriate measures to protect privacy, as part of a nation-wide study into domestic water use. Once their study is complete we will be able to deploy the meters into other locations to collect information that will help us better understand water consumption.

Improved operational leakage management Leakage currently represents about 20% of total water demand, but it is the only source of demand that we have direct control over. As well as improving efficiency and helping to defer investment, acting on leakage is important for reinforcing public messaging around water conservation. Our current approach to leakage management is inconsistent across the region. There is also limited visibility of our leakage performance and it is difficult to compare performance across the network and with other water suppliers. The review of our approach to operational leakage management has recommended a three to five-year action plan for improving our leakage data, reporting and decision-making. The proposed changes will allow: • More effective utilisation of the existing districtmetered areas network to identify and fix leaks • More effective adoption of new technologies • More robust, evidence-based decision-making on future renewals and investments. Proactive leakage control is essential to cost-effective and efficient leakage management. Monitoring flows into water supply zones, or district-metered areas, to identify changes in demand that indicate leakage, is an internationally-accepted and well-established technique for determining where leak location activities should be undertaken. In particular, we can look at water flows at night, when demand should be at a minimum, to see if there are changes that could signal a leak. We currently monitor the region’s water consumption through more than 150 district-metered areas. The quicker we can collect and analyse data from these district-metered areas, the quicker bursts or leaks can be located. This, together with speedy repair, limits the total volume of water lost from the network.

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We will be building on the existing district metering system and adding new data and analytical tools and capability so that we can: • Implement automated minimum night flow analysis and reporting across the network • Target prioritised areas expected to have relatively high leakage due to their pipe materials, operating pressure and from the night flow analysis • Establish baseline data to monitor the success of our leakage initiatives and for benchmarking. Implementing this leakage programme will enable us to adopt globally-recognised best practice water loss performance measures. It will help us improve our leakage management activities, benchmark our performance against other water companies, and set targets for future performance.

Balancing the value of water against the costs of acting on leakage One part of raising the profile of good leakage management, internally and externally, is the ability to tell a good story about its value. Calculation of the regional ‘economic level of leakage’ (ELL) provides a robust reference for considering when and how to act on leakage. It enables the cost of the lost water to be balanced against the cost of leak detection and repair, including consideration of the size of the leaks and the time they are left unrepaired. The baseline ELL has been established for 11 zones across the entire region, and will be refined as we collect more data from across our leakage management activities.

Working with our commercial customers Commercial and other non-residential usage of water makes up around 20% of total demand. Our client councils charge these customers based on the amount of water they use, so they are required to have water meters in place. One of our studies has explored the potential to use the commercial metering fleet to help reduce consumption across the region through better water use management. The data from these meters can also help us to better understand overall demand. The study focused on: • Completing a stock-take of the commercial meters installed in each city and their consumption history • Identifying opportunities where a reduction in consumption can be encouraged, with a focus on the largest users • Identifying gaps where commercial properties are not metered.

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Te Kaitiaki Wai | Summer 2019

The more water we can leave flowing through rivers, especially during warmer weather, the better.

The study’s recommendations include: • Taking a consistent approach to meter ownership, with the councils owning all meters to ensure they are appropriately maintained • Developing and implementing a meter renewal and calibration programme • Benchmarking business consumption to provide a regional tool for identifying where business are at the higher end of the consumption spectrum and have the potential to produce savings • Identify opportunities to encourage larger users to reduce their consumption, potentially through a dedicated Wellington Water water conservation champion. We are currently working through the study’s recommendations, together with those from the other studies, as we develop our overall sustainable water supply action plan.

To the future Sustainability needs to be at the core of everything we do, as a community and as custodians of our environment. Reducing water consumption and leakage will conserve and protect fresh water sources and reduce and delay the cost of additional infrastructure required to cater for increasing water demand. To ensure future generations enjoy a prosperous future living with our water and our environment, we are using the outcomes of various studies to inform our sustainable water supply policy and action plan. The policy and plan will focus on conservation, and set both short term (5-year) and longer term targets. In addition to looking at how we manage our network to reduce leakage, and working with our commercial customers, we will also be looking at how we can work with domestic customers to help them adopt behaviours and make the changes required to use water more efficiently and sustainably.


think before you dispose of wet wipes Plunket partnership preventing plumbing problems for parents The wet wipe: a must have in your nappy change bag, your handbag, your pram, your car – the list goes on. They’re quick and easy to clean up the ever too frequent mess, yet such a simple product can have a massive impact on your household plumbing and the environment, if not disposed of correctly. Chucking a wet wipe down the loo can be the easy way to forget about the mess, but when these are flushed down your toilet, they let loose on the wastewater network, wreaking havoc throughout the pipes and pumps. Blockages from wet wipes can cause overflows, which means untreated wastewater is sent out into the environment – and sometimes private property. Yuck! What’s worse, is that this can happen in your own household plumbing, not just out in the network. This can be costly – and let’s face it, new parents already have enough to worry about! This is one area where we can all make a difference to looking after the environment, and our water networks. To help families look after their pipes as well as the environment, and avoid unnecessary plumber bills – we’ve continued our partnership with Plunket New Zealand. Plunket is the largest provider of free support services for the development, health, and wellbeing of children under five in New Zealand. They see more than 90 per cent of new-borns in New Zealand each year. Their amazing nurses provide support through home and clinic visits, mobile clinics and Plunket Line, a free telephone advice service for parents (24 hours a day, 7 days a week).

No one wants wet wipes in the environment.

Helping families avoid the nightmare of blocked pipes and unnecessary financial stress whilst protecting the environment makes good sense. Remember to only flush the three Ps – pee, poo and paper (toilet paper) down the loo – everything else, including tampons and pads, condoms, cotton wool and ear buds, wrapping – everything you might once have thought ‘wouldn’t hurt’ – should ALWAYS go in the bin..

