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World Education University

Academic Catalog 2013


Great Education is PRICELESS. Now, it’s also FREE. www.theWEU.com

Welcome This catalog provides information to guide learners into the tuition-free community of World Education University (WEU, pronounced WE-U). This document presents information about the University, its mission and beliefs. A wide range of learning opportunities is presented together with the policies and procedures designed to support them. Many more programs and courses are being designed and will be launching very soon. WEU welcomes any suggestions for additional offerings, aligned with the needs and personal goals of our current and future learners. Together, WE and YOU are building a fellowship dedicated to a global education that will benefit humankind.

DISCLAIMER: The Academic Catalog is current as of the time of posting on the WEU website. It may be necessary or desirable for WEU to make changes to the Academic Catalog and Learner Handbook due to the requirements of an accrediting body, market conditions, or other reasons. WEU reserves the right to change or modify any provision in this Agreement, the Academic Catalog and Learner Handbook including academic programs and courses, university policies and procedures, faculty and administrative staff, and any other provisions. Any change or modification made will be effective immediately upon posting. WEU will take reasonable steps to advise the learner of any material changes or modifications. After posting, with or without notification, a learner’s continuation in WEU courses constitutes binding acceptance of the changes or modifications. WEU reserves the right to make changes in its equipment, instructional materials, and curriculum. Changes will be added as addenda to the Academic Catalog and will be posted on the University website. The program Dean should be contacted for questions concerning any such changes.


TABLE OF CONTENTS 2

Founder

4

Greetings from the University President

6

WEU Mission Instructional Philosophy

7

Technology and Methodology Learner Interactivity Cognitive Learning Style Assessment (No) Cost

8

9

Accreditation Admissions Policies Undergraduate and Graduate Learners for Credit Undergraduate Admission Requirements Graduate Admission Requirements International Students Official Transcripts and Documents Transfer of Credit

10

Academic Policies Withdrawals Records and Release Of Information

11

Transferability of Credit Disclosure Credit By Examination Grading Policies

12

Satisfactory Academic Progress

13

Learner Conduct Policy

14

Course Activity Program/Degree Completion Learners with Disabilities Intellectual Property Policy

15

Non-Discrimination and Harassment Statement Grievance Procedure Library

16

Computer System Requirements

17

Library

18

Academic Programs

171 Administration 1


2


3


Jim Waddell, D.Phil. (Oxon)

Greetings from the University President

10 4


Welcome to the World Education University lifelong learning community. Together we have the opportunity to explore learning that excites our imagination, provides knowledge to advance our social and economic lives, and unites us in a commitment to humanitarian service. Free of financial obligation, you now have choices in a wide range of studies from non-credit learning about things that simply nudge your curiosity, to for-credit undergraduate and graduate degree programs. Your study is self-paced and easily accessible through online technologies. As your learning is competency-based, you are liberated from traditional inflated grading systems. Employers will be in a better position to know what you can do. At the World Education University cost, time, and assessment are on your side as you fulfill your educational goals. Welcome to the University that frees you from the barriers to higher education.

Thank you for joining us in revolutionizing education. Jim Waddell, D.Phil. (Oxon) University President and Chief Academic Officer

11 5


MISSION

based, online learning experience that adapts to the learner’s unique methods of acquiring knowledge.

World Education University‘s (WEU) mission is to provide free education through innovative technologies to enable learners worldwide to improve their socio-economic condition and to inspire them to be socially responsible humanitarians.

Core Beliefs: •

The global community should have access to education without cost.

Economic barriers prevent a large portion of the global population from having access to education.

Access to education enables learners to gain knowledge and skills central to elevating them from poverty and to inspire them to seek solutions to local, regional, national and even global problems.

Offers a no-barrier admission policy for all learners who meet the basic requirements for admission and instruction.

Provides free education for all who join its learning community.

Partners with non-profit organizations, other institutions of higher learning, businesses, governments and individuals to expand access to free education.

Engages expert full-time and associate faculty who use advanced technology to provide a self-paced, competency-

Sustains a creative environment for learners of diverse ages and cultures through instructional excellence and supported by extensive learner-tolearner collaboration among learners.

Presents a general education program that stimulates creative thinking, life skills and communications aptitude; and encourages learners to use a variety of disciplines to assess information from multiple perspectives.

Integrates awareness of humanitarian issues throughout the curriculum.

Maintains a culture of evidence to establish optimal standards in all institutional activities.

Instructional Philosophy

To fulfill its Mission, WEU: •

At WEU, the aim is to equip learners with the skills and knowledge to meet both their personal goals and to encourage the evolution of humanitarian-minded learners through innovative course content and instructional techniques. Regardless of the learners’ particular fields of study, WEU intends to inspire them to take this gift of free education and give back to the world. WEU faculty members and staff impart more than just knowledge; they challenge and mentor the WEU learners to reach their full potential, including contribution to their community and the world. WEU offers an opportunity to immensely widen the availability of education and the scope of its usage. 6


Technology and Methodology

(No) Cost

The WEU courses use innovative technologies and teaching methodologies. Courses are taught completely online in a virtual classroom via the Internet and use the WEU PinPoint Adaptive Learning System (PALS) as a delivery platform. The courses are always accessible and self-paced. Unlike residential courses, the online courses do not meet in a classroom at scheduled times. Some faculty members may engage in scheduled activities (e.g. virtual office hours and video conferences) to enhance the learner experience.

It is the WEU core belief that the global community should have access to education without cost. World Education University does not charge tuition to its learners. The learning resources in the online classrooms (textbooks, interactive media, videos, articles, etc.) when required by a course, are accessible from the online classroom. There may or may not be a fee charged to the learner for using these resources. The learner, at his or her discretion, may choose to order features, functionalities, or associated virtual and/or physical goods through selected publishers or vendors for a fee. Some of these extra features may or may not be required to successfully complete a WEU course. These services provide additional tools that some learners might find helpful in their approach to learning.

Learner Interactivity WEU courses are designed to promote knowledge retention and skill development through active learning. Learners interact with course content and other learners to develop thinking skills that go beyond memorizing.

In order for the University to provide free education without any government financial support or assistance, it relies on income generated from a variety of online advertising and other revenue channels to support its operations. Throughout their courses, learners may be exposed to online advertising or consumer surveying in various forms.

Cognitive Learning Style Assessment The assessment tools used in the WEU courses are mindful of the cognitive learning style of the learners. Learners use the WEU Cognitive Learning Assessment (CLA) to better understand better how they learn. In some programs, students receive immediate formative feedback on their strengths and areas where they need to concentrate more effort. Difficulty and complexity increases as the student masters each aspect of knowledge and skills until they demonstrate competence.

The University will periodically use tools to collect a variety of data from the learners for the primary purpose of aligning its services to the learners’ needs. However, WEU values the privacy of our learners and will not share private personal information such as social security numbers or personal addresses without prior permission by the learner.

7


Accreditation

Successful completion of the Orientation Course

WEU is authorized to operate as a degree granting institution of higher education and is exempt from the California Private PostSecondary Act of 2009.

Successful completion of a WEU threecredit course in the selected program

Fulfill any program’s prerequisites

WEU is preparing the necessary materials to apply for accreditation. At this time no assurance can be given as to when, or if accreditation might be granted.

Fulfill any program’s special requirements for admissions

Undergraduate Admission Requirements

ADMISSIONS POLICIES

Applicants to undergraduate degree programs must have a high school diploma or an equivalency. Applicants must send any of the following signed and notarized documents by scanned digital mail to transcripts@theweu.com or upload them online in the Admissions module:

Undergraduate and Graduate Learners for Credit Stage 1: Conditional Admission After completing the following steps, learners for credit are admitted conditionally:

High school transcript or General Education Diploma (GED) or international equivalent

Identity verification

Academic transcripts and verification of prior academic achievements

Complete the Undergraduate or Graduate Admission Process

High School Equivalency Declaration Form

Sign a learner agreement with the University

Home School Program Certification form and transcripts

California High School Proficiency Examination (CHSPE) Letter

• •

Learners for credit have three months after enrolling in the Orientation Course to provide academic transcripts and documents. During this period, they may enroll in the Orientation Course and one additional WEU three-credit course.

WEU must receive transcripts or proof of high school graduation within three months after a learner enrolls in the Orientation Course. Learners should upload scanned notarized transcripts in the Enrollment Application section of www.theweu.com or send them as attachments to transcripts@theweu.com.

Stage 2: Degree Candidate Admission After completing the following steps, learners for credit are admitted as Degree Candidates:

If transcripts or other documents relative to the admissions process are not in English, they must be translated and notarized by a translation 8


service. See Section on OFFICIAL TRANSCRIPTS AND DOCUMENTS for more information.

credentials evaluation. See Section on OFFICIAL TRANSCRIPTS AND DOCUMENTS for more information.

To complete the undergraduate application process, the learner should follow the steps found at www.theweu.com. The learner becomes a degree candidate only when the application requirements have been satisfied and all necessary documentation has been received and vetted by WEU.

Official Transcripts and Documents Applicants should send notarized transcripts and documents by scanned digital mail to transcripts@theweu.com, or upload them in the Enrollment Application portion of the online system. Transcripts and documents not in English must be translated and notarized by a translation service. Applicants unsure whether their diplomas are equivalent to US degrees, may contact one of the following organizations to identify agencies that can evaluate their transcripts for a fee: National Association of Credential Evaluation Services (www.naces.org) and Association of International Credential Evaluators, Inc. (www.aice.org). These agencies are only suggested; they are not affiliated with WEU.

Graduate Admission Requirements Graduate applicants to Master or graduate certificate programs need to demonstrate they have the preparation to complete the degree requirements. Evidence of this preparation includes an undergraduate degree or a related degree in the desired field of study. Alternative evidence of equivalent learning from experience may be accepted. If transcripts or other documents relative to the admissions process are not in English, they must be translated and notarized by a translation service. See Section on OFFICIAL TRANSRIPTS AND DOCUMENTS for more information.

WEU must receive transcripts within three months after a learner enrolls in the Orientation Course. WEU reserves the right to require documents to be sent directly from institutions and agencies. The University also reserves the right to deny admission.

To complete the graduate application process, the learner should follow the steps found at www.theweu.com. The learner becomes a degree candidate only when the application requirements have been satisfied and all necessary documentation has been received and vetted by WEU.

Transfer of Credit Information Undergraduate Transfer

International Students

WEU may accept coursework from a college or university that carries the same or similar credit and has been successfully completed at a level equivalent to the WEU Competency level. Official transfer evaluations are based

WEU welcomes applications from individuals at the undergraduate and graduate levels with credentials from non-US institutions. Applicants must first obtain independent foreign 9


will not affect the competencies achievement for the course(s). After a grade of “W” is issued, the course may be retaken once, with no further withdrawal allowed. Failure to complete the course a second time will result in unachieved competencies for that course. Learners who have completed the final assessment will not be permitted to receive a “W.” “W” grades affect satisfactory academic progress. To withdraw from a course, the learner must submit the Course Withdrawal Form, and receive confirmation from the Dean of the relevant School.

on the current transfer policies at the time of admission and will be binding for the learner’s entire career at WEU. It is the learner’s responsibility to send notarized documents by scanned digital mail to transcripts@theweu.com or upload them in the Enrollment Application section of the WEU web site.

Undergraduate Limit of Transfer Credit: •

Associate Degrees: May transfer up to 50 % of total credits required for the degree

Bachelor Degrees: May transfer up to 75 % of total credits required for the degree.

Withdrawals from the University Learners are encouraged to contact an academic advisor prior to finalizing the decision to withdraw from the University.

Second Degree Learners: May transfer up to 75 % of total credits required for the degree. Are exempt from the General Education requirement of WEU.

A learner wishing to withdraw from the University must complete and submit the Institutional Withdrawal Form and obtain confirmation from the Dean of the School operating the program.

Graduate Limit of Transfer Credit: May transfer up to 50% of the total credits required for the degree. Transfer of credit is at the discretion of the appropriate School Dean.

Records and Release of Information

ACADEMIC POLICIES

WEU protects the confidentiality of education records and the rights of its learners to review and inspect those records upon request. WEU respects the privacy of its learners. Some services and features related to WEU courses require personal information. Personal information can include information such as name and email address, among other things. Learners understand that WEU may share personal information with business partners and others to receive communications from these parties.

Withdrawals Course Withdrawals Learners are encouraged to contact their academic advisor prior to finalizing the decision to withdraw from a program. A learner who wishes to discontinue enrollment in one or more current courses may withdraw by submitting a Course Withdrawal Form. A grade of “W,” indicating voluntary withdrawal, will be recorded on the learner’s transcript, but 10


WEU does not receive funds under an applicable program of the U.S. Department of Education and is therefore exempt from the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA). However, WEU values the privacy of our learners and will not share private personal information such as social security numbers or personal addresses without prior permission by the learner.

Credit by Examination

Transferability of Credit Disclosure

These examinations are comparable to a comprehensive final examination and useful when a WEU learner wishes to demonstrate their prior knowledge by testing out of a course.

Learners have the option to earn credit by examination for some courses through WEU’s partnership with Excelsior College, accredited by the Middle States Commission on Higher Education. Excelsior College charges a fee for this service. For more information, please see Transfer of Credit Disclosure section in this document.

Credits earned at WEU may not transfer to another educational institution. Credits earned at another educational institution may not be accepted by WEU. The learner should obtain confirmation that WEU will accept any credits they have earned at another educational institution before the learner signs the Learner Enrollment Agreement. The learner should also contact any educational institutions that they may want to transfer credits earned at WEU to determine if such institutions will accept credits earned at WEU prior to executing an enrollment contract or agreement. The learner should never assume that credits will transfer to or from any educational institution. It is highly recommended and the learner is advised to make certain that they know the transfer of credit policy of WEU and of any other educational institutions the learner may in the future want to transfer the credits earned at WEU, before the learner signs the Learner Enrollment Agreement.

WEU and Excelsior College are continuously collaborating to expand the portfolio of exams in different subject matter areas. For a list of exams and more information on credit by examination, please visit the WEU website.

Grading Policies GRADING CRITERIA Learners are evaluated in terms of the Course Learning Outcomes that are published on the syllabus for each course. Learners will access syllabi courses electronically within the online classroom. The final grade in a course will reflect the quality of the learner’s performance relative to the Course Learning Outcomes. The undergraduate grade levels are as follows: Grade: A (93-100%) Numeric Level: 1 Grade: B (84-92%)

Numeric Level: 2

Grade: C (74-83%)

Numeric Level: 3

Grade: D or F (Less than 74%) Numeric Level: 4

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Note: For Pass/Fail Courses Grading is as Follows:

being placed on Probation. The learner must achieve an overall minimum Competency Rate for all courses in which they have enrolled in the next four (4) courses to be removed from Probation. Should the learner not achieve this rate, he or she will be academically dismissed from the University.

Grade: Pass Percentage Equivalent: 74-100 Numeric Level: 3 Grade: Fail

Changes in degree program or School will not affect a learner’s Satisfactory Academic Progress standing. However, learners requesting admission into a new degree program after graduation from WEU will begin as a first-term learner with a new Standard Academic Progress history.

Percentage Equivalent: Less than 74 Numeric Level: 4 The graduate grade levels are as follows: Grade: A (93-100%) Numeric Level: 1

Learner Conduct Policy

Grade: B (87-92%) Numeric Level: 2 Grade: C (80-87%) Numeric Level: 3

Messages:

Grade: F (Less than 80%) Numeric Level: 4

Submitted email messages become the property of World Education University.

Assume all messages you post are available to other online learners.

Do not submit confidential or restricted information.

If you are submitting someone else’s ideas, be sure you get that person’s permission and cite the source.

Please remember that comments by learners represent their opinions, not those of World Education University.

Sending provoking, distracting, threatening, or misleading messages is forbidden.

Messages designed to provoke irrelevant or angry responses are also not permitted.

Note: For Pass/Fail Courses Grading is as Follows: Grade: Pass Percentage Equivalent: 80-100 Numeric Level: 3 Grade: Fail Percentage Equivalent: Less than 80 Numeric Level: 4

Satisfactory Academic Progress Satisfactory academic progress is evaluated at the end of every four (4) courses taken for credit. To maintain good standing, WEU learners must achieve an overall minimum Competency Rate for all credit courses in which they have enrolled in the four-course period. A drop below this rate will result in the learner 12


procedures. A learner may apply for readmission one year after dismissal.

Never send pornographic mail or pictures.

Behavior: •

Course Activity

A learner must not disrupt the learning of others.

Please welcome all online learners regardless of age, race, background, national origin, gender, sexual orientation, disability or religious beliefs.

Statements of bigotry, racism and hatred are strictly prohibited.

Never pretend to be someone else in your interactions with other learners.

Never alter another’s work and claim it as your own.

Avoid profane or obscene language.

Behave the way you would behave in a classroom setting.

Do not use World Education University’s online classroom to promote yourself, your company or your beliefs. It is fine to mention your experiences as they relate to the course material.

Sales pitches, chain letters or advertisements are strictly prohibited.

You may disagree with the opinions of other learners, however, do not personally attack another learner or use harassing language.

After a period of unapproved inactivity for one (1) calendar month, a learner will be placed automatically in inactive status. Should the learner wish to resume the course, they will need to re-enroll and begin the course at the first unit of study. Courses need to be completed in a timely manner compatible with the learners’ life schedule and in the context of their program of study. Unless an academic advisor provides an exemption, if a learner fails to complete their course within one (1) year from the date of enrollment he or she will be withdrawn automatically from the course.

Program/Degree Completion Since the WEU curriculum is universally competency-based and as some courses bear more credits than others, some courses may take more time to complete. The recommended time to complete any WEU program (certificate or degree, undergraduate or graduate) is number of credits in the program x 1.5 weeks. To determine the maximum time allotted to complete a program, multiply the number of credits in the program x 5 weeks. For example: Associate degree: 60 credits Recommended time: 90 weeks Maximum time: 300 weeks

Any violations of the above conduct policy will be grounds for immediate termination.

Undergraduate certificate: 24 credits Recommended time: 36 weeks Maximum time: 120 weeks

A learner may be dismissed from the University if they fail to comply with school policies and 13


This is a basic example; therefore learners should be sure to check the specific credit requirement in the catalog for their chosen program. Course facilitators will help learners stay on track, but it is the learner’s responsibility to ensure that they complete the program in the maximum amount of time as described above.

individual learner in a WEU course. Any other use of the materials violates the enrollment agreement. Intellectual Property rights in scholarly works of the learner who created the work belong to the WEU, unless an agreement provides otherwise.

Non-Discrimination and Harassment Statement

Learners with Disabilities

WEU does not discriminate against any person on the grounds of race, color, ancestry, national origin, religious creed, sex, gender, sexual orientation, age (40 or older), marital status, veteran’s status, physical or mental disability, and medical condition. Discrimination or harassment of any kind is unacceptable behavior within WEU and is not tolerated.

WEU courseware is designed to be accessible to all learners. WEU courses are always accessible and self-paced. The courses do not meet at scheduled times and learners have constant access to all components of courses. All video and interactive elements are replayable and none of WEU assessments, including tests and quizzes, are timed. In addition, our technology is built so that it interacts seamlessly with most free or commercially available accessibility tools.

Harassment is verbal or physical conduct that denigrates or shows hostility or aversion toward an individual because of that person’s race, color, ancestry, national origin, religious creed, sex, gender, sexual orientation, age (40 or older), marital status, veteran’s status, physical or mental disability, and medical condition. Harassment can also occur if conduct is directed toward a person’s relatives, friends, or associates.

A learner who needs assistance in identifying accessibility tools and auxiliary aids may access the list of suggested free or for-pay products at the WEU Library. If the list does not cover a particular need, please contact the WEU Human Resources Department on the WEU website for further guidance.

Grievance Procedure

Intellectual Property Policy World Education University (WEU) owns all proprietary rights, including patent, copyright, trade secret and trademark rights, to all WEU materials provided in conjunction with enrollment into WEU. No portion of the materials may be copied or otherwise duplicated, nor may the materials be distributed or transferred to any other person or entity. The materials are for the use of the 14

Within ten (10) business days of the alleged action(s), the complaint or concern should be addressed to the faculty or staff member involved.

If the learner feels more action is needed, an appointment may be scheduled for a phone conference with the Dean of their College. The learner should request this appointment within


of scholarly material. Learners should use the library database to initiate search for additional resources on topics beyond the resources outlined in the resources sections of the units in the courses they are enrolled.

ten (10) business days of the faculty or staff member’s response. The Dean will schedule the conference within ten (10) days of the learner’s request. •

If the previous steps have not solved the complaint, the learner must present in writing, all facts of the grievance to the University President at: 42-600 Bob Hope Drive, Rancho Mirage, CA 92270.

COMPUTER SYSTEMS REQUIREMENTS The contents of the WEU website and the WEU courses can be accessed via virtually any hardware solutions that the learner might have available.

The learner should present the facts within ten (10) business days of the phone conference with the Dean. The University President will either address the grievance him/herself or take action to form a grievance committee within ten (10) days of the receipt of the facts. The grievance committee, if formed, will be comprised of the appropriate number of individuals from the appropriate areas to ensure a fair and unbiased evaluation.

Mobile devices come with a wide range of capabilities, and can generally be used to access the WEU contents online, provided that they are connected to the Internet.

MACINTOSH SYSTEM Hardware: (minimum) Operating System: Mac OS 10.5+ CPU: PowerPC G3, G4, or G5

After a decision has been rendered by the grievance committee, the learner may request that the University President review the process and outcomes of the grievance.

Memory: 512 MB RAM Hard Drive: 500 MB free space Network: 256+ kbps

Library

Monitor: 1024x768, 16-bit color display or better

The WEU library, accessible via the PinPoint Adaptive Learning Systems (PALS), maintains a database of scholarly material that learners can use to access additional learning information and to find credible sources for integration into their projects and other academic activities.

Sound Card and Speakers PC SYSTEM Hardware: (minimum) Operating System: Windows 7, Vista or XP

The WEU library is committed to assisting learners in enhancing their academic experience by providing innovative and dynamic learning resources and access to a wealth

CPU: 1 GHz Memory: 512 MB RAM Hard Drive: 500 MB free space 15


Monitor: 1024x768, 16-bit color display or better Sound Card Speakers Hardware: (recommended) Operating System: Windows 7, Vista, or XP CPU: 2.3 GHz Memory: 3 GB DDR3 RAM Hard Drive: 250 GB (2 GB free) Monitor: 1024x768, 16-bit color display or better DVD-ROM or CD-RW/DVD-Rom Combo or DVD+/RW Sound Card and Speakers Webcam (not required, but recommended)

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ACADEMIC PROGRAMS 20

GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS

21

Associate of Arts in General Studies

22 24

Undergraduate General Education Requirements General Education: Course Descriptions

37

COLLEGE OF ARTS AND HUMANITIES

38 39 40

Certificate in Motion Graphics Associate of Arts in Digital Media College of Arts and Humanities: Course Descriptions COLLEGE OF BUSINESS Associate of Science in Business Administration Associate of Science in Business Technical Sales Bachelor of Science in Accounting Bachelor of Science in Business Administration Graduate Certificate in Social Entrepreneurship Graduate Certificate in International Business Master of Business Administration Master of Arts in Management Master of Arts in Social Entrepreneurship College of Business: Course Descriptions COLLEGE OF EDUCATION

43 44 45 46 47 49 50 51 53 54 55 75 76 77 80 81 82

83 84 85

Master of Science in Systems Engineering

86

Master of Science in Information Systems College of Engineering and Computer Science: Course Descriptions

87 92

COLLEGE OF HEALTH SCIENCES

96

Diploma in Medical Records and Transcription Diploma in Medical Coding and Billing Associate of Science in Medical Practice Management Associate of Science in Health Information Technology Bachelor of Science in Healthcare Administration Bachelor of Science: Associates to Healthcare Administration Bachelor of Science in Emergency Management in Healthcare Bachelor of Science: Associates to Emergency Management in Healthcare Bachelor of Science in Nursing College of Health Sciences: Course Descriptions

98 100 102 104 106 108 110 112 114 129

Master of Education in Instructional Mathematics K-8 College of Education: Course Descriptions COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING AND COMPUTER SCIENCE Graduate Certificate in Environmental Engineering Graduate Certificate in Systems Engineering

130 131 132

17

Graduate Certificate in Information Systems Master of Science in Environmental Engineering

COLLEGE OF HOSPITALITY, TOURISM AND RETAIL MANAGEMENT Associate of Arts in Hospitality Management Graduate Certificate in Hospitality Management

135

College of Hospitality, Tourism and Retail Management: Course Descriptions COLLEGE OF LEGAL STUDIES

136

Diploma in Criminal Justice


137

Diploma in Legal Nurse Consultant

138

Diploma in Paralegal Studies

139

Associate of Arts in Criminal Justice

140

Associate of Arts in Paralegal Studies

141

Graduate Certificate in Dispute Resolution in the Workplace Graduate Certificate in Dispute Resolution and Arbitration Graduate Certificate in Dispute Resolution and Mediation

142 143 144

Master of Science in Criminal Justice

145

Master of Science in Dispute Resolution

146

College of Legal Studies: Course Descriptions

156

COLLEGE OF PSYCHOLOGY

157

Graduate Certificate in Art Therapy

158

Graduate Certificate in Educational Psychology Graduate Certificate in Neuropsychology

159 160

Master of Science in Psychology

162

Master of Science in Expressive Arts Therapies

164

College of Psychology: Course Descriptions

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GENERAL EDUCATION

challenges among credit and non-credit learners on the global scene.

Associate of Arts in General Education

5. Cultivate and sustain partnerships with professional, government and other educational constituencies.

General Education Requirements for Bachelor’s Degrees

6. Achieve learner success in the form of: admission to graduate programs, job acquisition/promotion and/or personal fulfillment.

Principles

WEU has as part of its mission, a desire to provide a general education program for its learners which stimulates creative thinking, life skills and communication aptitude; and encourages learners to use a variety of disciplines to assess information from multiple perspectives.

• • •

To that end, WEU encourages learners to select courses from a variety of disciplines that will best expand their educational, professional and personal worldviews and encourage intellectual growth.

General Education Objectives

1. Provide innovative training through high quality, interdisciplinary education that considers present and anticipates future local and global challenges. 2. Attract and retain outstanding faculty, staff and learners. 3. Allow for personalized, creative learning experiences by using quality content, collaborative learning experiences, supportive scaffolding of learning support, service-learning, and pragmatic skill building to help individual learners gain the most from their educational experience with WEU and prepare them for the next step in their career path. 4. Design specific programs to address current and future interests and 19

Learning should be learner-centered and collaborative. A dedication to lifelong learning is essential for success. Self-awareness and interdisciplinary understanding are central to understanding one’s place in the world. Critical thinking, problem solving, and communication skills are hallmarks of a creative citizen. Technical and vocational skills are critical for effective functionality in the workplace. Global understanding and citizenship are core components of every course in the College.


ASSOCIATE OF ARTS in GENERAL STUDIES

Successful completion of the program is granted upon completion of the following credits/courses listed below:

Program Description

Freshman Composition (3 Credits)

SPEECH AND COMMUNICATIONS (9 CREDITS)

ENGL 201 English Composition I

The Associate of Arts Degree in General Studies program prepares students for careers in a variety careers by providing a broad survey of various disciplines from English Composition, Math and Physical Sciences, Arts and Humanities and the Social Sciences.

Speech (3 Credits) COMM 101 Speech and Communication Additional Course (3 Credits) ENGL 203 English Composition II

Program Objectives

MATHEMATICS (3 CREDITS)

Graduates of the Associate of Arts in General Studies program will demonstrate the following competencies: • •

MATH 125 Finite Mathematics SOCIAL SCIENCES (9 CREDITS, 3 COURSES)

Articulate major concepts and issues related to their chosen fields of study. Discuss and defend their positions on important issues related to various disciplines Demonstrate understanding of different world perspectives and ways of thinking. Apply skills learned to future study in their academic and professional careers.

HIST 200 American History I HIST 201 American History II PSYC 200 Introduction to Psychology ARTS & HUMANITIES (9 CREDITS, 3 COURSES) HUMA 220 Media as History HUMA 300 Ethics in the Modern World MUSI 110 Introduction to Western Music PHYSICAL SCIENCES (6 CREDITS, 2 COURSES) BIOL 101 Introduction to Cellular and Molecular Biology GEOG 110 World Geography

Admissions Requirements

ELECTIVES (24 CREDITS, 8 COURSES)

Fulfill the University’s Undergraduate Admissions Requirements and complete the University’s Admissions Process listed in the Admissions and Enrollment section of this catalog.

CRIJ 130 Criminal Law CRIJ 140 America’s Court Systems CRIJ 160 Ethics in Criminal Justice DIGA 110 Introduction to Digital Media DIGA 130 Introduction to Adobe Illustrator DIGA 140 2D Design DIGA 180 Audio Design DIGA 210 Digital Art & Design Criticism ENGL 310 Contemporary Issues in Women’s Literature HIST 210 Lost Civilizations

Program Structure The Associate of Arts in General Studies degree is comprised of core curriculum, electives within the field, and general education requirements.

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UNDERGRADUATE GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS

HIST 204 History of Christianity in America HIST 210 Lost Civilizations HIST 212 Colonial Latin and South America HIST 214 Empire and States in the Middle East and Southwest Asia HIST 216 History of Africa to 1890 HIST 218 The Contemporary World HIST 220 History of Education POLS 201 Introduction to International Relations POLS 203 Introduction to Comparative Politics POLS 205 Introduction to American Politics POLS 211 History of Political Thought POLS 212 Legal Concepts and Administration of Justice POLS 310 Politics and Society POLS 311 Politics of Change POLS 312 American Society and Judicial Behavior POLS 313 Foreign Policy of the United States POLS 314 Government and Metropolitan Problems POLS 315 Government and Business POLS 316 International Law and Organization POLS 320 Public Policy Analysis POLS 321 Public Administration PSCY 200 Introduction to Psychology PSYC 220 Statistical Analysis PSYC 230 Child Psychology PSYC 240 Educational Psychology PSYC 250 Learning Theory PSYC 260 Environmental Psychology PSYC 270 Measurement Concepts PSYC 290 Organizational Psychology PSYC 301 Social Psychology PSYC 303 Lifespan Development PSYC 310 Abnormal Psychology PSYC 320 Communications and Interviewing Techniques PSYC 330 Personnel Psychology PSYC 340 Introductory Research Methods for Behavioral Science PSYC 401 Cultural Psychology PSYC 403 Psychotherapy PSYC 405 Theories of Personality PSYC 410 Psychological Basis of Behavior PSYC 420 Introduction to Counseling

SPEECH AND COMMUNICATIONS (9 CREDITS) English Composition (3 Credits, Choose One Course) ENGL 101 Business English ENGL 201 English Composition I Speech (3 Credits, Choose One Course) COMM 110 Communication and Speech COMM 201 Interpersonal Communication Additional Course (3 Credits) ENGL 203 English Composition II MATHEMATICS (3 CREDITS, CHOOSE 1 COURSE) MATH 105 Principles of Mathematics MATH 125 Finite Mathematics MATH 135 Technical Mathematics I MATH 140 Pre-Calculus MATH 150 Graph Theory MATH 152 Business Calculus MATH 155 Technical Mathematics II MATH 157 Basic Applied Calculus MATH 160 Fundamentals of Linear Algebra MATH 250 Elementary Statistics MATH 260 Single Variable Calculus MATH 262 Calculus II SOCIAL SCIENCES (9 CREDITS, CHOOSE 3 COURSES) ANTH 200 Introduction to Anthropology HIST 101 Early Globalizations: East Meets West (1200s-1600s) HIST 103 World History in the Early and Modern Era (1600s-Present) HIST 200 American History I HIST 201 American History II 21


PHIL 105 Moral and Political Philosophy PHIL 201 Philosophy of Death and Dying PHIL 210 Technology, Society and Values

PSYC 430 Seminar: Human Sexuality SOCIAL SCIENCES (9 CREDITS, CHOOSE 3 COURSES)

PHYSICAL SCIENCES (6 CREDITS, CHOOSE 2 COURSES)

ARTH 110 Introduction to Western Art History ARTH 200 Art History I ENGL 105 Introduction to Cultural and Literary Expression ENGL 205 Cultural and Literary Expression in the Renaissance ENGL 207 Cultural and Literary Expression in Modernity ENGL 210 Comparative World Literatures ENGL 212 The Art of Poetry ENGL 214 The Art of Drama ENGL 216 The Art of Fiction ENGL 218 The Art of Prose: Scientific and Technical Writing ENGL 310 Contemporary Issues in Women’s Literature ENGL 312 Modern Poetry ENGL 314 Shakespeare ENGL 318 The Art of the Novel ENGL 320 The African-American Writer in American Literature ENGL 322 Twentieth-Century American Literature ENGL 324 Writing for the Technical Professions ENGL 326 Writing for Communication Arts ENGL 328 Advanced Writing and Editing Techniques ENGL 330 Seminar in Professional Writing ENGL 332 Writing for the Web ENGL 334 Survey of Technical and Professional Document Production ENGL 336 Writing for Publication ENGL 338 Advanced Technical Writing ENGL 410 Literature Survey ENGL 412 Major Authors ENGL 414 Multicultural Literature ENGL 450 Special Topics in Literature HUMA 130 Democracy and Democratic Principles HUMA 220 Media as History HUMA 300 Ethics in the Modern Age MUSI 110 Introduction to Western Music PHIL 101 Introduction to Philosophy PHIL 103 Logic and Critical Thinking

BIOL 101 Introduction to Cellular and Molecular Biology BIOL 103 Humanity and the Biological Universe BIOL 105 Nutrition BIOL 107 Food Microbiology CHEM 101 General Chemistry ENVE 210 Environmental Science GEOG 110 World Geography PHYS 101 Introduction to Mechanics PHYS 105 Journey Through the Universe PHYS 110 Physics for Telecommunications PHYS 170 General Physics I PHYS 175 General Physics II PHYS 180 General Physics III PHYS 250 Introduction to Physics

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GENERAL EDUCATION COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

study basic anatomy, physiology, genetics and microbiology. Special attention will be given to contemporary problems such as AIDS, genetic engineering, cancer, heart disease, and pollution. The student will use basic mathematical, computer and quantitative reasoning skills to present cohesive written summations of learning.

ARTH 110: INTRODUCTION TO WESTERN ART HISTORY (3 Credits)

BIOL 105: NUTRITION (3 Credits)

This course will examine the history of Western art, beginning with the first objects created by prehistoric humans around 20,000 years ago and ending with the art and architecture of the High Gothic period in fourteenth-century Europe. The information presented in this course will provide you with the tools to recognize important works of art and historical styles, as well as to understand the historical context and cultural developments of Western art history through the end of the medieval period.

An introduction to the principles of nutrition in food management. Includes food customs, patterns and habits, nutrients in foods, applied nutrition, and world nutrition problems and programs.

BIOL 107: FOOD MICROBIOLOGY (3 Credits) A course in basic food microbiology outlining important micro-organisms, food preservation and spoilage, food contamination, enzymes produced by micro-organisms, foods in relation to disease, food sanitation, control and inspection, and microbiological laboratory methods.

ARTH 200: ART HISTORY I (3 Credits) A survey of history and principles of the fine and utilitarian arts from the Paleolithic era through the Renaissance.

CHEM 101: GENERAL CHEMISTRY (3 Credits) This chemistry survey is designed to introduce learners to the world of chemistry. In this course, students will study chemistry from the ground up, learning the basics of the atom and its behavior. Students will use this knowledge to understand the chemical properties of matter and the changes and reactions that take place in all types of matter.

ANTH 200: INTRODUCTION TO ANTHROPOLOGY (3 Credits) This course introduces the discipline of Anthropology, which aims to construct a holistic understanding of the human within the cultural, biological, evolutionary, linguistic and historical context. By focusing on diversity, the learner explores the universal underpinning of our society, cultures and language.

COMM 110: COMMUNICATION AND SPEECH (3 Credits) This course teaches the basics of communication principles and concepts. Topics include: foundations of communication, interpersonal communications and problem solving, communicating in groups and in public, developing and delivering persuasive and informative speeches.

BIOL 101: INTRODUCTION TO CELLULAR AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY (3 Credits) This introductory course in biology starts at the microscopic level, with molecules and cells. Students will learn a great number of new terms and concepts that will describe life at the smallest level. Over the course of this class, students will recognize the ways in which the tiniest of molecules are involved in everyday life.

COMM 201: INTERPERSONAL COMMUNICATIONS (3 Credits) An introduction to person-to-person communication principles and concepts. Topics include intercultural issues, conflict management, and communicating in groups and in public.

BIOL 103: HUMANITY AND THE BIOLOGICAL UNIVERSE (3 Credits)

ENGL 090: DEVELOPMENTAL READING (3 Credits)

This course acquaints students with basic biological, health and environmental issues of the modern world. To achieve intended awareness, students will

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This course is founded on a strategic learning approach that involves teaching learners to become independent readers of various types of texts. The goal of such a program is to provide learners with a variety of learning strategies that foster comprehension and vocabulary development that meet the demands of college-level reading. Learners are trained to use active strategies that promote critical thinking such as graphic organizers, concept maps, SQ3R, Cornell Note-Taking, text-marking and annotating, and paraphrasing and summarizing.

In this course, students will read and examine works from this period, situating them within their sociohistorical and literary contexts, while attempting to determine how the art of English language and letters came into its own during this dynamic period. Learners will begin with an overview of European history during the centuries leading up to the Renaissance in order to become acquainted with the profound cultural and social changes brought about by the Italian Renaissance, the Protestant Reformation, nationalism/colonialism, and the growing power of the middle class.

ENGL 101: BUSINESS ENGLISH (3 Credits)

ENGL 207: CULTURAL AND LITERARY EXPRESSION IN MODERNITY (3 Credits)

A comprehensive study covering grammar, editing, writing and usage skills vital to successful written communication. This course is designed to assist students with the mechanics of writing and to improve their ability to write clearly.

In this course, we will work to develop a more nuanced understanding of the scope of cultural and literary expression in the late 19th and the first half of the 20th centuries and a working definition of what the vacuous-sounding term “modernism” might mean. In addition to literary “modernism,” the course will also take a brief look at the cultural production of “modernism” in art, music, architecture, cinema, philosophy, and drama.

ENGL 105: INTRODUCTION TO CULTURAL AND LITERARY EXPRESSION (3 Credits) This course will introduce students to the history and practice of English as a scholarly discipline. It has been designed to introduce the various tools that scholars have devised in order to facilitate the study of literary expression in English, from critical frameworks to close reading techniques. By the end of this course, students will have developed strategies to understand, analyze, and critically respond to works in any genre at an advanced level.

ENGL 210: COMPARATIVE WORLD LITERATURES (3 Credits) This course explores literary traditions from four parts of the world: Eastern, Western, African, and Native American, as these traditions influence and are influenced by religion, politics and history. Learners will be introduced to the background of each tradition, will read representative examples from each tradition, will discuss their ideas using focused questions, and will write a short essay at the end of each unit. Prerequisite: ENGL 201 or equivalent.

ENGL 201: ENGLISH COMPOSITION (3 Credits) This course is designed to develop the learner’s ability to write clearly. Emphasis is on effective writing and revising techniques including purpose, organization, and mechanics. Various modes and strategies of descriptive, narrative and illustrative essays are covered. The course culminates with a research paper.

ENGL 212: THE ART OF POETRY (3 Credits) An intermediate-level course in which the student learns the technique of reading, interpreting, and evaluating poetry of increasing difficulty and brilliance.

ENGL 203: ENGLISH COMPOSITION II (3 Credits) This course will reinforce the concepts practiced in English Composition by introducing basic research concepts and techniques. The intent of this course is to teach students how to prepare research for any discipline or subject.

ENGL 214: THE ART OF DRAMA (3 Credits) An intermediate-level course in which the student explores dramatic literature in an effort to discover its ritual origins, historical role and current significance.

ENGL 205: CULTURAL AND LITERARY EXPRESSION IN THE RENAISSANCE (3 Credits)

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ENGL 216: THE ART OF FICTION (3 Credits)

ENGL 320: THE AFRICAN-AMERICAN WRITER IN AMERICAN LITERATURE (3 Credits)

An intermediate-level course in which selected works of fiction are examined in an effort to understand the approaches, strategies and techniques of artists in this compelling medium. Students will also produce an original, creative piece.

Reading and discussion of representative works of African-American writers. Historical and social backgrounds are explored to interpret AfricanAmerican literature as meaningful as part of the American literary tradition.

ENGL 218: THE ART OF PROSE: SCIENTIFIC AND TECHNICAL WRITING (3 Credits)

ENGL 322: TWENTIETH-CENTURY AMERICAN LITERATURE (3 Credits)

An intermediate-level course in which the art of prose writing is explored in depth. This course focuses on stylistics and rhetoric and covers the development of scientific and technical literature.

An advanced study of major American literature of the 20th century.

ENGL 324: WRITING FOR THE TECHNICAL PROFESSIONS (3 Credits)

ENGL 310: CONTEMPORARY ISSUES IN WOMEN’S LITERATURE (3 Credits)

An intermediate-level writing course for students of the physical and life sciences and technology. Emphasis on style in technical writing, modes of technical discourse (definition, description, analysis, interpretation) and strategies for effective business communication, including resume writing, technical reports and oral presentations. Methods and procedures of research are explored in depth.

A study of contemporary women authors, this course explores women’s literature, examining issues that these writers’ voices bring to the forefront. There will be emphasis on both closereading of primary texts and of theoretical frameworks for understanding issues that are of importance in women’s literature. Our analysis of theoretical frameworks will primarily reference feminist intellectual history; while close readings of texts will stress isolating, in each story, how the author employs such literary devices as symbolism, allusions, narrative voice, imagery and irony. Learners will be expected to write essays as well as take short-answer tests. Prerequisite: ENGL 201 or equivalent.

ENGL 326: WRITING FOR COMMUNICATION ARTS (3 Credits) An intermediate-level writing course for students in the communication field with emphasis on developing writing fluency. Focus on expository, persuasive writing; in-depth study of research methods; and strategies for effective business communication, including resume writing and oral presentations.

ENGL 312: MODERN POETRY (3 Credits) This course is more an in depth study than an introduction to representative British and American poets of the 20th century. Emphasis is placed on the manner in which modern poetry derives from traditional patterns yet manages to create new forms and messages for our time.

ENGL 328: ADVANCED WRITING AND EDITING TECHNIQUES (3 Credits) An advanced workshop in business and technical writing techniques including technical aspects of editing and interpersonal skills employed by successful editors. Participants practice revising writing for specific audiences; strengthen their techniques in revising for style, clarity and conciseness; increase their command of grammar and mechanics; practice production editing and using style manuals; utilize word processors and computerized text editors; and develop important interpersonal editing skills through the use of role playing and peer evaluation. Participants also continue to be exposed to a variety of common

ENGL 314: SHAKESPEARE (3 Credits) An advanced course in which selected texts and critiques from Shakespearean literature are examined intensively.

ENGL 318: THE ART OF THE NOVEL (3 Credits) An advanced study of selected masterpieces in the novel form.

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other texts that were influential upon or influenced by the major author. The author studies will vary from trimester to trimester; the choices will include those authors who are generally considered part of the canon as well as third world and minority authors. Students may repeat the course to study a different major author.

forms of career-oriented business and technical writing.

ENGL 330: SEMINAR IN PROFESSIONAL WRITING (3 Credits) An advanced seminar in a specialized topic, utilizing the expertise of an instructor from the profession at large. The topic will vary from offering to offering.

ENGL 332: WRITING FOR THE WEB (3 Credits)

ENGL 414: MULTICULTURAL LITERATURE (3 Credits)

Focus is on learning and practicing advanced aspects of creating multimedia, hypertext, and online help documents. Topics: linear and nonlinear planning structures (“information architecture”), writing stylistics, the rhetoric and use of graphics, linking, reading and editing online, project management.

In this advanced course, the focus will be on the literature of another culture, subculture, or combination of cultures. The approach and subject matter will vary from offering to offering. A student may repeat the course to take advantage of the different offerings.

ENGL 334: SURVEY OF TECHNICAL AND PROFESSIONAL DOCUMENT PRODUCTION (3 Credits)

ENGL 450: SPECIAL TOPICS IN LITERATURE (3 Credits) In this advanced course, students will examine literature from a particular perspective. The course will focus on a specific theme, genre or approach, may focus on literature in relation to another discipline, or may look at literature in any other way that does not fall within the Survey, Major Author or Multicultural categories.

A survey of principles, techniques and procedures of electronic and print-based document production. Topics: the relationship between written and visual material, traditional copy preparation and design, desktop publishing, traditional printing techniques for books, brochures, pamphlets, and newsletters. Students will produce their own brochures, pamphlets, and newsletters.

ENVE 210: ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE (3 Credits)

ENGL 336: WRITING FOR PUBLICATION (3 Credits)

This interdisciplinary course explores the interaction of living organisms between themselves and the environment. Topics include biomes, air, water, soil and biological resources and population dynamics, energy sources, and land use management.

