Page 1

Photographing Flowers: Basics  © Wendy Folse   Apr 23, 2001  Spring is in the air and no other time of year inspires more people to pick up  their cameras and head outdoors. As nature begins to spread its marvelous  palette of colors across the land, it is time to brush up on some basic tips to  turn your garden photos into masterpieces. Remember the hints given in  previous articles. Get in close and fill the frame with the subject.  

Subject   What are you trying to show? Your garden, a particular flower, a vista, or  maybe color, shape, or form. Whatever your subject is, make sure that  you concentrate on composition and framing in order to capture the  subject. 

Mood or Theme   What mood or theme are you looking for? The mood and theme will help  determine which techniques will work best. For example, if you are trying to  capture a botanical type print of a variety of rose then you will want to  insure accuracy. This will require a greater depth of field and absolute  sharpness throughout.    • Botanical Print‐accuracy   • Blossom‐Impressionistic   • Plant‐‐Shape and form   • Landscape‐‐design, color, layout   • Patterns in Nature 

The copyright of the article Photographing Flowers: Basics in Photography is owned by Wendy Folse. Permission to republish Photographing Flowers: Basics in print or online must be granted by the author in writing. Page 1 


Motion will blur pictures   Use a tripod   Steady is the word. If you don't have a tripod handy brace yourself , lock your elbows and keep  them close to your body. This will help to eliminate blurry images. It is very difficult to  photograph single blossoms waving in the breeze.  Do no harm‐ do not break blossoms or trample plants in the process. Instead, carry small sticks  and twist ties to help isolate and steady the stems. Or better yet, wait until the wind dies down.  Plan your shots carefully   Limit the depth of field and use a large aperture, f/2.8, f/4, f/5.6, in order to eliminate  distracting backgrounds. Decide which part of the flower you want to be sharp. Selective focus is  the key here. Let whatever is not important go blurry. Blurring the background will put greater  emphasis on the flower.    Point & Shoot Cameras   Manual Override   If your camera has the option of manual override, experiment with it and learn how to use it.  Most flower photos require the use of special considerations that you just cannot get with  complete auto modes. Experimentation is the best teacher.  Program Settings   Many of the new automatic slrs on the market have a close‐up program setting that is great for  this type of work. Some programs are even designated with a flower icon.    Time of Day   Early morning   ƒ Best time of day to shoot   ƒ

Dew on the flowers drastically adds to the image  

ƒ

Colors are saturated and the contrast is reduced  

ƒ

No harsh shadows to distract from the flowers.  

Bright Sun   Not recommended for several reasons. One is that it will require you to use a much smaller  aperture thereby increasing depth of field. In photographing flowers it is desirable to eliminate  as much of the background as possible in order to isolate the flower. Another reason is that it  causes harsh shadows and washes out the colors of the flowers.  The copyright of the article Photographing Flowers: Basics in Photography is owned by Wendy Folse. Permission to republish Photographing Flowers: Basics in print or online must be granted by the author in writing.   Page 2 


Overcast Day   Colors will be brighter. No heavy shadows to ruin your picture. Less light allows the use of larger  f‐stops. Most professional photographers choose to shoot on a cloudy or overcast day whenever  possible.  Tips & Tricks   Aluminum Foil   Carry a piece of foil with you to use as a reflector. The sheet should be about the size of a sheet  of paper. Fold it up into a square and tuck it into your camera bag. Use it to reflect light onto the  blossom or plant to create highlights, or get rid of shadows.  Water Bottle   Carry a small spray bottle with you and use it to mist the blossom or plant. This adds an  attractive quality to the image. Consider the light. The droplets will sparkle and glow depending  on the direction of the light. Move around and observe the effect from different angles then  choose the best from which to shoot.  Black Card   Use a piece of heavy, dark colored construction paper to create a simple backdrop. First, meter  the scene without the black card in the picture. Then add the card and shoot with the metered  setting. The reason for this is that if you meter the black card, the meter will set the camera in  order to make the black card appear 18% gray, which is not what you want. You want the  flowers to be bold and vivid and the card to remain black.                    All photos are copyrighted and owned by Wendy L. Folse.    The copyright of the article Photographing Flowers: Basics in Photography is owned by Wendy Folse. Permission to republish Photographing Flowers: Basics in print or online must be granted by the author in writing.   Page 3 


The copyright of the article Photographing Flowers: Basics in Photography is owned by Wendy Folse. Permission to republish Photographing Flowers: Basics in print or online must be granted by the author in writing. Page 4 

Photographing Flowers: The Basics  

Article on how to take gorgeous photos of flowers.

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you