Page 1

CET: 12 Lead ECG Learning Package 


CET: 12 Lead ECG Assignment Learning Package

Version Control This document has been peer reviewed and moderated.  Changes to content  must not be made without the approval of the Clinical Education and Training  Manager – and a documented moderation process. All teaching packages should  be reviewed biannually, or externally moderated. Moderation

Version Control Date 29/03/200 5 01/06/201 2

Details Original Assignments

Authorised Jacqui Eades

Content Review

Todd Mushet

©WFA Clinical Education Team


CET: 12 Lead ECG Assignment Learning Package

›Introduction This package is designed as either a learning or revision tool.  It   incorporates   features   specific   to   the   interpretation   of   a   12   lead  Electrocardiograph (ECG). These include: • • • • • • • •

Lead systems Lead groups Axis & Axis Determination  ECG indicators of myocardial Infarction Chamber enlargement (RVH/LVH/RAA/LAA) Bundle Branch Blocks (RBBB/LBBB/IVCD) & Hemiblocks (LAH/LPH) ECG markers of Pulmonary disease Sundry   causes   of   ECG   change   (pericarditis,   pulmonary   embolism   &  cerebral injury)

The assignment can be done primarily through reading the texts and web sites in  the recommended reading section.   However referring to other journal articles,  texts and web sites that you may have sourced through your own research may  enhance your answers. It is expected that the assignment will take up to 30 hours to complete.  This will  vary depending on how much research you do and the depth you choose to go  into.

©WFA Clinical Education Team


Important Note  CET: 12 Lead ECG Assignment Learning Package Due to the extensive nature of this topic, this assignment has been divided into  sections   to   enable   students   who   have   limited   time   or   prefer   to   develop   certain  areas only. As such you may choose to do one or more components independently,  with CE points allocated accordingly. 

The final   section;   practice   ECGs,   does   however   require   knowledge   from   each  section, so this should only be challenged if you have completed all components of  the assignment or have prior 12 lead ECG knowledge or interpretation experience. 

›Instructions Answers should be entered in the spaces provided. Each answer should have a  reference showing where you sourced the information from. For an example on  how to format the reference refer to the references entered in the recommended   reading section below. For a more detailed guide to formatting references refer to   the   Wellington   Free   Ambulance   Services   Assignment   Guide.   Copies   are  available   on   station,   from   the   Training   Department   or   under   training   on   the  intranet   section   of   the   Wellington   Free   Ambulance   web   site  http://www.wfa.org.nz/.  Submitting the assignment can be done by sending it to the following address: Clinical Education Team Wellington Free Ambulance Service PO Box 601 Wellington Alternatively   you   can   submit   your   assignment   electronically   via   e­mail   to  assignments@wfa.org.nz   in MS word format. Please put the words Continuing  Education Assignment in the subject line of the email. The Clinical Education Team will be marking your assignment Please do not hesitate to contact a Clinical Educator if you have any concerns  regarding the assignment.

©WFA Clinical Education Team


CET: 12 Lead ECG Assignment Learning Package

›Grades Grading will be A B or C the criteria for which follows;

A

A comprehensive understanding of the subject matter is demonstrated and  information is incorporated from a wide range of sources inclusive of recent  research. Information is factual with few errors. Presentation is excellent

B

A good understanding of the subject matter is demonstrated. Information  from   standard   sources   is   incorporated.   Information   is   factual   with   few  errors. Presentation is good.

C

Does not   demonstrate   understanding.   Few   facts   are   presented   and   not  supported. Consistent errors in facts, and presentation is poor.

Continuing Education Points Section 1: Lead systems

    

    3 points

Section 2: ECG Indicators of myocardial Ischemia, Injury & Infarction points Section 3: Cardiac Vectors & Axis

        5 

    3 points

Section 4: Chamber Enlargement (RAE/LAE/RVH/LVH) points

        3 

Section 5: Bundle Branch Blocks & Hemiblocks  points

        3 

Section 6: ECG Changes for pulmonary disease and other miscellaneous                  conditions                 3  points        Section 7: Practice ECGs

©WFA Clinical Education Team

              10 points           Total: 30 points


CET: 12 Lead ECG Assignment Learning Package

Section 8: Practice ECGs: Extra for Experts! 

    5 points

         Total: 35 points

›Recommended Readings 1. Bledisloe, B.E. (1999). 12 Lead ECG Monitoring and Interpretation. Disease  Findings.  P. 1044­46. 2. Conover, M.B. (1996). Understanding Electrocardiology. (7th ed.). Mosby: St  Louis.  3. Garcia, T.B, & Holtz, N.E. (2003).  Introduction to 12 Lead ECG: The Art of   Interpretation. Jones and Bartlett Publishers: Massachusetts. 

4. Grauer, K. (1998). A Practical Guide to ECG Interpretation. (2nd ed.). Mosby:  St. Louis.  5. Hampton, J.R. (2003).  The ECG in Practice. (4th  ed.).   Churchill Livingston:  London. 6. Hampton, J.R. (2003). The ECG made Easy. (6th ed.).  Churchill Livingston:  London. 7. Huzar, R.J. (2002). Basic Dysrhythmias: Interpretation and Management. (3rd  ed.). Mosby: St Louis. 8. Magdic,   K.S.,   &   Saul,   L.M.   (1997).   ECG   Interpretation   of   Chamber  Enlargement. Critical Care Nurse. 17:1: pp13­25. 

