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the victims henceforth missed their appointment with the Village Headman earlier the same day they disappeared). Ibroheng had never complained to the authorities about anything before, and he had never had any altercations with anyone. Ibrogeng was a law-abiding citizen and the only time he had contact with state officers was when they would bring medicine and food to the villagers from His Majesty the King of Thailand. The informant explained that they would ask to see identification before handing over the offerings. When Ibroheng had not returned home, his father, Mr Hama Karhong, was the first to inquire at the Naresuan Camp about his son’s whereabouts. He was informed by a police officer (with unknown ranking) that no persons of such description were spotted there. The father asked to come inside the grounds but was denied entry. He gave his contact number to the officer, as well as a photo of his son. As of 15 June 2011, no one has phoned him back. Ibroheng’s older brother and friend of Dolhami, Mr Hasming Karhong, informed Dolhami’s family in Tantoo district about Dolhami disappearing and explained the story of the missing boat to them on 1 May 2011. The reason why the victims’ families firmly believe the Border Patrol Police Camp of Naresuan is lying and that they are in fact responsible for the men’s disappearance is because a witness’ account confirms that was the last place they were seen since the 30 April 2011. The eyewitness was looking for birds in front of the military camp when at around 5.30 p.m. he saw the victims drive a motorbike to the camp gates and into the camp located between villages 1 and 2, Banglang sub-district, Bannang Sata district, Yala province (it was later determined that the motorbike was Dolhami’s bronze Honda Wave – it has not been found either since that last sighting). Unfortunately, this person cannot be named as he refuses to be associated with the incident outof-fear. He met twice with the family to explain what he saw, but later refused to testify as a witness. The family described him as a normal villager with no concealed allegiances. The eyewitness’ account correlates well with accounts from family members. First, Ibroheng’s wife heard the two men discussing the boat’s retrieval earlier on the day of 30 April 2011. Then Ibroheng’s brother Hasming said he saw Ibroheng at around 4 p.m.; Ibroheng told him that he was going to get his boat back. Then, at around 7 p.m., Ibroheng’s other brother, Mr Makorseng Karhong, called Ibroheng’s wife asking whether Ibroheng had come back home. She replied he had not. Makorseng then tried many times to call Ibroheng’s mobile phone, as well as Dolhami’s, but without avail. After a while, the phones stopped ringing and went straight to answering machine – they had been turned off. OFFICIAL ACTION: Ibroheng’s brother, Makorseng, complained to MAC, and they in turn passed on the case to CrCF. CrCF suggested that the relatives file the case at Bannang Sata Police Station. The relatives also complained at the Damrong Tham Center (governmental office under the SBPAC) in Mueang Yala. They then sent a complaint letter to the Police Centre in the southernmost provinces to investigate the case. The Centre estimated it would take three months to investigate the case. Seven days after the incident, the Police Center sent their Region 9 unit to interview the families of the victims. Since then, there has been no update to the investigation, but the case was transferred to Bannang Sata Police Station. In addition, Dolhami’s family met with Police Captain Jedsada Chumpol from the Border Patrol Police Camp on 2 May 2011. He denied knowing anything about a missing boat and suggested that the family complain to the Tantoo Police Station 50

Enforced Disappearances in Thailand  

Enforced Disappearances in Thailand

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