An advanced writing course with special emphasis on published work. Students interested in writing and those seriously committed to their own writing improvement and to the writing of prose articles, fiction or poetry are especially encouraged to take this course.

GEOG 110: WORLD GEOGRAPHY (3 Credits) This course is a study of people, places and environment from a physical and cultural perspective. It emphasizes the practical and responsible application of geography to life situations. Learners analyze and evaluate the connection between their local and global communities.

ENGL 410: LITERATURE SURVEY (3 Credits) In this advanced course, students will survey British or American literature of s specific period. The period covered will vary from trimester to trimester. Students may repeat the course to cover additional time periods.

ENGL 412: MAJOR AUTHORS (3 Credits)

HIST 101: EARLY GLOBALIZATIONS: EAST MEETS WEST (1200S-1600S) (3 Credits)

In this advanced course, students will study a single major author. This course will provide intensive study of selected texts, an examination of the milieu in which the author wrote, and will include study of

This course will introduce students to the history of the world’s major civilizations from medieval times to the early modern era. The course will be structured chronologically, with each unit focusing

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on the expansion or decline of a particular civilization or the interactions and exchanges between civilizations. By the end of the course, learners will understand how many different civilizations evolved from isolated societies into expansive, interconnected empires capable of exerting global influence.

Provides an overview of societies that have either partially or totally disappeared yet have left some measurable contribution to the progress of world civilization. Students will be exposed to the definition of what constitutes a civilization, and then will examine the salient features of thirty-two lost civilizations presented in chronological order, pondering what happened to the civilization to cause it to be classified as “lost” and what causes a civilization to live or die.

HIST 103: WORLD HISTORY IN THE EARLY AND MODERN ERA (1600S-PRESENT) (3 Credits) This course will present a comparative overview of world history from the 17th century to the present era. Students will examine the origins of major economic, political, social, cultural, and technological trends of the past 400 years and explore the impact of these trends on world societies. This course will be structured chronologically and thematically, with each unit focusing on a significant historical subject.

HIST 212: COLONIAL LATIN AND SOUTH AMERICA (3 Credits) This course will introduce students to the history of Latin and South America from the year in which European explorers first discovered and began to colonize the region to the early 19th century, when many Latin and South American colonies declared their independence from European rule. By the end of the course, learners will understand how the interaction between native peoples and European settlers created diverse and complex colonial societies throughout Latin and South America, and why the colonies of the region eventually declared their independence from European political control.

HIST 200: AMERICAN HISTORY I (3 Credits) This course examines the major turning points in American history beginning with the events leading up to the American Revolution, the origins of the US constitution, reform movements, Manifest Destiny and the Civil War and Reconstruction, focusing on the social, political, and historical forces that have shaped the United States.

HIST 214: EMPIRE AND STATES IN THE MIDDLE EAST AND SOUTHWEST ASIA (3 Credits) This course will introduce students to the history of the Middle East and Southwest Asia from the preIslamic period to the end of World War I. By the end of the course, learners will understand how the Middle East and Southwest Asia developed politically, economically, and socially prior to World War One and recognize the critical role that the region played in the broader development of European and Asian societies.

HIST 201: AMERICAN HISTORY II (3 Credits) This course extends the examination of American history to the present day, including the impact of the frontier, the changing nature of business and government, World War I, the Great Depression, World War II, the growth of the United States as a world power, the Cold War and the struggle to achieve class, ethnic, racial, and gender equality. Contemporary world issues such as globalization, economic interdependence, terrorism and world cultures will also factor into our analysis of international conflict and cooperation.

HIST 216: HISTORY OF AFRICA TO 1890 (3 Credits) This course will introduce students to the history of Africa from 300,000 BCE to the era of European imperialism in the nineteenth century. Learners will examine the major political, economic, and social changes that took place in Africa during this period and examine the experiences of Africans who lived during this period. By the end of the course, students will understand how Africans transformed their continent beginning with human evolution and concluding with the era of global capitalism.

HIST 204: HISTORY OF CHRISTIANITY IN AMERICA (3 Credits) This course is a survey of the contribution, growth, and variety of Christian expressions in the United States with special attention to the impact and importance of the Constitution’s First Amendment.

HIST 210: LOST CIVILIZATIONS (3 Credits) 27


HIST 218: THE CONTEMPORARY WORLD (3 Credits)

radio to cinema to television and the internet, there will be articles, radio broadcasts, television, cinema, and internet items to better understand US and global history from the Spanish-American War in 1898 to today. Major themes will include media bias, media as both shaper and recorder of history, and evolving cultural attitudes toward and use of media in all its forms. Prerequisite: ENGL 201 or equivalent.

This is a survey course of 20th century global history: it covers the period of imperialism leading to World War I, the emergence of the USSR as a major power, the transformation of Europe as a result of World War II, the period of the Cold War, the role of the USA in the post-cold war world. Special emphasis is placed on the impact of geography, science and technology on political, economic and cultural development of the world.

HUMA 300: ETHICS IN THE MODERN AGE (3 credits) This course addresses the increasingly complex ethical and philosophical issues of the 21th Century through a reintegration of personal, normative, and meta ethical perspectives. Facets of a multi-cultural and diversified society are presented through critical reading, video and listening assignments that challenge learners to consider the larger scope of humanity beyond their own perspective. Prerequisite: ENGL 201 or equivalent.

HIST 220: HISTORY OF EDUCATION (3 Credits) This course examines American foundation and historical development of education in the United States. Through examination and discussion of relevant individuals, social theories, political systems, religion, and specific topics in education, the student will gain a historical perspective that will allow them to better understand present-day educational issues and concerns.

MATH 095: DEVELOPMENTAL MATHEMATICS I (3 credits)

HUMA 100: INTRO TO WEU

This course is for students who have not acquired the techniques of algebra.

Required of ALL WEU learners as part of the admissions process, this brief video-based course orients learners to the humanitarian mission of WEU, its founders and history, and explores how to navigate the Learning Management System.

MATH 100: DEVELOPMENTAL MATHEMATICS II (3 credits) A continuation of the sequence of topics in algebra begun in MAT 095. This course may not be challenged and may not be substituted for required mathematics courses.

HUMA 130: DEMOCRACY AND DEMOCRATIC PRINCIPLES (3 Credits) This course examines democracy as a system of governance as well as universal democratic principles that underlie all human societies in the context of the global experience of human liberty and human rights. Learners will consider the suitability of democracy as a governing structure as well as the potential for integration of democratic principles into other forms of government. Core assignments will comprise case studies, providing learners with the analytical exercise of evaluating particular democratic principles in a variety of countries.

MATH 105: PRINCIPLES OF MATHEMATICS (3 credits) This course provides the history of mathematics and gives an overview of mathematical principles including the nature of: numeration systems, algebra, geometry, money, logic, chance, graphs, voting and apportionment.

MATH 125: FINITE MATHEMATICS (3 credits) Review of elementary algebra and selected topics in statistics and probability. Sets, real numbers, graphing, linear and quadratic equations and inequalities, relations and functions, solving systems of linear equations, descriptive statistics, frequency distributions, graphical displays of data, measures of central tendency and dispersion, introduction to probability.

HUMA 220: MEDIA AS HISTORY (3 Credits) This course covers media as it has changed through history and looks at how media has documented historical events, at times being the driving force behind them. Covering the shift from newsprint to

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MATH 135: TECHINICAL MATHEMATICS I (3 Credits)

angle, DeMoivre’s theorem, logarithms, binomial theorem and Cramer’s rule. Applications are drawn from technology.

A mathematics course for students who wish to take selected courses within technical concentrations. Review of algebra: exponents, factoring, fractions. Linear equations, ratio, proportions, Word problem application. Coordinate systems and graphs of functions: straight line, slope. Systems of linear equations and their applications. Complex numbers. Quadratic equations. Introduction to trigonometry. Applications to problems in engineering and technology are emphasized throughout.

MATH 157: BASIC APPLIED CALCULUS (3 Credits) An introduction to calculus and its applications. Topics covered in this course include functions, limits, derivatives, tangent lines, the chain rule, maxima and minima, curve sketching, applications, anti-derivatives, fundamental theorem of calculus, integration by simple substitution and finding areas.

MATH 160: FUNDAMENTALS OF LINEAR ALGEBRA (3 credits)

MATH 140: PRE-CALCULUS (3 credits) College algebra and trigonometry gives students a strong preparation for taking calculus. Topics include functions, their graphs, domain, range, inverse functions, standard algebraic transformations of functions and their corresponding geometric transformations of their graphs, exponential and logarithmic functions, trigonometric functions and their applications, addition formulas and double angle formulas.

This course explores various aspect of linearity that include vector spaces, linear transformations, matrices, systems of linear equations, bases, projections, rotations, determinants, and inner products. The learner explores tools and models for using these concepts in a variety of situations and across disciplines.

MATH 250: ELEMENTARY STATISTICS (3 Credits)

MATH 150: GRAPH THEORY (3 credits)

This course covers the analysis, interpretation of data, probability distribution, sampling distributions and applications. Using descriptive statistics, students will describe and summarize data in words, tables, graphs and narratives as well as gain familiarity with the production and use of unbiased data.

This course is an introduction to graph theory and its applications. Topics include trees, matchings, graph coloring, planarity, and graph algorithms.

MATH 152: BUSINESS CALCULUS (3 credits) Applications of calculus to business and social science intuitive use of limits and continuity. Derivatives, extrema, concavity, and applications such as marginal analysis, business models, optimization of tax revenue, and minimization of storage cost. The exponential and logarithmic functions. Antiderivatives and the definite integral. Areas and consumer surplus. Some concepts of probability extended to discrete and continuous sample spaces.

MATH 260: SINGLE VARIABLE CALCULUS (3 Credits) This course is designed to introduce students to the study of calculus. In this course, learners will address three major topics: limits, derivatives, and integrals, as well as study their respective foundations and applications.

MATH 262: CALCULUS II (3 Credits)

MATH 155: TECHNICAL MATHEMATICS II (3 Credits)

Riemann sums, the definite integral, the fundamental theorem of the calculus. Area, volumes of solids of revolution, arc, length, work. Exponential and logarithmic functions. Inverse trigonometric functions. Formal integration techniques. L’Hopital’s rule, improper integrals. Polar coordinates.

Part of the integrated course sequence in mathematics for students who wish to take selected courses within technical concentrations. Topics include trigonometric functions, identities and equations, the sine and cosine laws, graphs of the trigonometric functions, functions of a composite

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MUSI 110: INTRODUCTION TO WESTERN MUSIC (3 Credits)

This class provides an in-depth introduction to the philosophical problems surrounding death. The major purpose of this course, aside from familiarizing students with the writings of major philosophers on the subject of death, is to teach learners how to think about death philosophically— to decide for themselves what they believe about death and to provide careful and convincing arguments for those beliefs.

A history of Western music from Middle Ages to present, comprising a survey of musical genres, styles, and representative composers of each era. Through critical reading, listening and written assignments, learners will apply musical vocabulary to deepen their understanding and enjoyment of music and its role in society.

PHIL 101: INTRODUCTION TO PHILOSOPHY (3 Credits)

PHIL 210: TECHNOLOGY, SOCIETY AND VALUES (3 Credits)

This course will introduce students to the major topics, problems, and methods of philosophy and surveys the writings of a number of major historical figures in the field. This course aims to not only familiarize learners with philosophers and problems but to also improve their ability to think critically about the issues, develop their own ideas about them, and express these ideas clearly and persuasively in writing.

An examination of models and case studies concerned with the impact of machines on man, of technological systems on social structure, and modes of production on value systems. Special attention is paid to the ethical problems connected with newly emerging technologies.

PHYS 101: INTRODUCTION TO MECHANICS (3 Credits) In this course, students will study physics from the ground up, learning the basic principles of physical laws, their application to the behavior of objects, and the use of the scientific method in driving advances in this knowledge.

PHIL 103: LOGIC AND CRITICAL THINKING (3 Credits) This course provides an introduction to critical thinking, informal logic, and a small amount of formal logic. The course touches upon a wide range of reasoning skills, from verbal argument analysis to formal logic, visual and statistical reasoning, scientific methodology, and creative thinking. Mastering these will help students become more perceptive readers and listeners, more persuasive writers and presenters, and more effective researchers and scientists.

PHYS 105: JOURNEY THROUGH THE UNIVERSE (3 Credits) Introductory and descriptive course in astronomy. Topics include: study of the universe, planetary motion, the solar system; stars and galaxies; quasars, pulsars, and black holes; possibility of extraterrestrial life.

PHIL 105: MORAL AND POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY (3 Credits)

PHYS 110: PHYSICS FOR TELECOMMUNICATIONS (3 Credits)

This course will introduce students to the basic concepts and methods of moral and political philosophy. Its primary focus is on the development of moral reasoning skills and the application of those skills to contemporary social and political issues. By the end of the course, learners will have gained a detailed understanding of the philosophical issues involved in many contemporary debates in the public sphere, as well as a refined sense of their own moral and political positions and intuitions.

A basic course in the physics of communication systems. Topics include electricity and magnetism, optics, frequency band width relationships. This course will include an introduction to signal propagation in different media as well as amplification and signal correction as applied to electrical and optical systems.

PHYS 170: GENERAL PHYSICS I (3 Credits) General Physics I is the study of the relationships between matter and energy in the world. In this course, students will examine Newton’s laws of

PHIL 201: PHILOSOPHY OF DEATH AND DYING (3 Credits) 30


through a systematic study and comparison of types of government and political systems.

motion, particle kinematics and dynamics, vectors, work, energy, and momentum. Students will also conduct experiments in lab assignments to experience the science in action.

POLS 205: INTRODUCTION TO AMERICAN POLITICS (3 Credits)

PHYS 175: GENERAL PHYSICS II (3 Credits)

This course will serve as an introduction to American government and politics. Readings will highlight how American government shapes and influences the individual freedoms and rights of its citizenship. Learners will also take a close look at social, economic, and foreign policy and the ways in which the broad themes of constitutional principles, political behavior, and governmental institutions have intersected to shape it.

General Physics II is the study of the relationships between matter and energy in the world. In this course, students will examine rotational motion, gravitation, waves, sound, thermodynamics, electric fields, electric potential and capacitance. Students will also conduct experiments in lab assignments to experience the science in action.

PHYS 180: GENERAL PHYSICS III (3 Credits)

POLS 211: HISTORY OF POLITICAL THOUGHT (3 Credits)

General Physics III is the study of relationships, specifically how the world works in mathematical terms. This course examines the broad area of electricity and magnetism, both as individual topics and their interconnections. The topics covered: are direct current (DC) circuits, magnetic fields, inductance, alternating current (AC) circuits, electromagnetic waves and optics. Students will also participate in lab activities to experience the science in action.

A study of the historical and theoretical underpinnings to current political ideologies, starting with the Greek city-state and the political theories of Plato and Aristotle, continuing with the Roman, Medieval and Renaissance contributions to political thought and culminating in the radical political theories of the 19th and 20th centuries.

POLS 212: LEGAL CONCEPTS AND ADMINISTRATION OF JUSTICE (3 Credits)

PHYS 250: INTRODUCTION TO PHYSICS (3 Credits)

This course covers the judicial process and its evolution, the rights of accused persons, and the administration of justice in the light of the elementary foundations and functions of substantive and adjective law. The theoretical aspects of basic concepts will be examined, but the stress will be on the practical aspects.

This course is a broad overview of classical and modern physics, and discusses the role of physics in society, technology, and engineering. Topics include mechanics, heat, sound, and electromagnetism.

POLS 201: INTRODUCTION TO INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS (3 Credits)

POLS 310: POLITICS AND SOCIETY (3 Credits)

The purpose of this course is to provide students with a basic understanding of foreign affairs and introduce them to the fundamental principles of international relations within the political science framework. At the end of this course, learners will have a comprehensive understanding of the basic principles and concepts of International Relations, as well as the analytical ability to examine the global political system.

The fundamental concepts of the state, government and their interrelationships. Topics include: the state as an instrument of social control; power, its legitimacy and authority; political doctrines such as democracy, oligarchy, and totalitarianism; the modern state and its political structures, elites, and decision makers; the electoral process and sociopolitical means of attitudinal influence. The impact of class, status and influence will also be analyzed.

POLS 203: INTRODUCTION TO COMPARATIVE POLITICS (3 Credits)

POLS 311: POLITICS OF CHANGE (3 Credits)

This course focuses its efforts on exploring the formal, public sphere of politics and power relations

This course is concerned with the impact of modernization on the political system; the

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system, the regional organizations of the bloc type, the substantive rules of international law, procedures for the pacific settlement of international disputes, international and social cooperation, and prospects for a development system of world order through international organization.

relationship between modernization and decolonization, revolution and nation-building; theories of political change; and the consequences of modernization as experienced by several countries from the First, Second, and Third Worlds.

POLS 312: AMERICAN SOCIETY AND JUDICIAL BEHAVIOR (3 Credits)

POLS 320: PUBLIC POLICY ANALYSIS (3 Credits)

This course covers changing values and patterns of judicial behavior, federal courts and the power of judicial review, fundamental constitutional principles, nationalization and enforcement of the Bill of Rights, the Supreme Court’s policy-making role and its effect on economic policy, and the controversy over the arbiter role of the court. Included will be an analysis of constitutional development of rights and duties of the people, and the role of the government as an institution.

This course will approach public policy decisions to determine goal achievement in terms of need articulation, relative costs and expended resources, planning and programming for future needs, and resource development.

POLS 321: PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION (3 Credits) This course will approach public policy decisions to determine goal achievement in terms of need articulation, relative costs and expended resources, planning and programming for future needs, and resource development.

POLS 313: FOREIGN POLICY OF THE UNITED STATES (3 Credits) The historical development of American policy, the mechanics of its formulation, and its current objectives will be studied, discussed, and analyzed.

PSYC 200: INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY (3 Credits) This course presents the theories and principles of modern psychology. Students learn about the different branches of psychology and the practical application of psychological tenets to functional behavior.

POLS 314: GOVERNMENT AND METROPOLITAN PROBLEMS (3 Credits) The first part comprises the political framework: state governmental structure, its functions, services, and financing; local, rural, and urban governments, their structures, services, and functions. The second half focuses on metropolitan problems and their interaction with metropolitan government: housing, schooling, transportation, sanitation, pollution, and taxation. Social parameters stemming from ethnic, religious, class, and employment factors, among others, will be interwoven in the analysis.

PSYC 220: STATISTICAL ANALYSIS (3 Credits) This course covers descriptive and inferential statistics, frequency distributions, percentile rank, measure of central tendency and variability, correlation and regression, and tests of significance. Using computer software, students will directly apply these statistics to specific problems common to the behavioral sciences.

POLS 315: GOVERNMENT AND BUSINESS (3 Credits)

PSYC 230: CHILD PSYCHOLOGY (3 Credits) The study of human growth and development. This course is designed to give the student an understanding of children and how they change while passing through the major phases of growth. Emphasis is placed on physical, emotional, and personality development with an aim toward understanding the period of human growth on which adulthood is founded. Special topics include identification of conditions in childhood leading to normal psychological development.

A consideration of relationships between business enterprise and the societal and political milieu in which these enterprises operate. New concepts in business ethics and corporate responsibility. Government regulation of business activity.

POLS 316: GOVERNMENT AND METROPOLITAN PROBLEMS (3 Credits) The nature of international law, the organization of the community of nations, the United Nations

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PSYC 240: EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY (3 Credits)

factors can facilitate or interfere with the individual worker’s feelings and behaviors on the job.

Emphasis on human learning. Consideration of concepts of readiness, individual differences, motivation, retention, transfer, concept development, reasoning, mental health, and measurement as related to learning. Psychological principles of teaching-learning technology are examined.

PSYC 301: SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY (3 Credits) This course will introduce you to the concepts and ideas in the area of social psychology.

PSYC 303: LIFESPAN DEVELOPMENT (3 Credits) This course in developmental psychology concerns itself with the changes (psychological and otherwise) that occur as a result of our physical and mental maturation. This course emphasizes that development proceeds throughout all stages of the lifespan.

PSYC 250: LEARNING THEORY (3 Credits) Learning theory is a fundamental science course. The student is asked to trace the emergence of modern cognitive learning theory (neo-behaviorism) from the original works of Pavlov, Thorndike, and Watson through the “blackbox” Skinnerian school of thought. The school emphasizes theoretical rather than methodological issues and, as such, is designed to give the student a firm grasp of the conditions under which permanent behavior change occurs.

PSYC 310: ABNORMAL PSYCHOLOGY (3 Credits) A study of mental health and abnormal behavior. The topics covered include: definitions of mental health and mental illness; problems of adjustment; the causes, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of mental disorders. Case studies supplement and illustrate the theoretical parts of the course material.

PSYC 260: ENVIRONMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY (3 Credits)

PSYC 320: COMMUNICATIONS AND INTERVIEWING TECHNIQUES (3 Credits)

A study of man’s relationship to the physical environment. Topics include: the effects of architecture on behavior, design in selective environments, social uses of space, urban and environmental stressors, and encouraging ecological behaviors.

The examination of communication from various standpoints, as illustrated by different types of interviews. Interviewing techniques employed for personnel selection are compared with those used in interrogation and those used for therapeutic purposes. Practice in interviewing.

PSYC 270: MEASUREMENT CONCEPTS (3 Credits)

PSYC 330: PERSONNEL PSYCHOLOGY (3 Credits)

The construction, validation, and interpretation of test results. Group and individual tests of aptitude, intelligence and personality are analyzed. Each student will develop and administer a measure for a specific diagnostic or research purpose.

Examines the important role of individual differences in selecting and placing employees, in appraising the level of employee’s work performance and in training recently hired and veteran employees to improve various aspects of job-related behavior. Emphasis is placed on job analysis, measurement of performance and methods used in selection, i.e., tests and interviews.Special attention to the legal issues involving fairness in selection of employees.

PSYC 290: ORGANIZATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY (3 Credits) A study of the impact of organizational structure, leadership and group dynamics on role-related behaviors, on personal feelings of motivation and commitment and communication within the organization. The course stresses theories of work motivation and job satisfaction and linkage of these factors with worker performance. A major focus of organizational psychology concerns the means by which organizations, supervisory and work-group

PSYC 340: INTRODUCTORY RESEARCH METHODS FOR THE BEHAVIORAL SCEINCES (3 Credits) This course stresses the classical approach to experimental research on human behavior. Students conduct and report on experiments in the fields of psychophysics, psychomotor learning, memory and

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psychotherapy, by both directive and non-directive methods. Counseling is considered both as a career in itself and as a component of one’s job in such fields as teaching, business and personnel management, health occupations, social work and the law.

perception. These laboratory experiments permit the student to apply knowledge gained in former courses about measurements, statistical inference and design of experiments.

PSYC 401: CULTURAL PSYCHOLOGY (3 Credits) Cultural Psychology reviews the cultural, community, and ecological factors that play a role in how people perceive their environment. The goal of this course is to investigate the ways in which culture can affect aspects of that individual’s psychology. Students begin by reviewing the history and major theories of cultural psychology before moving on to a more indepth examination of culture and its relationship to cognition, intelligence, emotion, motivation, and behavior. Learners end the course with a discussion of how human development and psychological disorders are affected by culture.

PSYC 430: SEMINAR: HUMAN SEXUALITY (3 Credits) Theories and practical techniques of counseling, including advisement, guidance, and supportive psychotherapy, by both directive and non-directive methods. Counseling is considered both as a career in itself and as a component of one’s job in such fields as teaching, business and personnel management, health occupations, social work and the law.

PSYC 403: PSYCHOTHERAPY (3 Credits) This course will provide students with an introduction to the theories, styles, and methods of psychotherapy that they would need to know in a clinical situation. Students will examine some of the more common techniques for conducting psychotherapy and be exposed to treatment options for various psychological disorders.

PSYC 405: THEORIES OF PERSONALITY (3 Credits) A survey of the major theoretical approaches to understanding the development, structure and dynamics of personality.

PSYC 410: PHYSIOLOGICAL BASIS FOR BEHAVIOR (3 Credits) A basic course to familiarize students with the bodily processes involved in various aspects of human behavior. Physiological psychology studies the biological basis of psychological functions such as sleeping, emotions, motivations, perceptions, learning, memory and problem solving. The two major biological systems most relevant to psychology are the nervous system and the glandular system.

PSYC 420: INTRODUCTION TO COUNSELING (3 Credits) Theories and practical techniques of counseling, including advisement, guidance, and supportive

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This is Your Journey. Learn. Grow. Make a Difference.

Academic Programs

29


COLLEGE OF ARTS AND HUMANITIES

experiences, supportive scaffolding of learning support, service-learning, and pragmatic skill building to help individual learners gain the most from their educational experience with WEU and prepare them for the next step in their career path.

Certificate in Motion Graphics Associate of Arts in Digital Media

4. Design specific programs to address current and future interests and challenges among credit and non-credit learners on the global scene.

The WEU College of Arts and Humanities acts as an innovator in designing and facilitating online arts and humanities instruction as well as courses in general education to impart the skills necessary for learners to become well-rounded, humanitarian citizens.

5. Cultivate and sustain partnerships with professional, government and other educational constituencies. 6. Achieve learner success in the form of: admission to graduate programs, job acquisition/promotion and/or personal fulfillment.

To accomplish its mission, the College of Arts and Humanities: •

• •

Principles

Offers innovative curricula designed to produce educated persons who approach their profession and life energetically, competently and ethically. Engages qualified and dedicated faculty with a passion for teaching and a dedication to humanity. Offers a breadth of courses for career and personal enrichment.

• • •

Engages learners in developing innovative solutions to artistic and social challenges.

College Objectives

1. Provide innovative training through high quality, interdisciplinary education that considers present and anticipates future local and global challenges. 2. Attract and retain outstanding faculty, staff and learners. 3. Allow for personalized, creative learning experiences by using quality content, collaborative learning 36

Learning should be learner-centered and collaborative. A dedication to lifelong learning is essential for success. Self-awareness and interdisciplinary understanding are central to understanding one’s place in the world. Critical thinking, problem solving, and communication skills are hallmarks of a creative citizen. Technical and vocational skills are critical for effective functionality in the workplace. Global understanding and citizenship are core components of every course in the College.


CERTIFICATE IN MOTION GRAPHICS

Program Structure Successful completion of the program is granted upon completion of the following credits/courses listed below:

Program Description

DIGA 110 Introduction to Digital Media DIGA 120 Introduction to Photoshop DIGA 130 Introduction to Adobe Illustrator DIGA 141 3D Animation DIGA 150 Introduction to After Effects

This program explores multiple contexts of time-based media from artistic, social and commercial perspectives. Learners will gain a clear understanding of the relationship between the narrative and the visual literacy of video as well as the ability to create appropriate multimedia elements. Lectures will describe and demonstrate the communicative value of motion graphics in driving a narrative. Learners will develop an awareness of motion design principles and elements while developing individual and unique projects.

Total Credits Required: 15

Program Objectives Graduates of the Certificate in Motion Graphics program will demonstrate the following competencies: •

• •

Understand and discuss significant cultural and historical issues in time-based media. Cultivate visual communication skills utilizing dynamic imagery and multimedia elements. Create digital files to convey graphic and aural communication. Gain aesthetic, verbal and critical abilities by evaluating current developments in time-based artistic projects.

Admission Requirements Fulfill the University’s Undergraduate Admissions Requirements and complete the University’s Admissions Process listed in the Admissions and Enrollment section of this catalog. 37


ASSOCIATE OF ARTS IN DIGITAL MEDIA

Admission Requirements Fulfill the University’s Undergraduate Admissions Requirements and complete the University’s Admissions Process listed in the Admissions and Enrollment section of this catalog.

Program Description The Digital Arts associate degree is a projectbased, career-oriented program designed for learners with an interest in the visual communication industry.

Program Structure The AA in Digital Arts degree is comprised of core curriculum, electives within the field, and general education requirements.

Course work guides the learner in developing fundamental skills in fields such as animation, game art, visual effects, web design, video and audio production, and motion graphics. Using industry-standard software, hardware and production techniques, learners gain practical experience and trans-media competency along with aesthetic awareness resulting in a strong, marketable portfolio.

Successful completion of the program is granted upon completion of the following credits/courses listed below: General Education Courses (See requirements on p.15) Core Courses Elective Courses

Program Objectives

• • • •

18 credits 12 credits

CORE COURSES DIGA 110 Introduction to Digital Media DIGA 120 Introduction to Photoshop DIGA 130 Introduction to Adobe Illustrator DIGA 210 Digital Art and Design Criticism DIGA 211 Digital Design and Content Development DIGA 212 Portfolio Production

Graduates of the Associate of Arts in Digital Media program will demonstrate the following competencies: •

36 credits

Demonstrate knowledge in the principles of design, color theory, and animation. Integrate video footage with digital graphics and soundtracks. Use industry standard applications to create digital media. Apply skills learned to future study and/or working in the industry. Create and maintain a professional portfolio and market this portfolio via websites and social media.

ELECTIVE COURSES Choose 4 of the following: DIGA 140 2D Design DIGA 141 3D Design DIGA 150 Introduction to After Effects DIGA 160 Video Production DIGA 170 Web Design DIGA 180 Audio Design DIGA 200 Computer Graphics I

Use written and communication skills to collaborate as part of a production team.

Total Credits Required: 66

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COLLEGE OF ARTS AND HUMANITIES COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

DIGA 140: 2D DESIGN (3 Credits) This course familiarizes learners with the fundamentals of two-dimensional design concepts, developing their artistic skills and practical knowledge, critical skills and confidence to effectively communicate their ideas. Topics include: principles of visual design, typography and layout, logo and brand design, color theory, interface and instruction design, information design, design process and critical thinking. Learners will use various mediums and tools to produce projects that will improve technical and creative skills and encourage creativity and artistic growth.

DIGA 110: INTRODUCTION TO DIGITAL MEDIA (3 Credits) This course introduces students to key concepts, technologies, and topics related to the study of state-of- the-art methods of creating digital media: time-based art, network culture, image resolution, computational techniques, virtuality, and interactivity. Students will explore ways of constructing types of digital media and investigate the history of digital technology, gaining an understanding of digital culture and its correlation to social, aesthetic and ethical issues.

DIGA 141: 3D ANIMATION (3 Credits) This project-based course discusses 3D animation in a variety of real-world applications. Learners will explore 3D animation as a medium for creating and enhancing artwork through hands-on explorations utilizing Maya and other industry-standard software.

DIGA 120: INTRODUCTION TO ADOBE PHOTOSHOP (3 Credits)

DIGA 150: INTRODUCTION TO AFTER EFFECTS (3 Credits)

In this course learners will cultivate their innate creativity and begin to develop a unique personal style using industry standard software, Adobe Photoshop. A thorough understanding of raster and vector concepts will be gained through a series of rewarding exercises and challenges designed to build a solid foundation of visual communication skills. Learners will acquire essential tools and techniques, taking them up to an intermediate level of digital art skills.

This course offers a basic foundation of motion graphic skills using Adobe After Effects. Students will gain a clear understanding of the process involved in manipulating multimedia elements to achieve communication across a timeline. Students will learn basic composing skills to render a wide variety of projects. Emphasis will be upon developing an individual style and the ability to output a variety of client based projects.

DIGA 130: INTRODUCTION TO ADOBE ILLUSTRATOR (3 Credits)

DIGA 160: VIDEO PRODUCTION (3 Credits)

This course provides an introduction to the process of creating vector-based graphic images using Adobe Illustrator, the industry-standard vector program for graphics professionals. In this course, the key features of Illustrator will be covered, including how to use the core drawing and shape tools, the transformation features, page layout, text, layers, perspective and 3-D drawing, exporting and printing files. Through a series of written and video tutorials complemented with hands-on exercises, learners will learn the basic skills needed to produce high quality artwork for print, multimedia, and web graphics.

Based upon real-world applications of motion media, this course offers an overview of the creative and effective use of video equipment, including digital video cameras and non-linear editing tools, as a catalyst for students’ examination of the theoretical and aesthetic ideas behind creating various types of media projects.

DIGA 170: WEB DESIGN (3 Credits) Through the development and maintaining of their own personal website, students will be introduced to basic design concepts including content, graphics, and navigation. Emphasis will be placed on projectbased learning using graphical interface software

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including Adobe Fireworks and Dreamweaver. Students will also be introduced to cascading style sheets and designing for mobile devices.

DIGA 180: AUDIO DESIGN (3 Credits) This course focuses on the use of technology in audio production and the designing of sound for live performance, film, television, video and games. Students will address the aesthetics of audio design through lecture, listening assignments and hands-on practice with industry-standard software.

DIGA 200: COMPUTER GRAPHICS I (3 credits) Introductory course in digital image-making which surveys the currently used application packages in the computer graphics field. Hands-on experience with emphasis on developing and understanding the workings of a digital design system.

DIGA 210: DIGITAL ART AND DESIGN CRITICISM (3 credits) An overview of the many forms of digital arts, this course encourages students in a collaboratory fashion to identify and address problems in the cultural and urban environment. Via creative problem solving, research and discovery, learners will discuss how design can improve the human condition and serve as a catalyst for thought and evolution.

DIGA 211: DIGITAL DESIGN AND CONTENT DEVELOPMENT (3 Credits) This course, designed for students already wellversed in the digital arts, enhances critical thinking and communication skills and informational literacy. Learners will develop content in preparation for the creation of their professional portfolio through research, exploration, constructive criticism and collaboration across the many forms of digital arts. Prerequisite: Completion of 9 credits of 100-level DIGA courses or the equivalent.

DIGA 212: PORTFOLIO PRODUCTION (3 Credits) Via creating and promoting their own professional portfolio, students will examine the business side of becoming a digital arts professional, including the importance of copyright, the constitution of a portfolio, establishing a business and building a network of clients. Prerequisite: DIGA 210.

40


COLLEGE OF BUSINESS •

Associate of Science in Business Administration

College Objectives

Associate of Science in Business Technical Sales

1. Innovate business and management training by striving to provide high quality education across the business and management disciplines that considers present and anticipates future local and global challenges. 2. Design specific programs to address current global challenges through collaboration with relevant global and local initiatives. 3. Provide individualized learning experiences using quality content, creative learning experiences, supportive scaffolding of learning support, service-learning, and pragmatic skill building to help individual learners gain the most from their educational experience with WEU and prepare them for the next step in their career path.

Bachelor of Science in Accounting Bachelor of Science in Business Administration Graduate Certificate in Social Entrepreneurship Graduate Certificate in International Business Masters of Business Administration Masters of Arts in Management Masters of Arts in Social Entrepreneurship The WEU College of Business educates global learners to become managers and leaders of character, who strive to improve the human condition through innovative social entrepreneurship and by shaping the future with their passion for learning and developing innovative solutions to complex problems.

Principles • •

To accomplish its mission, the College of Business: •

graduates possess the necessary skills to excel in the global business market. Integrates Social Responsibility into every class.

Offers innovative curricula designed to produce business leaders who approach their profession energetically, competently, and ethically. Is comprised of broadly educated faculty, who possess both exceptional academic and industry experience. Offers a breadth of business and management courses so that all

• •

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The focus is on the individual learner. Learners, faculty and staff share the responsibility of learning. Lifelong learning is essential for success. Leadership, ethics and social responsibility are the trademarks of WEU Business School Graduates. Global awareness and responsibilities are central in all activities.


ASSOCIATE OF SCIENCE IN BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION

Admission Requirements Fulfill the University’s Undergraduate Admissions Requirements, complete the University’s Admission Process, listed in the Admissions and Enrollment section of this catalog.

Program Description

Program Structure

The objective of the Associate of Science Degree in Business Administration is to give students a foundational understanding of business practices in the areas of finance, marketing, accounting and information systems. Learners in the Associate of Science Degree in Business Administration will expand their understanding of how business operates in both the national and international marketplace

Successful completion of the program is granted upon completion of the following credits/courses below: General Education Courses (See requirements on p. 15) Business Courses

BUSA 101 Introduction to Business BUSA 103 Introduction to Financial Accounting BUSA 105 Managerial Accounting BUSA 200 Principles of Microeconomics BUSA201 Principles of Macroeconomics BUSA 202 Principles of Finance BUSA 203 Principles of Marketing BUSA 204 Business Statistics BUSA 205 Business Law and Ethics BUSA 206 Management Information Systems BUSA 208 Principles of Management BUSA 209 Organizational Behavior BUSA 210 Corporate Communication

Program Objectives Upon successful completion of the Associate of Science Degree in Business Administration, learners will demonstrate the following competencies:

• • •

24 credits

BUSINESS COURSES Choose 8 of the following:

The completion of the general education requirements for the Associate’s Degree gives students a wide scope of learning in different disciplines and encourages critical thinking while the business curriculum allows students to select courses that relate directly to their personal, academic and professional goals.

36 credits

Demonstrate critical thinking skills in the areas of general education and business. Understand and apply basic business practices in their professional fields. Define finance, marketing, and management strategies. Relate financial principles to analysis of the effectiveness and efficiency of a business.

Total Credits Required: 60

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ASSOCIATE OF SCIENCE IN BUSINESS TECHNICAL SALES

Admission Requirements Fulfill the University’s Undergraduate Admissions Requirements, complete the University’s Admission Process, listed in the Admissions and Enrollment section of this catalog.

Program Description

Program Structure

The objective of the Associate of Science Degree in Business Technical Sales is to prepare students for an entry level position in business sales and customer service of technical products, goods or services to businesses and individuals.

Successful completion of the program is granted upon completion of the following credits/courses below: General Education Courses (See requirements on p. 15) Business Courses

The general education curriculum offers a strong foundation for a well-rounded education. The core curriculum provides instruction focusing on basic business principles, basic and advanced selling techniques, internet sales and service, customer service, contract and sales negotiations, team leadership, supervisory techniques, and sales personalities and profiling.

Total Credits Required: 60

Upon successful completion of the Associate of Science Degree in Business Technical Sales, learners will demonstrate the following competencies:

• • • •

24 credits

BUSINESS COURSES TBUS 114 Selling Techniques TBUS 130 Marketing and Distribution Principles TBUS 221 Consumer Behavior TBUS 260 Advanced Selling Techniques TBUS 270 Internet Sales and Service TBUS 280 Sales Personalities and Profiles TBUS 285 Customer Service Techniques TBUS 290 Contracts and Sales Negotiations

Program Objectives

36 credits

Apply basic economic, finance, and accounting principles to organizational environments. Recognize human resource concepts and activities in organizational environments. Define the various tasks and responsibilities of managers in organizations. Define and apply marketing and distribution principles. Describe consumer buying behavior.

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BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN ACCOUNTING

Admissions and Enrollment section of this catalog.

Program Description

Successful completion of the program is granted upon completion of the credits/courses listed below:

Program Structure

The Bachelor of Science Degree in Accounting program combines a strong breadth of studies in the liberal arts with an extensive foundation in the practice of accounting. Accounting captures information about an organization’s operating, investing and financing activities and reports this information to a wide variety of internal and external stakeholders. The Bachelor of Science in Accounting degree program prepares students for rewarding careers in this highly desirable field.

General Education Courses 36 credits (See requirements on p. 15) Core Business Courses 39 credits Accounting Major Courses 30 credits General Electives 21 credits (9 General Elective Units Must Be At The 300400 Level) CORE BUSINESS COURSES ACCT 114 Accounting I BUSA 105 Managerial Accounting BUSA 200 Principles of Microeconomics BUSA 202 Principles of Finance BUSA 203 Principles of Marketing BUSA 204 Business Statistics BUSA 205 Business Law and Ethics BUSA 206 Management Information Systems BUSA 208 Principles of Management ECON 201 Money and Banking INFS 105 Introduction to Information Systems MATH 125 Finite Mathematics

Program Objectives Upon successful completion of the Bachelor of Science in Accounting, learners will demonstrate the following competencies: • •

• •

Apply ethical management practices in leading global endeavors to create a better world. Mastery of the fundamental concepts, principles and practices common to all areas of accounting including taxation, financial accounting, managerial accounting, auditing and information systems. An awareness of and commitment to professional and ethical business practices. The ability to identify and solve unstructured real-world problems by identifying central issues, recognizing causational factors and generating evidence-based viable solutions.

ACCOUNTING MAJOR COURSES ACCT 210 Financial Accounting ACCT 302 Federal Taxation ACCT 306 Cost Accounting ACCT 311 Not for Profit Accounting ACCT 315 Financial Statement Analysis ACCT 320 Accounting Information Systems ACCT 402 Federal Taxation II ACCT 411 Auditing ACCT 416 Advanced Accounting FINA 210 Principles of Investment and Security Analysis

Admission Requirements

CAPSTONE COURSE BUSA 495 Business Capstone Course

Fulfill the University’s Undergraduate Admissions Requirements, complete the University’s Admission Process, listed in the

Total Credits Required: 126

45


BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION

Admission Requirements Fulfill the University’s Undergraduate Admissions Requirements, complete the University’s Admission Process, listed in the Admissions and Enrollment section of this catalog.

Program Description

Program Structure

The Graduate Certificate in Social Entrepreneurship program provides learners with the intellectual skills required to manage and lead a diverse array of global entrepreneurial endeavors in a manner that is both profitable and improves the human condition. Graduates generally join or create entrepreneurial companies. Learners who are interested in both private and public sector (for profit and not-for-profit) entrepreneurial endeavors will find this program of learning beneficial. The program will accommodate those learners who are currently employed and desiring advancement as well as learners seeking initial employment.

Successful completion of the program is granted upon completion of the credits/courses listed below: General Education Courses 36 credits (See requirements on p. 15) Core Business Courses 54 credits Specialization Courses 12 credits General Electives 24 credits (15 General Elective Units Must Be At The 300400 Level) CORE BUSINESS COURSES BUSA 101 Introduction to Business BUSA 103 Introduction to Financial Accounting BUSA 105 Managerial Accounting BUSA 200 Principles of Microeconomics BUSA 201 Principles of Macroeconomics BUSA 202 Principles of Finance BUSA 203 Principles of Marketing BUSA 204 Business Statistics BUSA 205 Business Law and Ethics BUSA 206 Management Information Systems BUSA 208 Principles of Management BUSA 209 Organizational Behavior BUSA 210 Corporate Communication BUSA 300 Operations Management BUSA 301 Human Resources Management BUSA 401 Management Leadership BUSA 402 Project Management BUSA 404 Risk Management

Program Objectives Upon successful completion of the Bachelor of Science in Business Administraion, learners will demonstrate the following competencies: • •

• •

Apply ethical management practices in leading global endeavors to create a better world. Effectively use business tools such as accounting, marketing and management to implement successful business plans and practices. Demonstrate understanding of microand macroeconomic principles and how those principles relate to business operations. Understand how current business information systems can be used in day to day operations to increase efficiency. Develop innovative and inspiring ideas for business that creates shareholder value while also improving the world.

SPECIALIZATION COURSES (Choose 1 specialization, See Below)

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Finance (Choose 4 courses)

Marketing (Choose 4 courses)

ACCT 315 Financial Statement Analysis ECON 320 International Economics and Finance FINA 205 Financial Management FINA 210 Principles of Investment and Security Analysis FINA 401 Finance: Working Capital Management FINA 405 Modern Portfolio Theory

BUSA 310 New Product Management MKTG 200 Retailing Management MKTG 301 Management of Promotion MKTG 315 Internet Marketing MKTG 401 Marketing Research

General Management (Take all courses) BUSA 305 Small Business Management BUSA 308 Introduction to International Business BUSA 310 New Product Management BUSA 313 Knowledge Management

BUSA 305 Small Business Management BUSA 306 Advertising and Promotion BUSA 310 New Product Management BUSA 403 Negotiation and Conflict Management BUSA 406 Business and Ethics

International Business (Choose 4 courses)

CAPSTONE COURSE

Small Business Entrepreneurship (Choose 4 courses)

BUSA 495 Business Capstone Course

BUSA 308 Introduction to International Business ECON 320 International Economics and Finance INFS 412 E-Commerce MKTG 310 Fundamentals of Exporting and Importing MKTG 320 Cross-Cultural Promotional Concepts and Practices MKTG 405 International Marketing

Total Credits Required: 126

Management of Information Systems (Choose 4 courses) INFS 210 Application Program Development I INFS 301 Database Program Analysis INFS 305 Managing Data Communications and Networks INFS 307 Structured Systems Analysis and Design INFS 410 Information Resource Management Managerial Accounting (Choose 4 courses) ACCT 210 Financial Accounting ACCT 306 Cost Accounting ACCT 311 Not for Profit Accounting ACCT 320 Accounting Information Systems ACCT 406 Internal Auditing 47


GRADUATE CERTIFICATE IN SOCIAL ENTREPRENEURSHIP

Admission Requirements Fulfill the University’s Graduate Admissions Requirements; complete the University’s Admission Process, listed in the Admissions and Enrollment section of this catalog, and meet the following Program special requirements:

Program Description

It is desired, but not mandatory, that applicants possess a graduate degree in Engineering, Science, Management, Business, or a related discipline.