©WFA Clinical Education Team


CET: 12 Lead ECG Assignment Learning Package

9. Morton, P.G.   (1996).   ECG/Pacemaker:   Using   the   12   Lead   to   Detect  Ischemia, Injury, and Infarction. Critical Care Nursing. 16:2: pp85­95. 10. Taigman,  M.,   &  Canan,   S.  (1990).  Cardiology  Practicum:  Reading   Bundle  Branch Blocks.  Journal of Emergency Medical Services. May: pp41­44. 11. Tintinalli JE, Kelen GD, Stapezynski JS.  (2000).  Emergency Medicine – A   Comprehensive   Study   Guide.  (5th  Edition).  McGraw­Hill   Companies   Inc:  United States of America 12. Victoria University of Melbourne. Paramedic Sciences. Graduate Certificate  in Intensive Care Paramedics.  Course Lecture Notes:  HHP5620 Advanced   Cardiac Care. 13. Wagner,   G.S.   (2001).  Marriot’s   Practical   Electrocardiography.   (10th  ed.).  Lippincott Williams & Wilkins: Philadelphia. 

›Websites www.12leadECG.com http://sprojects.mmi.mcgill.ca/heart/egcyhome.html   EKG world Encyclopedia.  http://bmj.bmjjournals.com/cgi/content/full/324/7334/415 http://www.ecglibrary.com/ecghome.html

©WFA Clinical Education Team


CET: 12 Lead ECG Assignment Learning Package

©WFA Clinical Education Team


›Key Words

Axis

Bundle Branch Blocks 

Cerebral injury 

Electrocardiograpgh (ECG)

Electrical current/impulse 

Hemiblocks

Lead

Left atrial enlargement (LAE/LAA)

Left Ventricular Hypertrophy (LVH)

Myocardial Infarction (MI), injury & ischemia

Pericarditis

Pericardial effusion

Pulmonary disease

Pulmonary embolism (PE)

Right atrial enlargement (RAE/RAA)

Right Ventricular Hypertrophy (RVH)

Waveform

© WFA Clinical Education Team


CET:  12 Lead ECG Learning Package

›Lead Systems The  electrical  picture  obtained   from the  heart is referred  to  as a   ‘lead’   1(7).  Several leads are utilized to view the heart from different vantage points, each   forming  a  different  view  of  electrical   activity  and  therefore  a  different ECG  pattern1­3.  The 12 lead ECG is made up of lead systems that correspond to the plane  from which they view the heart. The six limb leads view the heart from the   vertical / frontal plane, giving information about current flow that is right, left,   inferior or superior. The six limb leads are made up of three standard leads  and three augmented leads. The six precordial leads lie immediately in front  of the heart and view the heart from the horizontal / transverse plane, giving  information about current flow that is right, left, anterior, or posterior 1­9.  1. Name the three standard leads and the three augmented leads that make  up the limb leads.       Standard           Augmented  Answer:

Standard       Augmented       

2. Name the six leads that make up the precordial leads.

Answer:

     

© WFA Clinical Education Team


CET:  12 Lead ECG Learning Package

“Accurate placement of the precordial leads on the chest is crucial. Placing a lead as  little   as   one   intercostal   space   too   high   or   too   low   can   dramatically   alter   QRS  morphology and amplitude2 (15)”.  3. Anatomical landmarks  are  utilized  for  identifying  correct  placement of  the precordial leads on the chest. Describe these landmarks and provide  a labelled diagram showing the location of each of the precordial leads.       V1 –      V2 –      V3 –      V4 –

    V5 –      V6 –

Answer:

V1      V2      V3      V4      V5      V6     

© WFA Clinical Education Team


CET:  12 Lead ECG Learning Package

›Lead Groups Leads are  grouped according to  the  area of the  heart visualized by one  or more  leads2. 

4. Name the leads associated with each of the following groups:  •

Inferior wall leads: 

Septal wall leads: 

Anterior wall leads: 

Lateral wall leads:

Lateral precordial leads: 

High lateral leads:

Answer:

Inferior wall leads       Septal wall leads        Anterior wall leads        Lateral wall leads        Lateral precordial leads        High lateral leads       

NOTE: There is slight variation from text to text due to an overlap in precordial  lead orientation, i.e. V2 is both a septal and anterior lead, while V4 is both an  anterior and 

© WFA Clinical Education Team


CET:  12 Lead ECG Learning Package

›12 Lead Orientation Systems

Two basic formats are used to display the 12 standard leads of an ECG 2(16): Vertical Lead Orientation Format

I

aVR

V1

V4

II

aVL

V2

V5

III

aVF

V3

V6

Horizontal Lead Orientation Format

I

II

III

aVR

aVL

aVF

V1

V2

V3

V4

V5

V6

Today the vertical lead system is the most commonly used.  Using a three­channel  recorder  these   have  the  ability to  simultaneously record   lead  groups in  a  vertical   column. As shown previously, the standard limb leads (I, II, III) comprise the first lead   group,  followed   by  simultaneous  vertical   recording  of  the   augmented  leads  (aVR,  aVL, aVF) and then in two successive groups, the precordial leads (V1­V6) 2.  The horizontal lead format was the most exclusively used system in the past and is  still utilized in the community by a number of GP’s – hence the need to become  familiarised with both systems! The horizontal lead orientation system is obtained on  a single channel recorder. The advantage of this system is that a large amount of  information can be regularly obtained. The disadvantage being that this information is  obtained one lead at a time over a 40­60 second interval. This continuous stream of  tracing then has to be analysed and the tracing segmented and mounted for official  interpretation2. 

© WFA Clinical Education Team


CET:  12 Lead ECG Learning Package

5. Using the   following   tracings   in   the   vertical   lead   format   indicate   the  anatomical areas visualized by the leads that are shaded: A....

B. I

aVR

V1

V4

II

aVL

V2

V5

III

aVF

V3

V6 C.

Answer:

I

aVR

V1

V4

II

aVL

V2

V5

III

aVF

V3

V6

A.      B.      C.      D.     

© WFA Clinical Education Team

D.

