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The two families searched for their lost relative for months after the incident. At the time Musta’s wife was pregnant, still she visited Pattani’s Ingkayutthaboriharn army base but without avail. Awae said he spent most of his family’s savings to search for his brother. He went to several army camps in Yala and Hat Yai provinces, but there was nothing. The Maseng family finally accepted Wae-eso’s death and organized a funeral for him, even though they did not have his body. Wae-eso’s family said that Wae-eso and his boss Musta were good people and not involved in anything suspicious. However, Awae said he heard rumours that the police were looking for people who worked with mobile phones and that could well have been the motive behind his brother’s capture. Still, in his opinion, Wae-eso – who did not go to school – was not educated enough to understand how to circuit a detonator. Almost a year after her husband’s disappearance, on 4 October 2004, Musta’s wife complained to Queen Sikirit when the Queen she visited the region of the Deep South, as well as addressing a letter to her. Later, the very senior person informed the wife of the possible reason behind her husband’s disappearance. Apparently, 10 days before the incident was a bombing at the Tanyongmas supermarket. The police had found that a SIM card was used to trigger the explosive – the card was identified as having come from Musta’s shop. From the conversation with the secretary, the wife is confident that the police at Ra-ngae Police Station were responsible for taking the men away. Moreover, in their report, Senator Fakrudin Botor told HRW that Musta’a disappearance took place when the security forces were trying to substantiate reports that mobile phone networks around the Narathiwat Pileng military camp (Cho-airong district) had been deactivated before the militant raid that robbed it of 400 weapons on 4 January 2004. The investigation focused on local Muslims who owned or worked as technicians in mobile telephone shops in Narathiwat. He said that the authorities were also worried that mobile telephones were increasingly being used to trigger explosive devices used in attacks on government officials and civilians. OFFICIAL ACTION: Musta’s wife filed a missing person report on 12 February 2004, at the police station in Ra-ngae, Narathiwat province. Wae-eso’s wife also filed a missing persons report. In both cases the police have failed to locate the whereabouts of their respective husbands. In Musta’s case, however, the police took the computer from his shop, but they shortly returned it saying that there was no useful information on the hard drive. Tuanroohana believed that the Crime Suppression Division of the Royal Thai Police was just trying to find evidence as to Musta’s involvement in the Tanyongmas bombing and even when they were not successful, they stopped the investigation. Musta-Sidin’s wife took matters into her own hands and hired a lawyer from Yala named Somnek Rakung to write petitions to the relevant government officials. He addressed petitions to the Governor of Narathiwat province; Kraisak Chunhawan, ex-Senator of Narathiwat City Hall; Lieutenant General Pisan Wattanawongkeeree, Military Commander Region 4; ex-Prime Minister Taksin Shinnawatra; and many other officials of the Thai Parliament and the Royal Thai Police. In general, most responses have been irrelevant to Musta’s disappearance. Former Prime Minister Thaksin assured her that he would look into the case. The Thai Parliament gave their assurance that they would send the case to the Royal Thai Police.

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Enforced Disappearances in Thailand  

Enforced Disappearances in Thailand

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