The Graduate Certificate in Social Entrepreneurship program provides learners with the intellectual skills required to manage and lead a diverse array of global entrepreneurial endeavors in a manner that is both profitable and improves the human condition. Graduates generally join or create entrepreneurial companies. Learners who are interested in both private and public sector (for profit and not-for-profit) entrepreneurial endeavors will find this program of learning beneficial. The program will accommodate those learners who are currently employed and desiring advancement as well as learners seeking initial employment.

Program Structure The Graduate Certificate in Social Entrepreneurship program is lock-step based courses MUST be taken in the following order. Successful completion of the program is granted upon completion of the credits/courses listed below: BUSA 500 Ethics in Business Management BUSA 580 Entrepreneurship and Social Change BUSA 680 Analysis and Planning for Social Change BUSA 682 Building Social Ventures BUSA 684 Mobilizing Public and Private Resources

Program Objectives Graduates of the Graduate Certificate in Social Entrepreneurship program will demonstrate the following competencies: • • • • •

Total Credits Required: 15

Apply ethical management practices in leading global endeavors to create a better world. Design and implement entrepreneurial companies that result in positive social change. Design a plan to obtain capital and manage finances for a social venture. Motivate and lead teams and organizations to create positive social change. Develop innovative and inspiring ideas for projects and businesses that create shareholder value while also improving the world.

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GRADUATE CERTIFICATE IN INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS

Admission Requirements Fulfill the University’s Graduate Admissions Requirements, complete the University’s Admission Process, listed in the Admissions and Enrollment section of this catalog, and meet the following Program special requirements:

Program Description The Graduate Certificate in International Business program provides learners with the intellectual skills required to manage and lead a diverse array of international business endeavors. Strong emphasis is placed on learning how to understand and analyze the international marketplace, identify opportunities and develop strategies to gain a competitive advantage in the marketplace, and management of the international supply chain.

It is desired, but not mandatory, that applicants possess a graduate degree in Engineering, Science, Management, Business, or a related discipline.

Program Structure The Graduate Certificate in International Business program is lock-step based - courses MUST be taken in the following order.

Graduates generally go on to work for companies engaged in international business or for multi-national firms.

Successful completion of the program is granted upon completion of the following credits/courses below:

Learners who are interested in both private and public sector international business will find this program of learning beneficial. The program will accommodate those learners who are currently employed and desiring advancement as well as learners seeking initial employment.

BUSA 500 Ethics in Business Management BUSA 580 Entrepreneurship and Social Change BUSA 610 International Strategy BUSA 612 Globalization and Market Analysis BUSA 614 International Supply Chain Management

Program Objectives Graduates of the Graduate Certificate in International Business will demonstrate the following competencies: • • • •

Assess global cultural and legal diversity and develop effective business policies to manage international business operations.

Total Credits Required: 15

Apply ethical business practices in leading global endeavors to create a better world. Design and implement entrepreneurial companies that result in positive social change. Assess global market opportunities and develop effective business strategies. Develop effective policies and procedures for an efficient international supply chain. 49


MASTER OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION

Program Description

The MBA program is a combination of both theoretical and applied knowledge and includes hands-on experiences and labs for the learners. The courses offered through the program provide graduates with the analytical and intellectual skills required to manage and lead a diverse array of business organizations around the world. The program focuses on providing learners with sufficient depth in each domain of business knowledge while also affording learners the ability to integrate multiple domains in the creation of effective business strategies. Graduates typically seek positions in general management, marketing, finance, operations management, project management, logistics, entrepreneurship, sales, accounting and others. The program accommodates those learners who are currently employed and desiring advancement as well as learners seeking initial employment.

Admission Requirements Fulfill the University’s Graduate Admissions Requirements and complete the University’s Admission Process, listed in the Admissions and Enrollment section of this catalog.

Program Structure The MBA Program is lock-step based – courses MUST be taken in the following order. Successful completion of the program is granted upon completion of the credits/courses listed below:

Program Objectives

Core Business Courses Specialization Courses Capstone Course

Graduates of the Master of Business Administration program will demonstrate the following competencies: • • • • •

Develop effective accounting and financial strategies for a company that provides adequate financial resources to sustain growth. Design effective marketing strategies and campaigns. Develop strategies that capitalize on the effective integration of Information Technology resources within a business enterprise. Apply effective business analytical techniques that result in optimal decision making in all business endeavors.

33 credits 9 credits 3 credits

CORE BUSINESS COURSES

Apply ethical business practices in leading global endeavors to create a better world. Design and implement entrepreneurial companies that result in positive social change. Develop and implement effective organizational policies and procedures for a business organization. Assess local, national and global market opportunities and develop effective business strategies. Lead teams in managing operations and implementing projects.

BUSA 500 Ethics in Business Management BUSA 510 Organizational Behavior BUSA 520 Strategic Leadership BUSA 530 Financial Accounting BUSA 532 Spreadsheet Modeling BUSA 540 Marketing BUSA 550 Management Information Systems BUSA 560 Project Management BUSA 570 Disciplined Imagination and Risk Mitigation BUSA 572 Decision Analysis BUSA 580 Entrepreneurship and Social Change 50


Technology INFS 500 Information Infrastructure and Resources Fundamentals INFS 524 Systems Maintenance and Services

CHOOSE A SPECIALIZATION Concentration 1: Social Entrepreneurship

Concentration 8: Human Resources Management

BUSA 680 Analysis and Planning for Social Change BUSA 682 Building Social Ventures BUSA 684 Mobilizing Public and Private Resources

BUSA 524 Managing Groups and Teams BUSA 632 Recruiting Talented Professionals BUSA 634 Developing Policies for Human Resources Management

Concentration 2: International Business

CAPSTONE COURSE

BUSA 610 International Strategy BUSA 612 Globalization and Market Analysis BUSA 610 International Supply Chain Management

BUSA 695 Capstone Project for Business Administration

Concentration 3: Health Care Administration

Total Credits Required: 45

BUSA 620 The Health Care and Services System BUSA 622 Economics and Finance for Health Institutions BUSA 624 Health Care Policy and Legislation Concentration 4: Global Leadership BUSA 522 Leadership and Innovation for Entrepreneurs BUSA 616 Case Studies in Global Leadership BUSA 630 Conflict Resolution and Negotiation Concentration 5: Project Management BUSA 524 Managing Groups and Teams BUSA 617 International Project Management BUSA 660 Stochastic Modeling for Project Managers Concentration 6: Business Management BUSA 524 Managing Groups and Teams BUSA 610 International Strategy BUSA 662 Operations Management Concentration 7: Information Technology ENGR 580 Social Change with Engineering and 51


MASTER OF ARTS IN MANAGEMENT

Program Description

Admission Requirements

The Master of Arts in Management program is a combination of both theoretical and applied knowledge and includes hands-on experiences and labs for the learners. The courses offered through the program provide graduates with the analytical and intellectual skills required to manage and lead a diverse array of management positions around the world. The program provides graduates with the skills needed to manage both small and large size companies, teams and organizations. Graduates typically seek positions in general management, operations management, project management, entrepreneurship, and others. Learners who are interested in both private and public sector management systems will find this program of learning beneficial. The program accommodates those learners who are currently employed and desiring advancement as well as learners seeking initial employment.

Fulfill the University’s Graduate Admissions Requirements and complete the University’s Admissions Process, listed in the Admissions and Enrollment section of this catalog.

Program Structure The M.A. in Management Program is lock-step based – courses MUST be taken in the following order. Successful completion of the program is granted upon completion of the credits/courses listed below: BUSA 500 Ethics in Business Management BUSA 510 Organizational Behavior BUSA 520 Strategic Leadership BUSA 524 Managing Groups and Teams BUSA 560 Project Management BUSA 580 Entrepreneurship and Social Change BUSA 616 Case Studies in Global Leadership BUSA 630 Conflict Resolution and Negotiations BUSA 662 Operations Management BUSA 696 Capstone Project for Management

Program Objectives Graduates of the Master of Arts in Management program will demonstrate the following competencies: • • • • •

Assess local, national and global market opportunities and develop effective business strategies. Lead teams in managing operations and implementing projects.

Total Credits Required: 30

Apply ethical management practices in leading global endeavors to create a better world. Design and implement entrepreneurial companies that result in positive social change. Identify business and market opportunities and develop strategies to achieve a sustainable business. Develop and lead effective teams, groups and organizations. Develop and implement effective policies and procedures for an organization. 52


MASTER OF ARTS IN SOCIAL ENTREPRENEURSHIP

• • •

Program Description

The M.A. in Social Entrepreneurship program is a combination of both theoretical and applied knowledge and includes hands-on experiences and labs for the learners. The courses offered through the program provide graduates with the analytical and intellectual skills required to manage and lead a diverse array of global entrepreneurial endeavors in a manner that is both profitable and improves the human condition. Graduates can seek positions in general management, but typically join or create entrepreneurial companies. Learners who are interested in both private and public sector (for profit and not-for-profit) entrepreneurial endeavors will find this program of learning beneficial. The program will accommodate those learners who are currently employed and desiring advancement as well as students seeking initial employment.

Admission Requirements Fulfill the University’s Graduate Admissions Requirements and complete the University’s Admissions Process, listed in the Admissions and Enrollment section of this catalog.

Program Structure The M.A. in Social Entrepreneurship Program is lock- step based – courses MUST be taken in the following order. Successful completion of the program is granted upon completion of credits/courses listed below:

Program Objectives

BUSA 500 Ethics in Business Management BUSA 520 Strategic Leadership BUSA 522 Leadership and Innovation for Entrepreneurs BUSA 524 Managing Groups and Teams BUSA 560 Project Management BUSA 580 Entrepreneurship and Social Change BUSA 680 Analysis and Planning for Social Change BUSA 682 Building Social Ventures BUSA 684 Mobilizing Private and Public Resources BUSA 697 Capstone Project for Social Entrepreneurship

Graduates of the Master of Arts in Social Entrepreneurship will demonstrate the following competencies: • • • • •

Design and implement entrepreneurial companies that result in positive social change. Design a plan to obtain capital and manage finances for a social venture. Motivate and lead teams and organizations to create positive social change. Develop innovative and inspiring ideas for projects and businesses that create shareholder value while also improving the world.

Apply ethical management practices in leading global endeavors to create a better world. Design and implement entrepreneurial companies that result in positive social change. Identify business and market opportunities and develop strategies to achieve a sustainable business. Develop and lead effective teams, groups and organizations. Lead teams in designing and management projects.

Total Credits Required: 30

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COLLEGE OF BUSINESS COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

management and investors. Use of financial statements in the assessment of business performance. Exposure to methods for the adaptation of financial statements for decisionmaking. Topics include: statements of income, balance sheet, cash flow from operation and free cash flow; financial ratio analysis, cash budgets, pro forma statements, forecasting growth potential and financial requirements; quality of earnings, inventory valuation, and depreciation methods.

ACCT 114: ACCOUNTING I (3 Credits) This course is an introduction to financial accounting and reporting. Topics covered include accounting terminology and concepts, analyzing transactions, the double-entry framework, journalizing and posting transactions, adjusting entries, depreciation methods, tax and payroll requirements, financial statements and statements of cash flow. Prerequisite: MTH 105.

ACCT 320: ACCOUNTING INFORMATION SYSTEMS (3 Credits) Introduces the fundamentals of accounting information systems knowledge base needed by accounting professionals, business information generated by organizational and accounting processes and operations, application areas in an organization, and risks and internal controls.

ACCT 210: FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING (3 Credits) Stresses the theoretical and analytical aspects of financial accounting. Attention is directed to asset valuations with emphasis on current controversies and opinions of the AICPA and other professional organizations.

ACCT 402: FEDERAL TAXATION II (3 Credits) Federal Income taxation for partnerships, estates, trusts, and corporations: preparation of returns. Introduction to federal income tax procedure. Prerequisite: ACCT 302

ACCT 302: FEDERAL TAXATION (3 Credits) A study of federal tax structure as it applies to the taxation of individuals. The course will include elements of tax research and the preparation of tax forms.

ACCT 406: INTERNAL AUDITING (3 Credits) Internal control, behavioral aspects, audit reporting, the management of internal auditing, its status as a profession, internal auditing techniques such as: internal control questionnaires, flowcharting, interviewing, and statements and standards of major professional auditing and accounting bodies.

ACCT 306: COST ACCOUNTING (3 Credits) Examines the importance of cost accounting to the various levels of management and the dual function of cost as an information system and as a tool for planning and control. Concepts in the accumulation of manufacturing costs, job order, and process costs systems are stressed. A study of budgets and standard cost systems as a function for planning and control; direct costing, break-even and cost-volumeprofit analysis, as an aid to decision making.

ACCT 411: AUDITING (3 Credits) Fundamentals of auditing principles and procedures, form and content of auditor’s reports, professional ethics and legal responsibilities, EDP considerations, statistical sampling applications in auditing, the role of internal control in relation to the auditor and substantive audit procedures of assets, liabilities and equity capital.

ACCT 311: NOT FOR PROFIT ACCOUNTING (3 Credits) Fund accounting for nonprofit organizations such as governmental units, universities, hospitals, foundations and charitable institutions.

ACCT 416: ADVANCED ACCOUNTING (3 Credits) Methods for arranging business combinations; merger, consolidation, acquisition of common stock and acquisition of assets. Methods of accounting for business combinations, purchase and pooling of interest. Specialized topics include partnership and branch accounting.

ACCT 315: FINANCIAL STATEMENT ANALYSIS (3 Credits) A critical review of corporate financial reports and associated footnotes from the perspectives of different potential users including: creditors,

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ACCT 510: MANAGERIAL ACCOUNTING (3 Credits)

transactions are also covered in this course. The course will include elements of tax research, communication of tax strategies, ethics and the preparation of tax forms. A tax research project is required.

Effective managerial decision making and financial planning through accounting information and costing systems, performance evaluation and control of operations, budgeting, and management of assets.

ACCT 515: ADVANCED ACCOUNTING (3 Credits) Business combinations and consolidated financial statements under the purchase method and the accounting for goodwill is the core of this course. Specialized topics include branch accounting, partnership and foreign currency translation. A research project is required.

ACCT 511: INTERMEDIATE FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING (3 Credits) Accounting concepts and principles are combined with accounting practices and methods in order to provide a comprehensive presentation of the discipline of financial accounting. Interpretation and use of financial statements is covered with a focus on the complementary relationships between the accrual and historical cost-based traditional financial statements, on the one hand, and the newer statement of cash flow on the other. Specific topics include: accounting for revenues, expenses, assets, liabilities, and owners’ equity; financial statements, and accrual income and framework for financial statement analysis.

ACCT 581: CPA REVIEW FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING AND REPORTING (3 Credits) CPA Review Financial Accounting and Reporting provides review and practice with advanced topics in financial accounting and reporting to aid CPA exam candidates in successfully completing the exam.

ACCT 582: CPA REVIEW AUDITING AND ATTESTATION (3 Credits) CPA Review Auditing and Attestation provides review and practice with advanced topics in auditing to aid CPA exam candidates in successfully completing the exam.

ACCT 512: PROESSIONAL AUDITING (3 Credits) Fundamentals of auditing principles and procedures under generally accepted auditing standards will be covered. Auditor’s reports, professional ethics and legal responsibilities, EDP considerations, statistical sampling, applications in auditing, the role of internal control in relation to the auditor and substantive audit procedures of assets, liabilities and equity capital will be reviewed Communication of auditor findings to applicable parties will also be studied.

ACCT 583: CPA REVIEW BUSINESS ENVIRONMENT AND CONCEPTS (3 Credits) CPA Review Business Environment and Concepts provides review and practice with advanced topics in business environment and concepts to aid CPA exam candidates in successfully completing the exam.

ACCT 584: CPA REVIEW REGULATION (3 Credits)

ACCT 513: FINANCIAL STATEMENT ANALYSIS AND REPORTING (3 Credits)

CPA Review Regulation provides review and practice with advanced topics in regulation to aid CPA exam candidates in successfully completing the exam.

An analysis and evaluation of corporate financial statements as an aid to accountants, security analysis, lending officers and managers in making decisions based on financial data. Financial statements will be reviewed for fairness and completeness in reporting and revision will be made to financial statement data for analytical purposes. Communication of such analysis will be discussed.

ADVR 101: INTRODUCTION TO ADVERTISING (3 Credits) This course provides a survey of modern advertising covering the major media: print, radio, and television. Media are compared for their utility, impact and effectiveness as vehicles for advertising. Principles of good advertising copy and production are emphasized as are advertising ethics.

ACCT 514: FEDERAL TAXATION (3 Credits) A study of federal tax structure as it applies to the taxation of individuals and corporations. Property

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ADVR 150: PLANNING AND CREATIN THE ADVERTISING CAMPAIGN (3 Credits)

Advertising degree program-based on computer software.

This course will introduce students to the elements required to plan and create an effective advertising campaign.

ADVR 560: ADVERTISING COPY WRITING (3 Credits) This course examines the business, craft and creative process of writing advertising copy. Students are assigned weekly creative and text assignments. Critiques and individual reviews of draft copy help impart a thorough grounding in advertising creativity. Students work on the integration of the verbal and graphic components in imaginative concepts, supported by coherent, entertaining and persuasive text, all resting on a carefully devised foundation of sound strategy.

ADVR 201: ADVERTISING DESIGN CONCEPTS (3 Credits) This course covers the applications of professional design concepts, from original creative ideas to completed advertising material. Discussions cover a wide variety of artistic and practical uses of typography, photography, film, video, other visuals, layout, and storyboarding, in preparing print and electronic commercial messages for the page and screen.

ADVR 570: MEDIA PLANNING AND BUYING (3 Credits)

ADVR 220: MEDIA PRODUCTION WORKSHOP (3 Credits)

This course provides an understanding of the central position of media planning and buying in campaign development, as well as analysis of the organization and the purpose of the media plan. Discussion focuses on the rates and sources of information, evaluation of the representative media, problems of coverage costs, duplication and scheduling, and the media sales process.

This course introduces fundamental techniques of media production including still visuals, moving visuals, and sound. This is a workshop experience in which students gain basic audiovisual skills. ADVR 330: ADVERTISING AND PUBLIC POLICY (3 Credits)

ADVR 580: ADVANCED TOPICS SEMINAR: ADVERTISING (3 Credits)

This course critically examines the ethical and legal implications of current professional standards. Issues selected for analysis include truth in advertising, gender and ethnic stereotyping, and advertising for the children’s market. Practices are viewed from the vantage point, not only of present federal regulations, but also from an enlightened public policy for the future.

This seminar deals with current issues in advertising and public relations. Specific issues and course context vary in response to developments in the field.

ADVR 590: STRATEGIC ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS (3 Credits) This advanced course studies advertising from the consumer perspective, using a case-study approach.

ADVR 401: AGENCY WORKSHOP (3 Credits) This course covers the applications of professional design concepts, from original creative ideas to completed advertising material. Discussions cover a wide variety of artistic and practical uses of typography, photography, film, video, other visuals, layout, and storyboarding, in preparing print and electronic commercial messages for the page and screen. Assignments are oriented toward helping students develop critical thinking and media skills as they develop personal portfolios and assimilating acquired concepts into other courses and the advanced agency media and experiences within the

BUSA 100: SKILLS FOR SUCCESS (3 Credits) This course is designed to strengthen students study skills and learn effective strategies to increase performance and success in college. Students learn how to use their learning styles to tailor their approach to learning, process information more efficiently, manage time effectively, set goals, increase concentration, increase motivation, reduce stress and procrastination, read college textbooks more effectively, take notes, prepare for tests, and perform well on different kinds of test.

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BUSA 202: PRINCIPLES OF FINANCE (3 Credits)

BUSA 101: INTRODUCTION TO BUSINESS (3 Credits)

This course will focus on what managers, investors, and government agencies do with information. It is an introductory course to various fields of finance and is comparable in content to courses that other institutions label as “corporate finance” or “financial management.”

This course is designed as a survey course that will expose students to business terminology, concepts, and current business issues. The intent is to develop a viable business vocabulary, foster critical and analytical thinking, and refine business decisionmaking skills. These skills will be acquired by the reading materials, exercises, and research assignments in this course that simulate the workplace today.

BUSA 203: PRINCIPLES OF MARKETING (3 Credits) In this course, students will learn about the marketing process and examine the range of marketing decisions that an organization must make in order to sell its products and services. By the end of this course, students will be familiar with the art and science of marketing a product.

BUSA 103: INTRODUCTION TO FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING (3 Credits) Stresses the theoretical and analytical aspects of financial accounting. Attention is directed to asset valuations with emphasis on current controversies and opinions of the AICPA and other professional organizations.

BUSA 204: BUSINESS STATISTICS (3 Credits) Introduces the use of statistics in business. Topics covered include descriptive statistics, probability theory, discrete probability distributions, continuous probability distributions, statistical sampling and regression analysis.

BUSA 105: MANAGERIAL ACCOUNTING (3 Credits) This course will examine this sort of decision-making, identifying the tools and methods managers use to make the best-informed decisions possible. Upon completion of this course, students will be better prepared to make informed decisions within a firm. Pre-requisite: BUSA 103

BUSA 205: BUSINESS LAW AND ETHICS (3 Credits) This course will introduce students to the laws and ethical standards that managers must abide by in the course of conducting business. By the end of this course, you will have a clear understanding of the legal and ethical environment in which businesses operate.

BUSA 200: PRINCIPLES OF MICROECONOMICS (3 Credits) The purpose of this course is to provide students with a basic understanding of the principles of microeconomics. By the end of this course, learners will have a strong grasp on the major issues that face microeconomists, including consumer and producer behavior, the nature of supply and demand, the different kinds of markets and how they function, and the welfare outcomes of consumers and producers.

BUSA 206: MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEMS (3 Credits) In this course, students will learn about the various components of information systems used by various business organizations and how to leverage them in ways that increase effectiveness and efficiency within a business organization.

BUSA 208: PRINCIPLES OF MANAGEMENT (3 Credits)

BUSA 201: PRINCIPLES OF MACROECONOMICS (3 Credits)

In this course, students will learn to recognize the characteristics of proper management by identifying what successful managers do and how they do it. This course is designed to teach you the fundamentals of management as they are practiced today based on the idea that the essential purpose

Economics is traditionally divided into two parts: microeconomics and macroeconomics. The purpose of this course is to provide students with a fundamental understanding of the principles of macroeconomics. This course will ask learners to think critically about the national and global issues they currently face.

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of a business is to produce products and services to meet the needs and wants of the marketplace.

BUSA 301: HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT (3 Credits)

BUSA 209: ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOR (3 Credits)

This course will introduce students to more advanced topics in the field. Students will learn that identifying the best employees begins with identifying the firm’s needs and carrying out a proper recruitment and selection process. Training, development, and performance evaluations can then shape the selected employee into an ideal firm resource. Finally, adequate and incentivizing compensation can keep those resources with the firm. This course will cover all these topics and more.

This course will cover five major Organizational Behavior areas including managing individuals, managing groups, power and politics, conflict management, and organizational change.

BUSA 210: CORPORATE COMMUNICATION (3 Credits) Effective communication skills are a prerequisite for succeeding in business. Communication tools and activities connect people within and beyond the organization in order to establish the business’s place in the corporate community and the social community, and as a result, that communication needs to be consistent, effective, and customized for the business to prosper.

BUSA 303: STRATEGIC INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY (3 Credits) This course is developed to help students understand how information technology can be used as part of an organization’s overall strategy. In this course learners will focus on the allocation and use of technology resources across an entire firm as part of the larger organizational strategy.

BUSA 212: HUMAN RESOURCES BASICS (3 Credits) In this foundational concepts course, students will learn techniques to help them build a collaborative workplace and be introduced to the basics of Human Resource Management. Key concepts and topics included in this course include: identifying labor needs; the importance of the job description; recruiting, screening and hiring employees; human development at the workplace including orientation, mentoring, coaching and placing employees into the right job; personal biases and diversity in the workplace; empowering and supporting work environments; planning and setting workplace goals; and interfacing and working with others. The course focuses on the smaller office or clinic setting and will cover additional material such as customer service, basic payroll, basic benefits and basic employment and labor laws.

BUSA 305: SMALL BUSINESS MANAGEMENT (3 Credits) This course will introduce students to Entrepreneurship and Business Planning. The course begin by reviewing the history of small business and identifying a successful entrepreneur’s characteristics. The course will then coach learners in some basic business skills, teaching them to write a business plan, launch a new venture, identify market opportunities, create a marketing plan, and finance a business. Finally, the course will also review aspects of building a successful team.

BUSA 306: ADVERTISING AND PROMOTION (3 Credits) The purpose of this course is to lead students in an exploration of fundamental advertising principles and the role advertising plays in the promotional mix. Although some consider all promotion synonymous with advertising, students will learn the unique characteristics that separate advertising from other forms of promotional communication.

BUSA 300: OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT (3 Credits) In this course, students will learn the fundamentals of operations management as they apply to both production and service-based operations. Successful completion of this course will empower learners to implement the concepts you have learned in your place of business.

BUSA 308: INTRODUCTION TO INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS (3 Credits)

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relationships between economics, public policy, unionism, and business management and their impact upon management -labor relations; to provide a basic orientation to the framework, processes, and strategies involved in collective bargaining and the resolution of labor grievances and arbitration in management-labor relations.

Techniques for analyzing and understanding the world of international business. Students will examine the challenges posed by the multinational firm and the dynamic nature of international business.

BUSA 310: NEW PRODUCT MANAGEMENT (3 Credits)

BUSA 401: MANAGEMENT LEADERSHIP (3 Credits)

Techniques and practices applied to conceiving, developing, launching, and managing new products. An in-depth evaluation of the life cycle concept will analyze various stages and how careful planning and managing can extend it. The product management concept and its effectiveness as a management tool will also be studied.

This course will begin with an introduction that will help further the distinction between leadership and management, and then students will be introduced to major theories and models of leadership and of leadership development from a variety of perspectives.

BUSA 311: QUANTITATIVE APPLICATIONS TO MAKING MANAGERIAL DECISIONS (3 Credits)

BUSA 402: PROJECT MANAGEMENT (3 Credits) This course will walk students through the nuts and bolts of project management. From understanding the project life cycle to setting priorities and expectations to controlling expenses and reporting results, project management touches several resources within organizations. An overview of the tools used in contemporary project management will also be discussed throughout the course.

Quantitative techniques for managerial decisionmaking are covered. These techniques include decision theory, forecasting, inventory models, linear programming and simulation. Realistic business problems are solved using computer software.

BUSA 312: BUSINESS LAW AND ETHICS II (3 Credits)

BUSA 403: NEGOTIATIONS AND CONFLICT MANAGEMENT (3 Credits)

Law of property, application of Uniform Commercial Code to sales transactions and secured transactions, bankruptcy and related subjects. A study of government regulations as applied to business activities. Designed to give a basic understanding of legal problems in the marketing and transportation of goods.

This course will start with the conceptual framework of negotiations as it applies to all areas of negotiation in both the public and private sectors. Students will also learn to better understand the theory, processes, and practices of negotiation, conflict resolution, and relationship management so that they can be a more effective negotiator in a wide variety of situations.

BUSA 313: KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT (3 Credits) This survey of Knowledge Management examines the prevailing trends in Knowledge Management. Areas covered include KnowledgeWare technologies, The Learning Organization, Knowledge Management and Leadership and Organizational Design, introduction to systems approach and systems thinking, Knowledge Management Payoffs, the four underlying pillars of Knowledge Management.

BUSA 404: RISK MANAGEMENT (3 Credits) In this course, students will engage with case studies that address the catastrophes of the first decade of the new millennium, including the credit crisis of 2008–2009. These cases illustrate the importance of risk management and demonstrate how missed opportunities in effective risk management can and have led to monumental negative consequences.

BUSA 314: COLLECTIVE BARGAINING/LABOR RELATIONS (3 Credits)

BUSA 405: EMPLOYMENT LAW (3 Credits) The management of human resources takes place in a complex legal environment which places

The course is designed to meet two objectives: to introduce the student to the background and

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management principles and functions and addresses ethical theories and challenges related to modern business and management.

obligations and responsibilities on the employer and extends protections and rights to the employee. Federal and state requirements in EEO, employment standards, wages, job security, safety and health, workers compensation and other benefits will be covered. Integration of such requirements in day-today management practices is emphasized.

BUSA 502: MANAGING ORGANIZATIONS (3 Credits) This course focuses on problem solving techniques that take into consideration all aspects of the organization: the people, informal organization, work, formal organization and external culture. Students are introduced to a process to identify management problems through root-cause analysis, diagnose the causes of the problems, recommend solutions and plan implementation.

BUSA 407: COMPENSATION MANAGEMENT (3 Credits) Elements of a rational and objective compensation system are examined. Review of economic and behavioral science theories underlying modern compensation systems. Wage and salary administration, techniques of job evaluation, performance appraisal and wage surveys, role of employee benefits are studied.

BUSA 503: DECISION MAKING IN THE UNCERTAIN WORLD OF BUSINESS (3 Credits) What are the common pitfalls that most managers fall into when making decisions? This course discusses descriptive decision models and the heuristics and biases that lead people to poor decisions. Prescriptive models such as multi-criteria decision analysis, probability models and decision trees are presented that show how to structure values and risk to make better decisions. Decision support software is used in the course as an integral part of management decision making.

BUSA 408: BUSINESS PRACTICUM (3 Credits) This course is designed as a capstone course to the Small Business and Entrepreneurship concentration. Specific cases in finance, management, marketing and leadership will be explored as an integral part of the course through hands on approach to problem solving. Additional related business cases will also be explored in class.

BUSA 409: CYBER LAW, POLICY AND ETHICS (3 Credits)

BUSA 510: ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOR (3 Credits)

The Internet raises a multitude of legal issues in many areas. Among the issues covered in this course are privacy, electronic contracts, trademarks and domain names, content protection, jurisdiction, regulation, civil and criminal liability, and cybercrime.

This course addresses traditional concepts and themes in the field of Organizational Behavior. It focuses on development of theoretical challenges in organizational management and how to develop practical solutions to issues and problems in the modern global workplace. Specific topics include leadership, motivation, employee participation, teamwork, job enrichment and work integration.

BUSA 495: CAPSTONE COURSE IN BUSINESS (3 Credits)

BUSA 515: ECONOMICS FOR MANAGERS (3 Credits)

This is the final course to be taken by undergraduate business majors and includes a research project which incorporates material from courses taken throughout the Bachelor’s degree program.

Major topics include profit-maximization for a competitive firm, economic allocation of costs, price discrimination and other pricing strategies, pricing with market power, and an introduction to game theory.

BUSA 500: ETHICS IN BUSINESS MANAGEMENT (3 Credits) This course provides the learner with the basic skills needed to be successful in the MBA program. It focuses on expectations of graduate level work including correct documentation and use of scholarly resources, an introduction to basic business and

BUSA 516: MANAGERIAL CORPORATE FINANCE (3 Credits)

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BUSA 526: BUSINESS COMMUNICATIONS (3 Credits)

This course introduces the fundamental financial concepts managers use to make crucial corporate investment decisions. Students will also encounter important concepts such as free cash flow and the cost of capital. Students will learn to use techniques such as net present value (NPV), internal rate of return (IRR), Capital Asset Pricing Model (CAPM), capital budgeting, and regression output to distinguish between systematic and unsystematic risk.

This course is designed to help students convey messages and ideas clearly and persuasively in order to put ideas into action and generate desired results. The course teaches practical writing techniques and provides guidance on specific forms of business documents, including memos, emails, and PowerPoint presentations.

BUSA 528: INTRODUCTION TO E-COMMERCE (3 Credits)

BUSA 520: STRATEGIC LEADERSHIP (3 Credits) This course approaches and envisions leadership as a complex system requiring constant adaptation and reflection as a leader. The course explains levels of leadership as well as lenses through which to view organizational life. The course also focuses on traditional strategic management topics including analysis of the internal and external environment, as well as decisions and actions that an organization undertakes to gain and maintain a competitive advantage.

Electronic Commerce (EC) examines transactions that take place over networks, primarily the Internet. EC is the gateway for international business that transcends the barriers of time and distance. It is the process of electronically buying and selling goods, services, and information. This course will study what EC is, how it is being conducted and managed, its major opportunities, limitations, issues and risks and how businesses can leverage Internet technologies to gain a competitive advantage.

BUSA 522: LEADERSHIP AND INNOVATION FOR ENTREPRENEURS (3 Credits)

BUSA 530: FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING (3 Credits) This course focuses on developing an understanding of general purpose financial statements. Competency is developed in processing and presenting financial information and understanding the impact of basic financial ratios on the firm’s performance. Focus is also placed on recording transactions including cash, receivables, inventory, depreciation, payroll, bonds and liabilities.

Exposes learners to cutting edge ideas and thinking on how effective entrepreneurial leadership and innovation creates new ventures. This course focuses on the nexus between lead user knowledge and entrepreneurial leadership ability that results in the development of successful businesses. This course integrates the importance of social responsibility and how socially focused organizations both improve society and produce outstanding returns on investment.

BUSA 532: SPREADSHEET MODELING (3 Credits)

BUSA 524: MANAGING GROUPS AND TEAMS (3 Credits)

This course introduces basic quantitative techniques and includes an introduction to spreadsheet programing, queuing, and simulation. The course provides enhanced quantitative analytical skills for the business professional and focuses on practical applications using Microsoft Excel.

Builds on BUSA 510 Organizational Behavior and BUSA 520 Strategic Leadership, by intensely focusing on techniques for managing groups and work teams in a team-oriented culture. This course examines internal group processes such as: cohesion, communication, conflict, feedback & motivation. It also addresses composition issues in teams such as: diversity, globalism, and social loafing; and dynamics of teamwork such as: team-building, cross-functional integration, leadership roles & responsibilities, and team-interdependence.

BUSA 540: MARKETING (3 Credits) This course provides an introduction to current theories and concepts concerning the marketing of services and goods. Emphasis is placed on developing a domestic and global perspective of the marketplace and how targeting of market segments, market research, developing attractive product

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offerings, effective advertising, pricing and selection of distribution channels results in business success.

This course explores quality assurance topics that are suitable in applications for various business disciplines. Course discussions include the latest in quality and productivity improvement tools, leadership requirements in quality organizations to manage change, and innovation. Advanced topics related to the principles and application of quality management methodologies are presented.

BUSA 550: INFORMATION SYSTEMS MANAGEMENT (3 Credits) Provides an introduction to the role of information systems in support of businesses and organizations. Special focus is placed on how information systems support and enhance administrative operations, decision-making, new strategic endeavors, organizational structure, financial accounting, situational awareness, and facilitation of corporate leadership. Emphasis is placed on developing a managerial perspective regarding the development, use and management of information systems.

BUSA 570: DISCIPLINED IMAGINATION AND RISK MITIGATION (3 Credits) This course reviews management discipline within political, social, and economic context with a global perspective. This course emphasizes socialization and cultural processes in a cross border environment and provides a strategic assessment of the fundamental risk issues involved in the management of multinational corporations as they relate to state republics. The outcomes provide the student scholar with an academic picture of cultural discipline related to risk management.

BUSA 560: PROJECT MANAGEMENT (3 Credits) This course focuses on the planning, organizing, and managing of resources to bring about the successful completion of specific project goals. Emphasis is placed on how to improve quality while minimizing cost and time overruns. Learners learn how to develop effective scope statements, work break down structures, Gantt Charts, CPM diagrams, and apply Earned Value Management concepts. Methods for mitigating project risk, and techniques for leading project teams are also covered.

BUSA 572: DECISION ANALYSIS (3 Credits) This course provides the philosophy and analytical tools that allows business professionals to make optimal decisions when faced with complex business problems and decisions. Emphasis is placed on quantitative analytical methods including decision trees, with added focus on practical application of basic analytical skills developed in the course.

BUSA 561: ADVANCED CONCEPTS IN PROJECT MANAGEMENT (3 Credits) This course focuses on current organizational and behavioral tools and techniques needed for successful project management. Topics covered include professional project management development, cost and schedule control, and setting effective project schedules and financial plans for risk management.

BUSA 580: ENTREPRENEURSHIP AND SOCIAL CHANGE (3 Credits) At the nexus of business, nonprofit and government lies the emerging new realm of social enterprise. The leaders of this realm — social entrepreneurs — embrace the complexity of societies’ most pressing issues and foster creative solutions through business ventures. This course will explore this emerging realm and provide tools and knowledge for success within it. This course prepares the learner for BUSA 522 Leadership and Innovation for Entrepreneurs and/or BUSA 680 Analysis and Planning for Social Change.

BUSA 562: CONTRACT PROCUREMENT (3 Credits) This course focuses on the acquiring of goods and services in the project management environment. Topics covered include procurement and solicitation planning, source selection, contract administration, and decision making that minimizes ethical and legal risk.

BUSA 610: INTERNATIONAL STRATEGY (3 Credits)

BUSA 563: PRINCIPLES OF QUALITY CONTROL (3 Credits)

This course provides a deeper ability to assess the internal and external environment of the firm in a multinational context. It also addresses how firms

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create business and corporate level strategies to create value and sustainable competitive advantages in the international environment. Challenges inherent in managing a workforce comprised of employees from more than one country, political risks, and ethical issues are also addressed. Particular emphasis is placed on legal and cultural disparities between countries and regions.

This course builds on the skills developed in BUSA 560 but seeks a deeper theoretical awareness of how diverse cultural interactions affect project success. Specific emphasis is placed on managing and interacting with international partners, partnering for successful cross- cultural relationships, and how project managers must understand various preferences and practices used by project managers around the globe.

BUSA 612: GLOBALIZATION AND MARKET ANALYSIS (3 Credits)

BUSA 620: THE HEALTH CARE AND SERVICES SYSTEM (3 Credits)

This course focuses on the effects of globalization on a business’s ability to identify market opportunities. Specific emphasis is placed on the development of detailed market analysis plans for multinational enterprises. This includes the effect of politics and legal concerns, as well as the importance of history, geography, and cultural analysis in international business endeavors. It also appraises the importance of the internet on consumer behavior.

Provides an introduction to the U.S. National and Global healthcare and services system. Provides analysis of how the current system evolved over time and examines unique characteristics of health care as both a product and service. The course develops a thorough understanding of the role of patients, physicians, hospitals, employers, employees, insurers, communities and government in health care administration.

BUSA 614: INTERNATIONAL SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENT (3 Credits)

BUSA 622: ECONOMICS AND FINANCE FOR HEALTH INSTITUTIONS (3 Credits)

Provides an introduction to supply chain management and operations from the acquisition of raw materials, to the production of goods and services, and the transportation of these products and services to customers through various distribution channels. Learners will learn how to synchronize customer orders and production while minimizing costs.

Provides an introduction to economic concepts and norms that are specific to the Health Care community. The course includes analysis of health care demand, insurance policies, and obtainment of medical care for those without insurance and the disenfranchised. A treatise on managed care organizations, drug companies and policies, and the supply of medical providers and hospitals is also provided.

BUSA 616: CASE STUDIES IN GLOBAL LEADERSHIP (3 Credits)

BUSA 624: HEALTH CARE POLICY AND LEGISLATION (3 Credits)

This course addresses the meaning of global leadership and provides an opportunity for each learner to develop a personal perspective. It integrates a number of international sources and takes a case study approach to understanding how successful business visionaries address local, regional and global business challenges. Learners learn how understanding one’s own inherent leadership strengths and weaknesses are paramount to leader success. Cultural interactions and technology are also addressed as critical leadership components in the 21st Century marketplace.

This course addresses the regulation and norms that are involved in the development of health care legislation and policy in the U.S. It addresses the most important laws that pertain to the health care field and the role of third party payers and mangers and their impact on the availability of health care services and products.

BUSA 630: CONFLICT RESOLUTION AND NEGOTIATIONS (3 Credits) Conflict is a constant element in any decision-making environment. This course provides tools to help understand the nature of disputes and development of both group and individual strategies that result in

BUSA 617: INTERNATIONAL PROJECT MANAGEMENT (3 Credits)

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negotiated solutions that are satisfactory to all parties involved.

competitor analysis, and how to write an effective business plan.

BUSA 632: RECRUITING TALENTED PROFESSIONALS (3 Credits)

BUSA 682: BUILDING SOCIAL VENTURES (3 Credits)

This class provides in depth knowledge on techniques to recruit and staff organizations. Equal employment opportunity laws are discussed, as are techniques for determining job effectiveness of individuals and for ensuring that the right personnel are hired for the right jobs.

This course focuses on the development of effective business models for social responsible entrepreneurial endeavors. It also addresses the importance of having proper ethical and legal foundations when starting a new enterprise and how to effectively market an entrepreneurial company. This course also addresses the dynamics involved in building an effective new-venture team.

BUSA 634: DEVELOPING POLICIES FOR HR MANAGEMENT (3 Credits)

BUSA 684: MOBILIZING PRIVATE AND PUBLIC RESOURCES (3 Credits)

This course focuses on three diverse themes that are critical to Human Resource Management success. The first section addresses the foundation for federal, state and international laws that pertain to employment. The second section addresses the relationship between management and labor unions and the importance of balancing organizational goals with employee concerns. The third section addresses the development of effective compensation packages for employees.

Provides extensive analysis on socially responsible approaches for acquiring access to infrastructure and equipment required to start an enterprise. This also includes the mobilization of public and private stakeholder support, how to assess a new venture’s financial viability and strength, and how to gain access to financing and funding.

BUSA 695: CAPSTONE PROJECT FOR BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION (3 Credits)

BUSA 660: STOCHASTIC MODELING FOR PROJECT MANAGERS (3 Credits)

The final capstone course for the MBA degree. In this course learners will work on a course long project where they will demonstrate competency in all of the Program Outcomes expected for the MBA program. Successful completion of this course is the final requirement for obtaining the MBA degree.

This course provides an introduction to PERT. This provides project managers with the ability to make optimal decisions when faced with uncertainty. It applies probabilistic values to future scenarios so that project managers can better understand and articulate uncertainty to their customers.

BUSA 696: CAPSTONE PROJECT FOR MANAGEMENT (3 Credits)

BUSA 662: OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT (3 Credits) This course teaches the learner how to create mathematical models using Microsoft Excel to manage operations across an array of different business organizations. Techniques include facility planning, supply chain management, queuing, distribution networks, and transportation models. This course builds on methods learned in BUSA 532.

The final capstone course for the M.A. in Management degree. In this course learners will work on a course long project where they will demonstrate competency in all of the Program Outcomes expected for the M.A. in Management program. Successful completion of this course is the final requirement for obtaining the M.A. in Management degree.

BUSA 680: ANALYSIS AND PLANNING FOR SOCIAL CHANGE (3 Credits)

BUSA 697: CAPSTONE PROJECT FOR SOCIAL ENTREPRENEURSHIP (3 Credits)

This course focuses on the identification of socially responsible business opportunities and the generation of new ideas. It also addresses how to conduct a feasibility analysis, industry and

The final capstone course for the M.A. degree in Social Entrepreneurship. In this course learners will work on a course long project where they will demonstrate competency in all of the Program

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philosophy, psychology, semantics, aesthetics and literary criticism.

Outcomes for this program.. Successful completion of this course is the final requirement for obtaining the M.A. in Social Entrepreneurship diploma.

COMM 520: MEDIA RESEARCH (3 Credits)

COMM 101: COMMUNICATION: PRINCIPLES AND PROCESS (3 Credits)

This course is designed to familiarize the students with the basic research techniques (quantitative, qualitative, background research for creative projects, content analysis, opinion and audience research) used in the areas of public information, television, film and instructional communications. It introduces the students to the professional literature of their fields of specialization and to the skills necessary to read and interpret it.

This survey course introduces the nature, principles, elements and mechanism of the communication process. How, why, in what forms, and through what stages communication occurs is explored along with the nature of human perception and the role of verbal and nonverbal language in conveying meaning. Emphasis is placed on providing a working knowledge of the fundamental principles of communication as they apply to the design and delivery of the message via such media as print, radio, television, film and the Internet.

COMM 530: MEDIA AND CULTURE (3 Credits) An exploration of the role of media in the popular culture and in society in terms of the interaction of media and culture. The media’s role in reflecting society and, in turn, the shaping of media practice by society will be explored. Reading will include an examination of major works on public opinion and public policy.

COMM 210: BROADCAST HISTORY AND CRITICISM (3 Credits) This survey of ratio and television development in the United States includes consideration of the roles played by the broadcast media as cultural, social, and economic forces. Special emphasis is placed on major trends in both entertainment and factual programming.

COMM 540: SEMINAR: INTEGRATED MARKETING (3 Credits) These seminar courses are designed to cover areas of current professional interest or to fill specific student needs. The topic of this seminar is Integrated Marketing.

COMM 240: WRITING FOR MASS MEDIA (3 Credits) This practical introductory course exposes students to the basics of effective writing and the variety of writing challenges posed by the mass media. Simple forms of writing for various media are explored as are elements of good writing such as internal conflict, word economy, objectivity, subjectivity, and the use of nonverbal messages.