  I

aVR

V1

V4

II

aVL

V2

V5

III

aVF

V3

V6

aVR

V1

V4

II

aVL

V2

V5

III

aVF

V3

V6


CET:  12 Lead ECG Learning Package

›ECG Indicators of Ischaemia, Injury and Infarction Myocardial   ischemia   occurs   almost   immediately   after   disruption   of   blood  supply. Without oxygen the ischemic tissue remains capable of depolarising,  however the process of repolarisation is affected 10. Depolarisation normally  occurs   from   endocardium   to   epicardium.   Repolarisation   proceeds   from   the  epicardium to endocardium, reflected as a positive T wave. If subendocardial  ischemia is present then the process of repolarisation remains unchanged.  However   if   subepicardial   ischemia   is   present,   conduction   is   slowed   in   the  epicardium. This prevents the epicardium from repolarising first and instead  the process begins in the endocardium6.  During   ischemic   events   the   blood   supply   is   sufficient   to   keep   myocardial  tissue   alive,   however   it   is  insufficient   to   maintain   membrane   integrity   so   a  difference   in   membrane   potential   is   created.   The   flow   of   electrical   current  during   electrical   systole   (recorded   through   the   ST   segment)   and   electrical  diastole (the QT segment) is therefore also altered 6.  These abnormalities of repolarisation are reflected on ECG 11. 1. What are the ECG indicators of myocardial ischaemia?  Answer:

      

Although T wave inversion can indicate myocardial ischaemia, it is always inverted in  aVR and in a healthy individual may also be inverted in other leads 6,10. 

2. In what leads is T wave inversion a normal variant?

Answer:

     

© WFA Clinical Education Team


CET:  12 Lead ECG Learning Package

If myocardial ischaemia is allowed to progress untreated then myocardial injury will occur.   Although the affected area is no longer able to contract, the injured area is still capable of   partially   or   completely   depolarising   (depending   on   the   time   taken   to   restore   oxygen  supply).   With   myocardial   injury   the   electrical   current   flows   between   the   pathologically  depolarised area and the areas normally depolarised, a current flow referred to as either a  ‘current of injury’6(395) or an ‘injury current’9(1044). This results in the injured tissue remaining  depolarised   and   emitting   a   negative   charge   into   the   surrounding   fluid   when   the  surrounding normal myocardium is positively charged. This current of injury is reflected on  ECG9.   3. What   are   the   defining   ECG   characteristics   associated   with   myocardial  injury? Answer:

     

‘J­point elevation’ or ‘early repolarisation 10 (88)’ is a form of ST elevation that can occur in  healthy individuals (reported in 2% of young adults 11). The ST can be raised by as much  as 3­4mm.  4. Describe   the   differentiating   characteristics   that   are   associated   with   ST  elevation   as   a   normal   variant   and   compare   those   with   that   indicative   of  myocardial   injury.   An   example   of   each   may   be   incorporated   with   your  answer.

Answer:

     

© WFA Clinical Education Team


CET:  12 Lead ECG Learning Package

If a zone of injury is not reversed then the injury will progress and death or infarction   of the myocardial tissue will occur.  This evolution of MI is seen on ECG in stages.  The earliest stage is known as the hyperacute phase 10.  

5. Describe the ECG characteristics evident in this hyperacute phase and  the developmental QRS – ST changes that subsequently occur; markers  of MI. Answer:

     

A Q wave is said to be present when the first deflection after the PR interval (that of  the QRS complex) is negative. Small narrow q waves occur normally in certain leads  and represent the flow of electrical forces towards the intraventricular septum 2.  6. Name   the   leads   in   which   these   are   normally   visualized   and   the  parameters that define these as a normal variant.

Answer:

     

7. Define the   parameters   of   a   Q   wave   that   are   indicative   of   myocardial  infarction.

Answer:

     

8. Why is the Q wave diagnostic of MI and how does a Q wave develop? Answer:

     

© WFA Clinical Education Team


CET:  12 Lead ECG Learning Package

9. The term ‘reciprocal change10’ is  associated with  ECG findings  of MI.  Define this term and outline how it is depicted on ECG.

Answer:

     

Patterns of Ischemia, injury or infarction can be identified on ECG according to their  anatomical location6,10. 10. Using the Table below list the ECG leads utilized to view each of the  following anatomical regions of the heart and name the coronary artery  responsible for blood supply to that region.

Answer:

Anatomical Area

Facing Leads

Coronary Artery

     

     

    Anterior (localized)

     

     

    Anteroseptal

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Extensive Anterior

     

     

Inferior wall

     

(Site of infarction) Anterior wall:      Septal     

           Lateral            Anterolateral      

     

(diaphragmatic) Posterior wall

Right Ventricular wall

© WFA Clinical Education Team

     

     

     

     


CET:  12 Lead ECG Learning Package

Views of the R ventricular wall and the posterior wall are limited by the standard 12   lead ECG. Better vantage points can be achieved by relocating the chest leads 2,9. 11: Describe the correct lead placement for each of these areas. RV Wall:  Posterior Wall: Answer:

     

Using the standard 12 Lead ECG, posterior wall injury/infarction can also be viewed  indirectly by assessing what happens electrocardiographically in leads V1, V2 and V3  by applying the principle of reciprocal change or by applying the ‘mirror test’ 2(243).  11. Describe the QRS – T changes associated with posterior wall infarction  as seen in the anterior leads and describe how to apply the mirror test.  Outline   other   findings   (i.e.   reciprocal   changes)   that   are   indicative   of  PWMI.