Plunket provides services to about 4,250 new parents in the Wellington region each year, with 30 Plunket clinics or centres, and 90 planned parent courses per year in the region. In addition, they have a network of over 7,000+ families through their regional Facebook pages. Plunket provide a great network of families we can share our messages with, and we’re really keen to work in partnership to educate families about the importance of disposing non-perishable items correctly. We look forward to seeing how we can make a difference in reducing the impact on the wastewater network, and the environment.

Wellington Water is working with Plunket on wet wipe awareness.

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a grand tour Cleaning up New Zealand's beaches

Des Watson, ten months into his tour of New Zealand.

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t was a late afternoon in October and a cold southerly raked Petone Beach. The only person in sight slowly worked his way down the tide-line, bending and straightening, picking up rubbish. Des Watson began work at 7.30 am that morning, his usual starting time since January 1st 2019 when, after resigning from his job, he got in a self-converted trailer and left his home in Rarangi Beach near Blenheim to clean up New Zealand’s beaches. “I’ve always loved the sea,” Des said. “I supported beach cleanups, the Sea Sheppard and marine conservation groups.” A story about a beached whale with a stomach full of plastic rubbish and a car tyre prompted him to take a more personal approach. After coming home from work, he’d clean up

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Rarangi Beach for an hour. He did that for a couple of years, but wished he could do more. A small inheritance changed things. “I decided to resign from my job, buy a van and trailer and pick up as much rubbish as I could, to inspire other people to pick it up.” Des began his national tour by cleaning beaches down the West Coast, including five weeks at the Fox River clean-up, where volunteers collected nearly 14 000 bags of rubbish after the flooded river tore open an old landfill. “People got quite emotional seeing that much plastic in the environment. I mean, you have to wonder why someone would put a landfill anywhere near a river, but there was no point getting angry. We had to pick it up. And we did.”

Te Kaitiaki Wai | Summer 2019

Des carried on around the South Island for another eight months, picking up an estimated 15 tonnes of waste, and recording his journey on his Facebook page, Kiwis Clean Aotearoa, as he went. He is always grateful when people join him on a beach clean-up, but his priority is to raise awareness around the huge amount of rubbish we produce and wash down stormwater drains into the sea. “Humans put 8 million tons of plastic into the ocean every year, or approximately 1.8 trillion pieces. How much longer can the oceans sustain that kind of ignorance and abuse?” Des worried that in the debate around the sale of New Zealand’s freshwater, the issue of the plastic used to bottle it was being lost. “We exported 27 million litres of water in


plastic bottles last year. That’s a lot of single-use plastic water bottles. It’s mind-blowing really, all coming from clean green New Zealand.” Des is an arborist and brought tools to work and support himself, but a Givealittle page has enabled him to concentrate on his mission. “Thanks to the amazing generosity of New Zealanders I’ve been able to work mainly on cleaning and raising awareness.” The bleached and unravelling cigarette butts Des picked up while speaking were hard to spot amongst sand, stones and shells to the unpractised eye. “It looks like heaps of people are coming down here to smoke,” he said, “but these are washed down stormwater drains into the sea and then brought in with the tide.” Yesterday, after being out all day picking up rubbish, it started to rain. “I thought, ‘Oh god,’ when I imagined all the rubbish being washed out to sea and coming back in again.” Des said he would love to see protection around storm water outlets in the form of big mesh socks, such as those recently installed in Kwinana, Australia. He was delighted to hear that Hutt City Council are trialling stormwater outlet socks and drain litter traps, in conjunction with WelTec and NIWA, to find out how they can be most effectively rolled out across the region. “That will make a huge difference. It’s most definitely needed. Hopefully, the rest of the country will take note and follow.”

Hutt City Council’s trial outlet sock in Fraser Park being removed for emptying.

This bag of rubbish Des collected contained 76 plastic straws.

Des hoped that the time and cost involved with maintaining litter traps in drains wouldn’t become a barrier to their widespread use. “Community groups could help out. We could all pitch in. We can do amazing things if we work together.” The next destination for Des was the East Coast. From there he planned to work his way up to Cape Reinga and then down the west coast of the North Island. “It’ll take at least a year,” he said. “It’s quite messy.”

The trailer Des bought and converted with an inheritance.

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reducing our water footprint Reminding our community how to love every drop

Why do we need to conserve water? We need to look after our water all year round, because it is a precious taonga, or treasure. During the summer months, conserving water is especially important because we see a significant increase in the demand for drinking water. This is because more and more people head outdoors - watering the garden, washing windows, filling swimming pools, and playing in sprinklers all contribute to an increase in demand. On average, we supply 142 million litres of treated drinking water per day to the residents of the

metropolitan Wellington region. This can soar to over 180 million litres on hot days. High demand is not sustainable, as we are limited as a region to the amount of water we are able to take from our three catchments, and deliver through our pipes. It’s predicted by 2040 that if we don’t reduce our demand, and our population continues to grow, we will need to find an alternative water source or build more storage facilities (either of which will come at a significant cost to ratepayers). We want to ensure our community is aware of the need to conserve water, by reminding them where their water comes from.

The overarching campaign image that links household water use back to the source.

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Reducing residential outdoor water use To make sure there’s enough water to last all summer long, every year garden watering restrictions are put in place during daylight saving months (29 September 2019 – 5 April 2020) in Lower Hutt, Porirua and Wellington. Garden watering restrictions are in place all year-round for Upper Hutt. These restrictions are set in council bylaws and are base-level restrictions, meaning they can be increased depending on demand and supply around the region. They allow for the use of a single watering system (sprinkler, irrigation system, soaker hose, or unattended hose) between 6-8am and 7-9pm, on allocated watering days: • Even-numbered houses on even dates of the month (2nd, 4th, 16th, etc.) • Odd-numbered houses on odd dates of the month (1st, 3rd, 11th, etc.) To promote these restrictions we distribute flyers and place digital, newspaper and radio advertisements throughout the region. We also spread the word at events and community days such as the Go Green expo to promote the restrictions.

Garden watering restrictions are now in place.

Some of the conservation tips that will be going out on billboards and social media.