ECON 110: INTRODUCTION TO ECONOMICS (3 Credits)

COMM 301: COMMUNICATION LAW (3 Credits)

ECON 201: MONEY AND BANKING (3 Credits)

This survey of the statutes and regulations governing the press, broadcasting, film, and the Internet includes the analysis of defamation, contempt, privacy, freedom of speech, censorship, and political expression.

This course covers the structure and function of the banking system and financial markets in United States; the use of monetary policy in the regulation of the national economy; and the role of the Federal Reserve System.

COMM 510: VOCABULARY OF THE MEDIA CRITIC (3 Credits)

ECON 320: INTERNATIONAL ECONOMICS AND FINANCE (3 Credits)

This course is designed to provide the student with the critical vocabulary used by media critics in discussing and evaluating non-technological aspects of various media. Material will be drawn from

A study of international trade, investment, finance and economic cooperation. Topics include theory and techniques of international trade, the U.S. in international trade, tariffs and quotas, foreign aid

This course is an overview of economic principles, terminology and history. Via a worldwide survey of micro and macroeconomic models this course will deal with the theory and applications of economics.

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FINA 205: FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT (3 Credits)

programs, foreign exchange markets and hedging exposure to foreign exchange risk. Operations of multinational corporations, economic integration and cooperation, balance of payments and international adjustment mechanisms and international indebtedness.

Focus is on corporate financial decisions and policy. Topics include: capital budgeting and financing decisions, capital structure, mergers and acquisitions and financial failures. Risk/return considerations are examined in the context of value maximization.

ECON 520: MACROECONOMICS (3 Credits) A detailed examination of the relationship involving consumption, investment spending, the impact that government and international economic transactions have on the economy and the special role that money and interest rates play in determining output and employment levels. Students will also analyze the phenomena of productivity and economic growth, and discuss the major theoretical approaches to these issues.

FINA 210: PRINCIPLES OF INVESTMENT AND SECURITY ANALYSIS (3 Credits) An introduction to the investment process. An understanding of how individuals and institutions make their investment decisions. A broad exposure to a range of topics including selection of securities, security analysis, instruments and investment trends. The risks and returns involved in investing in different financial instruments are examined.

ECON 521: GAME THEORY AND INFORMATION ECONOMICS (3 Credits)

FINA 310: FUNDAMENTALS OF FINANCIAL PLANNING (3 Credits)

Major topics include analyzing simultaneous and sequential games (Nash equilibrium, backwards induction, sensitivity analysis), valuing information, information as a commodity and information markets, problems of information asymmetry (including moral hazard and adverse selection), and auctions.

Fundamentals of Financial Planning deals with the basics of financial planning. Topics include the financial planning process; measuring client-risk propensities; communication skills; using time value analysis in financial planning; basics of insurance, investment, and retirement planning; the regulatory and ethical environment information technology; and a sample financial planning case.

ECON 522: TOPICS IN STRATEGY (3 Credits) Major topics include vertical integration, strategic alliances, and strategies for technology companies.

FINA 401: FINANCE: WORKING CAPITAL MANAGEMENT (3 Credits)

ECON 523: GLOBAL ECONOMIC ECONOMIC PERFORMANCE (3 Credits)

An introduction to the management of short-term or current accounts of the firm to optimize the risk/return profile. Management of the liquid assets of the firm, which comprise a substantial portion of total assets, has become more significant because of the increasing range of management techniques and technologies.

This course is designed to bridge the gap between the abstract-theoretical models and the practical data-based needs of decision-makers. It is also intended to provide decision-makers with a compact and consistent framework for a sophisticated reading of economic signals for the gauging of the state of the global economy. A small subset of economic indicators will be used to capture the essence of the bewildering stream of economic signals about performance and trends in economic activity. This course examines sources of international economic information for the monitoring of trends in international economic performance by regions and sectors. Global competitive reports are used to gain a comprehensive world economic outlook.

FINA 405: MODERN PORTFOLIO THEORY (3 Credits) A detailed examination of portfolio management and capital market theory including a review of material on efficient markets, the basic Markowitz portfolio model and the capital asset pricing model. The above concepts in terms of international diversification and the evaluation of portfolio

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performance are covered Traditional equity and bond valuation techniques will also be investigated.

FINA 536: INVESTMENT PRINCIPLES AND POLICIES (3 Credits)

FINA 530: PRINCIPLES OF GLOBAL FINANCE (3 Credits)

This course investigates a variety of financial instruments as vehicles for effective investment decisions. These instruments include treasury securities, corporate bonds, preferred stock and common stock. Fundamental and quantitative methods of valuation and selection are examined. Efficient methods of portfolio construction, management and performance evaluation are studied.

This course teaches how multi-national firms or firms facing international competition manage financial risk unique to a multi-national setting such as fluctuations in currency exchange rates, interest rates and political stability.

FINA 531: FUNDAMENTALS OF DERIVATIVE CONTRACTS (3 Credits)

FINA 537: FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS AND PORTFOLIO MANAGEMENT (3 Credits)

This course involves study and analysis of various forms of derivative securities. Explanation of various risk-transfer devices such as options and futures contracts, valuation of and strategies involved in trading these securities, hedging and speculating with options and futures.

This course will focus on financial institutions and markets in the context of portfolio construction, management, performance evaluation and performance presentation standards. Specific topics include: capital markets and money markets, roles and functions of monetary institutions, sources and uses of funds, institutional investors, economic indicators, sources of information on global markets, the efficient market hypothesis, market inefficiencies and selection criteria, portfolio diversification methods, asset pricing models, portfolio construction and asset allocations, hedging and risk management, performance presentation standards, performance evaluation and attribution.

FINA 532: TOPICS IN FINANCIAL MARKETS AND INVESTMENT (3 Credits) Major topics include capital structure, determining discount rates, the risk return tradeoff, capital markets, and derivatives and options. FINA 534: ADVANCED ASSURANCE TOPICS (3 Credits)

HMRE 510: LABOR ECONOMICS (3 Credits)

This course explores different trends in the assurance area. Assurance services include professional activities that improve information quality for decision makers. Major course topics include assurance services and corporate governance, continuous auditing, international assurance models, earnings management and fraud detection.

The focus of this course is the macro and micro economic aspects of the labor market. Included are the examination of the economic, demographic, and technological factors affecting the nation’s workplaces. Key issues of wages and employment are considered from the perspective of labor market theory. Other topics include productivity, unemployment, education and training, occupational choice and government-sponsored human resource programs.

FINA 535: EXPORT-IMPORT OPERATIONS AND FINANCE (3 Credits)

HMRE 523: TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT OF HUMAN RESOURCES (3 Credits)

This course will concentrate on development and execution of export/import operations. Sources of data and methods for evaluating market potential within the context of international agreements and regulations are explored. The methods of executing export/import transactions, including instruments of trade financing, are examined extensively.

Examination of training and development in organizations, the purposes served and the role played in increasing individual and organizational effectiveness. Included are a review of adult learning behaviors; methodologies for conducting needs

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analysis and evaluation of training activities; and the systematic design of instructional modules for skills training activities and management development programs. The role of the training director and management of the training functions are examined.

This course emphasis is upon mastering and applying the fundamentals of selling. Focusing on trust-based selling, the text reflects the author’s extensive experience as a leading sales educator and as sales manager, trainer, and consultant with major corporations.

HMRE 529: HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT SEMINAR (3 Credits)

LEAD 552: LEADING CHANGE (3 Credits)

An advanced seminar on human resource management practices in multinational businesses. Students will examine, among other things the structure and design of multinational enterprises and the staffing of these organizations. Other topics include managing intercultural differences, training and developing employees in a multicultural environment, and the evaluation and compensation of employees in international assignments. A project will be required of all students.

Major topics include barriers to implementing organizational change; chaos, anxiety and political sources of employee resistance to change; using dissatisfaction, vision and process tools to implement change; applying different leadership styles to supporting change; and balancing change for dynamic stability using different implementation approaches and pacing of different kinds of changes.

HMRE 530: PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICES OF COLLECTIVE BARGAINING (3 Credits)

This course focuses on analyzing, critiquing and applying current managerial theory and practice, and serves as the cornerstone experience for management students. Students assess their own approaches to managing organizations in relation to theories and best practices.

MGMT 500: MANAGERIAL THEORY AND PRACTICE (3 Credits)

An introduction to fundamental concepts, principles and practices of the collective bargaining process from the organization of workers through negotiations. Topics include subjects of bargaining, strikes, slowdowns, contract administration and enforcement. The course also examines the roles of participants and of government agencies as related to the national Labor Relations Act, as amended, in the process.

MGMT 502: MANAGERIAL COMMUNICATION STRATEGIES (3 Credits) This course focuses on theories, concepts, tools and techniques used in the management of communication processes within an organization. Topics include: interpersonal/organizational communication policies and practices, team development and management, and crisis communication policies and practices.

HMRE 550: HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT (3 Credits) An introduction to human resource management in the modern organization. Major functional areas including employment, compensation, benefits, HRIS, employee and labor relations, training and development, human resources planning, personnel policy and procedures are covered.

MGMT 503: MANAGERIAL FINANCIAL STRATEGIES (3 Credits) This course focuses on the financial theories, concepts, tools and techniques with which to manage financial resources, respond to competitive challenges, begin new projects and recover from financial setbacks. Topics covered include: what managers need to know about accounting and finance; and managing your CFO.

LEAD 550: CREATING THE VISIONARY ORGANIZATION (3 Credits) This course explores the importance of corporate visionary as a source of long-term business success, as well as the practical guidelines for how to move one’s organization toward that status.

MGMT 504: ORGANIZATIONAL ANALYSIS AND DEVELOPMENT (3 Credits)

LEAD 551: LEADERSHIP (3 Credits) 68


MGMT 511: FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT FOR NONPROFITS (3 Credits)

This course focuses on theories, concepts, tools and techniques with which to strategically and systemically design and implement organizational structures. Topics covered include: matching organization mission, strategies, culture and structure; and ensuring the long-term growth and development of an organization and its resources.

This course focuses on the building of systems and practices needed to sustain a financially healthy nonprofit organization. Topics covered include: building and managing treasurers and board-level finance committees, viewing financial data strategically, capital formation, generating earned income, and creating processes for managing strategic endowment, gifts, and tax planning issues.

MGMT 505: MANAGEMENT AND CORPORATE GOVERNANCE (3 Credits) This course focuses on theories and practices related to managers’ roles and corporate governance issues. Topics covered include: defining corporate governance and ownership, managing boards, executive compensation, and regulatory issues such as the Sarbanes-Oxley Act. Ethics issues underpin the discussion of all topics.

MGMT 512: HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT: MANAGING VOLUNTEERS AND EMPLOYEES IN NONPROFIT ORGANIZATIONS (3 Credits) This course focuses on general human resources policies and procedures and on those aspects of human resources management unique to nonprofit organizations. Topics covered include: staffing, compensation, performance appraisal and development, and supervision of employees and volunteers.

MGMT 506: STRATEGIC DECISION MAKING (3 Credits) This course focuses on the concepts and tools managers use to develop and analyze industry and corporate strategies. Porter’s six forces (power of suppliers, buyers, competitiveness, substitutes, complements, and barriers to entry) provide the theoretical base for the course. Topics covered include: industry analysis, potential industry earnings (PIE) and individual corporate strategy development.

MKTG 200: RETAILING MANAGEMENT (3 Credits) An investigation of the organization of the retail function. Consideration of managerial problems in the operation of large and small retailing organizations, control of retail operations, design of retailing facilities, retailing strategies and current developments in the field.

MGMT 507: CAPSTONE SEMINAR (3 Credits) This seminar/scenario-based experience focuses on the integration of concepts, theories, and practices covered in the management program. Students become part of a business team in which they, as senior managers, run companies for several virtual years.

MKTG 301: MANAGEMENT OF PROMOTION (3 Credits) A firm’s promotional efforts focus on developing and managing integrated marketing communications. This course studies the planning and implementation of demand stimulating promotion, i.e. advertising, personal selling, sales promotion and publicity/public relations Promotion is seen as a key element of the marketing mix that contributes to an organization’s cohesive marketing strategy.

MGMT 510: LEGAL ISSUES FOR NON PROFITS (3 Credits) This course focuses on the legal issues related to the initiation, maintenance and growth of nonprofit organizations. Topics covered include: nonprofit formation and statutory requirements,liability, tax issues, and laws affecting contracts, employment issues, lobbying and public advocacy, and fund raising.

MKTG 310: FUNDAMENTALS OF EXPORTING AND IMPORTING (3 Credits) An introduction to the export/import practices of small and medium sized firms. The course will

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MKTG 580: MANAGING INNOVATION (3 Credits)

provide a guide through the stages of the export/import process, from an assessment of its feasibility to successful completion. Students will develop a familiarity with international trade regulations and requirements, procedures and documentation, intermediaries facilitating the acquisition of information, the flow of goods and services, and financing.

This course teaches the organizational and marketing skills to develop new products. Specific approaches to organizing product development processes and teams, choosing markets, generating and evaluating product ideas, choosing product attributes, predicting the success of new products and launching products are covered.

MKTG 315: INTERNET MARKETING (3 Credits)

MKTG 581: PRINCIPLES OF INTERNET MARKETING (3 Credits)

Shows how the Internet can be leveraged to acquire, retain and delight consumers. Students gain a strategic and tactical marketing perspective, with an emphasis on integrating online and offline marketing activities.

Major topics include the collection and use of online customer data, attracting customers to a website, using a website to create customer value, transitioning customers to online purchasing and competition strategies in industries with both online and traditional channels.

MKTG 320: CROSS-CULTURAL PROMOTIONAL CONCEPTS AND PRACTICES (3 Credits) The course is designed to sensitize the student to the cultural antecedents of managing promotional activities in international settings. Of special concern are the areas of advertising, public relations, publicity, personal selling and negotiations. Management of these functions will be investigated within the context of methodologies applicable to measurement and understanding of cultures, customs and business practices.

MKTG 582: IMPLEMENTING MARKETING STRATEGY (3 Credits) In this course, students will engage in some of the activities required when developing a marketing plan for a new product, including marketing research and post research to measure the success of the product’s introduction. Students will develop a branding strategy for a new product and the marketing communication strategies to communicate the benefits of the new product to the marketplace.

MKTG 401: MARKETING RESEARCH (3 Credits) Research activity in the field of marketing, methods of data collection and analysis thereof, quantitative techniques in marketing, the role of the computer in marketing research, control and evaluation of the marketing function.

MKTG 583: INTERNATIONAL MARKETING (3 Credits) Problems of cross-national marketing, identification of market potential, development of strategies to suit cultural differences, management of multinational marketing efforts. The development of product promotion policies, pricing strategies and distribution methods. Legal aspects of international marketing. Government trade regulations and impediments to technological innovation in developing countries. The political dimensions of multinational marketing.

MKTG 405: INTERNATIONAL MARKETING (3 Credits) Designed to develop a systematic approach for analyzing trends shaping the global marketplace. Among others, physical, cultural, socio-demographic, legal/political and technological factors are explored. Emphasis is placed on development and implementation of optimal marketing programs to capitalize on emerging market opportunities as well as the avoidance of the pitfalls inherent in crossnational marketing activities.

MKTG 584: SALES FORCE MANAGEMENT (3 Credits)

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measurement and understanding of cultures, customs and business practices.

Application of fundamental management principles to the sales function of a marketing-oriented firm. The course focuses on the external and internal responsibilities of the sales manager who has to generate and maintain an adequate sales volume while profitably managing human, physical and geographic resource.

PREL 101: PUBLIC RELATIONS AND PUBLICITY (3 Credits) This introductory course confronts the ethics of public relations and techniques of identifying public relations problems by using public relations techniques and measuring results. Case histories are analyzed.

MKTG 585: MARKETING RESEARCH (3 Credits) The course addresses the issues arising in the process of generating data and information for decision making in the area of marketing. Emphases are on the validity and reliability of the techniques associated with exploratory, descriptive and causal research designs; methodologies in measurement and scaling, sampling and fieldwork. Basic parametric and nonparametric techniques of data analysis are explored. Students gain experience in analyzing “real-life� marketing research data, which provides some exposure to the multivariate data analysis.

PREL 510: PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICES OF ADVERTISING (3 Credits) The functions, organization and economics of advertising agencies will be studied. Then, using market research data, students will develop advertising plans and budgets, as well as plans for monitoring results.

PREL 520: SEMINAR: PUBLIC RELATIONS I (3 Credits) This course uses a case study format to evaluate and discuss public relations as a management function. Its role in employee, community, investor, customer and government relations as well as laws and regulations affecting the profession are covered.

MKTG 586: MARKETING COMMUNICATION AND PROMOTION (3 Credits) This course will deal with fundamental concepts of marketing communication, including assessment of demand and legal environment of marketing communication, government impact on advertising and promotion through the Federal Trade Commission and other regulatory agencies. It also covers the development of promotion budgets, management of the advertising function, relationships with outside agencies, personal selling and supportive communication, the conditions of and integrations with the entire promotional program, and economic and social dimensions of promotional strategy.

PREL 530: WRITING FOR PUBLIC RELATIONS (3 Credits) This class is aimed at helping the student recognize the difference between effective and ineffective writing. Students are helped to improve the writing skills they need for careers in public relations. Focus is on persuasive writing and its components, which are needed to sell writing to clients, management and other gate keepers. Students are given the guidelines and practical experience for writing for both external and internal publics, everything from letters and news releases to newsletters and presentations.

MKTG 587: CROSS-CULTURAL PROMOTIONAL CONCEPTS AND PRACTICES (3 Credits) Cross-Cultural Promotional Concepts and Practices is designed to sensitize the student to the cultural antecedents of managing promotional activities in international settings. Of special concern are the areas of advertising, public relations, publicity, personal selling and negotiations. Students will investigate management of these functions within the context of methodologies applicable to

PREL 560: ADVANCED PUBLIC RELATIONS (3 Credits) This course uses a real-life situation derived from a business, non-profit organization or government agency. Students develop a complete public relations program, demonstrating their ability to

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formulate workable strategies and tactics for reaching appropriate publics.

TBUS 280: SALES PERSONALITIES AND PROFILES (3 Credits)

TBUS 114: SELLING TECHNIQUES (3 Credits)

This course focuses on discovering sales strengths through utilization of personality profiling and behavioural style profiling assessment instruments as applied to account representatives, retail salespersons, sales engineers, industrial product salespersons, non-technical and service salespersons.

This course emphasis is upon mastering and applying the fundamentals of selling. Focusing on trust-based selling. TBUS 130: MARKETING AND DISTRIBUTION

PRINCIPLES (3 Credits)

TBUS 285: CUSTOMER SERVICE TECHNIQUES (3 Credits)

This course provides an overview of marketing, consumer decision making, business marketing, segmenting and targeting markets, decision support systems and marketing research. In addition, it includes an examination of the distribution process of goods and services, the interrelationships of customer demands, production, pricing, promotion, and the movement of goods from producer to consumer.

This course is a study of customer service techniques required in order to sell and service products, systems, or services and provides a clear and usable process for developing the skills, attitudes, and thinking patterns needed to win customer satisfaction and loyalty.

TBUS 290: CONTRACT AND SALES NEGOTIATION TECHNIQUES (3 Credits)

TBUS 221: CONSUMER BEHAVIOR (3 Credits) This course focuses on the core concepts and applications of contemporary consumer behavior as it’s practiced today. It highlights today’s challenges while the most current consumer behavior statistics and contemporary examples reflect recent developments in business. It emphasizes how to handle ethics and diversity as well as ever-changing demographics and cultural trends.

This course focuses on principles, techniques, and analysis or strategies involved in contract and sales negotiations and the development of integrated strategies. It provides insight on how to negotiate in a win/win fashion as well as instruction on drafting contracts. Prerequisite: TBUS 114.

TBUS 260: ADVANCED SELLING TECHNIQUES (3 Credits) This course is a study of advanced techniques including: opening, investigating, demonstrating capability and obtaining commitment of the consultative and strategic seller. Prerequisite: TBUS 114

TBUS 270: INTERNET SALES AND SERVICE (3 Credits) This course is a study of internet sales, service and technology. It focuses on the process of establishing an online business, setting up online shopping capabilities, database integration, online customer service and retention, buyer behavior and current Internet sales issues.

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COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 2.

Master of Education in Instructional Mathematics K-8

3.

The WEU College of Education seeks to develop the knowledge, skills and professional commitments of educators that allow them to assist people to their full potential and to inculcate the moral sensibilities that enable to promote social justice and tolerance in their communities.

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To accomplish this mission, the College of Education will provide the following: Programs focused on core subjects and the associated learning. • Processes, on effective strategies to address learning disabilities, and on existing and emerging technologies that can transform the quality of education available to all people. • Programs that will allow education administrators to create environments and policies that support student learning. • Provide competency-based courses that accommodate diverse learners and backgrounds in education. WEU’s broadly educated faculty, who possess research-based expertise in their field and have experience in the education of people, are always reviewing the effectiveness of our programs and courses to ensure that our mission is accomplished. •

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research evidence on how to meet those needs. Develop educators’ appreciation for the historical context of educational goals in their community and nation and appropriate strategies for helping to ensure that they allow all people to reach their maximum potential. Equip educators with the capacity to implement instructional programs that focus on learner understanding of concepts and their application to community needs and business challenges. Provide educators with the mastery of subject matter, understanding of learning processes needed by learners and knowledge of developmental differences. Provide educators with the skills they need to support learning for a diverse population of learners, provide effective feedback, engage parents and reflect on their own work. Ensure that educators can collaborate effectively across disciplines to enhance learners’ engagement with an understanding of essential concepts. Help educators develop or enhance their professional commitments that enable them to improve the quality of their work and the environment they provide learners and teachers.

Principles • • • •

College Objectives

1. Design programs that reflect the educational needs of people and the 74

The focus is on the individual learner. Learners, faculty and staff share the responsibility of learning. Lifelong learning is essential for success. Leadership, ethics and social responsibility are the trademarks of WEU College of Education Graduates. Global understanding and citizenship are core components of every course in the College.


MASTER OF EDUCATION IN INSTRUCTIONAL MATHEMATICS K-8

Admission Requirements Learners must provide documentation of a Bachelor’s Degree (official transcript) or the foreign equivalent with 12 hours of college mathematics. Learners must also show demonstrated competency in the English language.

Program Description The World Education Master of Education in Instructional Mathematics K-8 degree program is designed to greatly augment the capacity of schools serving elementary and/or middle grades to provide high quality instruction in mathematics. Graduates will be able to assist educators in designing and implementing high quality mathematics and as permitted assume instructional responsibilities. The degree requirements are designed to enable persons lacking an education degree certification to acquire the skills and knowledge needed to become a highly effective mathematics instructor or coach to those who do so.

Program Structure The Master of Education in Instructional Mathematics K-8 program has three areas of study for which all courses (36 hours) must be completed: Foundations, Mathematical Concepts, and Instructional Practices. To allow for a mix of courses that may be more satisfying to enrollees, the following flexibility is permitted: Two of the Foundation courses must be completed prior to enrolling in a Content course. Two of the Content courses must be completed prior to enrolling in Instructional Practices courses. Instructional Practice courses must be completed in lock-step. The Capstone course can only be completed when all other courses are completed satisfactorily.

Program Objectives Graduates of the Master of Education in Instructional Mathematics K-8 program will demonstrate the following competencies: • •

Provide effective coaching and support to other educators teaching mathematics.

Create healthy learning communities for acquiring an understanding of mathematics in grades K through 8. Develop an instructional program that aligns with state standards using mathematical problems that relate to students’ surroundings. Utilize appropriate formative assessment strategies that address developmental issues and common misconceptions students have about mathematical operations. Design instruction that enables students to understand mathematics and apply that in a variety of disciplines and contexts. Adapt instruction to fit local contexts. 75


COLLEGE OF EDUCATION COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

systems, the meanings of operations and how they relate to one another, and computation within the number system as a foundation for algebra.

EDUC 524: RATIONAL NUMBERS AND PROPORTIONAL REASONING (3 Credits)

EDUC 500: EDUCATION POLICIES AND THEIR LIFE IN CLASSROOMS (3 Credits)

This course focuses on the content and instructional practices that support learners’ mastery of rational numbers and proportional reasoning (K-8). Attention is given to the basic number progressions in fractions and rational numbers, decimals and percentages, and ratios and proportions to develop both rational number concepts and skills with proportional reasoning.

This course provides a historical review of the goals of national and state educational policies and their intended and unintended effects on classroom practices and learner learning. The course focuses primarily on policies established since 1950s with brief reviews of earlier years in American education and comparisons with policies in other countries. Learners will analyze policies within a local school district in terms of their alignment with local, state and national goals.

EDUC 526: ALGEBRA AND FUNCTIONS (3 Credits) This course will focus on the content and instructional practices that support learners’ mastery of algebra and functions expectations in the Common Core standards (K- 8). Topics include transitions from arithmetic to algebra, working with quantitative change and how one can describe and predict change mathematically.

EDUC 510: THEORIES OF LEARNING AND EDUCATIONAL PRACTICE (3 Credits) This course focuses on the research evidence from the cognitive and neurosciences regarding practices and conditions that enable learners to a) become fluent in the strategies and skills associated with effective work in a discipline and b) acquire an understanding of concepts that allow them to transfer what they have learned to new and novel situations.

EDUC 528: GEOMETRY AND MEASUREMENT (3 Credits) This course focuses on the content and instructional practices that support mastery of geometry and measurement expectations found in the Common Core standards. Topics include the foundations of informal measurement and geometry in one, two, and three dimensions. The van Hiele model for geometric learning is used to frame how children build their understanding of length, area, volume, angles and geometric relationships.

EDUC 520: MATHEMATICS IN HISTORY (3 Credits) This course focuses on the development of mathematical concepts and their application in commerce and architecture throughout history. The course is designed to increase educators’ abilities to help learners understand the relationship between mathematical insights and developments in various civilizations and to provide educators with the background knowledge to create interdisciplinary instruction within their classroom or to collaborate with other educators in such endeavors.

EDUC 630: DESIGNING A SCOPE AND SEQUENCE (2 Credits) This course develops skills in unpacking established goals (or standards) for learner learning and provides strategies for back mapping from those desired outcomes to a sequence of instructional units that will allow learners to attain those goals. Critiques of existing scope and sequences in state documents and textbooks and appropriate adaptations and elaborations will be an integral component of this course.

EDUC 522: NUMBERS AND OPERATIONS (3 Credits) The course will focus on the mathematical practices that support the Common Core standards in numbers and operations (K-8) through eighth grade. Topics include different ways of representing numbers, relationships between numbers, number

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EDUC 632: INTEGRATING TECHNOLOGY (2 Credits)

their management plans and responses to unanticipated events in their classrooms.

This course focuses on those technologies showing the greatest promise in transforming the learning opportunities and successes of learners - including hardware, software, as well as open source resources that can be used to develop challenging and engaging units of instruction (such as census data, labor statistics, national archives, and legislative records). Learners will also explore ways to evaluate emerging technologies in terms of their effectiveness in improving learners understanding of enduring questions and in providing alternative ways of learning for learners with special needs.

EDUC 640: INSTURCTIONAL MATHEMATICS K-8 CAPSTONE COURSE (3 Credits) This course provides the student with the opportunity to develop two courses of study (primary and middle) that are consistent with best practices and Common Core standards introduced in the required courses for this M.A. program. Students will pilot at least one week of course work and analyze the strengths and weaknesses in the implementation.

EDUC 634: DESIGNING INSTRUCTION (3 Credits) This course integrates content, technology, and research on learning through its focus on designing and evaluating instructional units. Issues of differentiation, rubrics, and analysis of misconceptions will also be addressed. Learners will design instructional plans (inclusive of technological resources) within their content specialization that allows for various learning needs.

EDUC 636: ASSESSMENT (3 Credits) This course develops teachers’ skills in formative and summative assessment, with a focus on the use of formative assessments that reflect an understanding of diversity in learner development (physical, social, emotional, cognitive, and linguistic) and the appropriate discourse and feedback associated with various stages of development and misconceptions. Research on effective feedback strategies, learning tools (such as rubrics) and adaptations of instruction will be introduced and analyzed through various simulations.

EDUC 638: BEHAVIOR MANAGEMENT (2 Credits) This course focuses on how one develops a respectful community where learners can work productively including educators’ responsibilities for moral development and citizenship, appropriate adaptations of timing and sequencing, motivating learners successfully, and supporting parent involvement. Case studies and simulations will be used to allow educators to become more intuitive in

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More than a Great University: WEU is a Way of Life. www.theWEU.com

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COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING AND COMPUTER SCIENCE

College Objectives 1. An ability to apply knowledge of mathematics, science, and engineering. 2. An ability to design and conduct experiments, as well as to analyze and interpret data. 3. An ability to design a system, component, or process to meet desired needs within realistic constraints such as economic, environmental, social, political, ethical, health and safety, manufacturability and sustainability. 4. An ability to function on multidisciplinary teams. 5. An ability to identify, formulate and solve engineering problems. 6. An understanding of professional and ethical responsibility. 7. An ability to communicate effectively. 8. The broad education necessary to understand the impact of engineering solutions in a global, economic, environmental and societal context. 9. A recognition of the need for and an ability to engage in life-long learning. 10. A knowledge of contemporary issues, and an ability to use the techniques, skills, and modern engineering tools necessary for engineering practice.

Graduate Certificate in Environmental Engineering Graduate Certificate in Systems Engineering Graduate Certificate in Information Systems Master of Science in Environmental Engineering Master of Science in Systems Engineering Master of Science in Information Systems The WEU College of Engineering and Computer Science educates learners, from a diverse and multicultural population, to become productive and responsible members and leaders of the engineering profession and society at large, that strive to improve the human condition locally, nationally, and globally by shaping the future with their enthusiasm to learn, to question, and to solve some of the world’s most pressing engineering challenges and problems.

Principles • • • •

To accomplish its mission, the College of Engineering and Computer Science: •

Offers innovative curricula designed to produce engineers who approach their profession with competence, conscience and compassion. Engages broadly educated faculty, who model and encourage the notion of lifelong learning and socially-responsible practices of engineering.

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The focus is on the individual learner. Learners, faculty and staff share the responsibility of learning. Lifelong learning is essential for success. Scientific reasoning and processes are essential to every engineering discipline. Communication skills are crucial to function effectively in cross-disciplinary teams. Leadership and entrepreneurial skills are essential in engineering a better world.


GRADUATE CERTIFICATE IN ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING

Admission Requirements Fulfill the University’s Graduate Admissions Requirements, complete the University’s Admission Process listed in the Admissions and Enrollment section of this catalog and meet the following Program special requirements:

Program Description The Graduate Certificate in Environmental Engineering program allows environmental engineering professionals to improve their technical skills through advanced study without having to fully commit to a master’s degree program. By earning this certificate, learners will learn more in the growing and advanced field of water supply, wastewater treatment, recovery of byproducts, innovation in waste management, and protection of the environment. Learners will also further their education on the fundamental processes that control pollutant transport and fate in soil and groundwater. They will learn and be able to apply the methodologies and tools that require the knowledge of these processes for modeling remediation and risk assessment.

Those candidates with undergraduate degrees without significant undergraduate work in the information or related sciences, will be required to take the course ENGR 490 STEM Fundamentals for the Engineering Professional prior to taking the first program course.

Program Structure Successful completion of the program is granted upon completion of the following credits/courses listed below: ENGR 490 STEM Fundamentals for Engineering Professionals (Required for Some Learners) ENGR 560 Mathematical Modeling Methods ENGR 580 Social Change with Engineering and Technology ENVE 510 Energy and Environmental Systems ENVE 512 Air Pollution and Air Quality Engineering ENVE 514 Water Treatment INFS 550 Large Data Systems and Processes

Program Objectives Graduates of the Graduate Certificate in Environmental Engineering program will demonstrate the following competencies: • •

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Inspect industrial or municipal facilities or programs to assist the evaluation of operational effectiveness or compliance with environmental regulations.

Design systems, processes, or equipment for control, management, or remediation of water, air or soil quality. Collaborate with environmental scientists, planners, hazardous waste technicians, engineers, experts in law or business or other specialists to address environmental problems. Prepare, review or update environmental investigation or recommendation reports. Assists the development of site-specific health and safety protocols, such as spill contingency plans or methods for loading or transporting waste.

Total Credits Required: 15-18

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GRADUATE CERTIFICATE IN SYSTEMS ENGINEERING

Admission Requirements Fulfill the University’s Graduate Admissions Requirements, complete the University’s Admission Process listed in the Admissions and Enrollment section of this catalog and meet the following Program special requirements:

Program Description

Those candidates with undergraduate degrees without significant undergraduate work in the engineering, mathematics or science will be required to take the course ENGR 490 STEM Fundamentals for the Engineering Professional prior to taking the first program course.

The Graduate Certificate in Systems Engineering (GC SYSE) program assists learners who need proficiency in the processes involved in systems engineering, along with the knowledge and skills to successfully guide a system’s development process from start to finish. This program is designed for technical professionals who already have work experience and an engineering degree. Systems Engineering is an interdisciplinary approach and enables the realization of successful systems that is applied and managed for many purposes, especially business. Developing successful and efficient systems benefit businesses and other organizations in numerous ways, some of which include operations, cost, scheduling, performance, training and support, testing, manufacturing and disposal.

Program Structure Successful completion of the program is granted upon completion of the following credits/courses listed below: ENGR 490 STEM Fundamentals for Engineering Professionals (Required for Some Learners) ENGR 560 Mathematical Modeling Methods ENGR 580 Social Change with Engineering and Technology INDE 520 Industrial Engineering Fundamentals INFS 522 Systems Modeling, Analysis and Design SYSE 520 Systems Engineering Fundamentals SYSE 530 Human Factors and System Engineering

Program Objectives Graduates from the Graduate Certificate in Systems Engineering will demonstrate the following competencies: • • • • •

Perform needs analysis and conduct feasibility studies. Define operational requirements and the system maintenance specifications. Accomplish functional analysis and allocation of requirements. Plan, coordinate and conduct formal review meetings. Plan, coordinate, implement and control design changes. Initiate and maintain production/construction liaison, supplier liaison, and customer service activities.

Total Credits Required: 15-18

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GRADUATE CERTIFICATE IN INFORMATION SYSTEMS

Admission Requirements Fulfill the University’s Graduate Admissions Requirements, complete the University’s Admission Process listed in the Admissions and Enrollment section of this catalog and meet the following Program special requirements:

Program Description The Graduate Certificate in Information Systems program prepares learners for positions managing the information systems development process. This program focuses on information systems methodologies, software design, implementation, and evaluation of software applications. Learners acquire skills and competencies to develop and manage software applications and software projects, network within a large group, including other information systems professionals, and build techniques of leadership and interpersonal communications necessary to constantly encourage innovation in the field. Practical applications are emphasized throughout the curriculum, and discussed through the prism of their value in introducing or accelerating social change, and improving the quality of personal and professional lives of individuals, and the status of organizations and communities.

Those candidates with undergraduate degrees without significant undergraduate work in the information or related sciences, will be required to take the course ENGR 490 STEM Fundamentals for the Engineering Professional prior to taking the first program course.

Program Structure Successful completion of the program is granted upon completion of the following credits/courses listed below: ENGR 490 STEM Fundamentals for Engineering Professionals (Required for Some Learners) ENGR 580 Social Change with Engineering and Technology INFS 500 Information Infrastructure and Resource Fundamentals INFS 522 Systems Modeling, Analysis and Design INFS 524 Systems Maintenance and Services INFS 540 Information and Knowledge Management INFS 550 Large Data Systems and Processes

Program Objectives Graduates of the Graduate Certificate in Information Systems will demonstrate the following competencies: •

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Enable IT process automation from problem detection through resolution.

Select and implement methodologies and techniques to solve business problems and support the organizational decision making process. Integrate technologies, products and services into cohesive systems. Collaborate effectively in crossfunctional teams. Assess the organizational, ethical, and societal implications of IT practices. Implement business intelligence solutions.

Total Credits Required: 15-18

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MASTER OF SCIENCE IN ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING

Admission Requirements

Program Description

Fulfill the University’s Graduate Admissions Requirements, follow the University’s Admission Process and meet the following Program special requirements:

Environmental engineers are the technical professionals who identify and design solutions for environmental problems. If not for environmental engineers, modern society would be without safe drinking water, treatment and proper disposal of hazardous wastes, maintenance of air quality, control of water pollution, and remediation of contaminated sites. The Master of Science in Environmental Engineering program is developed to ensure learners attain the mathematical foundations and environmental processing skills for solving environmental problems affecting the local and global ecosystems.

Those candidates with undergraduate degrees without significant undergraduate work in the information or related sciences, will be required to take the course ENGR 490 STEM Fundamentals for the Engineering Professional prior to taking the first program course.

Program Structure Successful completion of the program is granted upon completion of the following credits/courses listed below: ENGR 490 STEM Fundamentals for Engineering Professionals (Required for Some Learners) ENGR 500 Portfolio Creation ENGR 560 Mathematical Modeling Methods ENGR 580 Social Change with Engineering and Technology ENGR 690 Career Development ENVE 510 Energy and Environmental Systems ENVE 512 Air Pollution and Air Quality Engineering ENVE 514 Water Treatment ENVE 610 Modeling Environmental Systems ENVE 612 Industrial Processes and Pollution ENVE 614 Waste Management and Recycling ENVE 616 Natural Resources Management ENVE 618 Hazardous Waste Infrastructure and Engineering INFS 550 Large Data Systems and Processes

Program Objectives Graduates of the Master of Science in Environmental Engineering program will demonstrate the following competencies: •

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Inspect industrial or municipal facilities or programs to evaluate operational effectiveness or ensure compliance with environmental regulations.

Design or supervise the design of systems, processes or equipment for control, management, or remediation of water, air or soil quality. Advise corporations or government agencies of procedures to follow in cleaning up contaminated sites to protect people and the environment. Collaborate with specialists to address environmental problems. Prepare, review, or update environmental investigation or recommendation reports. Develop site-specific health and safety protocols, such as spill contingency plans or methods for loading or transporting waste.

Total Credits Required: 36-39

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MASTER OF SCIENCE IN SYSTEMS ENGINEERING

Initiate and maintain production/construction liaison, supplier liaison, and customer service activities.

Program Description

Admission Requirements

The Master of Science in Systems Engineering program prepares individuals to apply mathematical and scientific principles to the design, development and operational evaluation of total systems solutions to a wide variety of engineering problems, including the integration of human, physical, energy, communications, management, and information requirements as needed, and the application of requisite analytical methods to specific situations. The program provides learners with the knowledge and technical skills needed to prosper in the field of systems engineering, while preparing them for careers in industry and government foundations. This program addresses the requirements of scientists and engineers engaged in multiple aspects of design, analysis, production, integration and operation of modern systems.

Fulfill the University’s Graduate Admissions Requirements, complete the University’s Admission Process listed in the Admissions and Enrollment section of this catalog and meet the following Program special requirements: Those candidates with undergraduate degrees without significant undergraduate work in the information or related sciences, will be required to take the course ENGR 490 STEM Fundamentals for the Engineering Professional prior to taking the first program course.

Program Structure Successful completion of the program is granted upon completion of the following credits/courses listed below: ENGR 490 STEM Fundamentals for Engineering Professionals (Required for Some Learners) ENGR 500 Portfolio Creation ENGR 560 Mathematical Modeling Methods ENGR 580 Social Change with Engineering and Technology ENGR 670 Operational Research ENGR 675 Managing Engineering Projects ENGR 690 Career Development INDE 520 Industrial Engineering Fundamentals INFS 522 Systems Modeling, Analysis and Design SYSE 520 Systems Engineering Fundamentals SYSE 530 Human Factors and System Engineering SYSE 620 Lifecycle and Integration of Systems SYSE 622 Sensor Systems Design SYSE 624 Control Systems

Program Objectives Graduates of the Master of Science in Systems Engineering program will demonstrate the following competencies: • Perform needs analysis and conduct feasibility studies. • Define operational requirements and the system maintenance specifications. • Accomplish functional analysis and allocation of requirements. • Execute systems analysis, synthesis, and system integration. • Plan, coordinate and conduct formal review meetings. • Monitor and review system test and evaluation activities. • Plan, coordinate, implement and control design changes.

Total Credits Required: 36-39 84


MASTER OF SCIENCE IN INFORMATION SYSTEMS

Admission Requirements Fulfill the University’s Graduate Admissions Requirements, complete the University’s Admission Process listed in the Admissions and Enrollment section of this catalog and meet the following Program special requirements:

Program Description The Master of Science in Information Systems prepares learners for professional and managerial positions in the field of information systems. The curriculum provides a better understanding of the use of information systems in enhancing the business processes across organizations, as well as the decisionmaking. Business theory merges with information systems theory preparing leaders in designing, implementing, and maintaining information systems that support the operations of the digital enterprise.

Those candidates with undergraduate degrees without significant undergraduate work in the information or related sciences, will be required to take the course ENGR 490 STEM Fundamentals for the Engineering Professional prior to taking the first program course.

Program Objectives

ENGR 490 STEM Fundamentals for Engineering Professionals (Required for Some Learners) ENGR 500 Portfolio Creation ENGR 580 Social Change with Engineering and Technology ENGR 690 Career Development INFS 500 Information Infrastructure and Resource Fundamentals INFS 522 Systems Modeling, Analysis and Design INFS 524 Systems Maintenance and Services INFS 540 Information and Knowledge Management INFS 550 Large Data Systems and Processes INFS 640 Enterprise Information Systems INFS 642 Information Security Management INFS 644 Web and Mobile Computing INFS 656 Cloud Computing and Virtualization INFS 660 Information Systems Policies and Strategies

Program Structure Successful completion of the program is granted upon completion of the following credits/courses listed below:

Graduates of the Master of Science in Information Systems will demonstrate the following competencies: •

• • • • •

Select and implement methodologies and techniques to solve business problems and support the organizational decision making process. Integrate technologies, products and services into cohesive systems. Collaborate effectively in crossfunctional teams. Evaluate resources for technical research and professional growth. Assess the organizational, ethical, and societal implications of IT practices. Implement frameworks for incident prevention, response and recovery based on identified security vulnerabilities. Implement business intelligence solutions. Enable IT process automation from problem detection through resolution.

Total Credits Required: 36-39

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COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING AND COMPUTER SCIENCE COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

ENGR 580: SOCIAL CHANGE WITH ENGINEERING AND TECHNOLOGY (3 Credits) This course introduces the learner to the social, ethical, legal and philosophical side of engineering practice. It discusses the social and organizational implications, rights and duties related to the actions of engineering professionals. In addition, it covers various engineering codes of ethics, laws and legislations, and liability. Topics include legal, economic, social, organizational and ethical issues in the context of the engineering industry.

ENGR 490: STEM FUNDAMENTALS FOR THE ENGINEERING PROFESSIONAL (3 Credits)

ENGR 670: OPERATIONAL RESEARCH (3 Credits)

This course provides an opportunity for learners with a non-related engineering or science background, a good understanding of the fundamental science and mathematics principles needed to be successful in an engineering-related graduate program. Learners taking this course will be exposed to theoretical and hands- on exercises in the fields of Mathematics and Physics. Mathematics topics include trigonometry, differential equations, integrals, applied statistics and introduction to mathematics modeling. Physics topics include statics, dynamics, electricity and optics.

This course introduces the learners to advanced analytical methods used for problem solving and making better decisions. It uses mathematical analysis and optimization in a holistic approach to improve the learners’ knowledge of designing useful and more efficient systems.

ENGR 675: MANAGING ENGINEERING PROJECTS (3 Credits) This course overviews project management topics and practices for the engineering professionals. Topics include conception, planning, scheduling, budgeting, leadership, management, tracking, and completion of projects, as well as the use of software tools in supporting project management efforts.

ENGR 500: PORTFOLIO CREATION (1 Credit) This course provides an opportunity for learners to explore and establish a professional portfolio and host it through a content management systems. Learners will identify various methods for collecting documentation and evidence of learning from the courses that will be taken as part of their studies. This course also covers research on electronic portfolio development for a variety of ages and situations, including useful criteria for evaluating portfolios.

ENGR 690: CAREER DEVELOPMENT (2 Credits) This course offers learners the resources they need in order to move forward along their career paths. This course will also aid in supporting and facilitating the academic, professional, and personal development of learners.

ENGR 560: MATHEMATICAL MODELING METHODS (3 Credits)

ENVE 510: ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENTAL SYSTEMS (3 Credits)

This course provides mathematical background and analysis of engineering processes. Mathematical models are used in the development and modeling of modern engineering system that include either theoretical scenarios or highly complex real-world interactions. Topics in this course will include differential equations, dimensional analysis and scaling, probabilistic modeling, optimization, discrete and continuous models, fitting models to data and case studies.

This course focuses on the essentials of renewable energy, transportation and sustainable design. It will introduce topics of engineering, conservation and sustainability. Topics include biofuels, renewable and non-renewable energy, sustainable agriculture, environmental policy and low impact development.

ENVE 512: AIR POLLUTION AND AIR QUALITY ENGINEERING (3 Credits)

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topics include landfill systems, capping and closure systems, raw materials waste management and recycling, policies and political aspects of waste management.