Answer:

     

12. Describe the QRS – T changes associated with Right Ventricular wall  infarction (RVI). Answer:

     

© WFA Clinical Education Team


CET:  12 Lead ECG Learning Package

Non – Q Wave infarctions account for approximately 30% ­ 40% of acute infarctions  (up to 50%7 depending on text) . Although these patients have a smaller infarct size,  better   residual   left   ventricular   function   and   lower   in   hospital   mortality,   long­term  survivability is on par or less than that of Q wave infarctions. The incidence of post­ infarction  angina and the  rate  of  recurrence  are  also  reported  as higher  with  this  group6. 13. Define the term ‘non­Q wave’ infarct and compare it to that of a Q­wave  infarct.  Answer:

     

Diagnosis of non­Q wave infarction is made through detection of elevated cardiac  enzymes [Troponin I/T)]6. Suspicion of non­Q wave infarct can however be formed  through clinical presentation and associated ECG changes. 14. Outline ECG changes associated with a non­Q wave infarction.  Answer:

     

© WFA Clinical Education Team


CET:  12 Lead ECG Learning Package

IMPORTANT: Remember ST elevation is not only caused by MI.  Differential considerations include the following: CAUSES OF ST ELEVATION12

Electrolytes LBBB Early Repolarisation Ventricular hypertrophy Aneurysm Treatment (pericardiocentesis) Injury (AMI, contusion, pericarditis) Osborne waves (hypothermia) Non­occlusive   vasospasm   prinz­

Quick Mention: ATRIAL INFARCTION  This is extremely rare and there is very little mention of it in standard texts.  It can however be seen on ECG when there is significant PR depression (in at  least  2 leads) with  associated  signs  of  infarction  and  without  any criteria  for  pericarditis5(77­78).   Other listed criteria includes: • • •

↑PR > 0.5mm in V5 &V6 with ↓PR in V1 & V2 ↑PR > 0.5mm in lead I with ↓PR in leads II & III ↓PR > 1.5mm in precordial leads and > 1.2 in leads I, II & III, combined   with atrial arrhythmias

P waves may also be abnormal in shape (W, M, notched, or irregular) 6(420)

© WFA Clinical Education Team


CET:  12 Lead ECG Learning Package

›Cardiac Vectors and Access The millions of individual electrical impulses generated by depolarisation and  repolarisation vary in intensity and direction and are referred to as cardiac  vectors5,7.  Such   vectors  when   travelling   in   the   same   direction   add   to   each  other   and   when   travelling   in   opposing   directions   cancel   each   other   out.   If  travelling at an angle towards each other then they add or subtract energy  and change directions when they meet 5. Combined these millions of vectors  form main vectors. The electrical activity of the main vectors is detected by  the ECG and converted into waveforms5. During depolarisation the series of cardiac vectors produced are graphically  represented as the QRS complex. The initial vector represents depolarisation  of the interventricular septum in a left to right direction (1). A sequence of  vectors produced by endocardial to epicardial depolarisation then immediately  follows as shown: (2) beginning in the right and left ventricles near the septum (3) continuing through the thin wall of the right ventricle and thick lateral wall  of the left ventricle (4)   ending   in   the   lateral   and   posterior  aspect   of   the   left   ventricle,  near  its   base7(255).

Huzar, R.J. (2002). Basic Dysrhythmias: Interpretation and Management. (3rd ed.). Mosby: St Louis. P.  255.

© WFA Clinical Education Team


CET:  12 Lead ECG Learning Package

The sum   total   of   all   these   vectors   creates   a   single   large   vector,   this   final  vector is what’s known as the “mean QRS axis or, simply, the QRS axis 7(255)”  of the heart7. 

›Lead Axis Each   view   of   the   heart   (lead)   is   provided   by   recording   the   difference   in  electrical potential between a positive and a negative pole 3.    • A single electrode on the body surface serves as a  positive  pole for  each lead • The negative pole of each lead is provided by either a single recording  electrode (bipolar lead, I, II, III) or a “central terminal” that averages the  input  from multiple  recording  electrodes 3  (unipolar  / V  leads:  V1­V6,  aVR, aVF, aVL6).  The axis of a lead is created is by placing a hypothetical line between the two  electrodes, i.e. between the positive and negative electrodes of a bipolar lead  or between the positive electrode and a reference point of the unipolar lead 6,7.  An   electrical   current,   cardiac   vector,   flowing   parallel   to   the   axis   of   a   lead  produces   a   positive   (upward)   deflection   if   travelling   towards   the   electrode  (lead)   or   a   negative   (downward)   deflection   if   travelling   away   from   the  electrode. The greater the magnitude of the vector is the larger the deflection   (amplitude), the lesser the magnitude the lesser the deflection 7. When flow is perpendicular to the lead axis, no deflection is produced and  when it is bi­directional, i.e. partly towards and partly away from the lead axis,   a  biphasic  (partly  positive,  partly  negative)  deflection  is  evident.   When   the  mean   of   a   biphasic   deflection   is   more   parallel   towards   the   lead   axis   the  biphasic   deflection   is   more   positive.   When   orientation   is   closer   to   the  perpendicular, the waveform is less positive. 

FRONTAL PLANE LEADS The axis of the standard limb leads, I, II and III forms an equilateral triangle,  ‘Einthovens Triangle2(11)’,with  each lead separated by 60º.   This provides a  triaxial reference system for viewing electrical activity 3,7. The augmented leads  (aV)   fill   the   gap   between   the   standard   limb   leads   and   create   a   hexaxial  reference system3,7. The six leads of this system are separated by angles of  30°, providing a perspective similar to a clock face3. 

© WFA Clinical Education Team


CET:  12 Lead ECG Learning Package

Huzar, R.J. (2002). Basic Dysrhythmias: Interpretation and Management. (3rd ed.). Mosby: St Louis. P.  Lead I can be seen to be a lateral (leftward) lead that views the heart from a  250.

horizontal vantage point defined as 0° from the positive pole (­180° from the  negative pole). Lead I and is used as a reference point.  Leads II & III  are  inferior leads that view vantage points angulated at +60°  / ­120°  & +120°  /  ­60°, from the positive and negative poles respectively 2,7.  .  Lead aVL is a lateral, leftward monitoring lead. Vantage point looks down at  the heart from the patients left shoulder. It corresponds to an angle of ­30° /  +150°. Lead aVF is an inferior monitoring lead. It records from the left lower  extremity. Vantage point looks up at the heart from the patient’s feet. It is  perpendicular and corresponds to an angle of +90° / ­90°.  Lead aVR is the most distant recording electrode. Viewpoint is from the right  shoulder (­150° / +30°). It is recorded as a negative deflection2,7.

Huzar, R.J. (2002). Basic Dysrhythmias: Interpretation and Management. (3rd ed.). Mosby: St Louis. 