The importance of loving every drop We want our customers to be aware of their water use all year, particularly through the summer months. It’s important to remind people where their water comes from, it is a natural resource, a taonga that shouldn’t be wasted. We are again incorporating the Love Every Drop message into the campaign. Water is a big part of what it means to be a Wellingtonian and New Zealander, and we want people to feel connected to the source so they can become more aware of their water use and make conscious efforts to reduce consumption. Having a connection to water and thinking about it as a life source is important to reducing our consumption, as we will begin to care more deeply for it. This year's campaign looks to broaden our customers’ thinking of water, and link water use in the house back to the source with underlying notes touching on climate change. This will be achieved by using natural elements in the creative outputs, as well as prompting people to think what the water footprint is. Expanding on this initial concept, we will introduce three water conservation tips throughout the campaign. To read more about conserving water and for helpful tips visit loveeverydrop.co.nz

2019-22 Statement of Intent measure update

During daylight savings, only one single sprinkler or irrigation system may be used from 6-8am and 7-9pm only at EVEN-numbered houses on EVEN days and ODD-numbered houses on ODD days.

Our customers will reduce the amount of water they are using at home because they have the information they need to be able to make informed decisions and change their behaviours (SOI measure 5). UPDATE: In quarter one we have run marketing campaigns targeted at our customers that provide important water conservation messages. We will measure the success of these campaigns as the year progresses.

To read more about garden watering restrictions, visit wellingtonwater.co.nz/your-water/drinking-water/ looking-after-your-water.

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changing behaviours Using customer research to inform our community engagement

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very year we ask our customers about their perceptions, attitudes and behaviours towards water and the services we offer. This year we have moved to a six-monthly survey format (January/June) so we are able to use the insights we get to adapt our communications, marketing, and education campaigns in a timely way. The online survey is conducted on our behalf by Colmar Brunton (using their customer panel). The June 2019 survey was completed by 465 participants aged 18 plus from throughout the Wellington metropolitan region (106 participants from Porirua, 116 participants from Upper Hutt, 128 participants from Lower Hutt, and 115 participants from Wellington). Results are post-weighted so each city’s results are representative of their population by age and region. The overall results have also been weighted by the population of each city, so each city’s influence on the overall result is proportionate to their population.

What do our customers think about us and the services we offer? We start the survey by asking our customers “Can you name the organisation that provides water services in your area?” This helps us get an understanding of whether our customers know where their water comes from, and how their services are delivered. • Unprompted and prompted awareness of Wellington Water as the organisation that provides water services to the region have increased. In total,

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Awareness of Wellington Water has increased significantly over the past two years.

72 per cent of residents are now aware that Wellington Water provides water services on behalf of our five client councils (compared to 60 per cent in January 2019 and 56 per cent in June 2018). We also ask our customers to rank (in order of importance) our three customer outcomes: safe and healthy water; respectful of the environment; and creating resilient water networks. • Providing safe and healthy drinking water continues to be viewed as the most important (91 per cent ranked as important/very important); respectful of the environment (78 per cent) and creating resilient networks (77 per cent). We then ask a bit more detail about people’s satisfaction with the services we provide (on behalf of our client councils) and their customer experience. Satisfaction with people’s interactions with Wellington Water has declined since the last measure, measuring 57 per cent compared to 65 per cent January 2019. This may be due to the customer experience issues we faced towards the end of the year with the transition into the alliance.

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What are our customers’ perceptions and attitudes towards water services? It’s important we have an understanding of what our customers’ perceptions and attitudes are towards water conservation, so we’re able to effectively design and promote behaviour change campaigns. People’s attitudes towards water conservation has decreased since January 2019, however, has increased since June 2018. • 66 per cent now think it’s necessary to conserve water where they live (down from 70 per cent in January 2019, up from 60 per cent in June 2018) and 91 per cent now believe water is a limited resource (down from 96 per cent in January 2019, up from 86 per cent in June 2018) which shouldn’t be wasted. In the past six months to June 2019, our customers had 1.8 interactions on average per household with Wellington Water; this compares to 1.8 in January 2019 and 1.9 in June 2018.


• 73 per cent of Wellington residents interacted with Wellington Water, compared to 71 per cent in January 2019 and 72 per cent in June 2018. • 47 per cent had an issue (a water leak/poor quality drinking water/unexpected water outage/flooding at home/ reported a problem), compared to in 49 per cent in January 2019 and 51 per cent in June 2018. Water leaks and unexpected water outages have the biggest negative impact on perceptions of Wellington Water, while seeing social media communications, signage and newspaper articles about Wellington Water has the most positive impact on perceptions.

How well are our marketing campaigns performing? We asked our customers if they’ve ‘seen or heard any advertising, public notices, or promotions from Wellington Water in the last six months. • 43 per cent cent of residents recall hearing or seeing something from Wellington Water in the last six months. This is a good result for unprompted awareness. • 39 per cent recall seeing at least one of the advertisements asked about. Colmar Brunton noted that the recall of the campaigns shown is higher than their non-television commercial campaign norm (29 per cent). While people thought the ads had “points that were relevant to me” and that the “points made in the ad were believable”, they rated low compared to norms on “easy to understand”, “told me some new information”, and “prompted me to take action”.

We asked our customers about their water storage and if they had a plan for safe disposal of wastewater (wees and poos) in an emergency. Consistent with previous surveys, eight in 10 residents have water stored for emergencies, but those who are storing water, are storing more than ever before. Four in ten Wellington residents have a plan in the event that they are unable to use their toilet. This leaves six in ten without a plan, or unsure of their plan. Upper Hutt residents and homeowners are more likely to have a plan than average, while renters and those aged 40 years old and under are less likely. Of those that do have a plan in place, roughly half are planning on digging a long drop and nearly 40 per cent are planning on using the two bucket system.

