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two orchard workers’ hands behind their backs and took them to the village where the soldiers had parked their vehicles. When they arrived, one of the head officers asked the squad leader ‚what contraband did you find‛, and the squad leader replied ‚we didn’t find anything.‛ The commanding officer then asked ‚then why did you apprehend them?‛ The squad leader then turned to Ms Jasor and asked her if Jahwa was her boyfriend – she replied ‚no.‛ The soldier then asked if Jahwa was the owner of the orchard and if anyone had seen Mr Ja-Hay (the actual owner) – he replied she did not know. The commanding officer ordered Ms Jasor be released and Jahwa put into the vehicle. The last thing Ms Jasor can remember about Jahwa is him being stepped on the neck until his tongue stuck out – there was a lot of blood she says. The victim’s daughter, Ms Na-der, returned home from Lumphun as soon as she heard about her father’s disappearance. She went to look for him at the army camp base in Mae Ai district the following day because that is where the Village Headman’s wife had said he was being held. At the gates, soldiers told her that her father had been released already. She enquired again two days later and was told that he had been moved to Mueang Chiang Mai. A Mr Jah Pe Po (also known as Mr Pa-aee Keasoi) had been detained at one of the detention for ten days when Mr Jalo was brought in. He said many villagers from Huay Ma Yom village arrived at the same time as he did. According to his fellow prisoner, Jahwa was blindfolded like the other new inmates, but was the only one with handcuffs on. The description of the clothes he was wearing matches the clothes his family said he wore every day for work: long black trousers and a T-shirt. Mr Pe Po added ‚I think Mr Jahwa had already been beaten because he had no strength left, but he wasn’t bloody.‛ Mr Pe Po then overheard the soldiers accusing Jahwa of shooting at them (although the gun never fired so no one died). Mr Jalo was beaten again in front of the other inmates. After which, Jahwa was placed in the middle of the marching field and 40 prisoners were forced to line up to kick Jahwa twice. The victim was doused with water and left on the field. A while later, Mr Pe Po was ordered by soldiers to go check his condition: he was in a critical condition. Still, Mr Pe Po was ordered to douse and kick Jahwa again. Half an hour later, Jahwa had died. According to Mr Pe Po, the victim’s body was buried in the Doi Lan national park of Mae Ai district. Mr Pe Po and other prisoners were forced to help getting rid of the body that night. Four officers were involved (JPF was provided with the names of two officials involved). The victim’s body was placed at the back of the truck (a Toyota Tiger) with the other live prisoners. Mr Pe Po recalls that they left the military barracks at around 8 p.m. and arrived at the place of burial at around 9 p.m. A pit was dug. Mr Pe Po said that the official poured whisky over the victim’s body and then performed a traditional Buddhist ceremony. The body (draped in a sheet) was pushed into the pit. More whisky was poured over and one official shot two full magazines of bullets from his gun (a 9 mm hand gun) into Jahwa’s head, chest and legs. More whisky was poured, the pit was covered and a large branch was placed on top. The soldiers drove the prisoners back to the barrack. The victim’s wife, Ms Na-eur, said that Jahwa had never had dealings with the police; he had never been arrested and had never been called into question. Although he had some history of using opium, it had been a long time since he last used. She did not comprehend why her husband was targeted in such a brutal way.

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Enforced Disappearances in Thailand  

Enforced Disappearances in Thailand

Enforced Disappearances in Thailand  

Enforced Disappearances in Thailand

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