© WFA Clinical Education Team


CET:  12 Lead ECG Learning Package

NB: the positive pole and negative poles are not defined by + or – rather the positive  pole is represented as that labelled by the lead. This is evident in the aV leads Lead aVL, positive pole = ­30°, negative pole =  +150°,  Lead aVF, positive pole = +90°, negative pole =  ­90°. Lead aVR, positive pole = ­150, negative pole = +30°  This concept is important to understand if you wish to advance your axis calculation from a  quadrant to isolating axis within 10° [This is not covered within the scope of this assignment].

© WFA Clinical Education Team


CET:  12 Lead ECG Learning Package

TRANSVERSE PLANE LEADS The precordial leads (V1 – V6) view the transverse plane. The precordial lead  axis is produced by connecting the central terminal of the hexaxial system  (centre of the electrical field) to a recording electrode placed at the various  positions on the anterior and left lateral chest wall. The angles between these  leads are approximately the same as the frontal leads, separated by angles of  30°3 (with the exception of V3, refer diagram  7(250)). 

Huzar, R.J. (2002). Basic Dysrhythmias: Interpretation and Management. (3rd ed.). Mosby: St Louis. 

Precordial leads   provide   a   panoramic   view   of   the   electrical   activity   of   the  heart, progressing from the thinner right ventricle and across the thicker left  ventricle. Electrically illustrated this is viewed as progression and regression  of the R and S wave, a reflection of intact anterior forces. 1. R­wave   progression   and   the   zone   of   transition   are   assessed   when  viewing the precordial leads. Define these terms. R­wave progression: Transitional Zone: 

Answer:

      

2. Outline causes of poor R wave progression.

Answer:

     

Early Transition  is said  to  occur when  the   QRS complex becomes predominantly  positive   sooner   than   usual,   i.e.   between   V1   and   V2,   and   late   when   the   R   wave  becomes more positive later than usual. © WFA Clinical Education Team


CET:  12 Lead ECG Learning Package

Early transition,   a   shift   to   the   right   toward   V1   is  referred   to  as  counter­clockwise  rotation. Late transition, a shift in transition zone to the left, toward V6 and usually  after V4, is referred to as clockwise rotation6,8. 3. List possible causes of early and late (delayed) transition. Early transition:  Late transition:  Answer:

     

© WFA Clinical Education Team


CET:  12 Lead ECG Learning Package

›Axis Determination

A shift in axis can be caused by pathological process such as hypertrophy, infarction  or   conduction   defects8.   Determining   QRS   axis   can   therefore   give   an   insight   into  pathology and help put the 12 lead and clinical picture together 6.  For the purpose of simplicity, axis determination can be rapidly obtained by applying  the 2 lead and quadrant approach2,7.  2 lead approach; The mean QRS is calculated in the frontal plane using leads I and aVF. Lead I is a  horizontal lead orientated toward 0°. Lead aVF is orientated perpendicular to lead I at  +90°2.  Quadrant approach; The hexaxial reference system is divided into four quadrants by the bisection of lead  axis I and aVF. Each of the four quadrants are separated by 90°7.

© WFA Clinical Education Team


CET:  12 Lead ECG Learning Package

4. Name the four quadrants illustrated? I  (0º to –90º) II (0º ­ +90º) III (+90º ­ +/­ 180º) IV (­90º ­ +/­ 180) Answer:

I  (0º to –90º)      II (0º ­ +90º)      III (+90º ­ +/­ 180º)      IV (­90º ­ +/­ 180     

Under normal circumstances the heart lies in the left side of the chest and the mean  orientation of the electrical axis follows in the same direction as  the hearts anatomical location i.e. towards the left 2 5. Where does the normal axis lie?

Answer:

     

© WFA Clinical Education Team


CET:  12 Lead ECG Learning Package

Rapid determination of the QRS axis can be done by assessing the dominant  direction of the QRS complex in leads I and aVF. Using a ‘thumbs up’ method for  positive deflections and a ‘thumbs down’ for negative deflection, orientation towards  normal, left, right or indeterminate quadrants can be easy assessed 2.

                                            Net QRS  Deflection    & Lead I          (left  thumb) Positive              Up Normal Axis

Right Axis Deviation Left Axis Deviation Indeterminate Axis

Thumb direction Lead aVF    (right thumb) Positive              Up

Negative         Down

Positive              Up

Positive              Up

Negative          Down

Negative         Down

Negative          Down

NB: If the QRS complex is equiphasic / isoelectric (equally positive and negative)   then a net deflection of zero is yielded, axis is therefore determined on the direction   of the alternative lead i.e. If the complex in lead I is equiphasic and the complex in   lead aVF is positive then the axis has shifted to the right. If the complex in aVF is   equiphasic and the complex in lead I is positive then the axis has shifted to the left.  When the axis is normal a more precise method is achieved by assessing the relative  ‘net deflection2 (126)’ of the QRS complex in these leads.  This can be done by adding  up the number of small boxes in the R wave (positive deflection) and subtracting the  number of small boxes in the Q and S waves (negative deflections). Then by viewing  leads I at 0° and aVF at +90° a rough estimate in degrees can be achieved; • •

If the net deflection of lead I is about the same as that of lead aVF, then the  mean QRS should lie midway between these leads (or close to +45°) If the net QRS of lead I is positive and clearly exceeds that of aVF, then the  mean QRS should lie closer to lead I (i.e. between 0° and +40°, depending on  how much greater the positive deflection in lead I is). If the net QRS of aVF is positive and clearly exceeds that of lead I, then the  mean QRS should lie closer to lead aVF (i.e. between +50° and +90°,  depending on how much greater the positive deflection in aVF is).

Remember: the mean QRS axis is orientated most toward the lead with the greatest  net QRS deflection and furthest away from the lead with the greatest negative net  deflection.

© WFA Clinical Education Team


CET:  12 Lead ECG Learning Package

›Practising Axis QUESTION 6: Using the following, calculate the quadrant for which each axis is  found.