What we’ve learned and what we’ll change We conduct this research so we can better understand our customers’ perceptions, attitudes and behaviours towards water and the services we offer. It’s also an opportunity for us to use the insights we get to adapt our community engagement activities including; communications, marketing, and education campaigns, in a timely way.

more water can be achieved by making sure we are using a good mix of channels to reach our customers (print, radio, digital, etc.) • We need to review communications channels and tactics regarding Garden Watering restrictions. Are we being clear and targeted enough? • Seeing or hearing something about Wellington Water (social media, signage and media) has the most positive impact on perceptions. Conversely, unexpected water outages and a water leak in the street have a negative impact on perceptions. We should continue to have a managed and consistent social media presence and through a targeted PR strategy, encourage increased media coverage. • There’s an opportunity to increase household resilience and awareness for the need to have water storage and a wastewater plan. These messages should be promoted all year through community events and advertising. We’ll continue to partner with Regional Public Health and Wellington Regional Emergency Management Office to make sure our messages are consistent.

Below are a few of the learnings we’ve taken from the June 2019 survey.

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• Our marketing tactics should focus on the promotion of a wide range of water conservation behaviours and be more action oriented.

Our customers will have positive interactions with us because we will measure and improve their customer experience satisfaction SOI measure 10).

• Our marketing and communications needs to be refined to make sure messages are easy to understand, provided new information, and have a clear call to action. • Making sure people have the information needed to conserve

Statement of Intent measure update

UPDATE: Our market research is one measure used to track customer experience satisfaction (together with call-backs and our door-to-door surveys). Customers that rated their satisfaction as good/very good was 83 per cent. Compared to 83 per cent (2018) and 84 per cent (2017).

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news in brief Drop, cover, hold

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n October 17, right on 1.30pm, horns and whistles were blown throughout the IBM building, depots and plants, sounding the alarm for the national earthquake drill. In a calm but timely manner, Wellington Water staff and visitors took to the floor to drop, cover and hold. When the `shaking´ stopped, heads emerged from under the desks, and everyone gathered at their nearest rally point. A crew of trained building assessors within the Wellington Water team ran their building checks at IBM, and confirmed the building was safe after the minor shake, so staff could return to business as usual.

Gerry sounds the alarm for staff in the IBM building.

Following the drill a group of staff practiced the route to the tsunami safe zone in Korokoro from Petone, taking only seven minutes to get to the blue tsunami zone line. The ShakeOut is a great reminder that we live in a shaky part of the country, and it’s incredibly important to have a plan and to get sorted!

The view from under the desk.

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Pinehaven Stream improvements - fully notified consent lodged Pinehaven Stream has a long history of flooding, with significant flood events occurring in December 1976, February 2004, January 2005, and July 2009. The overall problem being addressed by the project is the unacceptable risk of flooding faced by the people and communities in the Pinehaven catchment, and the

subsequent risk to their health, safety and wellbeing. This major project has reached an important milestone with consents from Greater Wellington Regional Council and Upper Hutt City Council being lodged after three years of development. The team are

now busy finalising 41 property reinstatement agreements and the design detail. The next step will be obtaining the contractor’s price along with an independent estimate. Construction is planned to start in quarter four 2020 once consents are obtained.

Pinehaven Stream poses a significant flooding risk to nearby properties.

Pinehaven Stream now.

An artist’s impression of the scene ten years after construction is completed.

Awarua wetland and stormwater improvements for Porirua City Council The Awarua Wetland and central business district stormwater improvement major project has reached an important milestone with consents being lodged with Greater Wellington Regional Council and Porirua City Councils. The project will help reduce flooding around the Porirua’s centre and improve the water quality of stormwater discharge to the environment. It includes a new wetland that is jointly funded by Ministry of Environment and Porirua City Council, as well as a large new stormwater outlet pipeline.

An artist’s impression of the proposed Awarua Wetland.

Additional works include some bunding to protect properties around Ngāti Toa St as well as upsizing and diversion of existing public drains at the back of Porirua School. Construction is planned to start in the second half of 2020 once consents are obtained.

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It’s all go at OmÄ roro! Work is well under way on the new reservoir that will greatly increase Wellington City’s safe drinking water storage and resilience. Work began in June on installing the pipeline along Wallace Street which will connect the reservoir to the network. Crews are taking the opportunity to renew drinking water, stormwater and wastewater pipes in the area while they are there. Some phone, fibre and electricity cable is also being replaced. Local residents and traffic have been disrupted. We are working closely with the community to minimise these impacts and are providing safe access for pedestrians and ongoing traffic management. Work is expected to be completed by mid-to late 2020.

Joan working with residents in Wallace Street to minimise traffic disruptions.

Jay Jay keeping the traffic moving with a smile.

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Redwood races We’re always happy to help out where possible, so when we received a request from Redwood School about lending them some of our equipment and donating prizes for their race day, we were more than happy to assist. Following the event we received a thank you email (below) from Redwood School.

A tap stand provides multi-person access to water.

Shower timers save water.

Wellington Water

Thank you

Redwood School would like to thank Wellington Water for donating the use of your tap stand water station, gazebo and generators and for the spot prizes for Redwood School's Red Race the school's main fundraiser of the year. This was our biggest race yet, with just over 400 entries, and included younger siblings, students, college-aged siblings, parents and grandparents. Making for a great day of family fun and raising about $13,000 for our school. We couldn't have made the event possible without the help and generosity of local business such as Wellington Water. The tap stand water station was a great hit with the kids, as were the shower timers. The generators were greatly appreciated and were used to help power the two inflatable obstacle courses, which were a crowd favourite.

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The less contaminated water is to start with, the less treatment required and the lower the base risk.

Safety through multiple barriers Having multi barriers to defend safe water against contamination is one of the six key principles internationally recognised as fundamental for drinking water management

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aintaining a multi-barrier approach is one of the most important of the six principles that underpin safe drinking water management. It acknowledges that providing safe drinking water to communities is a complicated process, and that water is vulnerable to contamination at multiple points on its journey from source to tap. Barriers are defence mechanisms – whether in a game of sport, in a military conflict or to protect against contamination. In any situation, a single barrier can at some time get broken. So the more barriers you put in place the lesser chance there is of a total breakthrough. That’s why multiple barriers are important in water supply. Unlike a game of rugby, where the consequences of a broken barrier may simply be win or lose, in water supply the consequences can be multiple cases of illness and even death.

