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who set out seven dead bodies have been recovered, three people survived and two people remain missing.62 The bodies were located over quite a wide radius suggesting that the killer(s) were attempting to hide the killings to avoid the news spreading. It is difficult to know why the killings took place. It is possible the perpetrator wanted to kill the broker for not paying him off. It is also possible the perpetrator was drunk and accidently shot one person and then decided to kill the others. A policeman was officially accused of the murders, however, he hung himself in what appeared to be very dubious circumstance suggesting he may have been set up. A detective from Tak province sent to investigate the case was also reportedly murdered. Authors of Militia Redux: Or Sor and Revival of Paramilitarism in Thailand published in 2007 have also documented several cases of enforced disappearances and killings affecting the refugee and migrant community. These cases include: 

On 28 February 2000, Ko Win Myint, a Mon man, was shot by an Or Sor member (local paramilitary hired by the Ministry of Interior) at a checkpoint near the Mon refugee camp at Halockhani in Sangkhlaburi district, Kanchanaburi province. He was accused of being a Burmese military intelligence agent by a drunk Or Sor member who shot him as he tried to explain who he was. He did not die immediately but was dragged by the Or Sor members to a cliff and kicked off. The militia did not allow the family to collect the body. Ko Win Myint worked for a Western NGO on a HIV/AIDs programme. In January 2002, 17 bodies were found dumped in the Moei River in Mae Sot. Their hands and feet were bound, their eyes blindfolded and their throats slit. Thailand’s Thai Rath newspaper speculated that two of the three main suspects were immigration officials. After questioning by the police, they reportedly absconded.63 In April 2003, a group of Mon men were caught illegally cutting bamboo by Or Sor members near Halockhani (the same group responsible for the murder of Ko Win Myint), where a scuffle had taken place between the men and the Or Sor. One man was shot and his body taken away and never recovered. In May 2003, six Burmese migrant workers were arbitrarily arrested, beaten and shot dead by local administrative officials and Chor Ror Bor members. A group of more than ten migrants were arbitrarily arrested by members of Chor Ror Bor who demanded a 2,500 Baht ransom from everyone. One of the Chor Ror Bor went to collect the money from other workers at a factory, however he was beaten by the workers who thought he was a drug abuser, not an official. More Chor Ror Bor then came and caught six of the Burmese migrants they believed had beaten their colleague. They were tied together and later handcuffed and beaten for two hours across the road from the village headman’s house before being taken into the forest, shot and burned on rubber tires. Several officials were sentenced to death for their role in the killings.

A detailed report on human rights abuses perpetrated against migrant workers between 2001 and 2003 in Tak province documents ten cases of migrants killed or enforcedly disappeared by state officials.

The group leader, who guided them into Thailand, survived the incident but has since gone missing. ‚Thais must stand up for migrants rights‛, The Irrawaddy, Volume 10, No. 2, February 2002.

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Enforced Disappearances in Thailand  

Enforced Disappearances in Thailand

Enforced Disappearances in Thailand  

Enforced Disappearances in Thailand

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