This course introduces in details the sources, effects and regulation of air pollutants. Students will be exposed to basic meteorological processes, air quality modeling, technology for air pollution control, odor control and noise pollution. In addition it will cover pollution control and health problems, global atmospheric changes and risk assessment. Learners will be able to model the impact of sources of air pollution on the environment.

ENVE 616: NATURAL RESOURCES MANAGEMENT (3 Credits) This course introduces the fundamental concepts of natural resource management. It will focus on both renewable and non-renewable resources such as soil, water, biofuels, forests, wildlife, oil, metals and minerals. Students will be exposed to the current issues dealing with both renewable and nonrenewable resources, policies, economics, politics and decision making structures.

ENVE 514: WATER TREATMENT (3 Credits) This course introduces engineering approaches to protecting water quality with an emphasis on fundamental principles. It covers theory and conceptual design of engineering systems for water treatment, wastewater and drinking water. In addition, it covers the physical, chemical and biological principles of process design, aeration, filtration, softening, chemical treatment, coagulation, taste and odor control.

ENVE 618: HAZARDOUS WASTE INFRASTRUCTURES AND ENGINEERING (3 Credits) This course provides fundamental concepts related to hazardous, radioactive power generation and waste management. It introduces sources and characteristics of hazardous and radioactive wastes, principle and applications of various hazardous waste control techniques.

ENVE 610: MODELING ENVIRONMENTAL SYSTEMS (3 Credits) This course introduces the development and application of analytical solutions and numerical models. It will introduce learners to readily available tools and applications that will aide them in the modeling of complex and real-world environmental systems. Topics include mathematical models and analysis, simulation applications and their application to real-world situations.

INDE 520: INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING FUNDAMENTALS (3 Credits) This course introduces learners to the blend of various engineering knowledge, management techniques, people management skills and computer technology integrated with applied mathematics and statistics. The industrial engineer can design, implement, control and manage complex systems in an optimum manner. This course introduces learners to safe and more efficient best practices in the field of systems engineering. Upon successful completion, learner should be able to work as productivity and improvement specialists with people and equipment.

ENVE 612: INDUSTRIAL PROCESSES AND POLLUTION (3 Credits) This course represents an interdisciplinary bridge between industrial and environmental engineering. Topics include characterization and assessment of polluting and industrial wasters, control and treatment of industrial emissions and wastes, administrative and legal aspects of pollution, soils (assessment and remediation) and industrial water pollution.

INFS 500: INFORMATION INFRASTRUCTURE AND RESOURCES FUNDAMENTALS (3 Credits)

ENVE 614: WASTE MANAGEMENT AND RECYCLING (3 Credits)

This course introduces existing and emerging information infrastructures and resources that are available to companies and corporations. It also covers issues that are involved in the management of the information technologies function. The course will provide an overview of network design, implementation and maintenance, broadband

This course introduces engineering aspects of solid, liquid, biodegradable and non-biodegradable waste materials and their collection, transport and disposal. It also covers incineration, compositing, recovering and recycling of solid wastes. Additional

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promising engineering and business applications of data mining. In addition, this course integrates techniques from several fields including machine learning, statistics, pattern recognition, artificial intelligence, and database systems, for the analysis of large volumes of data. This course gives a wide exposition of these techniques and their software tools. Topics include association (looking for patterns in data), sequence (one thing leading to another in data), classification (looking for new patterns), forecasting (predicting data).

networks, local area networks, wide area networks, wireless and mobile networks and Internet technologies and protocols. In addition, this course analyzes the strategic impact of these technologies on organizations.

INFS 522 SYSTEMS MODELING, ANALYSIS AND DESIGN (3 Credits) This course covers in detail the responsibilities and activities of a system engineer during the initial phases of a system development. It addresses the engineering objectives, responsibilities and activities during the major development phases of a system development. Topics in this course include functional analysis, system trade-offs, measures of effectiveness, system development models, customer integration and design principles and best practices. This course will introduce the learner to the system development lifecycle.

INFS 640: ENTERPRISE INFORMATION SYSTEMS (3 Credits) This course provides an opportunity for learners to gain understanding of the role of enterprise information systems in critical business processes conducted by a business organization. Learners will become aware of the critical role of enterprise information systems in a business organization, examine the intricate interplay between business processes and information systems, and work in teams in simulated environments using an enterprise information system.

INFS 524: SYSTEMS MAINTENANCE AND SERVICES (3 Credits) This course focuses on the activities surrounding an information system after it is developed. Topics gravitate around the elements of the information systems lifecycle, and include system implementation, installation, conversions and changeovers, post-implementation reviews, user training modalities, and system maintenance approaches.

INFS 642: INFORMATION SECURITY MANAGEMENT (3 Credits) This course provides an opportunity for learners to attain the fundamental principles of computer security as applied to management. This course covers privacy concerns, secrecy issues, operational security, physical security, hardware security, software security, communications security, and data security.

INFS 540: INFORMATION AND KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT (3 Credits) This course provides an introduction to the management of information, knowledge and database systems. The course emphasizes the understanding of the fundamentals of relational systems including data models, database architectures, and database manipulations. The course also provides an understanding of new developments and trends such as Internet database environment and data warehousing. The course uses a problem-based approach to learning.

INFS 644: WEB AND MOBILE COMPUTING (3 Credits) This course introduces learners to mobile computing and mobile application development. Students will learn about mobile computing applications, technologies, and wireless communication, as well as how to use mobile application frameworks and development environments to reinforce learned concepts.

INFS 550: LARGE DATA SYSTEMS AND PROCESSES (3 Credits)

INFS 656: CLOUD COMPUTING AND VIRTUALIZATION (3 Credits)

This course introduces concepts, tasks, methods and techniques in data collection, data processing and data analysis. Students will learn popular data mining techniques and will be able to identify

This course introduces learners to a cloud specific orientation about network and virtualization technologies. Learners will learn about datacenter

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network technologies and standards, network virtualization for systems and network devices, planning network concepts for mobility solutions, and network design and performance goals for centralized system provisioning.

This course will introduce the learners to complex system lifecycle and integration to system operation and maintenance. An overriding concern is the integration of engineering systems with management systems of an organization. Major phases, procedures, policies, and techniques in the engineering system life cycle are discussed in detail.

INFS 660: INFORMATION SYSTEMS POLICIES AND STRATEGIES (3 Credits)

SYSE 622: SENSOR SYSTEMS DESIGN (3 Credits)

This course places emphasis on the planning and management of information technologies and related resources at the corporate level. Topics include assessment of information technologies, tracking emerging technologies and trends, management of portfolio resources, end-user computing, technology transfer, outsourcing, theoretical models, strategic applications and strategic IT planning.

This course introduces the modern developments in the sensors systems design area. It presents certain challenges especially those required in a systems protocol. This entails addressing key design considerations especially in the advancements of inexpensive electronics. It presents a solution and lesson using human intervention which is given create consideration whenever speaking about system enhancements and development. Topics include optical and solid-state chemical and physical sensor, transduction mechanisms fabrication methods and applications.

SYSE 520: SYSTEMS ENGINEERING FUNDAMENTALS (3 Credits) This course introduces fundamentals of the systems engineering processes and their application to the development of engineering systems. It describes the role and the viewpoint of the system engineer. Topics in this course include: concept definitions, system synthesis, system analysis, mathematical models, risk assessment, engineering design, computer-aided systems engineering (CASE) tools, systems management, decision analysis and utility theory, human information processing, and organizational decision processes. Learners will identify the key components of a complex system and learn what needs to be included in one.

SYSE 624: CONTROL SYSTEMS (3 Credits) This course addresses the modeling, characteristics and performance of both linear and non-linear control systems. Topics will include controlling and protecting systems, stability, root locust and frequency methods. In addition it will address feedback control systems, signal flow graphs, Bode plots and steady state errors, Nyquist plots and state variable approach.

SYSE 530: HUMAN FACTORS AND SYSTEMS ENGINEERING (3 Credits) This course will provide a broad coverage of human factors and show how the application of human factors principles can improve the design of systems involving the interaction of humans with technology. It focuses on the cognitive and physical abilities and limitations, and applying that knowledge to engineering design. In addition, it focuses on the human performance of tasks. The objectives are safety, comfort and efficiency of humans performing their tasks.

SYSE 620: LIFECYCLE AND INTEGRATION OF SYSTEMS (3 Credits)

89


COLLEGE OF HEALTH SCIENCES

Diploma in Medical Records and Transcription

Diploma in Medical Coding and Billing Associate of Science in Medical Practice Management Associate of Science in Health Information Technology

Provides an integrated interprofessional, competency-based approach, providing formative assessment strategies and techniques to help learners most effectively master competencies. Provides a broad liberal arts educational model integrating knowledge from the humanities and sciences in order to provide and educational program that is holistic, visionary, culturally competent and socially relevant.

Bachelor of Science in Health Care Administration

College Objectives

Bachelor of Science: Associate’s to Health Care Administration

The College of Health Sciences prepares graduates to: 1. Critically evaluate evidence and apply it to the unique needs of each patient. 2. Provide the high quality safe and effective care and services to patients and society that local resources allow. 3. Act professionally, ethically, and compassionately at all times. 4. Create and transmit new knowledge in order to promote improved outcomes, the profession and ultimately benefit society. 5. Embrace social and cognitive diversity in addressing the healthcare needs of the world’s people. 6. Be effective educators for patients, families, communities, and learners.

Bachelor of Science in Emergency Management in Health Care Bachelor of Science: Associate’s to Emergency Management in Health Care Bachelor of Science in Nursing The mission of the World University College of Health Sciences to make the lives of all the world’s peoples healthier and better and to do it for free. Within five years, WEU College of Health Sciences will improve the health and lives in 100 countries of the world.

Principles

The WEU College of Health Sciences: •

Integrates technology, contemporary information and best-practice in order to present an educationally sound curriculum as the context to learning. 91

Provide access to its programs to the global community in order to enable learners to gain the knowledge and the skills essential to: overcome economic barriers; improve access to learning;


•

and to inspire students and graduates to find solutions to local, regional, national and global health problems.

health; genetics and genomics; healthcare informatics; public health disease tracking; and forensics just to name a few.

Wholly and abundantly support the University’s foundational premise to give back to the community. Through this focus, students and faculty will be encouraged and supported to be forces for positive changes and to make a difference and change the world. As we collectively act as instruments of positive change, we will use our newly acquired knowledge and skills to live true to the principles of charity, honesty, integrity, courage, justice, humility, kindness, respect, and loyalty to self and others. We will embrace and see each day as not just another day, but another opportunity as we recall that the quest for happiness and excellence will govern the choices we make and the paths we choose to travel.

Transfer Credit 1. Technical Programs. Students may transfer up to 12 credits maximum required for the certificate or diploma. Courses transferred must be very closely matched. Courses transferred must have a grade of C or better or the equivalent. Transfers are accepted at the discretion of the program director or college dean. 2. Associate Degree Programs: Students may transfer up to 25% of the total credits required for the degree. Courses transferred must be very closely matched and must have a grade of C or better or the equivalent. Transfers are accepted at the discretion of the program director or college dean.

Future Programs

3. Bachelor Degree Programs: Students may transfer up to 50% of the total credits needed for the degree in programs requiring 120 or more credits for completion. In bachelor programs where students are already given 50% credit for associate degrees, students may transfer up to 2 additional courses (6 credits) maximum. Courses transferred must be very closely matched and must have a grade of C or better or the equivalent. Transfers are accepted at the discretion of the program director or college dean.

As we look to the future and for opportunities for us to use the powerful vehicle of education to improve the health of the world’s people we are evaluating several exciting program possibilities going forward in our future educational offerings. We will look at cutting edge needs and what organizations like the National Institute of Medicine (IOM) recommend for the future of healthcare and healthcare education. Eventually we will be adding continuing education programs, postdegree certificates and focusing on baccalaureate, masters and doctoral programs in relevant areas such as: BSN and MSN- DNP; teaching in healthcare education including curriculum and instruction; healthcare organizational leadership; public and global

4. Graduate Degree Programs: Students may transfer up to 2 courses (or 6 credits maximum) unless otherwise noted. Courses transferred must be very closely matched and must have a grade of B or better or the equivalent. 92


5. Specific convictions may keep the individual from licensure eligibility. For eligibility questions, contact your states/country’s respective licensure/credentialing agency for further information. 6. Criminal background checks and drug screening may be required annually or as required by agency to continue in the program.

Transfers are accepted at the discretion of the program director or college dean. 5. All programs: A requirement of the College of Health Sciences is to have every student take the following courses in their programs: • • • • •

Program internships, practicums, clinicals or experientials Program capstone courses Student change project Program thesis or dissertations No transfer credit will be approved for these four categories of courses.

Health Screening, Immunization and CPR Requirement Students enrolled in health science programs can reasonably expect that their clinical/ experiential agency will require specific health information, immunizations and proof of current “health-provider” CPR prior to the agency providing a clinical or experiential experience. Since gathering this information and obtaining the required documentation can take some time (months) the student is strongly encouraged to begin collecting the data upon admission to the health science program. It is the student’s responsibility to research what health information will be needed for each agency he/she is planning on affiliating with. The student should be prepared to provide the healthcare facility with a copy of the required information prior to the onset of any clinical or practical experience and keep an original and backup copy of the information with them during visits to clinical agency. Any expense related to obtaining the required information is solely the responsibility of the student.

Criminal Background and Drug Screenings Programs in the College of Health Sciences may require criminal background screening and drug screening in order to be in compliance with affiliating clinical/experiential agencies (depending upon location). Criminal background checks will be at the expense of the student. The following requirements must be completed no later than 30 days in advance of any clinical/experiential course or no earlier than 60 days prior to the commencement of any clinical experience: 1. Pending results of the criminal background and drug screenings, students will be approved to enroll in and attend clinical/experiential courses 2. Criminal background checks will be completed by an external vendor from a list of approved vendors provided by your agency. 3. Drug screening will be completed by an external vendor from a list of approved vendors provided by your agency. 4. Students will be expected to disclose the use of any drug or alcohol, including prescriptive medications by the external vendor.

The following health care information is typically requested by healthcare facilities: 1. Current health-provider level CPR (cardio-pulmonary resuscitation) 2. N95 (or alternative) mask fitting 3. Recent TB test indicating a negative result; or chest x-ray indicating no evidence of disease 93


4. Seasonal influenza immunization 5. Tetanus Toxoid or booster (every 10 years) 6. MMR immunization and/or titer indicating immunity – red or hard measles (rubeola), German measles (rubella), and mumps 7. Chicken pox immunization and/or titer indicating immunity 8. Hepatitis B Series (0m-1m-6m) and titer indicating protection 9. History and Physical exam by healthcare provider indicating fitness for program.

94


DIPLOMA IN MEDICAL RECORDS AND TRANSCRIPTION

Admission Requirements Students must first fulfill the University’s Undergraduate Admissions Requirements and complete the University’s Admission Process listed in the Admissions and Enrollment section of this catalog.

Program Description

Students must successfully complete the programs prerequisites with a C or better to qualify for entry into this program. Students who have had experience in the prerequisites via work experience, previous coursework or other means may opt to test out of the prerequisites or may provide evidence of successful completion of a similar course with a C or better in high school, college or technical program.

The Medical Records and Transcription diploma program is designed to provide the student with the basic and foundational knowledge needed to begin a career in health sciences. In this field the student will be prepared with basic competencies in medical records management and transcription. Students will learn skills such as filing medical records, typing dictated medical reports and charted notes, taking histories and physical examinations among other similar related skills.

Additionally, students who have not successfully completed college courses in the past are strongly encouraged to take the recommended “pre-program” courses to prepare themselves for the rigor of college work.

Program Objectives Graduates of the Diploma in Medical Records and Transcription will demonstrate the following competencies: •

• • • • •

Program Structure

Create, update and evaluate patient records, health and insurance records to support the unique needs of each patient. Describe the importance of and protect patient’s confidential medical and health information Professionally and ethically transcribe medical reports and records. Define medical terminology and abbreviations. Communicate and collaborate with patients, coworkers and health care related entities. Identify, define, and demonstrate the knowledge, skills, abilities and responsibilities required in medical records management and medical transcription.

Successful completion of the program is granted upon completion of the following credits/courses listed below: Prerequisite/Recommended Courses GENH 120 Career Exploration (Recommended) GENH 130 Skills for Success (Recommended) GENH 160 Keyboarding (Required) HSCI 100 Introduction to MS Office Suite (Required) The estimated completion time for this program is 9-12 months of full-time study. For best results it is strongly recommended that students take courses in the order listed below. GENH 100 Medical Law and Ethics ENGL 101 Business English GENH 110 Introduction to Health Care GENH 140 Medical Terminology 95


GENH 142 Medical Procedures GENH 144 Anatomy & Physiology GENH 146 Human Diseases MEDR 150 Medical Records HSCI 110 Introduction to Electronic Medical Records MEDT 170 Beginning Medical Transcription MEDT 172 Advanced Medical Transcription HSCI 299 Student Change Project Total Credits Required: 34-46

96


DIPLOMA IN MEDICAL CODING AND BILLING

responsibilities required for the practice of medical coding and billing.

Admission Requirements

Program Description

Students must first fulfill the University’s Undergraduate Admissions Requirements and complete the University’s Admission Process listed in the Admissions and Enrollment section of this catalog.

The Medical Coding and Billing diploma program is designed to provide the student with the basic and foundational knowledge needed to begin a career in health science. In this field the student will be prepared with basic competencies in medical coding, billing and reimbursement systems. Students will learn skills such as accurately tracking when, where and how patients are treated and submit billing to insurance companies (and others) for reimbursement. Graduates of the program should be able to work in medical facilities such as hospitals and health care facilities, clinics and medical offices.

Students must successfully complete the programs prerequisites with a C or better to qualify for entry into this program. Students who have had experience in the prerequisites via work experience, previous coursework or other means may opt to test out of the prerequisites or may provide evidence of successful completion of a similar course with a C or better in high school, college or technical program. Additionally, students who have not successfully completed college courses in the past are strongly encouraged to take the recommended “pre-program” courses to prepare themselves for the rigor of college work.

Program Objectives Graduates of the Diploma in Medical Coding and Billing will demonstrate the following competencies: •

• • • •

Create, update and evaluate coding systems and basic billing procedures and use health information technology to support the unique needs of each patient. Describe the importance of and protect the patient’s confidential medical and health information. Professionally and ethically code medical records and submit patient billing. Define medical terminology and abbreviations. Communicate and collaborate with patients, coworkers, insurance companies and other health care related entities. Identify, define and demonstrate the knowledge, skills, abilities and

Program Structure Successful completion of the program is granted upon completion of the following credits/courses listed below: Prerequisite/Recommended Courses GENH 120 Career Exploration (Recommended) GENH 130 Skills for Success (Recommended) GENH 160 Keyboarding (Required) HSCI 100 Introduction to MS Office Suite (Required) The estimated completion time for this program is 12-15 months of full-time study. For best results, it is strongly recommended that students take courses in the order listed below. GENH 100 Medical Law and Ethics 97


ENGL 101 Business English GENH 110 Introduction to Health Care GENH 140 Medical Terminology GENH 142 Medical Procedures GENH 144 Anatomy & Physiology GENH 146 Human Diseases MEDR 150 Medical Records HSCI 110 Introduction to Electronic Medical Records MEDB 170 Medical Billing I MEDB 172 Medical Billing II MEDC 180 Medical Coding I MEDC 182 Medical Coding II HSCI 289 Medical Billing & Coding Externship HSCI 299 Student Change Project Total Credits Required: 40-52

98


ASSOCIATE OF SCIENCE IN MEDICAL PRACTICE MANAGEMENT

Program Description

Admission Requirements

This program prepares the student at the associate degree level in Medical Practice Management. Medical practice managers have strong organization and leadership skills and work to manage all aspects of a medical office, medical clinic or other smaller health care facility. Their knowledge includes a strong understanding of medical records, billing, scheduling, human resources, law and ethics, business procedures and accounting. The Medical Practice Managers Program is designed to prepare the graduate to be skilled in management techniques and other skills needed in order to effectively manage the medical office work environment and to work effectively with people using advanced communication and collaboration skills.

Students must first fulfill the University’s Undergraduate Admissions Requirements and complete the University’s Admission Process listed in the Admissions and Enrollment section of this catalog. Students must successfully complete the programs prerequisites with a C or better to qualify for entry into this program. Students who have had experience in the prerequisites via work experience, previous coursework or other means may opt to test out of the prerequisites or may provide evidence of successful completion of a similar course with a C or better in high school, college or technical program.

Program Objectives

Additionally, students who have not successfully completed college courses in the past are strongly encouraged to take the recommended “pre-program” courses to prepare themselves for the rigor of college work.

Graduates of the Associate of Science in Medical Practice Management will demonstrate the following competencies: •

• •

Communicate and collaborate with patients, coworkers, insurance companies and other healthcare related entities. Identify, define and demonstrate the knowledge, skills, abilities and responsibilities required for the practice of medical practice management.

Effectively manage and provide leadership in smaller-to-moderately sized healthcare facilities and/or medical offices and clinics to support the unique needs of each patient. Describe the importance of patient confidentiality and be skilled in protecting a patient’s confidential medical and health information. Demonstrate professional behavior that is ethical and compassionate. Utilize medical terminology and abbreviations in the health care delivery system.

Program Structure Successful completion of the program is granted upon completion of the following credits/courses listed below: Prerequisite/Recommended Courses GENH 120 Career Exploration (Recommended) GENH 130 Skills for Success (Recommended) GENH 160 Keyboarding (Required) HSCI 100 Introduction to MS Office Suite (Required)

99


The estimated completion time for this program is 18-24 months of full-time study. For best results it is strongly recommended that students take courses in the order listed below. GENH 100 Medical Law and Ethics ENGL 101 Business English GENH 115 Introduction to Health Science GENH 140 Medical Terminology GENH 142 Medical Procedures GENH 144 Anatomy & Physiology GENH 146 Human Diseases MATH 125 Finite Mathematics ACCT 114 Accounting I MEDR 150 Medical Records HSCI 110 Introduction to Electronic Medical Records MEDB 170 Medical Billing I MEDC 180 Medical Coding I HSCI 115 Leadership in Healthcare BUSA 101 Introduction to Business COMM 201 Interpersonal Communication BUSA 208 Principles of Management BUSA 212 Human Resource Basics HSCI 279 Medical Practice Management Capstone Externship HSCI 299 Student Change Project One General Elective Course at the 100-200 Level Total Credits Required: 61-73

100


ASSOCIATE OF SCIENCE IN HEALTH INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY

responsibilities required for the practice of medical practice management.

Admission Requirements Students must first fulfill the University’s Undergraduate Admissions Requirements and complete the University’s Admission Process listed in the Admissions and Enrollment section of this catalog.

Program Description This program prepares the student at the associate degree level in Health Information Technology. The health information technologist uses specific systems in order to manage, collect, analyze, monitor and report specific data in accordance with established standards and best-practices. The health information technologist functions to process medical information and works in a variety of medical and health settings as a health data analyst, insurance claims analyst, records technician and patient information coordinator.

Students must successfully complete the programs prerequisites with a C or better to qualify for entry into this program. Students who have had experience in the prerequisites via work experience, previous coursework or other means may opt to test out of the prerequisites or may provide evidence of successful completion of a similar course with a C or better in high school, college or technical program. Additionally, students who have not successfully completed college courses in the past are strongly encouraged to take the recommended “pre-program” courses to prepare themselves for the rigor of college work.

Program Objectives Graduates of the Associate of Science in Health Information Technology will demonstrate the following competencies: • •

• • •

Program Structure

Effectively organize and manage health information in order to support the unique needs of each patient. Describe the importance of patient confidentiality and be skilled in protecting a patient’s confidential medical and health information. Demonstrate professional behavior that is ethical and compassionate. Utilize medical terminology and abbreviations in the healthcare delivery system. Communicate and collaborate with patients, coworkers, insurance companies and other healthcare related entities. Identify, define and demonstrate the knowledge, skills, abilities and

Successful completion of the program is granted upon completion of the following credits/courses listed below: Prerequisite/Recommended Courses GENH 120 Career Exploration (Recommended) GENH 130 Skills for Success (Recommended) GENH 160 Keyboarding (Required) HSCI 100 Introduction to MS Office Suite (Required) The recommended completion time for is program is 18-24 months of full-time study. For best results it is strongly recommended that students take courses in the order listed below. GENH 100 Medical Law and Ethics 101


ENGL 101 Business English GENH 115 Introduction to Health Science GENH 140 Medical Terminology GENH 144 Anatomy & Physiology GENH 146 Human Diseases MEDR 150 Medical Records MEDB 170 Medical Billing I MEDC 180 Medical Coding I HSCI 115 Leadership MATH 125 Finite Mathematics COMM 201 Interpersonal Communication HSCI 300 Health Care Statistics BUSA 212 Human Resources Basics HINT 201 Information Technologies I HINT 202 Health Information Technologies II HINT 203 Health Information Technologies III HINT 204 Health Information Technologies IV: Capstone Internship HSCI 299 Student Change Project Two General Elective Courses at the 100-200 Level Total Credits Required: 64-76

102


BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN HEALTHCARE ADMINISTRATION

Program Description

The Healthcare Administration program prepares the student with the knowledge, abilities and skills necessary to qualify for a career in healthcare administration. Focusing on the needs of entry- to mid-level organizations, this bachelors program emphasizes both the conceptual and analytical skills required to manage and lead in contemporary and features investigative opportunities in project management, teamwork and leadership (among other areas). Graduates may be prepared for administrative positions in hospitals and health care organizations, clinics and medical offices, outpatient facilities, mental health organizations, insurance companies and other types of health related organizations.

Admission Requirements Students must first fulfill the University’s Undergraduate Admissions Requirements and complete the University’s Admission Process listed in the Admissions and Enrollment section of this catalog. Students must have computer proficiency in word processing, spreadsheets, and presentation software along with a mastery of data bases. Students who do not have strong skills in in these areas are strongly encouraged to complete GENH 160-Keyboarding and HSCI 100-Introduction to MS Office Suite. In addition, students who may lack foundational strategies for program success are strongly encouraged to complete GENH 130-Skills for Success and GENH 120-Career Exploration prior to enrolling in the program.

Program Objectives Graduates of the Bachelor of Science in Healthcare Administration will demonstrate the following competencies: •

to analyze healthcare or health administrative issues. Identify and explain common "best practice" solutions to strategic, tactical and operational issues in managing healthcare through the use of leadership, information and organizational knowledge Communicate and collaborate with patients, coworkers, insurance companies and other healthcare related entities. Identify, define and demonstrate the knowledge, skills, abilities and responsibilities required to effectively lead teams across a variety of healthcare settings.

Demonstrate an understanding of the legal, regulatory and ethical considerations of the U.S. healthcare delivery system and how these considerations impact collection, storage and use of information in order to support the unique needs of each patient. Describe the importance of patient confidentiality and be skilled in protecting a patient’s confidential medical and health information. Employ analytical and critical thinking skills while applying ethical principles relevant to healthcare systems in order

Program Structure Successful completion of the program is granted upon completion of the following credits/courses listed below: The recommended completion plan for this program is 36-48 months of full-time study. For best results it is strongly recommended that 103


Total Credits Required: 120

students take courses in the order listed below. ENGL 201 English Composition I ENGL 203 English Composition II GENH 100 Medical Law and Ethics GENH 115 Introduction to Health Science GENH 140 Medical Terminology GENH 144 Anatomy & Physiology GENH 146 Human Diseases MEDR 150 Medical Records MEDB 170 Medical Billing I MEDC 180 Medical Coding I COMM 110 Communication and Speech PHIL 103 Logic and Critical Thinking PSYC 200 Introduction to Psychology HSCI 115 Leadership PSYC 303 Lifespan Development CSCI 110 Introduction to Computer Science MATH 125 Finite Mathematics BUSA 301 Human Resource Management ACCT 114 Accounting I HSCI 300 Health Care Statistics PSYC 301 Social Psychology OR PSYC 401 Cultural Psychology HSCI 310 Public and Global Health I HSCI 320 Information Management in Healthcare HSCI 330 Healthcare Reimbursement Systems I HSCI 332 Healthcare Reimbursement Systems II HSCI 340 Cultural Perspectives in Healthcare HSCI 350 Organizational Theory and Behavior HSCI 410 Principles of Epidemiology HSCI 420 Healthcare Research HSCI 422 Evidence-Based Practice HSCI 430 Healthcare Policy and Politics HSCI 440 Quality and Safety in Healthcare HSCI 450 Strategic Planning HSCI 460 Healthcare Assessment, Evaluation & Outcomes HSCI 486 Healthcare Administration Practicum I HSCI 487 Healthcare Administration Practicum II HSCI 488 Healthcare Administration Practicum III HSCI 489 Capstone: Healthcare Administration Practicum IV HSCI 499 Student Change Project 104


BACHELOR OF SCIENCE: ASSOCIATE’S TO HEALTHCARE ADMINISTRATION

Program Description

This bridge program prepares the student who already has obtained an associate degree or higher in a healthcare field such as nursing, healthcare management, respiratory therapy, etc. The Healthcare Administration program prepares the student with the knowledge, abilities and skills necessary to qualify for a career in healthcare administration, including entry-to mid-level positions in the everexpanding healthcare sector. The program emphasizes both the conceptual and analytical skills required to manage and lead in contemporary healthcare organizations while providing investigative opportunities in project management, teamwork and leadership (among other areas). Graduates may be prepared for administrative positions in hospitals and healthcare organizations, clinics and medical offices, outpatient facilities, mental health organizations, insurance companies, and/or public and governmental health departments and other types of health organizations.

Admission Requirements Students must first fulfill the University’s Undergraduate Admissions Requirements and complete the University’s Admission Process listed in the Admissions and Enrollment section of this catalog.

Program Objectives

Prerequisite: Students must have completed and received an associate’s degree or higher degree in a health science field prior to enrolling in this associate degree to baccalaureate program. Students with an associate degree or higher will receive 60 credits toward the 120 required for the degree.

Graduates of the Bachelor of Science: Associate’s to Healthcare Administration will demonstrate the following competencies: •

Describe the importance of patient confidentiality and be skilled in protecting a patient’s confidential medical and health information. Employ analytical and critical thinking skills and apply ethical principles relevant to healthcare systems and analyze healthcare (or health administrative) issues based upon these principles. Identify and explain common "best practice" solutions to strategic, tactical and operational issues in managing healthcare through the use of leadership, information and organizational knowledge Communicate and collaborate with patients, coworkers, insurance companies and other healthcare related entities. Identify, define and demonstrate the knowledge, skills, abilities and responsibilities to effectively lead teams across a variety of healthcare settings as required for the practice of healthcare administration.

Demonstrate an understanding of the legal, regulatory and ethical considerations of the U.S. healthcare delivery system and how these considerations impact collection, storage and use of information in order to support the unique needs of each patient.

Students must have computer proficiency in word processing, spreadsheets, and presentation software in addition to mastery of data bases. Potential students should review the four “preprogram” courses for associate 105


degree healthcare programs and complete any prior to enrolling that they do not have a solid background in.

Program Structure Successful completion of the program is granted upon completion of the following credits/courses listed below: The recommended completion time for this program is 18-24 months of full-time study. For best results it is strongly recommended that students take courses in the order listed below. HSCI 111 HCA Bridge HSCI 115 Leadership ACCT 114 Accounting I HSCI 300 Healthcare Statistics HSCI 310 Public and Global Health I HSCI 320 Information Management in Healthcare HSCI 330 Healthcare Reimbursement Systems I HSCI 332 Healthcare Reimbursement Systems II HSCI 340 Cultural Perspectives in Healthcare HSCI 350 Organizational Theory and Behavior HSCI 410 Principles of Epidemiology HSCI 420 Healthcare Research HSCI 422 Evidence-Based Practice HSCI 430 Healthcare Policy and Politics HSCI 440 Quality and Safety in Healthcare HSCI 450 Strategic Planning HSCI 460 Healthcare Assessment, Evaluation & Outcomes HSCI 486 Healthcare Administration Practicum I HSCI 487 Healthcare Administration Practicum II HSCI 488 Healthcare Administration Practicum III HSCI 489 Capstone: Healthcare Administration Practicum IV HSCI 499 Student Change Project Total Credits Required: 60

106


BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT IN HEALTHCARE

Program Description

This program provides the student with basic knowledge that focuses on topics such as emergency planning and decision-making, homeland security, disaster response and recovery, and hazard identification and alleviation. With disasters such as accidents, hazardous material spills, fires, floods, tornados and hurricanes, terrorism, and earthquakes occurring at potentially anytime, the student will learn the skills to handle emergent situations when disaster strikes. The curriculum focuses on planning and prevention strategies, emergency response, communication and resource management, planning and recovery, disaster assistance and public education. The graduate of this program will have opportunities at the local, state and federal levels in any number of employment venues such as emergency management specialist, disaster response specialist, preparation and recovery specialist, etc.

Admission Requirements Students must first fulfill the University’s Undergraduate Admissions Requirements and complete the University’s Admission Process listed in the Admissions and Enrollment section of this catalog. Students must have computer proficiency in word processing, spreadsheets, and presentation software along with a mastery of data bases. Potential students should review the four “preprogram” courses for associate degree healthcare programs and complete any that they do not have a solid background in prior to enrolling.

Program Objectives

Program Structure

Graduates of the Bachelor of Science in Emergency Management in Healthcare will demonstrate the following competencies: •

Identify and explain common "best practice" solutions to strategic, tactical and operational issues in managing crisis situations through the use of leadership, information and organizational knowledge. Design and administer public and private emergency and disaster training and recovery programs. Communicate and collaborate with patients, coworkers, communities, states, governments and other health care response workers. Identify, define and demonstrate the knowledge, skills, abilities and responsibilities to evaluate and analyze simple to complex disasters.

Successful completion of the program is granted upon completion of the following credits/courses listed below:

Coordinate emergency and disaster responses and/or crisis management activities in order to support the unique needs of each patient, community or entity. Employ analytical and critical thinking skills while applying ethical principles in the delivery of emergency and disaster responses and planning activities.

The recommended completion time for this program is 36-48 months of full-time study. For best results it is strongly recommended that students take courses in the order listed below. ENGL 201 English Composition I 107


II EMHC 404 Emergency Management Practicum III EMHC 405 Emergency Management Practicum IV: Capstone HSCI 499 Student Change Project Two General Elective Courses

ENGL 203 English Composition II GENH 100 Medical Law and Ethics GENH 115 Introduction to Health Science GENH 140 Medical Terminology GENH 144 Anatomy & Physiology GENH 146 Human Diseases CSCI 110 Introduction to Computer Science PHIL 103 Logic and Critical Thinking PSYC 200 Introduction to Psychology MATH 125 Finite Mathematics HSCI 115 Leadership COMM 110 Communication and Speech ACCT 114 Accounting I HSCI 300 Healthcare Statistics PSYC 303 Lifespan Development PSYC 301 Social Psychology OR PSYC 401 Cultural Psychology BUSA 301 Human Resource Management HSCI 310 Public and Global Health I HSCI 320 Information Management in Health Care HSCI 340 Cultural Perspectives in Healthcare HSCI 350 Organizational Theory and Behavior HSCI 410 Principles of Epidemiology HSCI 440 Quality and Safety in Healthcare HSCI 450 Strategic Planning EMHC 201 Emergency Management I: Foundations of Crisis Management EMHC 202 Planning I: At-risk and Vulnerable Population Assessment EMHC 203 Emergency Management II: Managing Crisis Situations EMHC 204 Medical Law and Ethics II: Emergency and Crisis EMHC 300 Emergency Management III: Relief Options and Recovery Efforts EMHC 301 Planning II: Community, State and Federal EMHC 302 Emergency Management IV: Leadership, Communication and Teamwork EMHC 400 Emergency Management V: Decision Making and Conflict Management EMHC 401 Emergency Management VI: Capstone Management in Emergencies and Crisis EMHC 402 Emergency Management Practicum I EMHC 403 Emergency Management Practicum

Total Credits Required: 120

108


BACHELOR OF SCIENCE: ASSOCIATE’S TO EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT IN HEALTHCARE

Program Description •

This “bridge” program prepares the student who already has obtained an associate or higher degree in a healthcare field such as nursing, healthcare management, respiratory therapy, etc. This program provides the student with basic knowledge that focuses on topics such as emergency planning and decision-making, homeland security, disaster response and recovery, and hazard identification and alleviation. With disasters such as accidents, hazardous material spills, fires, floods, tornados and hurricanes, terrorism, and earthquakes occurring in an unpredictable manner, the student will learn skills to handle emergent situations when disaster strikes. The curriculum focuses on planning and prevention strategies, emergency response, communication and resource management, planning and recovery, disaster assistance and public education. The graduate of this program will have opportunities at the local, state and federal levels in any number of job titles such as emergency management specialist, disaster response specialist, preparation and recovery specialist, etc.

Admission Requirements Students must first fulfill the University’s Undergraduate Admissions Requirements and complete the University’s Admission Process listed in the Admissions and Enrollment section of this catalog. Prerequisite: Students must have completed and received an associate’s degree or higher degree in a health science field prior to enrolling in this associate degree to baccalaureate program. Students with an associate degree or higher will receive 60 credits toward the 120 required for the degree.

Program Objectives

Students must have computer proficiency in word processing, spreadsheets, and presentation software along with mastery of data bases. Potential students should review the four “preprogram” courses for associate degree healthcare programs and complete any

Graduates of the Bachelor of Science: Associate’s to Emergency Management in Healthcare will demonstrate the following competencies: •

activities in order to support the unique needs of each patient, community or entity. Employ analytical and critical thinking skills and apply ethical principles in the delivery of emergency and disaster responses and planning activities. Identify and explain common "best practice" solutions to strategic, tactical and operational issues in managing crisis situations through the use of leadership, information and organizational knowledge. Design and administer public emergency and disaster training and recovery programs. Communicate and collaborate with patients, coworkers, communities, states, governments and other health care response workers. Identify, define and demonstrate the knowledge, skills, abilities and responsibilities to evaluate and analyze simple-to-complex disasters.

Coordinate emergency and disaster responses and/or crisis management 109


IV: Capstone HSCI 499 Student Change Project

that they do not have a solid background in prior to enrolling.

Program Structure

Total Credits Required: 60

Successful completion of the program is granted upon completion of the following credits/courses listed below: The recommended completion time for this program is 18-24 months of full-time study. For best results it is strongly recommended that students take courses in the order listed below. EMHC 200 Emergency Management Bridge HSCI 300 Healthcare Statistics HSCI 310 Public and Global Health I HSCI 340 Cultural Perspectives in Healthcare HSCI 410 Principles of Epidemiology HSCI 440 Quality and Safety in Healthcare HSCI 450 Strategic Planning EMHC 201 Emergency Management I: Foundations of Crisis Management EMHC 202 Planning I: At-risk and Vulnerable Population Assessment EMHC 203 Emergency Management II: Managing Crisis Situations EMHC 204 Medical Law and Ethics II: Emergency and Crisis EMHC 300 Emergency Management III: Relief Options and Recovery Efforts EMHC 301 Planning II: Community, State and Federal EMHC 302 Emergency Management IV: Leadership, Communication and Teamwork EMHC 400 Emergency Management V: Decision Making and Conflict Management EMHC 401 Emergency Management VI: Capstone Management in Emergencies and Crisis EMHC 402 Emergency Management Practicum I EMHC 403 Emergency Management Practicum II EMHC 404 Emergency Management Practicum III EMHC 405 Emergency Management Practicum 110


BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN NURSING •

Program Description This “bridge” program prepares the student who has already obtained an associate degree or diploma in nursing and who also possesses a non-encumbered license as a registered nurse. The RN to Bachelor’s Program will focus on the application of clinical reasoning, leadership, communication and collaboration, research and evidence-based practice among other relevant topics in the provision of safe, effective and contemporary care. The program provides an opportunity for upward mobility as a bachelor’s-prepared registered nurse.

Admission Requirements Students must first fulfill the University’s Undergraduate Admissions Requirements and complete the University’s Admission Process listed in the Admissions and Enrollment section of this catalog.

Program Objectives

Prerequisite: Students must have completed and received an associate’s degree or diploma in nursing and have a current unencumbered registered nursing license prior to enrolling in this associate degree to baccalaureate program. This license must remain current in good standing throughout the program. Furthermore, students are required to report any actions against their license, outcomes of those actions, and sanctions if any. Students with an associate degree or higher will receive 60 credits toward the 120 required for the degree.

Graduates of the Bachelor of Science in Nursing will demonstrate the following competencies: •

technologies) as integral components in order to effectively communicate and collaborate with patients, coworkers, communities and others. Apply knowledge of healthcare policy, finance and regulatory environments to function as a leader in health care systems, in professional organizations, and within interdisciplinary teams for the promotion of health, prevention of disease, and management of care delivery.

Demonstrate the clinical competencies needed in the delivery of high quality, safe and comprehensive patient and population-centered care in order to support the unique needs of each patient, family or community. Employ analytical and critical reasoning skills while applying ethical principles in nursing practice in order to provide culturally sensitive healthcare for individuals, families and communities. Use evidence-based best-practice knowledge from nursing and related disciplines to shape and promote contemporary nursing practice and advance social justice. Implement strategies to facilitate health and wellness promotion, disease prevention and health restoration of individuals, families and populations across the lifespan. Use current and emerging information handling technologies (and other

Students must have computer proficiency in word processing, spreadsheets, and presentation software along with mastery of data bases. Potential students should review the four “preprogram” courses for associate degree healthcare programs and complete any that they do not have a solid background in prior to enrolling.

Program Structure Successful completion of the program is granted upon completion of the following credits/courses listed below: 111


The recommended completion time for this program is 18-24 months of full-time study. For best results it is strongly recommended that students take courses in the order listed below. HSCI 300 Healthcare Statistics HSCI 320 Information Management in Healthcare HSCI 340 Cultural Perspectives in Healthcare HSCI 410 Principles of Epidemiology HSCI 420 Healthcare Research HSCI 422 Evidence-Based Practice HSCI 440 Quality and Safety in Healthcare HSCI 450 Strategic Planning EMHC 201 Emergency Management I: Foundations of Crisis Management NURS 300 Bachelors Role in Nursing NURS 310 Health Promotion Disease Prevention NURS 320 Community Healthcare NURS 321 Community Healthcare Practicum NURS 330 Advanced Health Assessment NURS 340 Policy, Finance and Regulatory Influences NURS 350 Communication and Collaboration in the Healthcare Setting NURS 400 Advanced Leadership Strategies NURS 489 Capstone Scholarship Project HSCI 499 Student Change Project HSCI 350 Organizational Theory and Behavior Total Credits Required: 60

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COLLEGE OF HEALTH SCIENCES COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

Students will evaluate how vulnerability affects health damage, how manageability affects health disasters and how risk factors impact susceptible populations in planning. Students will be introduced to the four common risk assessment matrices of the emergency management cycle and explain the sequential steps in risk assessment and risk management. Risk analysis, risk perception, risk communication and collaboration and risk mitigation will be reviewed along with triage, logistics, medical management, and management of resources.

EMHC 200: Emergency Management Bridge (4 Credits) The Emergency Management Bridge course is designed to briefly provide a brief survey of the following concepts: human diseases; psychology; social psychology; cultural psychology; human growth and development; critical thinking and clinical reasoning; laws and ethics in healthcare; human resource management; and medical billing and coding. In addition the course will emphasize the following areas: human resource management; health care leadership; information management; accounting, and organizational theory and behavior. Students who lack depth of knowledge in any area may want to take the course most closely associated with the topic area to gain a foundational base.

EMHC 203: Emergency Management II: Managing Crisis Situations (3 Credits) Prerequisite: EMHC 201 Corequisite: EMHC 402 This course focuses on the cycle of crisis planning, training and compliance, crisis management teams, contingency planning and hands-on management of crisis situations. The basics of identifying, preventing, minimizing, and controlling crisis situations are covered. Students look at what traditional responders (law enforcement, firefighters, and emergency medical teams) do and how they work together within a broader matrix of public sector responders (volunteers, public health, etc.). General and medical disaster planning including a review of sequential steps of the planning process and application are addressed and the importance of testing contingency plans is stressed. The course concludes with lessons learned from a worldwide perspective and guidance regarding damage control, restoration and assessment and evaluation.

EMHC 201: Emergency Management I: Foundations of Crisis Management (3 Credits) This course is an introduction to emergency and crisis management. It provides a foundation in basic management skills in crisis and disaster management and presents emergency management as an integrated system. It introduces the student to topics such as prevention, planning, terrorism, bioterrorism, homeland security and emergency preparedness and response while exploring the resources and capabilities network that address emergent conditions. This course offers training in the fundamentals of the emergency planning process including the rationales behind planning training and readiness and developing capability for effective participation in the hazard and emergency operations planning process in order to save lives and protect property threatened by disaster.