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At the catchment and collection end of water’s journey to our tap, barriers include things such as protecting catchments and restricting human activity in catchment areas. This can be a challenge when so many people love to enjoy the outdoors, and with our extensive agricultural industry. Some communities often have little choice of where to source their water from and so need to be extra vigilant with barriers in catchments and the water collection process. In Havelock North, when a contamination incident occurred, there were no barriers to contamination in place between surface water contaminated by stock excrement and the water extracted from a bore drawing water from below the ground. It was assumed that the water sourced from the bore was protected by natural filtering processes under the ground to make the water safe, as was (and still is) common practice throughout much of New Zealand.

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In remote catchments, there’s more opportunity to isolate water abstraction points from sources of contamination such as human activity. The less contaminated the water is to start with, the less treatment required and the lower the base risk– so this is why catchment protection is so important. Physical treatment of water is another key barrier. It involves removing or de-activating bacteria, microbes and larger material in water taken from rivers, lakes or aquifers. Treatment barriers include methods such as screening and filtering, use of chemicals to improve clarification processes, disinfection by UV light, membrane osmosis or chlorination. Whatever process is used, the aim is to produce water that is safe to drink. The water still has a way to travel though. From treatment plant to customers' tap can take several days, and often involves water being stored in a tank or


A school group visits Te Marua Water Treatment Plant.

reservoir on a hill or elevated point, to help provide positive pressure. Secure storage and positive pressure can also reduce the risk of contamination getting into the network on the final stages of the journey to customers’ taps. In pipe networks, having a residual disinfection barrier remain in the water after treatment is another vital element of a multibarrier approach. At the moment chlorination is the most effective residual disinfectant, reducing the risk of microbiological contamination and maximising the chances of water arriving safely at the tap. The value of safe drinking water to a community is far in excess of the cost, and we’ve seen recently the consequences of not investing in this critical element of human health. Operating an effective multi-barrier approach requires the effort and commitment of people with a wide range of skills, from planning and policy making, investment decisionmaking, operational, technical and information management, to working with customers, communities and councils. It’s what makes working in the water industry so interesting.

Providing safe drinking water to communities is a complicated process.

A multi-barrier approach to water treatment is vital for water safety.

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It’s probably more than you think. See how you can use less at loveeverydrop.nz 28

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our water, our future Some of the big projects we’re working on around the region.

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ajor capital expenditure (capex) projects includes works which have a high monetary value, are required urgently, have significant technical or managerial complexity, or have greater levels of risk. Our current capex programme includes:

• Silverstream pipe bridge replacement (Greater Wellington Regional Council) - the preliminary design for the replacement pipeline beneath State Highway two (SH2) and over Silverstream bridge is nearing completion with a recommendation to construct a new pipe bridge across the Hutt River/ Te Awa Kairangi to keep the pipeline above the flood levels and the Wellington fault line. • Cross-harbour pipeline (Greater Wellington Regional Council) – site investigations are being undertaken to provide information to inform the pipeline route selection as part of the concept design development. The investigations include hydrographic surveys and bores to confirm ground conditions. • Kaitoke flume seismic upgrade (Greater Wellington Regional Council) – a contractor has been appointed to begin value engineering work to reduce risks associated with possible interruptions to water supply. • Seaview Wastewater Treatment Plant seismic strengthening (Hutt City Council) – works to seismically strengthen the treatment works with ground improvements and make structural improvements to the buildings. Ground improvements were completed in August. Structural improvements start in January. • Porirua central business district stormwater improvements (Porirua City Council) – land swap (Crown to Crown) is required for the wetland. Construction will commence in March. • Aotea and Takapuwahia reservoirs (Porirua City Council) – consent for Aotea reservoir has been

approved. Project will re-commence in July 2021 when funds are available. Takapuwahia reservoir on hold until July 2020 when funds are available. • Porirua wastewater network improvements (Porirua City Council) – a network improvement plan is being developed to inform wastewater treatment plant consent and wastewater network improvements. • Pinehaven stream stormwater improvements (Upper Hutt City Council) – engagement with affected residents is nearing completion. Detailed design is on track for completion in December. • Omāroro reservoir and Wallace St pipelines (Wellington City Council) – physical works of the pipelines to and from the proposed reservoir have started with pipe laying in Hargreaves Street. An application to close Wallace Street for 10 weeks from 8 December 2019 has been approved. Reservoir design is complete. There has been a change of procurement methodology to maximise opportunities from early contractor involvement. • Kilbirnie stormwater improvements (Wellington City Council) – project is currently on hold at Wellington City Council’s request while preferred options are being re-visited. • Sludge minimisation (Wellington City Council) – project to begin with concept design in November 2019 once objectives have been agreed with Wellington City Council. • Karori wastewater network improvements (Wellington City Council) – projects to reduce inflow and infiltration are under way. We’ve had great engagement and support from the Kilbirnie Residents Association. • Moe-i-te-Ra reservoir and Bell Road pipelines (Wellington City Council) – a brief has now been agreed to review the proposed location of the reservoir.

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I do it for them I do it for us I do it for her I do it for him I do it for me

Who do you do it for?

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Join us at the Plunket Fun Run at Remutaka Rail Trail on Sunday 8 March 2020. Bring the family and get active together – helping raise funds for Plunket services that support mental health and wellbeing of our parents and tamariki. Come down and help make the difference of a lifetime, together. For more info, please email raiseabundle@plunket.org.nz See you there!

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service goals We deliver our services by focussing on three customer outcomes: safe and healthy water, respect for the environment, and resilient networks that support the economy. Our performance in these areas is reported through 12 service goals (four for each outcome).

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Customer Outcome 1: Safe and healthy water We face a changing regulatory environment, expected changes in existing drinking water legislation have been incorporated in the new Regional Water Safety Plan. Future challenges with maintaining water quality within the source catchments, plants and network are reflected in this plan. Safe and healthy water is also affected by wastewater and stormwater entering land and waterways – particularly during heavy rain events. This is likely to get worse, with aging infrastructure, urban growth and more extreme weather events. Until we have reduced these occurrences we continue to rate this outcome as amber.

