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after he went to the south to visit his family, DSI had not provided protection. In 2004, he was accused of involvement in the January gun robbery, he was tortured and detained in Bangkok. A case was brought against his torturers by Somchai Neelapaijit prior to the disappearance of Somchai Neelapaijit. Abdulloh was a witness to his own torture. Abdulloh’s wife was murdered one year after his disappearance. Their village is in the Red Zone so it is possible that he was taken by insurgents. In cases involving multiple victims it is possible that only one or two of the individuals who were disappeared or killed were targeted and the others were enforcedly disappeared or killed because they were witnesses to the enforced disappearance or killing of those targeted. This is potentially the case in regard to the three men who were disappeared with Ku-amad Ahbesen in Pattani in 2005 (See page Annex for details) and the three people who were disappeared at the time of the killing of Pichit Ja-Ur, Jaga Ja-Ur in January 2006 in Fang district of Chiang Mai. d. Activists (environmental, human rights, political)

A wide range of activists face threats and attacks in Thailand. These include journalists, NGO workers (particularly those working with marginalized communities), lawyers, community activists, environmental activists, trade union activists and anti-corruption activists. Thai authorities, particularly security personal are a major source of threats and attacks on human rights defenders. However, others such as insurgents in southern Thailand and companies also pose a serious threat to human rights defenders. Perhaps the most blatant recent example of threats to human rights defenders in Thailand is current use of the Computer Crimes Act and Lese Majeste laws to stifle dissenting views and freedom of expression. Enforced disappearances of activists are known to have been taking place in Thailand since the June 1991 disappearance of Tanong Pho-an who was Senator, Chairman of the Thai Labour Congress and Deputy Chairman of the International Council of Free Trade Unions Asia-Pacific Regional Office. He was campaigning against the military-government’s dissolution of state enterprise labour unions. JPF has documented the enforced disappearance of several activists since Tanong’s disappearance. JPF has documented the disappearance of two anti-corruption activists in Khon Khen province in north east Thailand:  Songkran Namprom was disappeared on 20 September 1999 after being dropped off by a friend at a hotel where he was to meet a person who claimed that he is a policeman, Chairit Anurit. Songkran was a businessman and former Village Headman in Sila village. He was also an elected official of the government administration office (O bor tau). The informant told JPF that at the time of his disappearance he had made a complaint about corrupt business practices of the leader of the Subdistrict Administration Office, who then tried to bribe Songkran and then threatened to kill him. A man who identified himself as a policeman from Bangkok coincidently arrived at Songkran’s house. Songkran told him about the corruption case and the policeman suggested they meet at the Sofitel to discuss the matter privately. Songkran was dropped by an associate at the entrance of the hotel at 4 p.m. on the day of his disappearance. A body was found about a week later in a field in the neighbouring district which appeared to be Songkran. However, a special police unit in Bangkok informed his wife that the DNA apparently did not

Enforced Disappearances in Thailand  

Enforced Disappearances in Thailand

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