EMHC 204: Medical Law and Ethics II: Emergency and Crisis (3 Credits) Prerequisite: EMHC 201 This course examines the legal aspects and complex ethical issues that can arise in emergency and crisis situations. Students will study philosophical concepts as they relate to modern ethics and look at overlapping concepts as they relate to ethics and law. Key concepts in the course include: codes of professional conduct; crisis standards of care; ethical considerations; allocation of resources; triage; duty to care; willingness to response; role and role abandonment; law of public surveillance; law of public health practice; investigations and

EMHC 202: Planning I: At-risk and Vulnerable Population Assessment (3 Credits) The focus of this course is to examine and analyze risk-reduction strategies in order to manage disaster-related threats and minimize negative impact for vulnerable and at-risk populations.

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Corequisite: EMHC 404

emergencies; privacy and confidentiality and infectious disease.

The focus of this course is to examine best practices for communication, collaboration and effective work in teams in order to provide leadership and management in emergency and disaster situations. Various leadership theories will be examined. Students will study the concepts, both positive and negative in command-control-coordination and incident command systems (ICS) and discuss how ICS may be modified to promote flexible adaptation of response to the scale and type of incident. Students examine the role of information management in crisis and disaster and list the specific types of information required at the various phases of disaster management.

EMHC 300: Emergency Management III: Relief Options and Recovery Efforts (3 Credits) Prerequisite: EMHC 203; EMHC 402 Corequisite: EMHC 403 This course focuses on logistics and the management of immediate humanitarian relief (food, shelter, medicine and medical care, transportation, critical public services, economic activities and keeping order) efforts needed in the event of a major disaster. Students will examine and complete an exercise in resource needs assessment and examine the responsibilities that each tier has for coordinated resource management. The course also examines in detail, the process of recovery in the ensuing weeks, months and years after an affected region endures recovery. The dynamics of physical damage, social and economic disruption and population demoralization are studied. Students will learn about Federal authorities that govern Federal relief in the United States as well as globally and examine provisions for international aid in global disaster settings.

EMHC 400: Emergency Management V: Leadership, Decision Making and Conflict Management (3 Credits) Prerequisite: EMHC 302; EMHC 404 Corequisite: EMHC 405 This course introduces the student to the concepts and principles of transformational leadership within the context of Emergency and Disaster management. Three major constructs of transformational leadership (self-transformation, patient centered transformation, health systems transformation) will be explored along with other selected leadership theories. Students will examine the dynamics of critical decision making, and the concepts of: creativity and brainstorming; asking the right questions; managing multiple and conflicting issues; win-win; power; listening and negotiation among other selected topics.

EMHC 301: Planning II: Community, State and Federal (3 Credits) Prerequisite: EMHC 202; EMHC 403 As a continuation of EMHC 261; this course will provide an in-depth look at planning at the community, state, federal and global levels including review of a typical sequence of events following a Disaster Declaration, outlining and comparing State and local roles and responsibilities. Students will explore typical sequences of events following a Disaster Declaration, outlining State and local roles and responsibilities, the dynamics of managing major incidents at the National Incident Management System, and the procedures for requesting Federal Disaster Assistance. The role of international relief organizations and effective media relations including accurate reporting requirements will be discussed.

EMHC 401: Emergency Management VI: Capstone (3 Credits) Prerequisite: EMHC 400; EMHC 405 In this capstone course, students will pull disaster and crisis management concepts together as they review previous course material such as the role of health authority and examine new material in depth. A focus will be the management of fatalities including describing the disaster victim identification (DVI) system and role; environmental health concerns including vector and pest control, sanitation, water supply and shelter; prevention of epidemics and epidemic control; volunteer

EMHC 302: Emergency Management IV: Leadership, Communication and Teamwork (3 Credits) Prerequisite: EMHC 300: EMHC 301; EMHC 403 114


management; and hazardous materials. Students will apply prior learning to community planning and to becoming leaders and teachers of the community.

This course is intended to provide the student with 90 hours of real world experience in emergency management. Students are required to obtain a preceptor or preceptor(s) (no more than two) prior to enrolling into the externship, who will guide your experience and assure that you have met the course objectives. Documentation of your experience will be mandatory and presented in a portfolio and a time log will be required. Students will learn all they can related-to emergency management concepts but will specifically focus on the additional topics learned in EMHC 301 (planning) and new concepts introduced in EMHC 302 (leadership, communication, teamwork). Grading in this course will be competent/ unachieved (pass/fail).

EMHC 402: Emergency Management Practicum I (2 Credits) Prerequisite: EMHC 201 Corequisite: EMHC 203; Preceptor(s) This course is intended to provide the student with 90 hours of real world experience in emergency management. Students are required to obtain a preceptor or preceptor(s) (no more than two) prior to enrolling into the externship, who will guide your experience and assure that you have met the course objectives. Documentation of your experience will be mandatory and presented in a portfolio and a time log will be required. Students will learn all they can related-to emergency management concepts but will specifically focus on the foundational topics learned in EMHC 201, at risk and vulnerable populations studied in EMHC 202 and add additional concepts from EMHC 203 to their learning process in this course. Grading in this course will be competent/ unachieved (pass/fail).

EMHC 405: Emergency Management Practicum IV: Capstone (2 Credits) Prerequisite: EMHC 302; EMHC 404 Corequisite: EMHC 400; Preceptor(s) Recommended Corequisite: HCSI 499 This course is intended to provide the student with 90 hours of real world experience in emergency management. Students are required to obtain a preceptor or preceptor(s) (no more than two) prior to enrolling into the externship, who guide your culminating experience and assure that you will have met the course objectives. Documentation of your experience will be mandatory and presented in a portfolio and a time log will be required. In addition, in this last of the series course students will put all of their prior learning together and complete a culminating project which will be detailed in a final paper or video presentation. Students will be provided with freedom to choose and design projects that meet the course objectives; however final projects must be approved by the course instructor or program administrator. It is recommended that the student combine the 135 hours required in HCSI 499 (Student Change Project) in some form to allow for step 1/step 2 projects for substantial significance, but students who prefer to do so, can complete HCSI 499 independently of EMHC 405. Grading in this course will be competent/ unachieved (pass/fail).

EMHC 403: Emergency Management Practicum II (2 Credits) Prerequisite: EMHC 203; EMHC 204 Corequisite: EMHC 300; Preceptor(s) This course is intended to provide the student with 90 hours of real world experience in emergency management. Students are required to obtain a preceptor or preceptor(s) (no more than two) prior to enrolling into the externship, who will guide your experience and assure that you have met the course objectives. Documentation of your experience will be mandatory and presented in a portfolio and a time log will be required. Students will learn all they can related-to emergency management concepts but will specifically focus on the additional topics learned in EMHC 204 (law and ethics) and new concepts introduced in EMHC 300 (relief and recovery). Grading in this course will be competent/ unachieved (pass/fail).

EMHC 404: Emergency Management Practicum III (2 Credits) Prerequisite: EMHC 300; EMHC 401 Corequisite: EMHC 302; Preceptor(s)

GENH 100: Medical Laws and Ethics (3 Credits) Prerequisite: *HSCI 100; *GENH 160

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* Students may show prior evidence of similar instruction in content areas successfully completed or test out of HSCI 100 and/or GENH 160. Recommended: GENH 120; GENH 130

This course surveys the various roles in the healthcare system so learners understand the roles of members of the healthcare team. In addition, the course provides opportunities to investigate the many professional options available to them in healthcare.

The course provides the student with a basic understanding of legal and ethical considerations in healthcare and includes key components of medical ethics and law curriculum for healthcare. Students will be exposed to informed and uninformed consent, confidentiality of the patient, HIPAA laws, physician orders, malpractice, and what to do if a coworker disagrees with orders given by the physician. Students will be able to identify ways to incorporate ethics and law into their practice in the clinical care setting.

GENH 130: Skills for Success (3 Credits) This course is designed to strengthen the learners study skills and provide effective strategies to increase performance and success in college. Learners see how to utilize their learning styles to tailor their approach to learning, process information more efficiently, manage time effectively, set goals, increase concentration, increase motivation, reduce stress and procrastination, read college textbooks and material more effectively, take notes, prepare for tests, and perform well on different kinds of test.

GENH 110: Introduction to Healthcare (1 Credit) Prerequisite: *HSCI 100; *GENH 160 * Students may show prior evidence of similar instruction in content areas successfully completed or test out of HSCI 100 and/or GENH 160. Recommended: GENH 120; GENH 130

GENH 140: Essentials of Medical Terminology (3 Credits) Prerequisite: *HSCI 100; *GENH 160 * Students may show prior evidence of similar instruction in content areas successfully completed or test out of HSCI 100 and/or GENH 160. Recommended: GENH 120; GENH 130

This course provides an overview of the evolution of medicine, the role of allied health professionals and the different medical specialties. It will provide the student with a broad introduction to healthcare and healthcare delivery systems.

This course introduces learners to medical language and provides a logical understanding of the language of medicine and healthcare. Basic prefixes, suffixes, word roots, and rules are studied, along with word analysis, word building, spelling, and pronunciation. Each body system is reviewed with anatomy and physiology; diagnostic, lab, and surgical procedures; as well as pharmacology for interest and knowledge.

GENH 115: Introduction to Health Services (3 Credits) Prerequisite: *HSCI 100; *GENH 160 * Students may show prior evidence of similar instruction in content areas successfully completed or test out of HSCI 100 and/or GENH 160. Recommended: GENH 120; GENH 130

GENH 142: Medical Procedures (4 Credits) Prerequisite: *HSCI 100; *GENH 160 * Students may show prior evidence of similar instruction in content areas successfully completed or test out of HSCI 100 and/or GENH 160. Recommended: GENH 120; GENH 130

This course provides an overview of the healthcare system and its functions today. The course focuses on the different components of the industry and how the nation’s health care system is structured. In addition insurance and reimbursement mechanisms and regulatory and planning mechanisms are covered.

This course provides the student with an understanding of common medical and surgical procedures used in the care of patients. Students will gain knowledge and skills in performing basic medical assessments and basic medical tests, while

GENH 120: Career Exploration (3 Credits) 116


assisting with selected medical and surgical procedures. Rehabilitation and understanding various patient diagnoses and conditions will also be covered. This course contains a 45 hour lab (1 credit) with 45 hours of didactic material (3 credits).

keyboard, development of basic typing skills, and formatting basic computer compatible documents.

HINT 201: Health Information Technologies 1 (4 Credits) Prerequisite: *HSCI 100; *GENH 160; MEDR 150; MEDB 170; MEDC 180; MEDC 182; Signed agreement from supervisory mentor. * Students may show prior evidence of similar instruction in content areas successfully completed or test out of HSCI 100 and/or GENH 160. Recommended: GENH 120; GENH 130

GENH 144: Anatomy and Physiology (4 Credits) Prerequisite: *HSCI 100; *GENH 160 * Students may show prior evidence of similar instruction in content areas successfully completed or test out of HSCI 100 and/or GENH 160. Recommended: GENH 120; GENH 130 The introductory course provides students with a basic understanding of the structure, function and the physiological processes that occur in the human body. The focus is on understanding the interrelated nature of the body systems including selected concepts such as homeostasis. Students will study the skeletal, muscular, cardiovascular, respiratory, reproductive, sensory-neuro, endocrine, urinary and integumentary systems. This course contains a 45 hour lab (1 credit) with 45 hours of didactic material (3 credits).

This is an introductory level course that focuses on computerized health records systems emphasizing procedures for completion, maintenance, and preservation of health information. The relationship between health information management and the health care delivery system will be discussed and students will become familiar with the concepts of accreditation, certification, and licensing of health care facilities with emphasis on the accreditation survey process. The computerized patient record and computer applications to health data including abstracting, master patient index, and medical transcription are discussed. Students enrolled in this course will complete 45 hours of didactic (classroom) learning (3 credits) and 45 hours of introductory mentored experience (1 credit preceptorship) in the practice experience at the status of unpaid student learner in order to gain skills and practical knowledge. A tuberculosis (TB) clearance and other immunizations as required by the clinical facility will be the responsibility of the student. A drug screen and background check may also be required along with a signed Agency Agreement with a sponsoring site prior to the beginning of the first day of class.

GENH 146: Human Diseases (4 Credits) Prerequisite: *HSCI 100; *GENH 160 * Students may show prior evidence of similar instruction in content areas successfully completed or test out of HSCI 100 and/or GENH 160. Recommended: GENH 120; GENH 130 This course is an introductory study of pathophysiology organized by body systems. It includes foundational knowledge about the human body in health and disease and provides an overview of the important concepts of health promotion and disease prevention. Etiology, symptoms and treatments are covered for each common disease. This course includes information on new procedures, medicines, and therapies, as well as tips for health promotion and disease prevention. This course contains a 45 hour lab (1 credit) with 45 hours of didactic material (3 credits).

HINT 202: Health Information Technologies II (4 Credits) Prerequisite: HINT 200; Signed agreement from a supervisory mentor. This intermediate course builds upon HINT 200 material and explores numbering, filing, indexing, professionalism, study of statistical data including hospital census, electronic information processing and health information systems. Emphasis will be placed on regulatory issues, documentation practices, reimbursement, information

GENH 160: Keyboarding (3 Credits) This introductory course is designed to introduce students to keyboarding and basic formatting techniques. Emphasis is on mastery of the QWERTY

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management, quality improvement, utilization management, risk management, the role of the Health Information professional and currents trends in the field. The course touches upon Federal and state laws and regulations governing the handling of special health information (psychiatric, substance abuse and HIV/AIDS), the legal basis for the control, use and release of health information and the concept of consent for treatment and other procedures. This course provides practical experience in the use of software programs commonly used in health information, including master patient index, chart tracking, abstracting, encoders and groupers, release of information, birth registration, and incomplete record management systems. Emphasis will also be placed on the use of spreadsheet and database programs in the manipulation and use of health information. Students enrolled in this course will complete 45 hours of didactic (classroom) learning (3 credits) and 45 hours of mentored experience (I credit preceptorship) in the practice experience at the status of unpaid student learner. A tuberculosis (TB) clearance and other immunizations as required by the clinical facility will be the responsibility of the student. A drug screen and background check may also be required along with a signed Agency Agreement with a sponsoring site prior to the beginning of the first day of class.

drug screen and background check may also be required along with a signed Agency Agreement with a sponsoring site prior to the beginning of the first day of class.

HINT 204: Health Information Technology IV: Capstone Internship (2 Credits) Prerequisite: HINT 203; Signed agreement from a supervisory mentor. Following the completion of all HINT courses (except HSCI 299), students will have a chance to put their classroom knowledge to work during a 90 hour unpaid internship where the student works in real world situations guided by a preceptor. Students will arrange their own practical experience in a setting in a hospital, clinic, medical office or other similar agency and demonstrate and reinforce the knowledge and skills they have learned throughout the program. Students must successfully complete the externship training to fulfill the graduation requirements for this program. This course will be graded competent/unachieved (Pass/Fail).

HSCI 100: Introduction to MS Office Suite (3 Credits) This course provides the student with basic skills in the use of Microsoft Office Suite (Word, Excel, Access, and PowerPoint). Students must utilize a computer with MS Office Suite installed in order to complete this course. Basics such as file management, Internet, and the skills needed in order to use these programs in an educational setting will be covered.

HINT 203: Health Information Technologies III (4 Credits) Prerequisite: HINT 202; Signed agreement from a supervisory mentor. This final capstone course in the trilogy reinforces prior concepts and reviews advanced concepts such as best-practices in health information technology; pharmacological concepts; health care reimbursement, prospective payment systems and case mix analysis among other topics. Supervisory technical and professional relationships related to operating a health record department will be highlighted along with human resource issues, procedures, equipment and office systems. Students enrolled in this course will complete 45 hours of didactic (classroom) learning (3 credits) and 45 hours of mentored experience (1 credit preceptorship) in the practice experience at the status of unpaid student learner. A tuberculosis (TB) clearance and other immunizations as required by the clinical facility will be the responsibility of the student. A

HSCI 110: Introduction to the Electronic Medical Record (1 Credit) Prerequisite: *HSCI 100; *GENH 160 * Students may show prior evidence of similar instruction in content areas successfully completed or test out of HSCI 100 and/or GENH 160. Recommended: GENH 120; GENH 130 This course provides an introduction to the EMR, which can be defined as a database and software that a health care provider uses to maintain a patient’s health record. The history of the EMR, paper based medical records and the conversion to electronic medical records will be covered along with

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advantages and disadvantages, legal implications and selected subsystems will be covered.

Prerequisites: All courses listed in program except HSCI 299

HSCI 111: Healthcare Administration Bridge (1 Credit) Prerequisite: *HSCI 100; *GENH 160 * Students may show prior evidence of similar instruction in content areas successfully completed or test out of HSCI 100 and/or GENH 160. Recommended: GENH 120; GENH 130

Following the completion of all Medical Practice Management courses (except HSCI 299), students will have a chance to put their classroom knowledge to work during a 90 hour unpaid externship where the student works in real world situations guided by a preceptor. Students will arrange their own UNPAID practical experience (externship) in a setting in a hospital, clinic, medical office or other similar agency and demonstrate and reinforce the knowledge and skills they have learned throughout the program. Students must successfully complete the externship training to fulfill the graduation requirements for this program. This course will be graded competent/unachieved (Pass/Fail).

The Health Care Administration Bridge course is designed to briefly provide a survey of the following concepts: human diseases; psychology; social psychology; cultural psychology; human growth and development; critical thinking and clinical reasoning; laws and ethics in healthcare; human resource management; and medical billing and coding. Each area will include one-two lesson(s) in each topic. Students who lack depth of knowledge in any area may want to take the course most closely associated with the topic area to gain a foundational base.

HSCI 289: Medical Billing & Coding Externship (2 Credits) Prerequisites: MEDC 182 Following the completion of all online billing and coding courses, students will have a chance to put their classroom knowledge to work during a 90 hour unpaid externship where the student works in real world situations guided by a preceptor. Students will arrange their own UNPAID practical experience (externship) in a setting in a hospital, clinic, medical office or other similar agency and demonstrate and reinforce the knowledge and skills they have learned throughout the program. Students must successfully complete the externship training to fulfill the graduation requirements for this program.

HSCI 115: Leadership in Healthcare (3 Credits) Prerequisite: *HSCI 100; *GENH 160 * Students may show prior evidence of similar instruction in content areas successfully completed or test out of HSCI 100 and/or GENH 160. Recommended: GENH 120; GENH 130 This course provides an introduction and overview to leadership strategies and utilizes basic management techniques, key organizational behavior theories and concepts related to leadership and management in healthcare. In addition, an understanding of organizational dynamics, team development and cohesiveness, strategic intervention, implementation, decision-making and negotiation will be included along with written, verbal and interpersonal communications and their positive impact on effective leadership. Students will practice techniques in their own professional settings in order to development leadership, managerial, and organizational skills for quality improvement and patient safety.

HSCI 299: Student Change Project (1 Credit) Recommended: At least 75% of program courses completed prior to enrolling WEU believes that with the gift of a free education comes a responsibility to give back. In upholding this charge, this course is designed to provide the student with the opportunity to develop a social justice inspired project that allows the student to utilize his/her education and new skills in order to: 1) give back to one’s community; 2) enhance one’s skills and abilities; and 3) provide some sort of teaching and/or awareness. Although this course may be begun at any time, it is highly recommended that students wait until they are ¾ through their program. Students will spend 45 hours overall in this “lab” based course. Students must successfully

HSCI 279: Medical Practice Management Capstone Externship (3 Credits) 119


complete this project in order to fulfill the graduation requirements of his/her program. This course is graded competent/ unachieved (pass/fail).

This course prepares the student with a deeper understanding of the role of information systems and informatics in healthcare delivery systems, specifically the planning, analysis, design implementation and issues and best practices of technology systems. Included are systems development, project management, needs assessment and specification, feasibility and costbenefit analysis, federal and state regulations, bestpractice, logical and physical design, prototyping, system validation, deployment, human factors, and post-implementation evaluation. This course provides students with the basic understanding of information systems across a wide variety of health organizations.

HSCI 300: Health Care Statistics (3 Credits) Recommended: MATH 125 or equivalent This statistics course provides an overview of the appropriate use of statistical techniques most commonly reported in the research literature of the health professions understanding of and application of statistics as they relate to healthcare. Students will learn about the use and importance of statistics, understanding the basic statistics of published research, logic, handling and describing data, SPSS, trial design, protocols, analysis of numerical results, confidence intervals, comparison of means, hypothesis testing, analysis of variance, linear regression and correlation, binary outcomes, proportions and clinical strategies. This course will help students to be able to understand and manipulate basic mathematical and statistical techniques as preparation for more specialized courses in healthcare.

HSCI 330: Healthcare Reimbursement Systems I (3 Credits) Prerequisite: HSCI 320 This course provides an introduction and overview to the history, rationale, and methodology of the systems used in inpatient and outpatient settings in the health care industry in the United States. The focus will include the evolution of insurance, HMOs, and managed care. Students learn how healthcare providers are reimbursed for the services through an examination of: regulatory; private and public reimbursement; state rate setting; risk management; new models of reimbursement; the role of billing, coding, and accounts receivable; and managed competition. Reimbursement concepts include feefor-service, managed care, capitation systems, Diagnosis-Related Groups (DRGs), Resource Based Relative Value Scale (RBRVS), Ambulatory Payment Classifications (APCs), and related concepts.

HSCI 310: Public and Global Health 1 (3 Credits) Recommended: Junior standing or all first and second year courses completed (100 & 200 level courses). This introductory course is an overview of the most important health challenges facing the world today. Students examine key concepts and the most significant global health issues and will explore a range of themes including: vulnerability; communicable and non-communicable diseases; epidemiology; environmental health; health systems; distribution; child health; emergent situations and crisis; Millennium Development Goals (MDG’s); Healthy People 2020; reproductive health and rights; issues and controversies; and health among refugees and displaced populations. Interventions and global strategies and for disease prevention and health promotion will be at both the individual and population level will be emphasized.

HSCI 332: Healthcare Reimbursement Systems II (3 Credits) Prerequisite: HSCI 330 This course is a continuation of HSCI 330 and it provides for more advanced learning about healthcare reimbursement including financial management of healthcare organizations, addressing issues unique to health care organizations, and assessing the financial health of an organization in relationship to the organizations strategic plan. The course will also review the legal, regulatory, compliance, and ethical obligations that are critical to sound financial management along with fraud and abuse. Students will critically examine The Health

HSCI 320: Information Management in Healthcare (3 Credits) Prerequisite: HSCI 300

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Care Reform Act (2010) a.k.a. “OBAMACARE�. This course concludes with students examining healthcare reimbursement in foreign countries. Students will complete assignments comparing US Healthcare Reimbursement Systems with those from other selected countries.

genetic epidemiology; infectious disease epidemiology; research and investigation; morbidity and mortality; public health impact; screening; outbreak investigation; bioterrorism-related concepts and public health initiatives.

HSCI 420: Healthcare Research (3 Credits) Prerequisite: HSCI 410

HSCI 340: Cultural Perspectives in Healthcare (3 Credits) Prerequisite: HSCI 320

This course is an overview of research methodology and important concepts used in healthcare when conceptualizing, planning and conducting health disparities research. An emphasis will addresses the development of the students’ skills in evaluating and utilizing the research process to define clinical research problems, participate as appropriate in the research process, and use relevant research to determine current and best practice. The course will focus upon practical considerations and examples of survey research, sampling, measurement, and intervention development employed in clinical settings.

The focus of this course is to introduce the student to various healthcare beliefs related to various cultures and religions. Emphasis for this course includes: healthcare beliefs, values and traditions; differentiations between the concepts of culture, race, ethnicity, diversity and minority; cultural competence; and cultural profiles. Students will examine their own health beliefs and differentiate and distinguish between those of selected groups in the United States and then globally.

HSCI 350: Organizational Theories and Behavior (3 Credits) Prerequisite: HSCI 340

HSCI 422: Evidence-Based Practice (3 Credits) Prerequisite: HSCI 420 This course will help to prepare the healthcare provider to review, expand, and update their knowledge in order to translate current evidence into evidence-based practice and ultimately practice at the highest level of expertise. Methods by which new knowledge is generated and levels of evidence informing healthcare practice will be investigated. Content includes: barriers to the use of evidencebased practice; leadership in implementation of evidence-based practice; and methods, appraisal, and utilization of research findings toward the goal of implementing best practices.

This course examines models of behavioral sciences theories, models and concepts as applied to the study of management and organization. The focus is on the behavior and interaction of individuals, groups and organizations in the delivery of healthcare. Topics include: organizational theories; organizational behavior; employee behavior; employee motivation and management and leadership; teamwork; communication, collaboration and conflict; power, politics and organizational structure; the importance of human resources; organizational culture and change; and decision making.

HSCI 430: Healthcare Policy and Politics (3 Credits) Prerequisite: HSCI 410

HSCI 410: Principles of Epidemiology (3 Credits) Prerequisite: HSCI 340

This course provides an overview of health policy and its history, development, and implementation. Students will focus on: the relationship between agenda and policy setting; economics and financing; need and demand; politics, ethics, and law; policy implementation; and evaluation and change. Emphasis will be placed on understanding current health care policy issues and how policies drive the economics of the entire health care system. This

This overview course in epidemiology studies the distribution of disease and health in human populations. Topics include: basic principles of epidemiology and their relationship; spread of infectious disease; measures of disease occurrence and outbreak; descriptive and analytic epidemiology; vaccination; standardization and methods to control confounding; modification and interventions;

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course covers health care policy in the United States and selected global health care policy issues will also be included.

health quality and efficiency in the students chosen discipline will be reviewed within the scope of empowering the graduate to delivery care to the highest and fullest level of their education and preparation. The unique role of health care providers in quality improvement and conceptualization and redesign of effective care delivery models that address gaps in science and delivery of patient care services will be highlighted.

HSCI 440: Quality and Safety in Healthcare (3 Credits) Prerequisite: HSCI 410 This course introduces students to the history of healthcare quality and the relevant theory, content, tools and methods for patient safety in healthcare settings. Students will be introduced to National Patient Safety Goals; QSEN competencies and other similar initiatives in various healthcare fields both nationally and globally. Students will be provided with a theoretical background to the basic principles of patient quality and safety, clinical risk management, error theory, quality improvement and patient safety in light of various healthcare stakeholders.

HSCI 486 Health Care Administration Practicum I (2 Credits) Prerequisite: HSCI 310; HSCI 320; HSCI 330; HSCI 332. This course is intended to provide the student with 90 hours of real world experience in health care administration. Students are required to obtain a preceptor or preceptor(s) (no more than two) prior to enrolling into the externship, who will guide your experience and assure that you have met the course objectives. Documentation of your experience will be mandatory and presented in a portfolio and a time log will be required. Students will learn all they can related-to health care administration but will specifically focus on the topics learned in HSCI 310; HSCI 320; HSCI 330; HSCI 332. Specific assignments will address selected concepts in these courses. Grading in this course will be competent/ unachieved (pass/fail).

HSCI 450: Strategic Planning (3 Credits) Prerequisite: HSCI 440 This course familiarizes students with strategic planning for healthcare organizations. It focuses on the role, functions, and application of strategic planning and marketing in healthcare organizations with special emphasis on the process of strategy assessment, development, and implementation. Students will learn how to collect and analyze data to identify specific areas in need of improvement in order to create and incorporate a strategic plan. This course provides an overview of the methods utilized in evaluating organizational performance and productivity, analyzing internal and external resources, and performing needs assessment.

HSCI 487 Health Care Administration Practicum II (2 Credits) Prerequisite: HSCI 350; HSCI 410; HSCI 420; HSCI 422; HSCI 486 This course is intended to provide the student with 90 hours of real world experience in health care administration. Students are required to obtain a preceptor or preceptor(s) (no more than two) prior to enrolling into the externship, who will guide your experience and assure that you have met the course objectives. Documentation of your experience will be mandatory and presented in a portfolio and a time log will be required. Students will learn all they can related-to health care administration but will specifically focus on the topics learned in HSCI 350; HSCI 410; HSCI 420; and HSCI 422. Specific assignments will address selected concepts in these courses. Grading in this course will be competent/ unachieved (pass/fail).

HSCI 460: Healthcare Assessment, Evaluation and Outcomes (3 Credits) Prerequisite: HSCI 450 This course places emphasis on the analysis, synthesis and application of contemporary science to address current and emerging issues related to patient care quality and safety within a healthcare system. Health transformation initiatives, including using data to drive health system change, organizational theories and culture, and the dynamic forces at microsystem, mesosystem and macrosytem levels are examined. A deep exploration of what is being done to control health care costs and improve

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HSCI 488 Health Care Administration Practicum III (2 Credits) Prerequisite: HSCI 430; HSCI 440; HSCI 450; 487

WEU believes that with the gift of a free education comes a responsibility to give back. In upholding this charge, this course is designed to provide the student with the opportunity to develop a social justice inspired project that allows the student to utilize his/her education and new skills in order to: 1) give back to one’s community; 2) enhance one’s skills and abilities; and 3) provide some sort of teaching and/or awareness. This course includes 135 hours of “lab” based project whereas the student will develop a project, write a publishable paper, design an intervention designed to improve healthcare or create another approved activity in order to complete the requirements of this course. Students must successfully complete this project in order to fulfill the graduation requirements of his/her program. This course is graded competent/ unachieved (pass/fail).

This course is intended to provide the student with 90 hours of real world experience in health care administration. Students are required to obtain a preceptor or preceptor(s) (no more than two) prior to enrolling into the externship, who will guide your experience and assure that you have met the course objectives. Documentation of your experience will be mandatory and presented in a portfolio and a time log will be required. Students will learn all they can related-to health care administration but will specifically focus on the topics learned in HSCI 430; HSCI 440; HSCI 450; and SCI 460. Specific assignments will address selected concepts in these courses. Grading in this course will be competent/ unachieved (pass/fail).

MEDB 170: Medical Billing I (3 Credits) Prerequisite: *HSCI 100; *GENH 160 * Students may show prior evidence of similar instruction in content areas successfully completed or test out of HSCI 100 and/or GENH 160. Recommended: GENH 120; GENH 130

HSCI 489 Capstone: Health Care Administration Practicum IV (2 Credits) Prerequisite: HSCI 488 This course is intended to provide the student with 90 hours of real world experience in health care administration. Students are required to obtain a preceptor or preceptor(s) (no more than two) prior to enrolling into the externship, who will guide your experience and assure that you have met the course objectives. Documentation of your experience will be mandatory and presented in a portfolio and a time log will be required. In this last of the series course students will put all of their prior learning together and complete a culminating project which will be detailed in a final paper or video presentation. Students will be provided with freedom to choose and design projects that meet the course objectives; however final projects must be approved by the course instructor or program administrator. It is recommended that the student combine the 135 hours required in HCSI 499 (Student Change Project) in some form to allow for step 1/step 2 projects for substantial significance, but students who prefer to do so, can complete HCSI independently of HSCI 489. Grading in this course will be competent/ unachieved (pass/fail).

This course introduces the student to basic medical billing procedures while providing the requisite knowledge and skills needed to become employed in medical billing. A special emphasis on accurate documentation, HIPAA regulations and standards of ethical billing practices are emphasized.

MEDB 172: Medical Billing II (3 Credits) Prerequisite: MEDB 170 This course is the continuation of MEDB 170: Medical Billing I. In this course the emphasis is on more advanced medical billing procedures and practices.

MEDC 180: Medical Coding I (3 Credits) Prerequisite: *HSCI 100; *GENH 160 * Students may show prior evidence of similar instruction in content areas successfully completed or test out of HSCI 100 and/or GENH 160. Recommended: GENH 120; GENH 130

HSCI 499 Student Change Project (3 Credits) Recommended: At least 85% of courses completed in your program. 123


This course focuses on established medical diagnosis and procedural coding systems including a study of nomenclature versus classification systems, basic coding principles, and application of coding guidelines in outpatient and inpatient settings.

This course is the continuation of MEDT 170: Beginning Medical Transcription. It emphasizes continued practice of medical transcription incorporating both medical and surgical dictation in the medical specialties of cardiology, gastroenterology, orthopedics, pathology and radiology. This course contains a 45 hour lab (1 credit) with 45 hours of didactic material (3 credits).

MEDC 182: Medical Coding II (3 Credits) Prerequisite: MEDC 180 This course is the continuation of MEDC 180: Medical Coding I. In this course the student will progress to more complex medical coding and also focus on coding compliance and applying coding guidelines for statistical and reimbursement purposes.

NURS 300 Bachelors Role in Nursing (3 Credits) The professional nursing role is explored to gain a deeper understanding of the nurse’s role as provider of care, educator, advocate, researcher and manager of care. The transition from ADN to BSN is explored along with the differences in education and practice levels. The course explores the development of professional nursing, new nursing knowledge, nursing diagnoses, interventions and outcomes. Nursing theories along with the ANA Scope and Standards of Practice, IOM recommendations for nursing, Code of Ethics for nursing and nursing practice acts, and the BSN Essentials will be examined. Major contemporary nursing issues are explored within historic, economic, philosophical, and political contexts and as influenced by psychological, social, cultural, ethical, and legal issues.

MEDR 150: Medical Records (3 Credits) Prerequisite: *HSCI 100; *GENH 160 * Students may show prior evidence of similar instruction in content areas successfully completed or test out of HSCI 100 and/or GENH 160. Recommended: GENH 120; GENH 130 This course introduces medical record forms and content, medical record formats, numbering and filing systems, storage and retrieval systems, as well as legal requirements for maintaining medical records.

NURS 310 Health Promotion and Disease Prevention (3 Credits)

MEDT 170: Beginning Medical Transcription (4 Credits) Prerequisite: MEDR 150

Health promotion and disease, illness and injury prevention of individuals, families, and communities is the focus of this course. Utilizing the nursing process, students will examine interventions in wellness and illness. Concepts from epidemiology will be integrated as students examine vulnerable populations and risk. Students will address barriers to health, health promotion strategies and available resources to promote healthy lifestyles. Healthy people 2020 will be examined in detail. Emergency planning and crisis content will be revisited in this course. Emphasis will be placed on health promotion/disease prevention with strategic planning at the primary, secondary, and tertiary levels. Prevention, early diagnosis, prompt treatment, and in-depth patient education will be highlighted.

This course provides the student with basic medical transcription knowledge and skills. It is the study of medical transcription and its practical application to comprehensive dictation including chart notes, history and physicals, emergency room reports, consultation, initial office evaluation and discharge summaries. The focus of this course is to provide the student with a knowledge base of the content and formats of medical reports typically dictated in clinics, hospitals, and other healthcare organizations. Skill-building is achieved through repetition and building upon skills previously learned skills. This course contains a 45 hour lab (1 credit) with 45 hours of didactic material (3 credits).

MEDT 172: Advanced Medical Transcription (4 Credits) Prerequisite: MEDT 170 124


NURS 320 Community and Public Health Nursing (3 Credits) Prerequisite: NURS 310 Corequisite: NURS 321

first day of class.This course is graded competent/ unachieved (pass/fail).

NURS 330 Advanced Health Assessment (3 Credits) Prerequisite: NURS 310

In this course, key concepts, theories, problems and basic epidemiological principles of public/ community health nursing are applied in collaboration with diverse groups. Current trends in health care delivery and community resources are examined along with the sociocultural, political, economic, ethical, and environmental factors that influence community, public and global health. Students examine the concepts of community assessment, disease prevention, and health promotion in order to plan, implement, and evaluate interventions for diverse populations. Students will begin to develop positions on critical health care issues including access to care, disparities, vulnerable populations, health promotion across the lifespan, and the implementation and progress of Healthy People 2020 National Health Objectives.

Utilizing a holistic approach, this course provides the knowledge base for comprehensive health assessment of the patient across the lifespan. Emphasizing the expanded role of the BSN nurse as provider of care employing increased knowledge and skills, students will perform competent, comprehensive health histories, physicals, psychosocial assessments, developmental, cultural, spiritual, and environmental assessments using specific assessment tools. Students will examine health beliefs, identify factors impacting implementation of healthy lifestyle, and develop a health promotion plan for self and others. A physical, psychological, and sociocultural, approach is used to assess the client and to incorporate consideration of the client's needs, state of wellness, developmental level, and response to life experiences. Students will identify expected findings, identify the presence of alterations, and explore health promotion behaviors. Further skills to be developed include: interviewing, developing a narrative, formulating an in depth health history, developing assessment skills in the physical, psychosocial, developmental, cultural, spiritual, and environmental areas.

NURS 321 Community Healthcare Practicum (3 Credits) Corequisite: NURS 320; Designated Preceptor(s) This course is intended to provide the student with 135 hours of real world experience in community/public health nursing. Students are required to obtain a preceptor or preceptor(s) (no more than two) prior to enrolling into the practicum, who will guide your experience and assure that you have met the course objectives. Documentation of your experience will be mandatory and presented in a portfolio and a time log will be required. Students will focus on the use of evidence-based knowledge and six interrelated roles of the professional nurse in addressing the preventative health needs of populations and aggregate groups in the community setting. Students will design a project during the course and apply nursing concepts and public health and community-based practices to selected populations to facilitate the promotion, maintenance and restoration of optimal health across the lifespan. A tuberculosis (TB) clearance and other immunizations as required by the clinical facility will be the responsibility of the student. A drug screen and background check may also be required along with a signed Agency Agreement with a sponsoring site prior to the beginning of the

NURS 340 Policy, Finance and Regulatory Influences in Healthcare (3 Credits) Prerequisite: NURS 330 The purpose of this course is to examine the foundational concepts of healthcare policy, the financial structures of the healthcare system and the regulatory influences that impact nursing practice and patient care. Students will explore the complex process of patient care services and evaluate the implications of healthcare issues relevant to their practice. Students will discuss the changing environment of health care systems and the strategies that affect health care policy decisions which shape those systems. Sociocultural, ethical, economic and political issues affecting the access, delivery and utilization of health care services are studied. Appropriate professional nursing roles and

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ethical decision-making models are explored which give meaning to health care and clinical nursing leadership within complex health care systems.

do so in order to create a more robust and substantial project.

NURS 489 Capstone Scholarship Project (3 Credits) Prerequisite: NURS 300; 310; 320; 321; 330; 340; 350

NURS 350 Communication and Collaboration in Healthcare Settings (3 Credits) This course provides the learner with the framework for strong communication skills in the healthcare setting, including verbal, non-verbal and knowledge in patient-centered collaborative practice. Nursing students will examine their own communication skills using a communication assessment scale and engage in discussion together to improve communication techniques. A focus of this course will be on managing nursing care with individuals and families experiencing complex health problems and the development of inter-professional team problem solving skills and collaborative planning. Viewing communication in light of patient teaching, stress, validation, patient advocacy, and therapeutic use of self will be addressed. Selected topics include the need for collaborative practice, expectations of team members, and nurses as facilitators and leaders.

This course allows students to synthesize knowledge and skills learned in the baccalaureate program in order to demonstrate competencies consistent with program outcomes and to refine their nursing practice skills. In this last course students will put all of their prior learning together and complete a culminating project which will be detailed in a final paper or video presentation. This course includes 135 hours of documented experience presented in a portfolio including a time log. Students are required to obtain a preceptor or preceptor(s) (no more than two) prior to enrolling into the externship, who will guide your experience and assure that you have met the course objectives. Students will be provided with freedom to choose and design projects that meet the course objectives; however final projects must include a teaching element and be approved by the course instructor or program administrator. It is recommended that the student combine the 135 hours required in HCSI 499 or NURS 400 in some form to allow for step 1/step 2 projects for substantial significance, but students who prefer to do so, can complete HCSI 499 independently. Grading in this course will be competent/ unachieved (pass/fail).

NURS 400 Advanced Leadership Strategies (3 Credits) Prerequisite: NURS 350 Recommended: NURS 489 In this advanced leadership course, students will review in detail organizational systems leadership; transformational leadership and leadership strategies intended to improve quality, safety and outcomes within the healthcare environment. The three major constructs of transformational leadership (self-transformation, patient centered transformation, health systems transformation) will be explored related to health outcomes and the nurse’s role as change agent and leader in the profession. Awareness of complex systems, the impact of power upon the system, political influences, and healthcare as big business will be topics for discussion. Students will use quality improvement concepts, processes and outcomes measures to design projects that improve healthcare delivery and/or outcomes and will be required to partner with someone in a healthcare leadership role to design and implement their project. Students who wish to combine this course with NURS 489 may

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COLLEGE OF HOSPITALITY, TOURISM AND RETAIL MANAGEMENT

Continues to challenge faculty, staff and students to create, discover and implement sustainable practices in study and work.

College Objectives 1. Innovate management and industry specific training by striving to provide high quality education across the disciplines that considers present and anticipates future local and global challenges. 2. Design specific programs to address current global challenges through collaboration with selected global industry and public initiatives. 3. Attract and retain outstanding faculty, staff and learners. 4. Provide individualized learning experiences using quality content, creative learning experiences, supportive scaffolding of learning support, service-learning, and pragmatic skill building to prepare them for the next step in their career path. 5. Cultivate and sustain partnerships with industry, business, government and other educational constituencies.

Associate of Arts in Hospitality Management Graduate Certificate in Hospitality Management The mission of the WEU College of Hospitality, Tourism and Retail Management educates all students to become managers and leaders within the global and dynamic industries of hospitality, retail and tourism. The College inspires all students to pursue their educational and personal goals, exhibit a strong work ethic, and become responsible and ethical leaders in their field. To accomplish its mission, the School of Hospitality, Tourism and Retail Management: • Offers innovative and contemporary curricula designed to produce leaders who approach their profession with confidence, competence and commitment. • Encourages students to become active participants in their education. • Is comprised of a highly diverse faculty who possess academic as well as industry experience. • Maintains an inclusive learning environment. • Offers a range of courses so that all learners develop the required skills to excel in the global hospitality, retail and tourism industries. • Integrates social and environmental responsibility in all programs.

Principles • • • • •

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Learners, faculty and staff share the responsibility of learning. Lifelong learning is essential for success. Leadership, ethics, and social responsibility are the trademarks of WEU Graduates. Communication skills are crucial for future hospitality leaders to function effectively in cross-disciplinary teams. Leadership and entrepreneurial skills are essential in developing innovative leaders who will manage and lead in a complex and uncertain environment.


ASSOCIATE OF ARTS IN HOSPITALITY MANAGEMENT

Admission Requirements Fulfill the University’s Undergraduate Admissions Requirements and complete the University’s Admissions Process, listed in the Admissions and Enrollment section of this catalog.

Program Description

Program Structure

The objective of the Associate of Arts Degree in Hospitality Management is to prepares students for entry level positions across a wide selection of services and businesses in the Hospitality Sector, including hotels, higher end restaurants, country clubs, cruise ship companies, spas, and sports facilities. The program will accommodate those students who are currently employed and desiring advancement as well as students seeking initial employment in this dominant industry. The general education component of the curriculum offers a strong foundation for a well-rounded education. The program also prepares students for entry into Bachelor’s Degree programs.

Successful completion of the program is granted upon completion of the following credits/courses listed below: ENGL 201 English Composition I COMM 201 Interpersonal Communication ECON 110 Introduction to Economics GEOG 110 World Geography HEAL 100 Nutrition and Health MATH 105 Principles of Mathematics MATH 250 Elementary Statistics HOTR 150 Introduction to Information Technology HOTR 110 Introduction to Hospitality HOTR 120 Marketing in the Hospitality Industry HOTR 130 Customer Service and Standards HOTR 140 Accounting in the Hospitality Industry HOTR 210 Front Office Management HOTR 220 Food and Beverage Management HOTR 230 Basic Law for Hotel, Retail and Tourism Management HOTR 270 Internship/Practicum/Case Study for Hospitality Management Two General Elective Courses at the 100-200 Level

Program Objectives Graduates of the Associate of Arts in Hospitality Management program will demonstrate the following competencies: •

• • • • •

Apply basic customer service, accounting and management principles to business environments in the Hospitality Industry. Recognize human resource concepts and activities in organizational environments. Define the various tasks and responsibilities of managers in the Hospitality Industry. Define and apply marketing strategies in the Hospitality Industry. Describe consumer buying behavior. Identify and use the appropriate current technology to aid the implementation of management and service.

Total Credits Required: 60-64

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GRADUATE CERTIFICATE IN HOSPITALITY MANAGEMENT

• •

Admission Requirements

Program Description

Fulfill the University’s Graduate Admissions Requirements and complete the University’s Admissions Process, listed in the Admissions and Enrollment section of this catalog.

The objective of the Graduate Certificate in Hospitality Management is to prepare students for management level positions in the Hospitality Industry. The program will accommodate those who are new to the field seeking initial employment as well as experienced professionals desiring advancement. The courses in this program are designed to give knowledge and preparation needed to earn positions in high end hotels, full service resorts, country clubs, vacation ownership clubs, cruise lines and other hospitality organizations. An internship or industry based case study is an integral part of the program. A Bachelor’s Degree or equivalent experience in the industry will be required for admission to this program.