S On Track

S Some concern

S Off track

We provide safe and healthy drinking water We are compliant with the Drinking Water Standards for NZ. Changes to the standards will be incorporated into our compliance monitoring. The Regional Water Safety Plan (WSP) that prioritises improvements to mitigate drinking water quality risks remains with the regulator for formal approval. All drinking water quality issues continue to have overview by the Drinking Water Safety Committee. A policy setting out the objectives for the committee is complete. We have commenced work to implement improvements identified in the plan although it still has not had formal sign off from the regulator. Regional Public Health in light of pending legislation changes are reviewing our WSP with more rigour and scrutiny than previous.

We operate and manage assets that are safe for our suppliers, people and customers We are initiating a programme of improvements to progressively reduce hazards from surcharging manholes and fall from height risks from reservoirs. In partnership with the Alliance, future work will focus on developing a sound understanding of the health and safety risks from the all assets that we manage. An emerging issue that we have identified are a small number of homes that are damp, mouldy and unhealthy as a direct consequence of overflows from our wastewater and stormwater networks. We are formulating a package of responses that will be implemented to protect the health of our customers.

We provide an appropriate region-wide firefighting water supply to maintain public safety The hydrant performance testing work programme is on track across the region. Where non-compliant hydrants are found they are prioritised for repair/replacement as required. FENZ, operating under its new legislation, is keen to have regular dialogue with Wellington Water in order to improve firefighting services.

We minimise public health risks associated with wastewater and stormwater Leaks from our wastewater network are contaminating our streams to levels that are far from meeting our community’s expectations. Swimming is affected and a number of locations are above levels safe for secondary contact. A third of the wastewater network across the region is in poor or very poor condition. In addition we also have capacity constraints that result in wastewater overflows further affecting urban stormwater, streams and the coast. Work is ongoing to minimise the number of wet weather overflows but this is a challenge compounded by pressures from growth. Addressing the leaky network requires a multipronged approach that includes renewals and reducing inflow and infiltration. We are preparing a package of recommended responses to address the significant contamination from private laterals.

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Customer Outcome 2: Respect for the environment Freshwater quality in the Wellington metropolitan region is variable. In some places, urbanisation is contributing to the degradation of water quality through increased stormwater volumes flowing directly into water bodies. Our wastewater network can also result in increased pollution in waterways from leaks in aging pipes and overflows during heavy rain events. To improve these outcomes we will need to identify a range of solutions of which new infrastructure is only part of This is reinforced by the publication of the Te Awarua-o-Porirua Whaitua Improvement Plan and Receiving Water Quality Strategic Case. The impact of some of these initiatives will be tested in pilot studies to assess effectiveness. Due to the long term nature of this goal we continue to rate this outcome amber.

S On Track

S Some concern

S Off track

We manage the use of resources in a sustainable way The increasing trend in per capita demand for water is showing signs of stabilising (but notreducing) and the regional population is growing, increasing overall demand. If this continues the regional limit could be exceeded within the next few years. We will need to accelerate initiatives to achieve a sustainable water supply. Councils have given us direction to pursue a “conserve” approach rather than “construct”. We have commenced work on identified alternative demand management initiatives. Some of these options will be trialled through pilot programmes in 2019/20 and 2020/21. We have a challenge ahead managing an increasing number of water leaks. These have been increasing year-on-year for the last five years, we’ve built a backlog of jobs, and we know over the summer period visible leaks are front of mind for our customers – especially when we’re asking them to conserve water. To address this we’ve developed several initiatives, which are currently being scoped and implemented.

We will enhance the health of our waterways and the ocean We monitor freshwater sites and beaches and are in the process of expanding our surveillance to provide greater breadth and understanding of the sources and severity of the impacts of our 3 waters network on our environment. We know the exfiltration from our wastewater network is well above the targets being set by central government policy. The age of our infrastructure and growth expectations are also putting pressure on the performance of our networks. There is a long-term ongoing initiative to identify and remove sources of pollution. We are mapping a pathway for the enhancement of our networks to achieve the new standards. The failure of the Porirua Wastewater Treatment Plant on 6 October 2018 led to a discharge of activated sludge that resulted in a prosecution for not complying with our resource consent and a conviction on 13 September 2019. The causes and systems that contributed to this incident have been addressed.

We influence people’s behaviour so they are respectful of the environment Our customer survey showed that more people than ever are aware of Wellington Water – just over 70% of those surveyed, compared to 38% in June 2017. Our campaigns raise awareness about the need to look after our water, but the survey showed we need to give people more information about what to do. We’re adapting our next summer water conservation campaign to provide more tips for people on how to cut back their water use, and have developed material with clearer ‘what to do’ messaging around fats and oils, menstrual products and wet-wipes. We’re also developing a new school education resource that promotes respectful behaviour with water.

We ensure the impact of water services is for the good of the natural and built environment The Whaitua Implementation Plan has been issued for the Te Awarua-o-Porirua and there are outcomes included that will drive our future levels of service once these are incorporated into the Natural Resources Plan. The Wellington / Hutt Valley Whaitua committee has been formed, there are important learnings for us from the Porirua Whaitua that can be used. We continue to monitor, and participate where appropriate, in national water policy and work streams such as the National Planning Standards – Network Utilities, and MfE Essential Freshwater. We are also working on the application for the consenting of the Porirua Wastewater Treatment Plant discharge. Presentations have been given to the Wellington/Hutt Valley Whaitua committee by the Chief Advisors about the infrastructural challenges we face.

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Customer Outcome 3: Resilient networks that support the economy The overall reliability of our three waters service will be compromised during significant natural events as well as every day network performance issues such as water main failures and wastewater blockages. We want our networks to be adaptive to daily operational need and meet the needs of growing cities. We are both investigating and investing to improve our performance; however, a green rating is a long-term aspirational goal. Understanding the limitations of our networks so that improvements can be made is vital to supporting growth in the region and minimising the impacts of events such as flooding. Due to the extent of the regional issues, we currently rate this outcome red.