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10.

© WFA Clinical Education Team


CET:  12 Lead ECG Learning Package

Answer:

1.       2.       3.       4.       5.       6.       7.       8.       9.       10.      

© WFA Clinical Education Team


CET:  12 Lead ECG Learning Package

›Chamber Enlargement The terms enlargement, hypertrophy and dilation are used synonymously to  describe what happens to the heart as a result of work overload.   The term  hypertrophy is used to describe an increase in muscle mass that develops  when  the  cardiac muscle  fibres are stretched and  increase  their size as a  result   of   the   heart   being   forced   to   contract   against   increased   resistance.  Dilation refers to  expansion  of size  (not  mass).  As  the  heart  adapts  to  an   increased workload the chambers may stretch or dilate to accommodate the  increase in blood volume. Hypertrophy and dilation frequently occur together  as   compensatory   mechanisms   to   maximize   cardiac   output.   The   term  enlargement therefore encompasses both13.  When   evaluating   the   ECG   for   chamber   enlargement   there   are   three   basic  concepts that enable understanding of why certain ECG changes occur: 1. The   chamber   may   take   longer   to   depolarise,   potentially   causing   an  ECG waveform of prolonged duration. 2. The   enlarged   chamber   may   generate   more   current   than   normal,  thereby producing greater voltage and an ECG waveform of increased   amplitude. 3. A   larger   percentage   of   the   total   current   may   move   through   the  expanded chamber, thus shifting the electrical axis of the ECG13(16).  More muscle mass = more muscle cells, therefore more  conduction

ATRIAL ENLARGEMENT Given   a   p­wave   reflects   atrial   depolarisation,   assessment   of   atrial  enlargement is based on p­wave morphology. That said, factors other than  atrial   enlargement   such   as   rhythm   disturbance   or   alterations   of   atrial  conduction may also produce abnormality of p wave morphology. Due to this,  © WFA Clinical Education Team


CET:  12 Lead ECG Learning Package

various text use the term ‘abnormality’ in preference to enlargement because  the reliability or specificity of ECG criteria is subject to error 2,6,13.  Atrial depolarisation is best seen in two key leads, II and V1. Lead II is the  best lead because its orientation is virtually parallel to the orientation of the   electrical impulse as it travels from the SA Node to the AV Node. The p wave  in   lead   II   should   therefore   always   be   upright.   Lead   V1   is   chosen   for   its  anatomical location, as a septal and right­sided lead this is placed in close  proximity to the right atrium and views electrical activity from the right atrium  as  coming   towards  it   and   electrical   activity   from   the   left   atrium  as  moving  away   from   it.   The   p   wave   in   V1   may   normally   have   either   one   or   two  components and may be positive, negative or biphasic 2,6,13. 

1. List the ECG criteria outlined for right and left atrial enlargement.  •

Right Atrial Enlargement / Abnormality (RAE/RAA): 

Left Atrial Enlargement / Abnormality (LAE/LAA):

Answer:

      

Chambers can   enlarge   individually  or  in   groups.   If   both   atria   are  enlarged   at  the  same time, this is known as Biatrial enlargement3,5,13.  

2. What are   the   ECG   indicators   are   suggestive   of   biatrial   enlargement?

Answer:

     

© WFA Clinical Education Team


CET:  12 Lead ECG Learning Package

© WFA Clinical Education Team


CET:  12 Lead ECG Learning Package

VENTRICULAR ENLARGEMENT 3. Outline  the rules applied for interpretation of right and left ventricular  enlargement.  •

Rules for Right Ventricular Hypertrophy (RVH):

Rules for Left Ventricular Hypertrophy (LVH):

Answer:

     

It is also possible for both the left and right ventricles to be enlarged at the same   time, this is referred to as Biventricular enlargement3,5.  

4. What are   the   ECG   indicators   suggestive   of   biventricular   enlargement? Answer:

     

© WFA Clinical Education Team


CET:  12 Lead ECG Learning Package

›Bundle branch blocks and Hemiblocks The intraventricular conduction system is comprised of the right bundle branch (RBB)  and the left bundle branch (LBB). Originating from the LBB are two fascicles, the left  anterior  fascicle  (LAF)  and  the  left  posterior fascicle   (LPF) 5,6.  A third  division,  the  septal fascicle, sends out connecting branches between the LAF and the LPF 6. The  RBB and the left fascicles further divide into smaller and smaller branches to form a  network of terminal branches, the ‘purkinje system’ 5(123).  The RBB is responsible for innervating part of the right septum and the right ventricle.  The LAF innervates the superior and anterior aspects of the left ventricle, while the  LPF innervates the inferior and posterior aspects of the left ventricle 5.

Sequence of Normal Ventricular Activation Following activation of the AV Node, the first part of the ventricles to be depolarised  is the left side of the septum. Septal innervation occurs in a left to right direction and   upon reaching the ventricles spreads simultaneously in an outward direction across  the ventricular conduction pathways of both the right and left ventricle 2. Because of the much greater size and mass of the left ventricle (LV), left sided electrical activity dominates on the ECG. During  normal conduction septal depolarization is depicted on the right­sided lead (V1) as a small, positive r wave, electrical flow from  left to right (i.e. towards the electrode). Following activation of both ventricles, left ventricular conduction dominates and  conduction in V1 is viewed as moving predominantly away from the electrode, i.e. towards the left. This is recorded as a  relatively deep, negative S wave2.

In left   sided   leads,   leads   I   and   V6,   the   opposite   is   viewed.   Septal   activation   is   recorded as an initial negative wave (septal q wave) as the electrical current moves  from   left   to   right,   away   from   the   viewing   electrode.   As   activation   of   the   LV   then  dominates, electrical activity is seen as moving in a right to left direction, i.e. toward  the viewing electrode, and is depicted as a relatively tall, positive R wave 2. SUMMARY: • •

Right sided leads are predominantly negative Left sided leads are predominantly positive

© WFA Clinical Education Team


CET:  12 Lead ECG Learning Package

Normal QRS appearance or morphology is therefore viewed in the three key leads as  follows:

Lead I = R wave  or qR Lead V1 = rS or  S wave Lead V6 = R or  qR wave.