Program Structure Successful completion of the program is granted upon completion of the following credits/courses listed below: HOTR 510 Introduction to Hospitality HOTR 520 Marketing in the Hospitality Industry HOTR 530 Customer Service and Standards HOTR 540 Accounting and Budgeting in the Hospitality Industry HOTR 550 Leadership in the Hospitality Industry HOTR 560 Fundamentals of Tourism HOTR 565 Basic Law for Hotel, Retail and Tourism Management HOTR 570 Internship/Practicum/Case Study for Hospitality Management

Program Objectives Graduates of the Graduate Certificate in Hospitality Management, program will demonstrate the following competencies: •

• • • •

Understand and practice best Leadership Practices. Identify and participate in dominant trends in Hospitality, e.g. impact of Eco-Tourism on industry.

Apply high standards customer service and management principles to a variety of business environments in the Hospitality Industry. Recognize human resource concepts and activities in organizational environments. Define the various tasks and responsibilities of managers in Hospitality Industry. Define and apply marketing strategies across a wide variety of services in Hospitality Industry. Describe consumer buying behavior.

Total Credits Required: 23-29

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COLLEGE OF HOSPITALITY, TOURISM AND RETAIL MANAGEMENT COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

HOTR 150: INTRODUCTION TO INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY (3 Credits)

HEAL 100: NUTRITION AND HEALTH (3 Credits)

This course examines the issues, problems and systems of the rooms division, including the front office functions, housekeeping, engineering and security. There will be an emphasis on solutioncentered management.

This course is an introduction to computers and information technology. A broad overview of topics including software, hardware, networking and information technology will be examined. Examples and applications in the Hospitality Industry will be emphasized.

HOTR 210: FRONT OFFICE MANAGEMENT (3 Credits)

This course covers the principles of human nutrition, including current world nutrition problems. Recent developments in nutrition, food fads and available resources will be addressed.

HOTR 110: INTRODUCTION TO HOSPITALITY (3 Credits)

HOTR 220: FOOD AND BEVERAGE MANAGEMENT (3 Credits)

This course provides an understanding of the scope of the hospitality industry. Key hospitality management terms and definitions, opportunities, along with growth and trends in the industry will be introduced.

This course will be a study of food service management principles, philosophies, systems and applications. Case studies will be used to identify standards and develop best practice solutions to problems.

HOTR 120: MARKETING IN THE HOSPITALITY INDUSTRY (3 Credits)

HOTR 230: BASIC LAW FOR HOTEL, RETAIL AND TOURISM MANAGEMENT (3 Credits)

This course will cover the application of basic marketing principles to the various hospitality products and services. Marketing management and strategic marketing plans will be included.

This course will be an overview of business related contracts, real and personal property in the hospitality industry. Duties of and responsibilities along with food and beverage liability will be included.

HOTR 130: CUSTOMER SERVICE AND STANDARDS (3 Credits)

HOTR 270: INTERNSHIP/PRACTICUM/CASE STUDY FOR HOSPITALITY MANAGMENT (2-6 Credits)

This course is an introduction to customer service information, ideas, knowledge and application in the hospitality industry. Case studies and examples will be utilized.

This will be an experience unique and new to the student. The student will design a program based on research, industry experience or training assignment with specific learning objectives, performance standards and deliverables.

HOTR 140: ACCOUNTING AND BUDGETING IN THE HOSPITALITY INDUSTRY (3 Credits) This course is an introduction to accounting, covering basic concepts, the accounting cycle and components of financial statements. Preliminary analysis of financial reports will be included. There will be instruction on how to identify and deploy available capital resources, along with a review of essential decision-making guidelines.

HOTR 510: INTRODUCTION TO HOSPITALITY (3 Credits) This course provides an in depth study of the hospitality industry. Strategic management terms, functions, roles and definitions, along with growth

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geography that affect the industry will be reviewed. There will be an understanding of the socioeconomic impact of tourism along with trends and values in “eco-tourism�.

and trends in the industry will be studied. A review of Information Technology systems and trends will be included.

HOTR 520: MARKETING IN THE HOSPITALITY INDUSTRY (3 Credits)

HOTR 565: LAW FOR HOSPITALITY, RETAIL AND TOURISM MANAGEMENT (3 Credits)

This course will cover the application and identification of prevailing and innovative marketing principles in the hospitality industry. Marketing management and strategic marketing plans will be developed by the students. Case studies and reviews from the industry will be the basis for this course.

This course will be an overview of business related contracts, real and personal property in the hospitality industry. Duties of and responsibilities along with food and beverage liability will be included. Advanced case studies will be integrated into the content.

HOTR 530: CUSTOMER SERVICE AND STANDARDS (3 Credits)

HOTR 570: INTERNSHIP/PRACTICUM/CASE STUDY FOR HOSPITALITY MANAGEMENT (2-6 Credits)

This course is an advanced study of customer service information, ideas, knowledge and application in the hospitality industry. Front Office issues, systems, problems and viable solutions will be addressed. Case studies and examples will be utilized.

This will be an experience unique and new to the student. The student will design a program based on research or leadership training assignment with specific learning objectives, performance standards and deliverables.

HOTR 540: ACCOUNTING AND BUDGETING IN THE HOSPITALITY INDUSTRY (3 Credits) This course is an advanced review and application of hospitality accounting, covering concepts, the accounting cycle and components of financial statements. Various methods of analysis of financial reports will be covered. The student will identify and learn how deploy available capital resources, along with an advanced review of essential decisionmaking guidelines and models.

HOTR 550: LEADERSHIP IN HOSPITALITY (3 Credits) This course will cover an understanding and identification of various leadership roles. An understanding of historical and contemporary models of effective leadership will be included. There will be an opportunity for the student to review self-assessment tools and personal character in leadership, including a look at leadership in the future. The students will be encouraged to assess their own strengths and weaknesses.

HOTR 560: FUNDAMENTALS OF TOURISM (3 Credits) This course will be an overview of travel, its principles, practices and systems. Tourism as an industry including aspects of physical and cultural

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COLLEGE OF LEGAL STUDIES

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Diploma in Criminal Justice

Diploma in Legal Nurse Consultant Diploma in Paralegal Studies

Associate of Arts in Criminal Justice Associate of Arts in Paralegal Studies

Offers curricula designed to connect students to the social and legal community. Is comprised of broadly educated faculty, who possess both exceptional academic and industry experience. Offers a breadth of courses so that all graduates possess the necessary skills to excel in their community and in society. Engages learners in developing innovative solutions to complex conflict challenges.

College Objectives

Graduate Certificate in Dispute Resolution in the Workplace

1. To master the core legal concepts at the heart of our society. 2. To understand compare and contrast the benefit of multiple legal systems. 3. To use the obtained knowledge and skills to impact the community in which the learner resides.

Graduate Certificate in Dispute Resolution and Arbitration Processes Graduate Certificate in Dispute Resolution and Mediation

Principles •

Master of Science in Criminal Justice

• •

Master of Science in Dispute Resolution

The mission of The World Education University College of Legal Studies is developing the intellectual skills and acumen of its learners through which they will be able to contribute to their communities and our society. Our distinguished faculty and staff join with our students in the dynamic, coextensive goals of improving the quality of life at every opportunity through the effective use of our legal system. It is not always possible to reward and express gratitude to those who have helped you.

• • • •

To accomplish its mission, the College of Legal Studies: 134

Using optimal means to achieve total inclusion of all learners. The focus is on the individual learner. Learners, faculty and staff share the responsibility of learning. Lifelong learning is essential for success. Social service through the law is an essential and a continuing responsibility. Dispute resolution is best practiced through compassion and understanding. Exemplify a personal and professional commitment to ethical conduct and respect for others Sustain and promote the conviction that education is the fundamental right of all students.


DIPLOMA IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE

psychological theories of crime causation and discipline specific evaluation of human behavior.

Admission Requirements

Program Description

Fulfill the University’s Undergraduate Admissions Requirements and complete the University’s Admissions Process listed in the Admissions and Enrollment section of this catalog. It is desired but not mandatory that learners enrolling in the diploma program typically already have a bachelor’s degree and want to expand their career opportunity or want to change careers altogether.

The field of Criminal Justice centers on the control of criminal behavior in the maintenance of public order and includes the primary functions of law enforcement, prosecution, trial, corrections and associated responsibilities. World Education University’s career development programs are designed to meet the needs of legal professionals. The program is structured around core criminal justice classes on such topics as law enforcement, the judicial process, juvenile justice, corrections and probation and criminal law and procedure. The program provides an interdisciplinary approach to understanding the complex and pluralistic society by explaining the concepts of social control and resolutions available in criminal justice, including current procedures and future changes.

Program Structure Successful completion of the program is granted upon completion of the following credits/courses listed below: CRIJ 110 Introduction to Criminal Justice CRIJ 120 Introduction to Corrections CRIJ 130 Criminal Law CRIJ 132 Constitutional Law CRIJ 134 Law of Evidence CRIJ 140 America’s Court System CRIJ 150 Criminal Investigations CRIJ 160 Ethics in Criminal Justice CRIJ 170 Juvenile Delinquency CRIJ 180 Forensic Science

Program Objectives Graduates of the Diploma in Criminal Justice will demonstrate the following competencies: • •

• •

Describe America’s Court system, the role of prosecutors, judges and defense attorneys. Demonstrate the ability to apply principles of criminal law to criminal justice practice and understand the civil liabilities of criminal justice. Demonstrate sound ethical reasoning and judgment skills by analyzing and debating significant ethical issues by explaining, defending, and assessing personal ethical perspectives. Apply scientific principles and methods of inquiry to arrive at reasoned decisions. Demonstrate an understanding of biological, sociological, and

Total Credits Required: 3o

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DIPLOMA IN LEGAL NURSE CONSULTANT

• •

Program Description

The role of the Legal Nurse Consultant is to evaluate, analyze and offer an opinion on the delivery of health care and its outcomes. A Legal Nurse Consultant is a registered nurse and therefore a unique and valuable member of a litigation team. You will use the same problem solving skills required in nursing in the practice of legal nurse consulting. The nursing process requires assessment, analysis and issue identification, outcome identification, planning, implementation and evaluation. These processes are the basis of legal research and analysis, so you can see how you can adapt the skills you have used in nursing to begin a new and exciting career as a Legal Nurse Consultant.

Admission Requirements Fulfill the University’s Undergraduate Admissions Requirements and complete the University’s Admissions Process, listed in the Admissions and Enrollment section of this catalog and meet the following special program requirements: Candidates for admission must submit evidence of their credential (R.N., B.S.N., or M.D.) to be eligible for admission.

Program Structure

Program Objectives

Successful completion of the program is granted upon completion of the following credits/courses listed below:

Graduates of the Diploma in Legal Nurse Consultant program will demonstrate the following competencies: • • •

• • • •

Describe the Legal Nurse Consultant’s role in the insurance industry and in risk management. Describe the ethics, professionalism, and standards of practice for Legal Nurse Consultants. Design a business and marketing plan for a legal nurse consulting business.

PARS 140 Legal Research PARS 142 Legal Analysis and Writing PARS 150 Litigation and Trial Practice PARS 152 Torts: Personal Injury Litigation MEDR 150 Medical Records LNUC 120 Legal Nurse Consulting: Principles and Practice

Identify primary and secondary sources of the law. Use research tools and techniques necessary to find the law. Prepare written legal analysis identifying issues in a case, the rule of law, application, counterarguments and conclusions. Establish case files. Interview experts or witnesses. Carry out investigations and demonstrate a broad knowledge of tort litigation practice, law and procedure. Explain the Legal Nurse Consultant’s role in professional negligence, product liability, toxic tort, and criminal litigation. Evaluate and analyze medical records and case analysis.

Total Credits Required: 33

136


DIPLOMA IN PARALEGAL STUDIES

• • •

Program Description

The paralegal program at World Education University prepares learners for a career as a paralegal. Paralegals are found in all types of organizations, but most are employed by law firms, corporate legal departments, and various government offices. The Paralegal Diploma program provides a foundation in legal studies. Upon successful completion of the Paralegal Diploma, graduates are able to: use research tools and techniques necessary to find the law, rules and regulation, prepare professional legal documents, establish case files, interview experts or witnesses, carry out investigations and demonstrate a broad knowledge of litigation practice, law and procedure. Graduates acquire core knowledge in the following areas of law: business law, criminal law, real property, torts and contracts.

Establish case files. Interview experts or witnesses. Carry out investigations and demonstrate a broad knowledge of litigation practice, law and procedure. Acquire core knowledge in the following areas of law: business law, criminal law, real property, torts and contracts.

Admission Requirements Fulfill the University’s Undergraduate Admissions Requirements and complete the University’s Admissions Process, listed in the Admissions and Enrollment section of this catalog.

Program Structure Successful completion of the program is granted upon completion of the following credits/courses listed below: CRIJ 130 Criminal Law PARS 120 Paralegal Today PARS 140 Legal Research PARS 142 Legal Analysis and Writing PARS 150 Litigation and Trial Practice PARS 152 Torts: Personal Injury Litigation PARS 160 Contracts PARS 170 Business Organizations PARS 180 Real Property PARS 210 Domestic Relations

Program Objectives The objective of the paralegal diploma program is to prepare learners for a career as a paralegal. It is desired but not mandatory that learners enrolling in the diploma program typically already have a bachelor’s degree and want to expand their career opportunity or want to change careers altogether.

Total Credits Required: 30

Graduates of the Diploma in Paralegal Studies program will demonstrate the following competencies: • Identify primary and secondary sources of the law. • Use research tools and techniques necessary to find the law. • Prepare written legal analysis identifying issues in a case, the rule of law, application, counterarguments and conclusions. • Prepare professional legal documents. 137


ASSOCIATE OF ARTS IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE

Program Description

The field of Criminal Justice centers on the control of criminal behavior in the maintenance of public order and includes the primary functions of law enforcement, prosecution, trial, corrections and associated responsibilities. World Education University’s career development programs are designed to meet the needs of legal professionals. The program is structured around core criminal justice classes on such topics as law enforcement, the judicial process, juvenile justice, corrections and probation, and criminal law and procedure. The program provides an interdisciplinary approach to understanding the complex and pluralistic society we live in by explaining the concepts of social control and resolutions available in criminal justice, including current procedures and future changes.

Demonstrate an understanding of biological, sociological, and psychological theories of crime causation and discipline specific valuation of human behavior. Specific Competencies: Demonstrate the ability to apply specific competencies to entry-level criminal justice professions which meet each student’s educational goal.

Admission Requirements Fulfill the University’s Undergraduate Admissions Requirements and complete the University’s Admissions Process, listed in the Admissions and Enrollment section of this catalog.

Program Structure Successful completion of the program is granted upon completion of the following credits/courses listed below: CRIJ 110 Introduction to Criminal Justice CRIJ 120 Introduction to Corrections CRIJ 130 Criminal Law CRIJ 132 Constitutional Law CRIJ 134 Law of Evidence CRIJ 140 America’s Court System CRIJ 160 Ethics in Criminal Justice CRIJ 170 Juvenile Delinquency CRIJ 180 Forensic Science CRIJ 210 White Collar Crime CRIJ 220 Homeland Security CRIJ 230 Organized Crime CRIJ 240 Private Security CRIJ 250 Crime and Drugs CRIJ 260 Policing COMM 201 Interpersonal Communication ENGL 201 English Composition I HIST 200 American History I MATH 105 Principles of Mathematics PSYC 200 Introduction to Psychology

Program Objectives Graduates of the Associate of Arts in Criminal Justice program will demonstrate the following competencies: • Describe America’s Court system, the role of prosecutors, judges and defense attorneys. • Demonstrate the ability to apply principles of criminal law to criminal justice practice and understand the civil liabilities of criminal justice. • Demonstrate sound ethical reasoning and judgment skills by analyzing and debating significant ethical issues by explaining, defending, and assessing personal ethical perspectives. • Apply scientific principles and methods of inquiry to arrive at reasoned decisions.

Total Credits Required: 60

138


ASSOCIATE OF ARTS IN PARALEGAL STUDIES

criminal law, real property, torts and contracts.

Admission Requirements

Program Description

Fulfill the University’s Undergraduate Admissions Requirements and complete the University’s Admissions Process, listed in the Admissions and Enrollment section of this catalog.

The paralegal programs at World Education University prepare students for a career as a paralegal. Paralegals are found in all types of organizations, but most are employed by law firms, corporate legal departments, and various government offices.

Program Structure Successful completion of the program is granted upon completion of the following credits/courses listed below:

The Associate Degree in Paralegal Studies core program provides a foundation in the law and legal analysis and writing. Upon successful completion, you will be able to: use legal research tools and techniques necessary to find the law, rules and regulation, prepare professional legal documents, establish case files, interview experts or witnesses, carry out investigations and demonstrate a broad knowledge of litigation practice, law and procedure.

CRIJ 130 Criminal Law PARS 120 Paralegal Today PARS 134 Administrative Law PARS 140 Legal Research PARS 142 Legal Analysis and Writing PARS 150 Litigation and Trial Practice PARS 152 Torts: Personal Injury Litigation PARS 160 Contracts PARS 162 Trusts, Wills and Estate Administration PARS 170 Business Organizations PARS 180 Real Property PARS 210 Domestic Relations PARS 230 Immigration Law PARS 240 Environmental Law PARS 250 Intellectual Property PARS 260 Bankruptcy Law PARS 270 Social Security Disability COMM 201 Interpersonal Communication ENGL 201 English Composition I HIST 200 American History I MATH 105 Principles of Mathematics PSYC 200 Introduction to Psychology

Program Objectives Graduates of the Associate of Arts in Paralegal Studies will demonstrate the following competencies: • • •

• • • • •

Identify primary and secondary sources of the law. Use research tools and techniques necessary to find the law. Prepare written legal analysis identifying issues in a case, the rule of law, application, counterarguments and conclusions. Prepare professional legal documents. Establish case files. Interview experts or witnesses. Carry out investigations and demonstrate a broad knowledge of litigation practice, law and procedure. Acquire core knowledge in the following areas of law: business law,

Total Credits Required: 60

139


GRADUATE CERTIFICATE IN DISPUTE RESOLUTION IN THE WORKPLACE

Enrollment section of this catalog and meet the following special Program requirements: It is desired, but not mandatory, that applicants possess a graduate degree in a related field of study. Learners must also show demonstrable competency in the English language.

Program Description

Program Structure

The Graduate Certificate in Dispute Resolution in the Workplace program provides learners with the tools required to effectively address workplace conflict through the dispute resolution process. The program provides professionals in business, education, health care, human resources and management and law the critical skills associated with conflict management. Learners learn effective communication and active listening skills and develop their conflict resolution skills.

The Graduate Certificate in Dispute Resolution in the Workplace program is lockstep based – courses MUST be taken in the following order. Successful completion of the program is granted upon completion of the credits/courses listed below: DISR 502 Emerging Trends in Dispute Resolution DISR 506 Ethics and the Neutral in Dispute Resolution Processes DISR 512 Effective Communication and Active Listening in Conflict DISR 622 Dispute Resolution in the Workplace DISR 624 Dispute Resolution and the ADA

Program Objectives Graduates of the Graduate Certificate in Dispute Resolution in the Workplace program will demonstrate the following competencies: • • • • • • •

Total Credits Required: 15

Identify and manage workplace disputes. Understand the importance of effective communication and active listening. Identify and manage the cross culture issues in workplace conflict. Create dynamic resolution to conflicts. Identify the appropriate dispute resolution process. Master the skill of Resolving conflict rationally and effectively. Successfully terminate unproductive workplace relationships.

Admission Requirements Fulfill the University’s Graduate Admissions Requirements, complete the University’s Admission Process listed, in the Admissions and 140


GRADUATE CERTIFICATE IN DISPUTE RESOLUTION AND ARBITRATION PROCESSES

Enrollment section of this catalog and meet the following special Program requirements: It is desired, but not mandatory, that applicants possess a graduate degree in a related field of study.

Program Structure The Graduate Certificate in Dispute Resolution and Arbitration Process program is lockstep based – courses MUST be taken in the following order.

Program Description The Graduate Certificate in Dispute Resolution and Arbitration (DISR) require that learners have completed a bachelor’s degree or the equivalent in sociology, psychology, political science, criminal justice or legal studies. The program provides professionals the critical skills associated with conflict management and in the use of arbitration to resolve conflict. The program accommodates those learners who are currently employed and desiring advancement as well as students seeking initial employment.

Successful completion of the program is granted upon completion of the credits/courses listed below: DISR 502 Emerging Trends in Dispute Resolution DISR 506 Ethics and the Neutral in Dispute Resolution Processes DISR 512 Effective Communication and Active Listening in Conflict DISR 628 Community Based Dispute Resolution Practices DISR 630 Emerging Trends in Dispute Resolution

Program Objectives Graduates of the Graduate Certificate in Dispute Resolution and Arbitration demonstrate the following competencies: • • • • • •

Total Credits Required: 15

Familiarize the learner with the three types of arbitration Outline the characteristics of arbitration. Know the difference between arbitration and litigation. Understand which disputes are not subject to arbitration. Develop and utilize skills in arbitration for the purpose of resolving conflict. Understand the role of the arbitrator. Develop content expertise in a selected area of study.

Admission Requirements Fulfill the University’s Graduate Admissions Requirements, complete the University’s Admission Process, listed in the Admissions and 141


GRADUATE CERTIFICATE IN DISPUTE RESOLUTION AND MEDIATION

It is desired, but not mandatory, that applicants possess a graduate degree in a related field of study. Learners must also show demonstrable competency in the English language.

Program Description

The Graduate Certificate in Dispute Resolution and Mediation program is lockstep based – courses MUST be taken in the following order.

Program Structure

The Graduate Certificate in Dispute Resolution and Mediation Program is designed for working professionals who want to develop the ability to handle conflict successfully in their organizations and in the community. The course provides each learner with the knowledge and experience to conduct mediations.

Successful completion of the program is granted upon completion of the credits/courses listed below: DISR 502 Emerging Trends in Dispute Resolution DISR 506 Ethics and the Neutral in Dispute Resolution Processes DISR 514 Arbitration DISR 516 Interviewing, Counseling and Intake DISR 632 Dispute Resolution and Multiparty Conflicts

Program Objectives Graduates of the Graduate Certificate in Dispute Resolution and Mediation will demonstrate the following competencies: •

• • •

Total Credits Required: 15

Demonstrate effective communication and active listening skills across organizational, professional, and social settings. Display critical thinking processes: analyze, understand, and evaluate communication within organizations and as part of external professional situations. Understand issues of perception, bias, values, differences and culture. Demonstrate knowledge of problem solving skills. Understand the nature of conflict as it relates to organizations.

Admission Requirements Fulfill the University’s Graduate Admissions Requirements, complete the University’s Admission Process listed, in the Admissions and Enrollment section of this catalog and meet the following special Program requirements: 142


MASTER OF SCIENCE IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE

Program Description

World Education University’s Master of Science in Criminal Justice program offers extensive education and training in Criminal Justice. The program explores theory, best practices, and emerging technologies to provide students with foundational knowledge and empirical approaches for use in assessing and resolving complex problems faced by the criminal justice system.

• • •

Develop, understand, and apply research in criminal justice to shape policy. Demonstrate ability to ethically gather and protect evidence. Engage communities in policing and foster policies inherent to an inclusive criminal justice system. Develop best practices in evaluating, engaging and managing parties in a conflict. Lead parties toward effective communication. Develop content expertise in a selected area of study.

Admission Requirements

The program is designed to provide police, court and security personnel, corrections officers, and law enforcement professional advanced knowledge and acumen critical to success in the criminal justice field.

Fulfill the University’s Graduate Admissions Requirements and complete the University’s Admission Process located in the Admissions section of this catalog.

Program Objectives

Program Structure

The program objectives of the Master of Science in Criminal Justice program are to demonstrate competency in the theory and application of advanced concepts in criminal justice.

Successful completion of the program is granted upon completion of the credits/courses listed below: CRIJ 500 Advanced Criminology CRIJ 502 Criminology in the Era of Terrorism CRIJ 504 Criminal Justice Administration CRIJ 506 Research and Analytic Methods CRIJ 508 Law, Evidence and Ethics CRIJ 510 Corrections Administration CRIJ 612 Legal Issues in Criminal Justice CRIJ 614 Investigative Processes CRIJ 616 Seminar in Community Policing CRIJ 618 Seminar in Modern Organized Crime CRIJ 620 Leadership in Criminal Justice CRIJ 622 Restorative Justice

Graduates of the Master of Science in Criminal Justice will demonstrate the following competencies: •

Draw on an extensive base of knowledge to make ethical and strategic decisions regarding safety and security. Contribute to the success of a criminal justice organization through active participation in the execution and development of best practices. Communicate effectively with the public, peers, and offender population in a manner that achieves desired goals.

Total Credits Required: 36

143


MASTER OF SCIENCE IN DISPUTE RESOLUTION

Admission Process located in the Admissions section of this catalog.

Program Description

The Master of Science in Dispute Resolution Program Core courses are lockstep based – courses MUST be taken in the following order. Electives may be taken after the successful completion of the core courses.

Program Structure

The Master of Science in Dispute Resolution program offers a rigorous and comprehensive approach to conflict resolution. The program provides professionals in business, education, health care and law the critical skills associated with conflict management. Program graduates demonstrates professional competencies which are the driver for success in arbitration, negotiation, mediation, and facilitation in resolving conflicts between teams, individuals, and organizations.

Successful completion of the program is granted upon completion of the credits/courses listed below: DISR 502 Emerging Trends in Dispute Resolution DISR 504 Dispute Resolution Processes DISR 506 Ethics and the Neutral in Dispute Resolution Processes DISR 508 Cross-cultural Issues in Dispute Resolution DISR 510 Transformative Dispute Resolution DISR 512 Effective Communication and Active Listening in Conflict DISR 514 Arbitration DISR 516 Interviewing, Counseling and Intake DISR 518 Research Methods

Program Objectives Graduates of the Masters of Science in Dispute Resolution will demonstrate the following competencies: •

• • • •

Identify a variety of techniques in negotiation, mediation, facilitation and dispute resolution by employing critical thinking and research skills. Apply alternative dispute resolution through a process of analysis, effective communication and active listening skills. Develop best practices in researching and conducting dispute resolution sessions. Develop best practices in evaluating, engaging and managing parties in a conflict. Lead parties toward effective communication. Develop content expertise in a selected area of study.

Elective Courses (Choose 3) DISR 622 Dispute Resolution in the Workplace DISR 624 Dispute Resolution and the ADA DISR 626 Dispute Resolution in the Digital Age DISR 628 Community Based Dispute Resolution Practices DISR 630 Emerging Trends in Mediation DISR 632 Dispute Resolution and Multiparty Conflicts Total Credits Required: 36

Admission Requirements Fulfill the University’s Graduate Admissions Requirements and complete the University’s 144


COLLEGE OF LEGAL STUDIES COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

property, and society, while it encourages critical thinking about these topics. Special emphasis is given to both the law and the procedural aspects of criminal justice.

CRIJ 132: CONSTITUTIONAL LAW (3 Credits) This course imparts an understanding of the living law of America, examining how the interpretation of the law within this basic framework is, by and large, a product of the times and the ideologies of Supreme Court justices, the court having the final word in determining what the interpretation of the law is. This is of notable interest to the student of criminal justice, who will journey through the anatomy of the Constitution and its Amendments. Students will learn the guarantees the Constitution provides by way of civil rights and civil liberties. Amendments affecting the criminal justice system that include: search and seizures, arrest warrants, due process, Miranda rights, confessions, entrapment, double jeopardy, the right to a fair trial, bail, fines, and punishment are all given consideration as is the magnitude of this document and the implications for protecting the personal freedoms of those governed by it clearly illustrated.

CRIJ 110: INTRODUCTION TO CRIMINAL JUSTICE (3 Credits) Introduction to Criminal Justice provides a realistic description of the United States criminal justice system and how it works including police, courts and corrections. Much more than an “encyclopedia” of criminal justice topics, it provides an intricately woven picture of contemporary United States criminal justice covering relevant topics such as: the staggering increases in juvenile crime, police abuse/brutality, the crisis of prison overcrowding, and the growing trend of alternative sentencing. It helps students integrate the wealth of material to which they are exposed, and assumes a forwardlooking perspective that recognizes the importance of individual rights, social order, multi- culturalism and high-technology as they affect the day-to- day practice of criminal justice students. The fundamental tried-and-true concepts of an evolving discipline give learners the critical thinking skills necessary to effectively apply these skills to the real world as they face today’s problems and the emerging issues of tomorrow.

CRIJ 134: LAW OF EVIDENCE (3 Credits) This course focuses on the fundamentals of Evidence: the definition of the law of evidence, its origin, as well as the relevant application of such, when, and by whom. Examination of the admissibility of evidence to support or disprove facts is critical in any case; therefore, consideration will be given to actual cases as students learn evidentiary rules and the part they play in the recognition, gathering and presentation of evidence deemed admissible at trial.

CRIJ 120: INTRODUCTION TO CORRECTIONS (3 Credits) This course stresses the historical significance of crime and punishment and the development of the modern- day correctional system. Consideration will be given to the range of sentencing, from probation to the death penalty and all alternatives in between. The people “behind the walls” and the special challenges of the transgressors and the individuals responsible for their oversight is a topic of increasing concern. Learners will likewise examine the issues of rehabilitation and subsequent releases of offenders versus the welfare and rights of society.

CRIJ 140: AMERICA’S COURT SYSTEM (3 Credits) This course teaches the fundamentals of the legal system in United States and includes an overview of Federal courts, State courts, Appellate courts, Lower courts and Juvenile courts. It covers the dynamics of courthouse justice, prosecutors, defense attorneys, judges, defendants and victims. It also covers the processing and sentencing of the guilty.

CRIJ 130: CRIMINAL LAW (3 Credits) This course explores the general principles of criminal liability, the defenses to criminal liability, and the elements of crimes against persons,

CRIJ 150: CRIMINAL INVESTIGATION (3 Credits)

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This course emphasizes the policies and procedures established by the field, in addition to present day tools and techniques available for the law enforcement professional. Students will benefit from real-life cases that will provide a “hands on” approach to learning. Topics of recent controversy such as stalking, DNA profiling and the media frenzy surrounding investigations are also covered.

Crime: the word itself inspires images of dark, deserted streets and shady characters in a gangster film. What seldom comes to mind is the wellgroomed professional, government official or corporate figurehead; yet “suit crime” is rapidly gaining exposure as the prevalence of this nontraditional criminal activity soars. The psychological and sociological implications of this level of corruption are laid bare in this fascinating area of study. The discovery and study of white-collar crimes in various forms such as corporate crime, occupational crime, political, finance and enterprise reveal the far-reaching network of activity. Students will probe the theories behind white-collar crime, and the effort to exercise social control, and establish policing and regulation.

CRIJ 160: ETHICS IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE (3 Credits) This course provides students with an honest, straightforward approach to the provocative issue of morals and standards in an arena filled with potential contradictions. Learners will gain insight into morality, ethics and human behavior and given tools to develop moral and ethical behavior. Ethics and law enforcement, ethics and legal professionals, ethics of prosecution, punishment and corrections and ultimately, policy and decision-making are likewise noteworthy.

CRIJ 220: HOMELAND SECURITY (3 Credits) This course gives a historical background on the phenomenon of terrorism and the roots of contemporary conflicts shaping the world stage and presents theoretical and concrete information about Homeland Security Organizations.

CRIJ 170: JUVENILE DELINQUENCY (3 Credits) This course introduces theories and concepts of this ever changing branch of the criminal justice field. The potential root of this behavior, analysis thereof, nature of such crimes, and their far reaching effects will be considered. Pivotal issues, critical to the evolution of this area of study, include the issue of juvenile detention, the role of the adult court system, developmental implications and of particular significance, prevention.

CRIJ 230: ORGANIZED CRIME (3 Credits) This course provides a detailed, comprehensive analysis of the origins, history, theoretical explanations, and structure of domestic and international organized crime, including drug trafficking, gambling, and loan sharking. It explains the methods employed by law enforcement agencies to combat organized crime, and the policy decisions reached by various investigating committees and commissions, including the President’s Commission on Organized Crime.

CRIJ 180: FORENSIC SCIENCE (3 Credits) This course discusses the history and development of forensic science, functions of the forensic scientist and services of the crime laboratory setting the stage for comprehending the scope of the forensic science. Learners will explore crime scene and physical evidence; gain understanding in the organic and inorganic analysis of evidence, and ascertain the merit of the microscope. Forensic toxicology, DNA as a new scientific tool, hairs, fibers, fingerprints, in addition to document and voice examinations, all demonstrate the partnership of investigators and forensic scientists in the collecting of evidence with the techniques of science to draw meaningful conclusions in criminal investigations.

CRIJ 240: PRIVATE SECURITY (3 Credits) This course gives an overview of the history of private security, explores the business of the private security industry, private security law, tools and systems integration in the industry, and provides an overview of investigative security, surveillance and undercover operations, private and public partnerships for security, and homeland security.

CRIJ 250: CRIME AND DRUGS (3 Credits) This course will educate students on what does and does not work in the criminal justice system, and how, ironically enough, the more that is known

CRIJ 210: WHITE COLLAR CRIME (3 CREDITS) 146


CRIJ 504: CRIMINAL JUSTICE ADMINISTRATION (3 Credits)

about the problem, the less is understood. The complex problem of crime and policy, the war on crime, models of criminal justice and the concept of the “career criminal” will be discussed. The course continues with the conservative attack on crime: deterring criminals, intermediary alternatives of punishment, and the incapacitation of offenders. Finally, students will examine reform and the rehabilitation of these individuals, as well as the consequences and limits of drug policy, treatment and education, versus legalization.

Apply management, leadership, and organizational behavior concepts and principles in a criminal justice organization. Examine how effective and efficient administration is achieved in all three branches – police, courts, and corrections. Explore transactional analysis, management by objectives (“MBO”), techniques for budgeting and managing costs, and the fundamentals of accreditation as they relate to criminal justice administration. Research and critically evaluate the impact of state budget cuts on effective police administration.

CRIJ 260: POLICING (3 Credits) This course furnishes a unique perspective of police, as the writer of the accompanying textbook is an authority in the field with nearly a quarter century of experience in police work. Students will review police history and organization, U.S. police and private security, as well as police department organization, the personal side of policing, qualifications for police candidates, goals and objectives of these crime fighters and peacekeepers, including the dynamics of police culture and operations, provide valuable insight to those specializing in the field of criminal justice.

CRIJ 506: RESEARCH AND ANALYTIC METHODS (3 Credits) Explore social scientific research methodology within the criminal justice discipline. Examine traditional and contemporary resources and techniques for social scientific inquiry, research design, and data analysis. Apply qualitative and quantitative methods of research. Develop perspective on fundamental elements of research, including ethics, data collection, validation, and interpretation, and ability to make informed decisions about the value of criminal justice research findings.

CRIJ 500: ADVANCED CRIMINOLOGY (3 Credits)

CRIJ 508: LAW, EVIDENCE, AND ETHICS (3 Credits)

Apply integrated theories of crime and delinquency from a broad interdisciplinary perspective to garner understanding of how research in criminology is produced. Examine how criminology research translates into crime control policy. Critically assess current crime control and crime prevention strategies pertaining to policy and practice. Design and execute original research on one of the following topics: reintegration, rehabilitation, new penology, or prison abolition.

Discuss and critique rules of evidence in investigation, civil and criminal trials, and administrative proceedings. Examine the ethical obligations of agents assigned to gather evidence, including the role of the agent, the Federal Rules of Evidence, and court precedents. Engage in adversarial challenges of evidence in group projects. Interview an expert or professional in the area of criminal or civil law charged with gathering, presenting, or defending evidence to develop insight into the significance of developing evidence knowledgeably and ethically.

CRIJ 502: CRIMINOLOGY IN THE ERA OF TERRORISM (3 Credits) Explore current sociological, political, and religious climates that contribute to terrorism. Critique the way that the terrorist threat is shaped by law and other institutions. Examine responses to terrorism, including a wider culture of surveillance and control. Reflect on the relationship between immigration and terrorism. Develop understanding of the emerging changes to the role of a criminal justice professional as the result of terrorism.

CRIJ 510: CORRECTIONS ADMINISTRATION (3 Credits) Examine management and leadership and operational implications in correctional facilities in the context of an inclusive prison system. Assess the impact of internal and external forces on correctional policy and administration design,

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CRIJ 618: SEMINAR IN MODERN ORGANIZED CRIME (3 Credits)

including the impact of security, safety, and prisoner treatment and the impact of public policy. Develop critical skills in thinking and acting strategically in correctional organizations from the perspective of correctional offices and facility leaders. Compare and contrast effective administration in public and private correctional facilities.

Explore modern organized crime on an international level, including coactions between international organized crime, terrorism, and technology. Assess criminal enterprises and organizations in Latin America, the Middle East, and Africa. Critically evaluate the impact of modern organized crime on the function of law enforcement organizations. Design and execute a research project on transnational criminal enterprises and their impact on American social, economic, and political life.

CRIJ 612: LEGAL ISSUES IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE (3 Credits) Assess legal limitations of criminal justice organizations. Explore legal issues relating to due process and judicial review of administrative decision-making. Critically evaluate the legal basis of criminal law and criminal justice policies. Develop ability to avoid and recognize instances that may lead to tort actions against representatives of criminal justice agencies.

CRIJ 620: LEADERSHIP IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE (3 Credits) Analyze the scope of ethical leadership in the criminal justice system, including directing and developing justice and public safety organizations. Explore law enforcement leadership theory and practice through the concepts of values, group dynamics, dimensions of power, conflict and change management, decision-making, and organizational development. Develop tools for implementing leadership in bureaucratic and public agencies. Critically evaluate the policies implemented by prison wardens in the United States and abroad.

CRIJ 614: INVESTIGATIVE PROCESSES (3 Credits) Evaluate the investigative process from formulation of investigative plan to presentation of evidence. Develop acumen to conduct effective and efficient investigations of crimes. Explore investigative techniques, including crime scene processing, accusatory and non-accusatory interviewing, and forensic examination of evidence. Examine recent advances in technology relevant to authenticating documents, capturing and managing evidence, and investigation of cybercrime.

CRIJ 622: RESTORATIVE JUSTICE (3 Credits) Assess the application of restorative justice theory in practices, including through review of techniques such as victim impact panels, family conferencing, and victim and offender conferencing. Examine restorative justice as a means of dealing with crime. Compare and contrast restorative justice and retributive models to develop framework for the applicability of the restorative approach. Evaluate challenges in the implementation of restorative justice.

CRIJ 616: SEMINAR IN COMMUNITY POLICING (3 Credits) Examine community policing philosophy and practice. Compare and contrast Problem Oriented Policing (“POP”) and Community Oriented Policing (“COP”). Analyze problem solving models, dispute resolution strategies, and police community relationships. Explore the changing roles of leadership, mitigating factors in community policing, officer evaluation techniques, and organizational structures that facilitate the implementation of community policing initiatives. Conduct research in one of the following areas to generate advanced knowledge of community policing: Crime Prevention through Environmental Design (“CPTED”), Chicago’s Alternative Policing Strategy (“CAPS”), CRIMESTOPPERS, or Parole Notification Programs.

DISR 502: EMERGING TRENDS IN DISPUTE RESOLUTION (3 Credits) This course reviews the historical trends in dispute resolution practices and examines the emergence of new practices as our sociocultural development has evolved, as well as evaluates how changing global and economic dynamics have shaped the need for responsive conflict resolution practices.

DISR 504: DISPUTE RESOLUTION PROCESSES (3 Credits) 148


the involvement of organizations. Prerequisite(s): DISR 502, DISR 504, and DISR 506.

Compare and contrast dispute resolution processes, including negotiation, mediation, arbitration, interviewing, counseling, and the ministerial. Evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of problem solving and transformative dispute resolution processes. Develop foundational knowledge for selecting the most appropriate dispute resolution process. Survey ethical, legal, and policy issues arising from the use of dispute resolution processes to prepare for additional courses in dispute resolution. Prerequisite(s): DISR 502.

DISR 512: EFFECTIVE COMMUNICATION AND ACTIVE LISTENING IN CONFLICT (3 Credits) Apply communication theories to the context of conflict management. Explore the vehicle of communication, including basic principles and assumptions, to garner understanding of techniques to influence, persuade, and manage parties in conflict. Observe and participate in conflict management using sources of power, nonverbal communication, listening skills, perception, and dialogue to achieve desired outcomes. Develop communication competence to control conflict. Prerequisite(s): DISR 502, DISR 504, and DISR 506.

DISR 506: ETHICS AND THE NEUTRAL IN DISPUTE RESOLUTION PROCESSES (3 Credits) This course focuses on the professional responsibility of the Neutral in the Dispute Resolution Process. The basic provisions of existing, proposed, and adopted Rules of Professional Conduct for Dispute Resolution Professionals in various contexts will be examined. Prerequisite(s): DISR 502 and DISR 504.

DISR 514: ARBITRATION (3 Credits) This course offers students the resources they need to move forward along their career paths. This course will also aid in supporting and facilitating the academic, professional, and personal development of students. Prerequisite(s): DISR 502, DISR 504, and DISR 506.

DISR 508: CROSS-CULTURAL ISSUES IN DISPUTE RESOLUTION (3 Credits) Relate variances in culture to dispute resolution processes. Analyze the impact of stereotypes, attributions, appetites for risk, and world views on dispute resolution. Investigate the role of international agreements, conventions, and treaties, such as the United Nations Commission on International Trade Law (“UNCITRAL”), the Convention on the Recognition and Enforcement of Foreign Arbitral Awards of 1958, the Inter-American Convention on International Commercial Arbitration, and the 1961 (Geneva) European Convention on International Commercial Arbitration, as means for navigating cultural issues in dispute resolution. Develop strategies to enhance effectiveness in crosscultural dispute resolution. Prerequisite(s): DISR 502, DISR 504 and DISR 506.

DISR 516: INTERVIEWING, COUNSELING & INTAKE (3 Credits) Apply communication theories to and engage in interviewing, counseling, and intake processes. Develop skills and confidence in a client centered approach. Explore best practices in case management centered on outreach, identification, assessment, development of a plan, and ongoing service coordination and support. Prerequisite(s): DISR 502, DISR 504, and DISR 506.

DISR 518: RESEARCH METHODS (3 Credits) Explore social scientific research methodology within the field of conflict resolution. Apply techniques, processes, and qualitative and quantitative methods of research, utilizing traditional and contemporary sources. Prerequisite(s): DISR 502, DISR 504, and DISR 506.

DISR 510: TRANSFORMATIVE DISPUTE RESOLUTION (3 Credits) Examine the transformative approach to dispute resolution. Explore empowerment and mutual recognition as strategies for facilitating transformative dispute resolution. Learn the “ten hallmarks” of a successful transformative mediator. Debate the applicability of the transformative approach to legal and business mediation, including

DISR 622: DISPUTE RESOLUTION IN THE WORKPLACE (3 Credits) Analyze workplace issues that require dispute resolution, including labor management relations and arbitration of nonunionized workplace matters. Examine processes, such as fact finding, and benefits

149


of negotiation, arbitration, and mediation to resolve workplace conflict. Reflect on trends in ethical hotlines and ombudspersons. Incorporate personal experience in assessing workplace conflict and requirements for dispute resolution to achieve personal and professional growth. Prerequisite(s): DISR 502.

mediation and other conflict resolution practices in the legal system. Under the supervision of the course instructor, students will engage in an original research and writing project that evaluates and critiques a community based dispute resolution program. Prerequisite(s): DISR 502, DISR 504, and DISR 506.

DISR 624: DISPUTE RESOLUTION AND THE ADA (3 Credits)

DISR 630: EMERGING TRENDS IN MEDIATION (3 Credits)

Develop understanding of the physical and mental impairments that qualify as disabilities under the Americans with Disabilities Act (“ADA”) and the ADA requirements for accessibility and reasonable accommodation. Evaluate the two basic ways that disability issues arise in dispute resolution, including claims under Titles I or II of the ADA or Section 501 of the Rehabilitation Act and requests by parties to dispute resolution processes for reasonable accommodations to be made. Engage in mock mediation to develop specialized skills useful in handling ADA or Rehabilitation Act cases and ADArelated requests. Prerequisite(s): DISR 502, DISR 504, DISR 506, and DISR 514.

Students will engage in critical examination of mediation processes as it has evolved, been shaped by and shaped, social, public policy, legal, and ethical issues throughout society. Prerequisite(s): DISR 502, DISR 504, and DISR 506.

DISR 632: DISPUTE RESOLUTION AND MULTI-PARTY CONFLICTS (3 Credits) This course examines the legal, ethical, and policy issues that arise when using dispute resolution processes to resolve multi-party controversies. Learners will apply the theoretical and legal concepts to develop codes of conduct, rules of engagement or model agreements. Prerequisite(s): DISR 502, DISR 504, and DISR 506.