S On Track

S Some concern

S Off track

We minimise the impact of flooding on people’s lives and proactively plan for the impacts of climate change Completion of our hydraulic models by 2021 will provide us with a comprehensive understanding of the likely impact of flooding on communities and their vulnerability to the impacts of climate change. There are known flood risk areas that will need improved flood mitigations. Programmes are being developed and prioritised to understand the scale and urgency of an appropriate response. Recent flooding in specific communities has highlighted the need to continue proactive planning for flood protection and the importance of a multi-pronged solution e.g. building controls, private drain maintenance. Selected projects have been completed in high risk areas.

We provide three waters networks that are resilient to shocks and stresses Our Community Infrastructure Resilience project is complete excluding the desalination option which is being finalised. This project is now at the stage of handover to the council Emergency Operations Centres to develop the plans for the distribution of the water after an event. We are continuing to prioritise work on projects identified in the 80-30-80 strategy including planning for delivery of the Cross Harbour Pipeline in progress and commencement o f work on the Omāroro reservoir inlet and outlet pipelines. We are also looking at wastewater and the development of the quake to flush response.

We plan to meet future growth and manage demand We are continuing a programme of catchment assessments where growth is anticipated to identify and recommend future upgrades to the infrastructure to inform each councils to plan for and fund those works through future Long Term Plans. These will develop a 30yr outlook to enable our infrastructure planning and investment to meet Council’s future growth strategies. Intensive work is needed to identify constraints and associated costs for planning upgrades or new infrastructure to support each council’s growth aspirations. A holistic approach to investment needs to be considered, given the constraints to funding for addressing existing network constraints and facilitating additional growth

We provide reliable services to customers Response to non-urgent repairs has been slowing; there is room for improvement with the implementation of the Alliance and we have an issue with reporting this data. Increased awareness around health and safety requirements has meant that more planning is now being carried out prior to the works on site. Work with Service Planning has highlighted medium term liability around the age of our infrastructure and the timing of funding required to renew water and wastewater pipe assets.

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Te Kaitiaki Wai | Summer 2019


2019-22 Statement of Intent measure Update

Tracking our tracking ourperformance performance Health and Safety Health and Safety

Critical Risk - Lost Time Injury (LTI) Frequency Rate

Critical Risk - Lost Time Injury (LTI) Frequency Rate

Note: LTI rate is based on rolling 12 months data per 200,000 hours worked. This data only includes Critical Risks Consultant Contractor Wellington Water Benchmark Total 2 1.5 1

0 Oct 18 Nov 18 Dec 18 Jan 19

Feb 19 Mar 19 Apr 19 May 19 Jun 19

Jul 19

0.0 Aug 19 Sep 19

The above graph presents Lost Time Injury (LTI) sustained from any of our 9 identified critical risks (risks that are common to our activities and have the potential to serious harm us or cause death). This graph celebrates the effort we put in the managing our significant risks. We have not had any recent LTI's that Lost Time Injury Frequency relate to Critical Risks. However, Rate we continuing to ensure the controls that are in place to prevent workers being The above graphrisks presents Lost Time Injury (LTI) sustained from any of our 9 identified critical risks harmed by critical are regularly reviewed.

(risksTime thatInjury are common to Rate our activities and have the potential to serious harm us or cause death). Lost Frequency This graph celebrates the effort we put in the managing our significant risks. We have not had any Note:toLTI rate is Risks. based However, on rolling 12 data per 200,000the hours recent LTI's that relate Critical wemonths continuing to ensure controls that are in worked. place to prevent workers being harmed by critical risks are regularly reviewed. 4

Consultant Industry Benchmark

Contractor Total

Wellington Water

3

3.0 2.2

2

1.5

1 0 Oct 18 Nov 18 Dec 18 Jan 19

0.8 Feb 19 Mar 19 Apr 19 May 19 Jun 19

Jul 19

0.0 Aug 19 Sep 19

There has been a significant change to our supply chain LTIFR due to the hours worked being reported incorrectly. We are now able to reflect on a frequency rate that is actually reflective to the incidents within the business. Our contractors are now trending below the industry benchmark, and Wellington Water is sitting at twice the construction industry bench mark. It is important to note that we did not have a LTI in the last quarter. LTI's in previous quarters has meant the frequency rate remains high and will reduce over time. The top graph above highlights our LTI's are a result of physical work (body strains etc.), and not caused by our critical risks. We’re working to reduce our LTI rate, however it is reassuring that our LTI's are not events that could have caused significant harm/fatality.

Te Kaitiaki Wai | Summer 2019

There has been a significant change to our supply chain LTIFR due to the hours worked being

37


Total Recordable Injury Frequency Rate Total Recordable Injury Frequency Rate Note: Total Recordable Injuries include medical treatment, hospitalisation and fatalities (minor first aid treatment has been excluded). The TRIFR is based on rolling 12 months data per 200,000 hours worked.

15

Consultant

Contractor

Wellington Water

10 5.8 4.6 4.6 4.0

5

0 Oct 18 Nov 18 Dec 18 Jan 19 Feb 19 Mar 19 Apr 19 May 19 Jun 19

Jul 19

0 Aug 19 Sep 19

This graph shows a positive picture with our injuries within the group. It is clear to see our injury rate tracking down over the past year. It is positive to note that all 3 groups are tracking down at a similar rate. This gives us a strong indication that the groups are working together and the correct controls are being used. There is still work to do in this space to keep the line tracking down, within Wellington Water we know we need to focus on manual handling activities that can cause sprains and strains.

Capital expenditure (capex)

This graph shows a positive picture with our injuries within the group. It is clear to see our injury rate tracking down over the past year. It is positive to note that all 3 groups are tracking down at a similar rate. This gives us a strong indication that the groups are working together and the correct controls are being used. There is still work to do in this space to keep the line tracking down, within Wellington Water we know we need to focus on manual handling activities that can cause sprains and strains.