Grauer, K. (1998). A Practical Guide to ECG Interpretation. (2nd ed.). Mosby: St. Louis.  P. 102.

Because leads I and V6 are left­sided leads and Lead V1 is a right­sided lead these  are the three key leads used for recognition of BBB’s 2. An   intraventricular   conduction   problem   is   present   when   a   delay   or   obstruction   of  impulse conduction occurs anywhere along the bundle branch pathway. The type of  conduction   delay   or   block   is   identified   according   to   the   site/level   from   which   the  impulse conduction is delayed or obstructed and as such is termed as either right   bundle   branch  block (RBBB),  left  bundle  branch   block  (LBBB);  an  intraventricular  conduction   defect   (IVCD)   or   a   hemiblock;   left   anterior   hemiblock   (LAH)   or   left  posterior hemiblock (LPH). The terms complete or typical and incomplete or partial  are also applied to BB blocks3. 

Remember: if a BBB exists innervation to the portion of the heart that branch  serves is done via a slower cell­to­cell route.  A larger period of time is therefore required to depolarize that section; the time  taken is thus greater than 0.12 seconds. This is reflected on ECG as a wide  QRS with altered QRS morphology5. As a rule if the QRS is wide consider BBB. Additionally a regular rhythm that looks ugly = LBBB (although this can be  confused for a paced or ventricular rhythm!) In comparison, Hemiblocks cause little or no widening of the QRS because  the amount of slow cell­to­cell transmission of the depolarised wave is limited 5. Remember also to select the lead in which the QRS looks the widest: lead I,  II, or III, some leads may be deceptively narrow or borderline 14.  © WFA Clinical Education Team


CET:  12 Lead ECG Learning Package

1. Describe the following types of blocks. In your description include the  ECG findings used to identify the existence of each block.  A). Complete Right bundle branch block (RBBB B). Incomplete Right bundle branch block (RBBB): C). Complete Left bundle branch block (LBBB): D). Incomplete Left bundle branch block (LBBB): E). Intraventricular conduction defect/delay (IVCD): F).   Left   anterior   hemiblock   (LAH),   also   termed   left   anterior   fascicle   block  (LAFB): G).   Left  posterior   hemiblock   (LPH),   also   termed   left   posterior   fascicle   block  (LPFB): 

Answer:

     

© WFA Clinical Education Team


CET:  12 Lead ECG Learning Package

2. Secondary ST­T wave changes are associated with BBB’s. Why do these  occur and what are the expected ECG findings?

Answer:

     

3. Define the terms bivascicular and trifascicular and outline the associated ECG  findings.

Answer:

     

© WFA Clinical Education Team


CET:  12 Lead ECG Learning Package

›Pulmonary Disease Pulmonary disorders can produce characteristic and profound changes to the  ECG.   Recognition   and   understanding   of   these   changes   enables   the  interpreter to discern and eliminate a cardiac origin 12.  1. Outline the expected changes associated with CORD

Answer:

      

2. Outline the expected changes associated with Emphysema.

Answer:

     

© WFA Clinical Education Team


CET:  12 Lead ECG Learning Package

›Pericarditis

Pericarditis can be difficult to diagnose and relies primarily on the history and  physical exam in association with ECG findings2.  Cause of ECG change is likely to be due to: 1. Inflammation spreading to the adjacent layer of the myocardium (epicardium),  causing ST­T wave abnormalities as seen with epicardial ischemia or injury.  Because   the   whole   of   the   epicardium   is   usually   effected   ST   change   is  widespread.   2.

Significant pericardial   fluid   (as   with   effusion)   or   a   thickened   (fibrotic)  pericardium dampens the cardiac impulses causing a generalized decrease in  electrical waveform3,12. 

The ECG findings alone are non­conclusive, predominantly due to the lack of change  in some cases and the possibility of variable ST­T changes, intermediate return to  baseline and the nature of pericarditis being either acute or chronic. Additionally texts  vary and refer to typically no change, non­specific change or distinct stages (stage 1  & 23,12 or 4 stages2,11).  Differential   diagnosis   needs   also   to   include   consideration   to   MI   and   or   early  repolarisation.

Note: with early repolarisation there is an absence of symptoms and ECG change is  localized to one, or at the most, two areas of the heart. With MI Q waves are usually associated with ST elevation and the ST elevation is  localized to 2 or more corresponding leads, it’s not diffuse as seen with pericarditis. Additionally Hx and clinical picture should be consistent with pericarditis 8.  3. Outline the possible ECG changes associated with pericarditis.

Answer:

     

© WFA Clinical Education Team


CET:  12 Lead ECG Learning Package

›Pericardial Effusion Most   patients   with   pericarditis   will   also   have   a   pericardial   effusion 3,4,12.   ECG  abnormalities evident are associated with “the “insulating” effect of pericardial fluid,  which attenuates electrical signals of myocardial origin, and the pendular motion of  the heart within the fluid­filled pericardial space 11(393)”.

4. What is the triad of ECG criteria diagnostic of pericardial effusion.

Answer: Note: The ST­T changes of early repolarisation mimic those of pericarditis, therefore  making differentiating between the two a common problem.  Diagnosis can be assisted by measuring the ST segment / T wave amplitude ratio in  leads V5, V6 or I. Using the end of the PR segment as baseline (0mV), measure the   amplitude (height) of the ST at onset and in that same lead measure the amplitude of  the T wave peak. If the ratio of the ST amplitude to the T wave amplitude is below   0.25mV,   early   repolarisation   is   most   likely.   If   the   ratio   is   above   0.25   the   acute  pericarditis is likely 11(393). Remember: 1mm (height)  = 0.1mV (amplitude) Example: If the ST is 2mm (0.2mV) and the T wave is 5mm (0.5mV) then the ratio is  0.3, which meets the criteria for pericarditis.