DISR 626: DISPUTE RESOLUTION IN THE DIGITAL AGE (3 Credits)

LNUC 120: LEGAL NURSE CONSULTING: PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICE (18 Credits)

Examine Information Technology(“IT”) in dispute resolution on an international level. Explore the European Small Claims Procedure and efforts by countries to adopt laws that satisfy the standards of the United Nations Commission on International Trade Law (“UNCITRAL”) as they relate to dispute resolution and IT. Critically evaluate IT as a “fourth party” in dispute resolution. Analyze online dispute resolution methods, including consensual and adjudicative processes and policies. Participate in simulated online negotiation, mediation, and arbitration to gain experience in dispute resolution utilizing IT. Prerequisite(s): DISR 502, DISR 504, DISR 506, and DISR 514.

After completing the foundational courses in legal research, legal analysis and writing and the legal process, this core course includes in-depth coverage on topics on the Legal Nurse Consultant’s role. Topics include: professional negligence, product liability, toxic tort, criminal litigation, life care planning and damage assessment, the nurse as expert witness, working with experts, preparation for and evaluation of deposition and trial testimony, medical records and case analysis, medical literature research, client interviews and communication, independent medical examinations, discovery/disclosure, alternative dispute resolution and mediation, trial preparation and trial practice, and the Legal Nurse Consultant’s role in the insurance industry and in risk management. The course includes guidance on business principles for the Legal Nurse Consultant: ethics, professionalism, and standard practices. The course culminates with guidance on how to start a Legal Nurse Consulting business including how to write a business plan and marketing plan, how to grow a consulting business,

DISR 628: COMMUNITY BASED DISPUTE RESOLUTION PRACTICES (3 Credits) Students will engage in the study of Community Based Dispute Resolution Programs. This course will explore the relationship between community, in which the program has developed, and the dispute resolution system. It will also examine how these processes have been affected by the absorption of

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PARS 142: LEGAL ANALYSIS AND WRITING (3 Credits)

and general business practices. As the final project for the course, students write their own marketing plan and business plan.

A requisite for the capable paralegal is the ability to prepare professional legal documents. This comprehensive course provides the learner with indepth knowledge of the fundamentals of legal analysis and writing. Learners will first examine an overview of the legal system, including analytic principles and the legal process. They learn the specifics of legal analysis, including statutory analysis, case law and briefing, identifying and stating the issue, case application and counter analysis. Emphasis on application of these key principles in legal writing allows students to prepare interoffice memorandums, court briefs and general legal correspondence. Prerequisite(s): PARS 140.

PARS 120: PARALEGAL TODAY (3 Credits) This course is the core of the paralegal program. Learners learn the past, present and future of the paralegal profession, including the paralegal defined, educational options, techniques for marketing skills and career opportunities. Instruction focuses on ethics and professional responsibility, the organizational structure in the legal workplace, office culture and politics, preparing learners for the challenges of today’s paralegal. Learners receive a formal introduction to law by an overview examination of American Law, the court system and alternative dispute resolution, substantive law in its various forms, as well as administrative law and government regulation. Legal procedures and advanced skills involving civil litigation and trial procedures, criminal law, conducting interviews and investigations, using primary and secondary sources to legal research, the emerging technology of computer- assisted legal research, in addition to legal analysis and writing provide valuable insight and a solid foundation.

PARS 150: LITIGATION AND TRIAL PRACTICE (3 Credits) This course provides comprehensive coverage of the civil litigation practice for paralegals. It provides detailed information on the litigation process starting from the pre-suit investigation going through to an appeal. There is a special focus on the role of the lawyer and those responsibilities that may be delegated to the paralegal’ as well as, attention to litigation principles, lawyer client relationship and ethics, gathering evidence, deposition, trial preparation, and structure of a trial, judgments, and appeals.

PARS 134: ADMINISTRATIVE LAW (3 Credits) The continuing growth of administrative law and regulations make this course fundamental and essential to most law practices. The course covers the delegation of authority to agencies, legislation oversight, judicial review, disclosure of information, the administrative process, procedural due process, formal adjudication, rules and rulemaking, obtaining judicial review and more.

PARS 152: TORTS-PERSONAL INJURY LITIGATION (3 Credits) This course explores civil wrongs, and illustrates and explains the different types of tort recoveries that are allowed by law. Students learn the elements required to prove each tort, and defenses that may be posed, along with a step-by-step strategy for the preparation and settlement for each type of action. Topics include tort theory based upon negligence, products liability, libel, slander and malpractice.

PARS 140: LEGAL RESEARCH (3 Credits) This course is designed to teach the fundamentals of Legal Research. The learner will learn research tools and techniques necessary to find the actual law, but will also learn how to use the various secondary materials available, which assist in the research process. Some of the topics covered are: Case Reporters, Digests, Codes, Annotated Codes, Annotated Reporters, Loose-leaf Services, Legal Encyclopedias, Treatises and Computerized Research Services.

PARS 160: CONTRACTS (3 Credits) This course provides paralegal learners with a wellorganized, functional approach to the law of contracts. Paralegal learners learn an approach for analyzing contract problems they need for their professional assignments. Topics include the type of

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law to apply to contract transactions, when a contract is formed, when it is enforceable, a plaintiff’s allegation of breach, a defendant response to an allegation of breach, and the remedies available for a breach of contract.

consequences of separation and divorce. Students learn to draft common agreements, pleadings and other documents applicable to these topics.

PARS 162: TRUSTS, WILLS AND ESTATE ADMINISTRATION (3 Credits)

This course covers the law of immigration and the changes that have taken place in immigration law since September 11, 2001. It walks the student through the entire background, process, and tools essential for a legal professional’s mastery of immigration law.

PARS 230: IMMIGRATION LAW (3 Credits)

This course focuses on the basics of property law and its application to the main theme of wills, trusts, and estate administration. The laws that govern construction and administration of wills and trusts are covered in detail along with the roles of various participants in the process. Students will learn to develop an estate plan to dispose of assets and diminish or eliminate estate taxes through the effective use of wills and trusts. Ethics is addressed to prepare the paralegal student for the necessity to adhere to a prescribed set of rules and guidelines that apply to their work.

PARS 240: ENVIRONMENTAL LAW (3 Credits) This course provides an overview of the role other areas of law play in the development and implementation of these policies. Students will receive an introduction to law and the legal system including court structure and civil procedure. They will learn principles of American property law and examine common law theories and remedies for environmental harms and liabilities, as well as land use and regulation and constitutional issues in environmental regulation.

PARS 170: BUSINESS ORGANIZATIONS (3 Credits) This course prepares paralegal students for the practical aspects of the law of business organizations. It covers all issues that are typically encountered in working with business clients. Topics include the types of business organizations, formation of corporations, corporate financial structure, employment and compensation, as well as, operating and maintaining business entities.

PARS 250: INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY (3 Credits) This course covers four fields of intellectual property law; trademarks, copyrights, patents, and trade secrets. It covers topics such as the duration of rights, protection from infringement, and new and international developments in each field.

PARS 260: BANKRUPTCY LAW (3 Credits)

PARS 180: REAL PROPERTY (3 Credits)

This course gives a brief history of bankruptcy law, research aids, alternatives to bankruptcy, a discussion of the role of the various parties involved in the bankruptcy process, and an overview concerning eligibility and the selection of the appropriate bankruptcy chapter under which a bankruptcy should be filed. Emphasis is placed on the paralegal’s role in the fact gathering process and the interface with clients.

This course trains paralegals in the practice of modern real estate transactions. Topics covered are property ownership, surveys and legal descriptions of real property, easements, standard provisions found in real estate contracts, deeds, real estate finance, real estate lending, mortgages, foreclosures, title examinations, title insurance, real estate closings, condominiums, cooperatives, time-shares, and residential and commercial leases.

PARS 210: DOMESTIC RELATIONS (3 Credits)

PARS 270: SOCIAL SECURITY DISABILITY (3 Credits)

This course prepares paralegal students for the area of family law. Students are introduced to the legal principles and processes involved in the law of marriage, divorce, separation, support, custody and visitation, annulment and adoption, and tax

This course provides insight to the disability appeals process and complex administrative procedures that ultimately appear before a federal administrative law judge. Students will learn to understand and apply key legal issues in the successful

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representation of clients before the Social Security Administration generally, and the Office of Hearing and Appeals specifically.

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COLLEGE OF PSYCHOLOGY

College Objectives 1. Improved scores on APA Psychology skills testing from initial program test to final graduation test. 2. Competitive scores on GRE Psychology content area exams. 3. Admission to graduate programs. 4. Job acquisition in mental health or related positions. 5. Promotion within current job environment. 6. Learner satisfaction with learning upon completion of degrees. 7. Employer/organization satisfaction with employees/volunteers who complete training in specific areas.

Graduate Certificate in Art Therapy Graduate Certificate in Educational Psychology Graduate Certificate in Neuropsychology Master of Science in Psychology Master of Science in Expressive Arts Therapies

Principles

The WEU College of Psychology creates individualized learning experiences with documented outcomes to educate global mental health practitioners to better serve the least-served in humanity.

• • •

Goals: • •

The WEU College of Psychology strives to provide documented high quality mental health education. The WEU College of Psychology will design specific programs to address current global mental health crisis through collaboration with global and local mental health initiatives. The WEU College of Psychology will design individualized learning experiences using quality content, creative learning experiences, supportive scaffolding of learning support, service-learning, and pragmatic skill building to help individual learners gain the most from their educational experience with WEU and prepare them for the next step in their career path.

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The focus of education is on the individual learner. Learners, faculty and staff share the responsibility of all learning. Continual lifelong learning is essential for immediate and long-term success. Leadership, ethics and social responsibility are the foundation and the core of WEU College of Psychology Graduates. Awareness of Global Mental Health needs and Global Mental Health Practitioners’ responsibilities are central in all activities.


GRADUATE CERTIFICATE IN ART THERAPY

Fulfill the University’s Graduate Admissions Requirements, complete the University’s Admission Process in the Admissions section of this catalog and meet the following special Program requirements:

Program Description

Must hold a bachelor’s degree in psychology, related mental health field or a visual art degree with a minor in a mental health area. Learners must submit a portfolio of 20 images of visual art work. Learners must demonstrate undergraduate work in both psychology and the visual arts.

World Education University’s Graduate Certificate in Art Therapies is designed to explore Art Therapy as both a creative process and a profession. It is the use of Art to foster awareness, clarity, vitality, and wholeness. This program provides experiences, education, and training in Art and Psychology that leads to caring, giving, compassionate graduates. We use guest specialists, lectures, demonstrations, the seminar approach, class presentations and other education methods, but our learning goes beyond the usual. We promote the value and importance of non-verbal expression through conceptualizing problems and solutions by making art; using story and narrative; creating research journals; playing games and roles and by using creative and expressive experiences that utilize all of the Arts.

Program Structure Successful completion of the program is granted upon completion of the credits/courses listed below: EXPT 610 Introduction to Art Therapy EXPT 612 History and Theory of Art Therapy EXPT 620 Art Therapy Practice and Assessment EXPT 630 Professional Functioning and Standards in Art Therapy EXPT 640 Art Therapy Media and Techniques EXPT 650 Multicultural Art Therapy EXPT 670 Practicum I in Expressive Arts Therapies EXPT 671 Internship I in Expressive Arts Therapies EXPT 672 Internship II in Expressive Arts Therapies

Program Objectives Graduates of the Graduate Certificate in Art Therapy will demonstrate the following competencies: • • • • •

Demonstrate fluency in art therapy approaches. Demonstrate competency in case conceptualization and clinical practice in Art Therapy. Cultural competency within the practice of art therapy. Relate foundational knowledge of research. and science in art therapy approaches. Pursue an ethical and professional identity as an art therapist.

Total Credits Required: 30

Admission Requirements 156


GRADUATE CERTIFICATE IN EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY

practice or hold a master’s degree in a mental health field.

Program Structure Successful completion of the program is granted upon completion of the credits/courses listed below:

Program Description

PSYC 620 Introduction to Educational Psychology PSYC 622 Educational Psychology for Teachers PSYC 624 Theories and Principles of Learning PSYC 626 Motivation in Learning PSYC 628 Educational Assessment

World Education University’s Graduate Certificate in Educational Psychology is designed to provide specialized study for professionals in the Mental Health fields.

Program Objectives

Total Credits Required: 15

Graduates of the Graduate Certificate in Educational Psychology will demonstrate the following competencies: • • • • • •

Act reflective in their practice, selfassessment and self- care in the field of Educational psychology. Relate effectively and meaningfully with individuals, groups and/or communities in the field of Educational psychology. Understand scientific knowledge and methods in the field of Educational psychology. Apply evidence-based practices in the field of Educational psychology. Demonstrate knowledge in assessment and diagnosis in the field of Educational psychology. Develop interventions designed to alleviate suffering and promote health and well-being in the field of Educational psychology. Consult and provide expert guidance in response to a client’s needs in the field of Educational psychology.

Admission Requirements Must be enrolled concurrently in a master’s program in a mental health field or show equivalent training as designated by the standards of their country for mental health 157


GRADUATE CERTIFICATE IN NEUROPSYCHOLOGY

Program Structure Successful completion of the program is granted upon completion of the credits/courses listed below:

Program Description

PSYC 610 Introduction to Brain and Behavior in Psychology PSYC 612 Biological Basis in Behavior PSYC 614 Cognitive and Affective Basis in Behavior PSYC 615 Cognitive Assessment PSYC 616 Psychology of Linguistics PSYC 618 Cognitive Neuroscience of Perception

World Education University’s Graduate Neuropsychology is designed to provide specialized study for professionals in the Mental Health fields.

Program Objectives Graduates of the Graduate Certificate in Neuropsychology program will demonstrate that following competencies: • • • • • •

Total Credits Required: 18

Possess reflective in their practice, selfassessment and self- care in the field of neuropsychology. Relate effectively and meaningfully with individuals, groups and/or communities in the field of neuropsychology. Understand scientific knowledge and methods in the field of neuropsychology. Apply evidence-based practices in the field of neuropsychology. Demonstrate knowledge in assessment and diagnosis in the field of neuropsychology. Develop interventions designed to alleviate suffering and promote health and well-being in the field of neuropsychology. Consult and provide expert guidance in response to a client’s needs in the field of neuropsychology.

Admission Requirements Must be enrolled concurrently in a master’s program in a mental health field or show equivalent training as designated by the standards of their country for mental health practice or hold a master’s degree in a mental health field. 158


MASTER OF SCIENCE IN PSYCHOLOGY

• • •

Program Description World Education University’s Master’s Degree in Psychology is designed to prepare learners with the academic knowledge and necessary skills to prosper in a variety of mental health care settings. Focus areas within in the masters in psychology include an Engineering Psychology, Quantitative Psychology, Industrial/Organizational Psychology, Forensic Psychology, Neuropsychology, Educational Psychology, and Cognitive Behavioral Psychology. The Master’s in Psychology Program is structured as a terminal degree open to qualified learners with diverse backgrounds who wish to develop or improve their academic and work qualifications in psychology.

• •

Program Objectives Graduates of the Master of Science in Psychology program will demonstrate the following competencies: • • • • • • •

Apply evidence-based practices in the field of psychology. Demonstrate knowledge in assessment and diagnosis in the field of psychology. Develop interventions designed to alleviate suffering and promote health and well-being in the field of psychology. Consult and provide expert guidance in response to a client’s needs in the field of psychology. Provide instruction, disseminate knowledge, and evaluate acquisition of knowledge and skills in professional psychology. Provide supervision and training in the professional knowledge base of enhancing and monitoring the professional functioning of others. Possess knowledge of key issues and concepts in related disciplines and be able to interact with professionals from those disciplines. Manage the direct delivery of services and/or the administration of organizations, programs or agencies.

Admission Requirements Fulfill the University’s Graduate Admissions Requirements, complete the University’s Admission Process in the Admissions section of this catalog and meet the following special Program requirements:

Develop professional values and attitudes in the field of psychology. Be aware and sensitive to individual and cultural diversity in the field of psychology. Follow ethical legal standards and policies in the field of psychology. Be reflective in their practice, selfassessment, and self-care in the field of psychology. Relate effectively and meaningfully with individuals, groups and/or communities in the field of psychology. Understand scientific knowledge and methods in the field of psychology. Generate research and/or evaluation of research in the field of psychology.

• •

Learners must hold a bachelor’s degree in psychology or related area. Learners must demonstrate competency as a learner at the bachelor’s level.

Program Structure Core Courses Specialization Course Elective Courses

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24 credits 15 credits 21 credits


Successful completion of the program is granted upon completion of the credits/courses listed below: CORE COURSES PSYC 600 Lifespan Developmental Psychology PSYC 602 Research Methods in Psychology PSYC 604 Psychology of Social Behavior PSYC 606 Statistics in Psychology PSYC 607 Theories of Personality PSYC 608 Law, Ethics and Standards in Mental Health PSYC 609 Foundations in Psychopathology PSYC 613 Cognitive Psychology SPECIALIZATION COURSES Specialization in Industrial and Organizational Psychology PSYC 646 Objective Assessment PSYC 650 Management and Leadership PSYC 622 Interpersonal Conflict and Negotiation PSYC 655 Organizational Culture and Design PSYC 658 Performance Management ELECTIVE COURSES In addition to the courses listed above, students in the Master of Science in Psychology program must choose 7 additional courses from COUN, EXPT, or PSYC. These courses must be at either the 500 or 600 level. Total Credits Required: 60

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MASTER OF SCIENCE IN EXPRESSIVE ARTS THERAPIES*

Admission Process in the Admissions section of this catalog and meet the following special Program requirements: • •

Program Description

World Education University’s Master’s Degree in Expressive Arts Therapies is designed to prepare learners with academic knowledge and necessary skills to prosper in a variety of mental health care settings. Focus areas within the masters in expressive arts therapies include Art Therapy, Music Therapy, and Play Therapy. The Master’s in Expressive Arts Therapies is structured as a terminal degree open to qualified learners with diverse backgrounds who wish to develop or improve their academic and work qualifications in the expressive arts therapies.

Program Structure Core Courses Specialization Course Elective Courses Field Experience

CORE COURSES COUN 601 Counseling Theories COUN 605 Applied Skills for Group Dynamics and Facilitation PSYC 600 Lifespan Developmental Psychology PSYC 602 Research Methods in Psychology PSYC 608 Law, Ethics and Standards in Mental Health PSYC 609 Foundations in Psychopathology

Graduates of the Master of Science in Expressive Art Therapies will demonstrate the following competencies:

• • •

24 credits 18 credits 9 credits 9 credits

Successful completion of the program is granted upon completion of the credits/courses listed below:

Program Objectives

Learners must hold a bachelor’s degree in psychology or related area. Learners must demonstrate competency as a learner at the bachelor’s level. Learners must demonstrate competency in arts specialization area.

Demonstrate fluency in counseling psychology fundamentals and art therapies approaches. Demonstrate competency in case conceptualization and clinical practice in Art Therapies. Cultural competency within the practice of art therapies. Relate foundational knowledge of research and science to counseling psychology fundamentals and art therapy approaches. Pursue an ethical and professional identity as an art therapist.

SPECIALIZATION COURSES (Choose 1 specialization) Specialization in Art Therapy EXPT 610 Introduction to Art Therapy EXPT 612 History and Theory of Art Therapy EXPT 620 Art Therapy Practice and Assessment EXPT 630 Professional Functioning and Standards in Art Therapy EXPT 640 Art Therapy Media and Techniques EXPT 650 Multicultural Art Therapy

Admission Requirements Fulfill the University’s Graduate Admissions Requirements, complete the University’s

Specialization in Play Therapy 161


EXPT 622 Play Diagnoses and Assessment EXPT 624 Therapeutic Powers of Play EXPT 664 Sand Tray Play: A Therapeutic Process EXPT 660 Gestalt Play, Role Play and Psychodrama EXPT 665 Child Centered Play Therapy EXPT 668 Developmental Play Therapy FIELDWORK COURSES EXPT 670 Practicum I in Expressive Arts Therapies EXPT 671 Internship I in Expressive Arts Therapies EXPT 672 Internship II in Expressive Arts Therapies ELECTIVE COURSES In addition to the courses listed above, students in the Master of Science in Psychology program must choose 3 additional courses from COUN, EXPT, or PSYC. These courses must be at either the 500 or 600 level. Total Credits Required: 60

*This program does not meet the standards for attaining the USA ATR credential at this time.

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COLLEGE OF PSYCHOLOGY COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

COUN 605: APPLIED SKILLS FOR GROUP DYNAMICS AND FACILITATION (3 Credits) This graduate level course explores counseling as a relationship in which the counselor helps the client mobilize resources to resolve problems or modify attitudes and values. Group counseling is an integral part of that process. This course is presented as a comparative study of counseling theories and practices as applied to groups, introducing major approaches, strategies, and applied skills in group counseling and examining the purpose and function of different types of counseling groups. To gain experience learners will participate in several groupcounseling sessions in the classroom setting. Learners gain awareness of their own personal philosophy of the group process and which approaches are most appropriate to particular situations.

COUN 600: INTRODUCTION TO COUNSELING (3 Credits) This introductory graduate level course covers the theory and philosophy of counseling, the distinction between counseling and psychotherapy, personality types and development, learning theory, and trait theory. Learners become involved in the counseling experience and investigate the variables of client, counselor, setting, methods, and expectations, as well as basic theories of client-centered counseling, behavioral counseling, and counseling based on the theory of individual differences. Learners learn to handle real-life situations with confidence.

COUN 606: CASE MANAGEMENT: ASSESSMENT, ORIENTATION AND TREATMENT (3 Credits)

COUN 601: COUNSELING THEORIES (3 Credits) This graduate level introductory course covers the theory and philosophy of counseling, the distinction between counseling and psychotherapy, personality types and development, learning theory, and trait theory. Learners become involved in the counseling experience and investigate the variables of client, counselor, setting, methods, and expectations, as well as basic theories of client-centered counseling, behavioral counseling, and counseling based on the theory of individual differences. Learners learn to handle real-life situations with confidence.

This graduate level course Focuses on the chemically dependent person, this course covers initial intake, assessment of the problem, orientation of the patient to a specific program, treatment planning, reports and record keeping, recovery planning for the patient and family, and aftercare and follow-up. By the end of the course, learners will understand and be able to demonstrate case management skills from initial intake to continued recovery, as well as skills needed in any treatment setting, including inpatient or outpatient hospitalization, social model programs, and publicly funded treatment models.

COUN 603: CRISIS INTERVENTION: THEORY AND PRACTICE SKILLS (3 credits)

COUN 608: COUNSELING IN COMMUNITY PROGRAMS (3 Credits)

This graduate level course presents a basic crisis intervention model along with appropriate clinical presentations of persons in crisis in a variety of settings, e.g., loss, AIDS and HIV related, substance abuse, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and victimization. Topics include defining crisis, when crisis is a danger, ethical and professional considerations, and use of self in crisis counseling. Learners learn about the theory and skills, mental health triage, cultural sensitivity, self-care, community resource information, referrals, and networking.

This graduate level course covers the foundations, contextual knowledge and basic knowledge and skills needed to work as a competent counselor within community settings. This course provides emphasis on helping clients in variety of settings and stages of needs, such as crisis, referral, support, and advocacy.

COUN 609: MULTICULTURAL COUNSELING (3 Credits) This graduate level course addresses the similarities and differences among various culturally diverse

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groups, and informs counselors of the characteristics and processes necessary to become a culturally skilled counselor.

considerations; and treat special populations (women, seniors, adolescents, and ethnic groups) and chemically dependent people and alcoholics.

COUN 610: CULTURAL, SOCIAL, AND HISTORICAL OVERVIEW OF ALCOHOL AND DRUG RELATED PROBLEMS (3 Credits)

COUN 615: DUAL DIAGNOSIS: THE SYNERGISM OF CHEMICAL DEPENDENCY AND PSYCHIATRIC ILLNESS (3 Credits)

This graduate level course explores how history, culture, and context frame the social and policy response that enables substance abuse treatment. The historical, political, economic, and cultural factors contributing to and defining substance abuse problems are examined. These factors are emphasized because they are important, critical, and supplemental contributors to the biological, medical, and disease model definitions of substance abuse. In particular, the differential impact of substance abuse problems in various communities and demographic groups is examined, e.g., African American, Asian, Latino, gender, age, LGBT, and socio-economic status.

This graduate level course provides a basic differential diagnosis framework for counselors working with a chemically dependent population. It introduces the major psychiatric disorders and how they mirror/interact with substance abuse disorders. Through methods such as case histories and roleplaying, participants learn about prevalence, symptoms, assessment, treatment planning, and interventions.

COUN 620: HISTORY and THEORY OF SCHOOL AND CAREER COUNSELING (3 Credits) This graduate level course provides an introduction to the historical, philosophical, and psychological, and sociological bases of guidance and counseling in the schools. The developmental model of school counseling will be introduced along with state and national standards. Learners will learn the counselor’s role as facilitation for learners’ personal/social growth, academic development, and career development as well as advocate, leader and change agent.

COUN 612: CHEMICAL DEPENDENCY I: DISEASE, SYMPTOMS, DIAGNOSIS, PHARMACOLOGY AND RECOVERY (3 Credits) This graduate level course focuses on the disease of chemical dependency and corresponding symptoms. By the end of the course, learners will be able to understand the disease concept of chemical dependency and drugs used to treat it; identify symptoms of different types of chemical dependency; classify and identify major drugs; describe the development and use of psychoactive drugs throughout history; recognize signs of crosstolerant, addictive, and synergistic effects of drugs; and identify signs of drug toxicity.

COUN 622: ADMINISTRATION AND LEADERSHIP OF SCHOOL AND CAREER COUNSELING (3 Credits) This graduate level course introduces learners to dynamics of family interaction and methods of prevention and intervention in family problems. Learners will analyze the family interaction, and propose remedial intervention. This course presents the learner with the opportunity to observe the application of the systematic theoretical framework and objective procedures described by Adler and developed by Dreikurs. The course is a demonstration/ discussion type in which the learner has the opportunity to interact as the “counselor” and focus on family.

COUN 613: CHEMICAL DEPENDENCY II: INTERVENTION, TREATMENT, MANAGEMENT, PATIENT HEALTH PROMOTION AND RECOVERY (3 Credits) In this graduate level course learners learn to assess the physiological effects of alcohol and other drugs; tailor withdrawal plans to each patient’s alcohol/ drug-use history; recognize signs and symptoms of toxicity, withdrawal, and overdose; identify principles of detoxification and withdrawal from each major drug group (including multiple dependencies); be made aware of ethical

COUN 624: CONSULTATION WITH PARENTS AND CHILDREN (3 Credits) This graduate level course will explore theoryderived practices regarding communication and

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physical, behavioral and spiritual dimensions of the disorder and its treatment are fully examined.

consultation with parents and teachers with respect to problems they encounter with children. It will also cover educational and clinical applications, issues regarding information sharing with other professionals, collaborating with other professionals and making referrals.

EXPT 610: INTRODUCTION TO ART THERAPY (3 Credits) This introductory level graduate course in art therapy will acquaint learners with the definitions, historical roots, theoretical underpinnings, and basic elements of the field of art therapy.

COUN 626: MEASUREMENT FOR SCHOOL AND CAREER COUNSELING (3 Credits) This graduate level course is designed to allow learners to gain knowledge and skills regarding the use of tests by both school counselors and school psychologists, including the who, what, when, where, why and how of assessment; the test selection process; administration procedures and communication of test results both orally and in writing to a variety of audiences.

EXPT 612: HISTORY AND THEORY OF ART THERAPY (3 Credits) This graduate level course explores the history of field of Art Therapy through studying its founding members, related disciplines and traditional populations. The history of Art Therapy is taught in a reflective manner to help learners relate the history of Art Therapy to Current Practices in Art Therapy.

COUN 628: COUNSELING FOR CAREER ADJUSTMENT AND CHANGE (3 Credits)

EXPT 620: ART THERAPY PRACTICE AND ASSESSMENT (3 Credits)

This graduate level course will develop career counseling competencies uniquely related to the needs of adult clients who are faced with problems of career adjustment and change. The course includes theoretical constructs and models to prepare career counseling professionals for work in business and industry, adult schools and higher education, and various private settings.

This graduate level course helps learners to gain a comprehensive understanding of art-based assessments for the art therapist. The historical background as well as the development and use of projective techniques and diagnostic tools are examined. Methods of administration and interpretation of the assessment techniques are presented.

COUN 630: FOUNDATIONS IN DISASTER RELIEF MENTAL HEALTH (3 Credits)

EXPT 622: PLAY DIAGNOSIS AND ASSESSMENT (3 Credits)

The purpose of this basic level Disaster Services training is to prepare licensed mental health professionals to provide for and respond to the psychological needs of people across the continuum of disaster preparedness, response and recovery.

In this graduate level course you will learn about the process of symbolic and social play development. Topics include an overview of the neurocognitive basis of development, an examination of social and symbolic play from a functional skills perspective, the variations in the developmental sequence caused by developmental disorders, with an emphasis on mental retardation and autism, and a review of both structured and informal techniques of assessment.

COUN 632: TRAUMATIC STRESS (3 Credits) This course is a comprehensive study of the disorder “Post-Traumatic Stress.” A well-defined mental health diagnosis, learners will study all facets of the disorder, including therapeutic outcomes and stress management interventions. The course is presented from a “holistic view” toward the disorder and many dimensions of therapeutic interventions are presented. Learners will study the symptomology, causes, medical and mental health interventions, as well as holistic approaches to working with clients and achieving stress management outcomes. The

EXPT 624: THERAPEUTIC POWERS OF PLAY (3 Credits) This graduate level course explores the many therapeutic elements of play, across the developmental stages from early toddlerhood through latency. Definitions of pathology--that is, what it is that play must address--will be discussed

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Gestalt approach to assessment, limit-setting, goalsetting, the developing sense of self, and the therapeutic environment.

as a basis to understand the healing attributes of play. This is done both developmentally and through the prism of Piagetian and Psychoanalytic/Object Relations theories.

EXPT 662: STRUCTURED PLAY THERAPY: COGNITIVE- BEHAVIORAL, PRE-SET, RESOLUTIONS (3 Credits)

EXPT 630: PROFESSIONAL FUNCTIONING AND STANDARDS IN ART THERAPY (3 Credits) This graduate level course provides an overview of the laws, ethics, and related issues affecting profession practice in Art Therapy. All aspects of professional functioning, including history, roles, relationships to other mental health providers, organizational structures, resume building and interviewing skills and the credentialing and licensure process will be explored through lecture, discussion, projects, and assignments.

This graduate level course covers a wide-range of structured play therapy techniques and their theoretical underpinnings, including pre-set and prearranged play, therapist-staged dramas, facilitation of adaptive resolutions in child-generated play, contingency play, redirection, distancing, limitsetting, time-limited play therapy, and cognitivebehavioral play therapy techniques. They include the use of the Socratic method, modeling, correction of cognitive distorts, perspective-taking, and behavioral rehearsal.

EXPT 640: ART THERAPY MEDIA AND TECHNIQUES (3 Credits)

EXPT 664: SAND-TRAY PLAY: A THERAPEUTIC PROCESS (3 Credits)

This graduate level course will address non-verbal and verbal communications by examining symbolic representation. The use of art in the process of therapy is discussed. The capacity to gain selfawareness and understanding of others is explored and related to the learner’s professional and clinical development.

This graduate level course introduces Sandplay, a nonverbal therapeutic process developed by Dora Kalff, a psychologist and close collaborator of C.G. Jung. Its powerful healing attributes help clients bring into consciousness that which was previously hidden. This course explores the practicalities of sandplay therapy as a treatment modality and demonstrates how it is used with children and adults. The historical development of this international technique in addition to its theoretical foundations and research documentation will also be included.

EXPT 650: MULTICULTURAL ART THERAPY (3 Credits) This course is designed to increase students’ knowledge, insight and skills related to 1.) The delivery of multicultural psychological services/ art therapy and 2.) Effective collaboration in a multicultural milieu. Students explore competencies required to increase their ability to work effectively and ethically in a complex and diverse social world. The application of theoretical and practical implications are integrated into the course and topics will include race and ethnicity, sex and gender, sexual orientation, social class, and age and ability.

EXPT 665: CHILD CENTERED PLAY THERAPY (3 Credits) Child-Centered Play Therapy (CCPT ) is a systematic treatment approach to child-generated play. This course is a combination of didactic presentations and experiential activities that detail the four major elements of CCPT technique: structuring, reflective listening, fantasy play, and limit setting. Also included are the history and theory of CCPT, selection of toys, types of play, assessment for termination, combining CCPT with other models of child therapy, and the benefits and limitations of the CCPT model.

EXPT 660: GESTALT PLAY, ROLE PLAY and PSYCHODRAMA (3 Credits) This graduate level course will build upon the theoretical foundations of Gestalt therapy, this course emphasizes the methods of Gestalt play therapy, role-play, and psychodrama by using puppet play, dramatic enactment, art, floor play, sand tray, and stories. The course also covers the

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EXPT 668: DEVELOPMENTAL PLAY THERAPY (3 Credits)

and use arts therapy techniques in addressing those problems. Learners participate in a supervised experience of an arts therapist through working with clients, participating in clinical meetings, keeping case notes and participating in treatment planning. The learner will complete a minimum of 300 hours of client contact and 20 hours of supervision by site supervisor (masters level counselor or related area). Learners will also participate in 30 hours of group (8:1 ratio) supervision with a university supervisor.

This graduate level course on developmental play therapy theory and application methods covers the role of play within physical and social-emotional growth and secure attachment. Guided Interaction, a play therapy model to instruct parents in the process, will be introduced, and methods to assist parents in shifting parenting responses and developing nurturing skills will be taught.

PSYC 600: LIFESPAN DEVELOPMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY (3 Credits)

EXPT 670: PRACTICUM I IN EXPRESSIVE ARTS THERAPIES (3 Credits)

This graduate level course, Lifespan Developmental Psychology focuses on the following content areas: the study of life span development; genetics, prenatal development, and childbirth; infancy and toddlerhood; early childhood; middle childhood; adolescence; early adulthood; middle adulthood; late adulthood; and death and dying.

This graduate level course offers the learners an opportunity to learn about typical problems brought to a therapist and art therapy techniques that can be used in addressing those problems. Learners experience the role of the arts therapist through onsite observation, classroom discussions, reading and personal arts process. Learners observe and work with an arts/expressive therapist in the clinical or work setting, share experiences and pose questions about their clinical placements. The learner will complete a minimum of 100 hours of observation and 35 hours of practice at sites and 4 hours of supervision by site supervisor. Learners will also participate in 20 hours of group (8:1 ratio) supervision with a university supervisor.

PSYC 602: RESEARCH METHODS IN PSYCHOLOGY (3 Credits) This graduate level course will review and discuss basic and inferential statistics. Emphasis is placed upon the role of statistics in the design and decisionmaking, research methodology, analysis, interpretation of research design and results.

PSYC 604: PSYCHOLOGY OF SOCIAL BEHAVIOR (3 Credits)

EXPT 671: INTERNSHIP I IN EXPRESSIVE ARTS THERAPIES (3 Credits)

This graduate level course presents an analysis of the way individuals think, feel and behave in social situations and what factors influence our social behavior. The dynamics of individual and group behavior, and the perception of gender and ethnic differences as applied to the development of attitudes and values are also presented.

This graduate level course offers the learners an opportunity to work with typical problems brought to a therapist and use arts therapy techniques in addressing those problems. Learners participate in a supervised experience of an arts therapist through working with clients, participating in clinical meetings, keeping case notes and participating in treatment planning. The learner will complete a minimum of 150 hours of client contact and 10 hours of supervision by site supervisor (masters level counselor or related area). Learners will also participate in 15 hours of group (8:1 ratio) supervision with a university supervisor.

PSYC 606: STATISTICS IN PSYCHOLOGY (3 Credits)

EXPT 672: INTERNSHIP II IN EXPRESSIVE ARTS THERAPIES (3 Credits)

This graduate level course provides an introduction to descriptive and inferential statistics. Topics include measures of central tendency, measures of variability, correlation and regression, sampling distributions, hypothesis testing procedures including t-tests and analysis of variance.

This course offers the learners an opportunity to work with typical problems brought to a therapist

PSYC 607: THEORIES OF PERSONALITY (3 Credits) 167


PSYC 613: COGNITIVE PSYCHOLOGY (3 Credits)

This graduate level course reviews personality psychology. This course will examine the question, “What is personality?” in-depth and from a number of perspectives by analyzing how different concepts of personality have developed and progressed over time.

This graduate level course will concentrate on the classic topics in adult cognition: memory, attention, categorization, problem solving, reasoning, and decision-making. Special attention will be paid to the relationship between logic and the psychology of reasoning and to the relationship between linguistics and the psychology of language.

PSYC 608: LAW, ETHICS, AND STANDARDS IN MENTAL HEALTH (3 Credits)

PSYC 614: COGNITIVE AND AFFECTIVE BASIS IN BEHAVIOR (3 Credits)

This graduate level course familiarizes learners with both legal and ethical responsibilities associated with the practice of Counseling. Learners learn about appropriate roles and behavior to avoid liability and prevent harm to clients. Issues such as confidentiality, duty to treat, responsibility to third parties, ethical decision-making, and legal remedies for discrimination experienced by people in or in need of recovery from alcoholism and/or drug addiction are explored.

Learners investigate how human behavior is shaped and modulated by cognition, affect, and their interaction. Findings from the fields of perception, motivation, language, memory, and learning are covered. Topics include artificial intelligence, fuzzy logic, metacognition, Gestalt theory, Gibson’s ecological view, and Marr’s computational approach.

PSYC 615: COGNITIVE ASSESSMENT (3 Credits)

PSYC 609: FOUNDATIONS IN PSYCHOPATHOLOGY (3 Credits)

The graduate level course will review psychometric theory, and cover cultural issues, biases and theories of intellectual assessment. The course will also cover development and standardization of the WAIS. Learners must demonstrate proficiency in WAIS administration, scoring, and interpretation in order to successfully complete this course.

This graduate level course provides an overview of the nature and history of abnormal behavior and then examines the predominant models underlying our understanding of abnormality. Detailed descriptions and empirical research relating to a range of clinical problems form the core of the course.

PSYC 616: PSYCHOLOGY OF LINGUISTICS (3 Credits)

PSYC 610: BRAIN AND BEHAVIOR IN PSYCHOLOGY (3 Credits)

Determine how humans encode language in their brains, so that they can produce and understand an unlimited variety of utterances in context. Language and other forms of communication; how children acquire language; biological basis of language; the structure of language -- phonology (sound structure), syntax (grammatical structure) and semantics (meaning).

This introductory graduate level course is designed to help learners explore, understand, and analyze the relationship between the biological basis of behavior and how the brain interacts with the individual’s environment to shape individual identity. Brain & Behavior is a prerequisite course in a series of courses that emphasize personal growth and change.

PSYC 618: COGNITIVE NEUROSCIENCE OF PERCEPTION (3 Credits)

PSYC 612: BIOLOGICAL BASIS IN BEHAVIOR (3 Credits)

Advanced seminar on the brain basis of human perception. Topics include sensory perception, object and face recognition, word perception, mental imagery, and spatiotemporal neuroimaging of brain systems for perception.

This course surveys the structural and functional relations of the central nervous system, physiology, sensory processes, and behavior. Study is divided into two subsections: (1) physiological psychology and (2) evolution, genetics, and behavior. Learners become familiar with the biology of memory and the biological/genetic aspects of psychiatric disorders.

PSYC 620: INTRODUCTION TO EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY (3 Credits) 168


administering and interpreting, a variety of assessment measures typically used in schools. The presentation of assessment information in an acceptable format to parents and teachers will also be addressed.

This introductory graduate level Educational Psychology is a course designed to explore theory and research related to teaching and learning in formal educational settings, including K-12 schools, higher education, and adult settings. The emphasis is on studying those factors under the control of educators when engaged in the teaching/ learning process.

PSYC 630: ENGINEERING PSYCHOLOGY (3 Credits)

This course is designed to be an in-depth overview of research and theory on learning and cognition, social and personal development, individual differences, motivation and assessment of learner learning. Particular attention will be given to the application of these topics to classroom settings.

Survey of the applied areas of psychology which have proven useful in the design of equipment for human use and in the design of man-machine systems.. The content is basically psychological, but the emphasis is on how psychological knowledge can be applied in the design or organization of machines, equipment or systems intended for human use. Examples are drawn from a wide range of areas.

PSYC 624: THEORIES AND PRINCIPLES OF LEARNING (3 Credits)

PYSC 632: ADVANCED ENGINEERING PSYCHOLOGY (3 Credits)

This graduate level course provides survey of classical and contemporary theory and research related to human cognition. Topics include the study of learning processes, memory and higher cognitive functions. It explores relevant research on traditional and contemporary issues in learning. The emphasis of this course is on human learning and behavior modification.

This course is intended for learners who have already had an introduction to engineering psychology and wish to learn more about selected topics in the area. The course is run in a seminar format, with learners selecting topics of interest, doing library research and presenting in class those studies and issues they have found as their work progresses. In their presentation learners will put together all they have found in a “state-of-the-art� summary for their particular topic.

PSYC 622: EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY FOR TEACHERS (3 Credits)

PSYC 626: MOTIVATION IN LEARNING (3 Credits)

PYSC 640: PSYCHOMETRIC THEORY (3 Credits)

This graduate level course will investigate what it means to be properly motivated, why individuals often develop problematic motivational patterns, and how proper motivation can be fostered. This course explores various theories of motivation and their application to learning and teaching. A variety of theories, issues and strategies, such as goal setting, learned helplessness, self-construal, selfregulation, attributions of causality and group behavior, concerned with achievement-related contexts, are discussed.

This course is designed to give learners a broad understanding of psychometric principles related to psychological assessment. Special emphasis will be placed on understanding the science of psychological assessment including reviewing statistics which are foundational to the field of psychological assessment, the development of tests, reliability, validity, development of norms and item analysis. Classical and Modern Test Theory (including IRT) will be reviewed.

PSYC 628: EDUCATIONAL ASSESSMENT (3 Credits)

PSYC 642: INTERMEDIATE STATISTICS (3 Credits)

This graduate level course will provide educators with the skills needed to evaluate, explain, and apply assessment and testing data to inform classroom instruction and education decisions. The course will outline procedures for designing or selecting,

An extension of elementary descriptive and inferential statistics through basic statistical research designs, including analysis of variance and covariance.

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PSYC 644: ADVANCED STATISTICS (3 Credits)

mediation. Topics include: methodology for studying conflicts, individual differences and negotiation styles, the effect of physical components and culture on adversaries, strategic choices, social dilemmas, negotiators’ power and effective third party intervention in interpersonal and group settings.

Focus on statistical methods appropriate for data in which standard assumptions such as normality and equality of variance are not met. Covers approaches for problems from one sample estimates of location to nonparametric multivariate techniques such as factor analysis.

PSYC 654: ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOR (3 Credits)

PSYC 646: OBJECTIVE ASSESSMENT (3 Credits)

This course explores organizations at the individual level, examining the relationship between employees and managers, as well as employees and teams. It examines the factors that drive productivity and success in organizations, including motivation, diversity, work stress, conflict and negotiation, decision-making, personality, and attitudes.

This graduate level course combines an exploration of the construct of personality and the conceptual issues in the measurement of personality with specific training in the applied skill of personality assessment using structured tests, primarily the MMPI-2.

PSYC 648: INTEGRATIVE ASSESSMENT (3 Credits)

PSYC 655: ORGANIZATIONAL AND CULTURE DESIGN (3 Credits)

This course will review the major clinical and conceptual aspects of a comprehensive psychological assessment report and a checklist model will be introduced to assist the learner in the integration of clinical and psychological test findings. By the end of this course participants should be well on their way to being able to write a report of psychological assessment at the level of complexity expected of a clinical psychology intern at the beginning of the internship year.

This course explores organizations at the organizational level, examining the relationship between culture and organization design, as well as structure and environment. It examines the impact of change in strategy and technology; environmental turbulence and organizational maturity; and reviews organization development as a means to advance the changing nature of organization. Supporting topics include corporate ethics, life cycle and control, organizational climate, and globalization.

PSYC 650: MANAGEMENT AND LEADERSHIP (3 Credits)

PSYC 656: CONSUMER BEHAVIOR THEORY AND PRACTICE (3 Credits)

Management and leadership is the heart of organizational life. This course examines how managers and leaders create results by empowering culture and organizational commitment. Leading with the premise that there is no ideal leadership style and that an effective style depends on realistic assessment of the organizational culture, life cycle, and market environment, learners apply management and leadership theory to their own work environment, evaluating how specific situations can be effectively addressed.

The course aims to provide learners with an understanding of consumer behavior; to acquaint learners with the factors, which influence consumer behavior through the decision-making process and cultures of consumption; and to outline the links between consumer behavior research and marketing theory and practice.

PSYC 658: PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT (3 Credits) This course aims to course provide learners with a wealth of knowledge and skills to achieve measurable and sustainable improvements to performance at both individual and organizational levels.

PSYC 652: INTERPERSONAL CONFLICT AND NEGOTIATION (3 Credits) This seminar will examine social psychological theories for conflict escalation and reduction of conflicts. The class will focus on research findings concerning social conflict, negotiation and

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