The Capex Spend By Water, By Month graph shows, on the right-hand scale, how we are tracking at spending what the region has budgeted on renewing and improving the three waters networks. The solid black line is what we’ve spent or accrued; the black dots are our forecast, and the red dots are what we spent and how last year. The left-hand scale shows how much we’ve spent so far on each of the three waters – drinking (blue bar), storm (green bar) and waste (purple bar).

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Te Kaitiaki Wai | Summer 2019


Drinking water usage trends Increasing trend in per capita for water is slowing, potentially due to a milder summer. If the overall trend continues it’s likely the regional limit of 374 litres per person (per day) will be exceeded within the next few years.

0.8

0.6

0.4

0.2

Council UHCC

PCC

Q1 2019/20

System Performance Metrics Explorer Dashboard HCC

Q4 2018/19

Q3 2018/19

Q2 2018/19

Q1 2018/19

Q4 2017/18

Q3 2017/18

Q2 2017/18

Q1 2017/18

Q4 2016/17

0.0 Q3 2016/17

We currently monitor freshwater sites and beaches. Some of these sites exceed pollution target levels. This is a long-term ongoing initiative to identify and remove sources of pollution. Test results from freshwater monitoring sites have shown a decline in water quality over the last 12 months.

Date Level Quarter

Q2 2016/17

Target: 90 per cent of all freshwater sites have a rolling 12 month median < or + 1000 colony forming units (cfu)/100ml.

Perfomanc Percentag

1.0

Q1 2016/17

Freshwater quality

Percentage of monitored fresh water sites that have a rolling twelve month median value for E.coli (dry weather samples) that do not exceed 1000 cfu/100ml

WCC

Water Supply

Service Water Sup

400

Perfomanc Average d

Average drinking water consumption/resident/day

Date Level Quarter 300

200

100

Q1 2019/20

Q4 2018/19

Q3 2018/19

Q2 2018/19

Q4 2017/18

Q3 2017/18

Q1 2018/19

WCC

Service Stormwat

0.30

Perfomanc Number o

Number of pipeline blockages per km of pipeline

Date Level Quarter

0.25

0.20

0.15

0.10

0.05

Q1 2019/20

Q4 2018/19

Q3 2018/19

Q2 2018/19

Q1 2018/19

Q4 2017/18

Q3 2017/18

Q2 2017/18

Q1 2017/18

Q4 2016/17

Q3 2016/17

0.00 Q2 2016/17

Porirua's stormwater network continues to be hit by intense rainfall events resulting in surface flooding.

Council UHCC

PCC

Stormwater

Q1 2016/17

Target: < 0.5 pipeline blockages per kilometre of pipeline.

Q2 2017/18

System Performance Metrics Explorer Dashboard HCC

Stormwater pipeline blockages

Q1 2017/18

Q4 2016/17

Q3 2016/17

Q2 2016/17

Q1 2016/17

0

Council HCC

PCC

UHCC

WCC

Te Kaitiaki Wai | Summer 2019

39


Wastewater

Wastewater pipeline blockages Target: < 0.8 pipeline blockages per kilometre of pipeline. Blockages continue to be an issue, however we are tracking within our target.

Wastewater

Number of wastewater reticulation incidents per km of reticulation pipeline (blockages)

Perfomance Mea Number of waste

0.30 Date Level Quarter

0.25

0.20

0.15

0.10

Q1 2019/20

Q3 2018/19

Q2 2018/19

Q1 2018/19

Q4 2017/18

Q3 2017/18

Q2 2017/18

Q1 2017/18

Q4 2016/17

System Performance Metrics Explorer Dashboard Q3 2016/17

Q2 2016/17

Q1 2016/17

0.00

Q4 2018/19

0.05

Council

HCC

PCC

UHCC

WCC

Service Wastewater

Wastewater

Wastewater overflows (dry weather) Eliminating dry-weather overflows continues to be a challenge. No dry weather overflows occurred in quarter one.

The number of dry weather sewerage overďŹ&#x201A;ows from the Council's sewerage system expressed per 1000 sewerage connections to the sewerage system

Perfomance Mea The number of dr

Date Level Quarter

0.4

0.3

0.2

0.1

HCC

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Te Kaitiaki Wai | Summer 2019

PCC

Council UHCC

WCC

Q1 2019/20

Q4 2018/19

Q3 2018/19

Q2 2018/19

Q1 2018/19

Q4 2017/18

Q3 2017/18

Q2 2017/18

Q1 2017/18

Q4 2016/17

Q3 2016/17

Q2 2016/17

Q1 2016/17

0.0


Watering guide GARDEN WATER RESTRICTIONS A single watering system (sprinkler, irrigation system, soaker hose, or unattended hose) between 6-8am and 7-9pm, on odd/even dates of the month depending on your house number.

RESIDENTIAL SPRINKLER BAN Includes sprinklers, irrigation systems, soaker hoses and unattended watering. Handheld watering is allowed.

RESIDENTIAL OUTDOOR WATER BAN Includes spinklers, irrigation systems, soaker hoses, unattended watering and any handheld watering.

See what this means for you at loveeverydrop.nz Te Kaitiaki Wai | Summer 2019

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Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a lot of water! By using grey water or a hose nozzle to water your gardens you can help ensure our water lasts all summer. See how you can use less at loveeverydrop.nz Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a lot of water! By using grey water or a hose nozzle to water your gardens you can help ensure our water lasts all summer.

See how you can use less at loveeverydrop.nz

Wellington Water is owned by the Hutt City, Porirua City, Upper Hutt City, Wellington City, South Wairarapa District and Greater Wellington Regional councils. The councils are all equal shareholders Our vision is to create excellence in regional water services so communities prosper. Our customers, the residents of the metropolitan Wellington Region, and South Wairarapa, use the services we provide: drinking water; wastewater; and stormwater in their homes, businesses, and communities every day.

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Te Kaitiaki Wai | Summer 2019

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