© WFA Clinical Education Team


CET:  12 Lead ECG Learning Package

›Pulmonary Embolism

ECG findings in the acute phase of Pulmonary Embolism (PE) are believed to be the  result of right ventricular failure and acute right atrial and ventricular dilation. These  occur   secondary   to   pulmonary   hypertension,   which   is   caused   by   mechanical  obstruction of a central or peripheral pulmonary artery 6. This acute development of  right heart strain is termed ‘cor­pulmonae 3(214)’ and while it can be caused by other  events the most common cause is PE3. Since PE is under diagnosed in most clinical settings and it is estimated “that only  one   of   every   three  of   death­dealing   pulmonary   embolism   is   diagnosed   while   the  patient is still alive6(433)”, early recognition or at least suspicion of PE is essential for  increasing     diagnosis   and   reducing   mortality.   While   in   many   cases   the   ECG   can  remain unchanged or findings are non­specific and transient there are still changes  or patterns that are clearly reflective of PE that can raise a high degree of suspicion  and prompt further investigation. According to one study, 82% of patients with minor  to massive PE had a combination of typical ECG change. In addition, patients with  two   thirds   or   more   obstruction   all   had   evidence   of   the   commonly   noted   ECG  change6(433).   Other texts however argue that in the setting of PE most ECG’s are  normal2,4, with the notable exception of Sinus Tachycardia in the present of sudden   onset of SOB2­6.  NOTE: The described ECG patterns of acute PE can resemble those of MI, therefore  if anterior or inferior wall MI is suspected consideration should be made towards the  possibility   of   acute   PE,   particularly   if   the   patient   presents   with   severe   dyspnoea.  (Although dyspnoea presents with AMI the degree is much more pronounce if caused  by a PE)2,6. 

5. Outline the ECG findings associated with suspicion of acute PE

Answer:

     

© WFA Clinical Education Team


CET:  12 Lead ECG Learning Package

›Cerebral Injury Ischemic   and   hemorrhagic   cerebral   events,   such   as   that   of   a   major   stroke,  subarachnoid   hemorrhage   or   traumatic   brain   injury   (TBI)   lead   to   repolarisation  abnormalities.

6. Outline the   ECG   findings   associated   with   suspicion   of   cerebral  injury

Answer:

     

© WFA Clinical Education Team


CET:  12 Lead ECG Learning Package

›Practice ECGs A simple, systematic approach to descriptive analysis of 12 leads can be  achieved by applying the mnemonic AHI AHI2(23).

RAte RHythm   Intervals (PRI, QRS, QT)   Axis   Hypertrophy    Infarct (Q,R,S,T)  • • • •

Q waves R­wave progression ST segment changes T­wave change

While you may prefer to use your own methodology, Grauer introduces this as  a simple way of incorporating all the necessary components for descriptive  analysis and interpretation of 12 leads. Once routinely applied, use of this or  similar methods avoids under analysis or missing essential components that  help with correct ECG interpretation.  Using the attached ECG’s (and your choice of approach) give a descriptive  analysis   of   each   of   the   essential   components   and   outline   your   overall  interpretation The following is a guideline for formatting answers.  ECG 1: Rate Rhythm/regularity P wave PRI QRS  QT ST segment T wave Axis © WFA Clinical Education Team


CET:  12 Lead ECG Learning Package

Transition Hypertrophy Interpretation: Include  underlying rhythm,  hypertrophy, ischemia/  infarction and any  other findings. 

© WFA Clinical Education Team


CET:  12 Lead ECG Learning Package

PRACTICE ECG.  1

© WFA Clinical Education Team


CET:  12 Lead ECG Learning Package

PRACTICE ECG.  2

© WFA Clinical Education Team


CET:  12 Lead ECG Learning Package

PRACTICE ECG.  3

© WFA Clinical Education Team


CET:  12 Lead ECG Learning Package

PRACTICE ECG.  4

© WFA Clinical Education Team


CET:  12 Lead ECG Learning Package

PRACTICE ECG.  5

© WFA Clinical Education Team


CET:  12 Lead ECG Learning Package

PRACTICE ECG.  6

© WFA Clinical Education Team


CET:  12 Lead ECG Learning Package

PRACTICE ECG.  7

© WFA Clinical Education Team


CET:  12 Lead ECG Learning Package

PRACTICE ECG.  8

© WFA Clinical Education Team


CET:  12 Lead ECG Learning Package

PRACTICE ECG.  9

© WFA Clinical Education Team


CET:   12 Lead ECG Learning Package

PRACTICE ECG  10

© WFA Clinical Education Team


CET:   12 Lead ECG Learning Package

PRACTICE ECG  11

© WFA Clinical Education Team


CET:   12 Lead ECG Learning Package

PRACTICE ECG.  12

© WFA Clinical Education Team


CET:   12 Lead ECG Learning Package

PACTICE ECG. 13

© WFA Clinical Education Team


CET:   12 Lead ECG Learning Package

PRACTICE ECG.14

© WFA Clinical Education Team


CET:   12 Lead ECG Learning Package

PRACTICE ECG  15

© WFA Clinical Education Team


CET:   12 Lead ECG Learning Package

© WFA Clinical Education Team


CET:   12 Lead ECG Learning Package

PRACTICE ECG 1

© WFA Clinical Education Team


CET:   12 Lead ECG Learning Package

PRACTICE ECG 2

© WFA Clinical Education Team


CET:   12 Lead ECG Learning Package

PRACTICE ECG 3

© WFA Clinical Education Team


CET:   12 Lead ECG Learning Package

PRACTICE ECG 4

© WFA Clinical Education Team


CET:   12 Lead ECG Learning Package

PRACTICE ECG 5

© WFA Clinical Education Team

12 Lead ECG Learning Package  

CME 12 Lead ECG

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you