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Ban Phai Police Station (only 10 minutes away from his house) until after dark. The last time the family managed to talk with him was around 9 p.m. when his other son, Mr Krittapong Laosiphaphan, called to see when he was coming back and the victim replied that he was not finished yet. Kritaphong later received three missed calls from his father between 11.14 and 11.16 p.m. At 11.18 p.m., an incoming call from Kamol to his family was cut off. The police at Ban Pai Police Station told the family that it was recorded that the victim leaving to go to his car at around 11.40 pm. As of 16 July 2011, Kamol’s whereabouts are unknown. Yet his car – a red Saburu – was found on 29 February 2008, at Surinthorn Hospital in Ban Haet sub-district (about 15 km from the police station). The victim’s brother, Mr Prasert Laosiphaphan, requested the phone company try to triangulate the victim’s phone signal and found that all calls originated from the Ban Phai district of Khon Kean province. Relatives have been searching the morgues for unidentified bodies but have not found any that resembles the victim yet. The phone records also showed that from 1-7 February 2008, Kamol mostly called police officers. The 6-7 February 2008, 80% of the calls were to the police. The records rightly showed the last call he made to his family at 11.18 p.m. on 7 February 2008. Police have informally told the family that the victim must have gone to Cambodia for gambling, but when the family requested Immigration and Customs to check the names of exits from Thailand, Kamol was not on the list. On 8 February 2008, the brother of the victim’s wife, called Mr Veera Somkwamkid (leader of the People’s Network against Corruption) for help. Verra said he would report the incident to several of his contacts in Bangkok – he has since not been in touch with the family. On 18 June 2008, the victim’s family received two anonymous phone calls. The caller confirmed Kamol’s death and said he knew the names of the two police officers responsible for the abduction. Then in March 2010, a large pile of sand was dumped in front of the Ban Phai family home. OFFICIAL ACTION: On 8 February 2008 at 9.50 a.m., the victim’s other brother (Mr Panya Lausiphaphan) and wife, complained at the Ban Phai Police Station the victim had been going back and forth all of the day before. At around 3 p.m. the victim’s brother and wife returned to question Pol. Lt. Col. Chanthosuth about Kamol’s whereabouts – they were told Kamol left at about 11.40 p.m. the day before. The police filed the case and said they would investigate but have since been silent on the matter. The resulting forensic investigation of the victim’s car (found on 29 February 2008) revealed eight handprints that did not belong to the victim. Handcuffs were found inside the glove compartment. The family requested a copy of the report but was denied that request. The family made a complaint with the Crime Suppression Unit in Bangkok (CSU). The CSU undertook an investigation of Ban Phai Police Station and interviewed the victim’s family. They allegedly did not find any evidence relevant to the crime. The family also reported the crime to the NHRC and the DSI. The DSI accepted the case as a special case on 24 June 2009, under a charge of self-interested corruption causing the nation a loss. Case 10/2553 has been sent to the appropriate authorities for investigation and prosecution under national law. 22

Enforced Disappearances in Thailand  

Enforced Disappearances in Thailand

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