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E-assessment student survey results Authors: Dave Westwood & Agi Ryder, Research and Innovations Team, CLTE, April 2011

Executive summary Context:

This report describes the results of the online student survey conducted between December 2010 and March 2011 as part of the university-wide e-assessment project. The aim of the survey was to elicit the views of students studying modules that form part of the project. We were looking to understand students' experience of submitting assessment and receiving feedback online.

Methodology:

The collection of data was carried out through a mixed methods design questionnaire. The questionnaire was constructed of three distinct parts: • demographic information about the respondents • experience of e-submission • experience of e-feedback Once the data had been cleaned to take out any partial respondents or non completions the sample comprised n, 570 students.

Summary of results: Benefits •

The student experience of e-submission has been very positive. The majority of the sample reported their experience as being good or excellent, and almost three quarters of respondents reported the desire to submit online in the future. The main benefits of e-submission described by our respondents were that it is quick, easy, and allows for the fitting of submission into their lives and not dictating their lives by needing to travel into the University. The cost savings made by students in not needing to purchase paper, ink and travel costs were also highlighted as benefits of e-assessment.

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Challenges • The challenges included system specific issues as well as wider technical problems such as connection issues. • Some students seemed less happy with online submission due to uncertainty of what is a new process. • It is important to note that the systems used for e-submission are different from those used in everyday life by students and so students declaring they are confident using computers and the web may still need training and support to successfully complete the specific task of submitting assignments online. • The issues in comparison to the benefits appear to be more developmental and technical rather than endemic to the e-assessment process as a whole. The results suggest that students are willing to deal with the issues in order to receive the higher level benefits attributed to the e-assessment process.

Feedback • •

• •

Only a minority of respondents had received feedback in any medium when responding to the questionnaire. The majority of those having received feedback had done so through written online feedback. The respondents suggest that it is not the medium of feedback which is of utmost importance to them but rather the perceived quality of the feedback itself. Respondents did comment upon liking emailed feedback saying that it felt more personal and confidential. It is important to note that in addition to their need for written online feedback, the respondents attributed high value to face to face contact and feedback from their tutors.

Support • •

• •

Most students identifying a support structure as being available to them subsequently reported a good or excellent experience of e-submission. This shows the importance of adequately supporting students in new endeavours in order that they may best experience the benefits which they highlight as coming with e-assessment. Students report the importance of a range of online and face to face support options that are timely and assessment/course specific. The benefits of practice submissions are also highlighted as of developmental importance to the students.

An electronic copy of this report will soon be available upon the e-assessment@MDX wiki.

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Context: This report describes the results of the online student survey conducted between December 2010 and March 2011 as part of the university-wide e-assessment project. The aim of the survey was to elicit the views of students studying modules that form part of the project. We were looking to understand students' experience of submitting assessment and receiving feedback online. A link to the survey was distributed by tutors and was also placed on each of the participating modules as an announcement on oasisplus. There were approx. 90 modules participating in the project.

Methodology: The collection of data was carried out through a mixed methods design questionnaire. The questionnaire was constructed of three distinct parts. First, respondents were asked for some demographic information including: school, year of study, mode of study, campus, and gender. Students were also asked about their confidence with using both computers and the web. The second section of the questionnaire asked respondents a mixture of Likert scale and open ended questions about their experiences of e-assessment, including what type of coursework they submitted, where they submitted from, the support they received, their thoughts about the overall experience of e-assessment, as well as the possibility of using it in the future. The final part of the questionnaire dealt with their views on e-feedback asking similar questions to that of the second part. (See Appendix A for a full copy of the questionnaire).

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Participants: Once the data had been cleaned to take out any partial respondents or non completions the sample comprised n, 570 students. Figure 1 shows the number of respondents from each school.

Figure 1: Counts of respondents by school.

Figure 1 shows the greatest counts of responses coming from HSSC; 256 (44.91%), followed by BS; 163 ( 28.60%), EIS; 95 (16.67%), A&E; 54 (9.47%), and finally IWBL; 2 (0.35%). School specific results sections can be found at the end of the full sample results section.

Respondents were predominantly studying within their first year, with 334 (58.60% of total sample) respondents reporting as being within this year. 80 (14.04%) persons studying within year 2; 79 (13.86%) within year 3 and 38 (6.67%) of respondents coming from year 4 or postgraduate study. Finally 34 (5.96%) respondents identified themselves as studying on an ‘other’ year - foundation/Phd etc. This skewing of respondents towards first year students is to be expected given the modules put forward to be included within the eassessment project. The only school which went against this trend of having most respondents studying within year 1 was the Business School. Business School respondents were equally represented from all three years of a typical undergraduate programme: year 1; 49 (30.06% of BIS respondents), year 2; 47 (28.83%), and year 3; 54 (33.13%). 4


Within the overall sample respondents were mostly female 364 (63.86%) vs. 203 (35.61%) being male. The sample was dominated by full-time students 535 (93.86%) based at a UK campus 475 (83.33% of total sample). 73 (12.81%) respondents identified themselves as studying at an oversees campus with 17 (2.98%) saying they studied as a distance learner. Finally, 550 (96.4%) of respondents agreed that they were confident using computers. 545 (95.61%) agreed that they were confident using the web.

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Results: E-submission When asked about the experience of submitting coursework or carrying out assessment online 373 (65.44%) students reported their experience as having been good or excellent. When asked how they would prefer to submit coursework in the future 406 (71.23%) respondents stated they would prefer to do this online. 408 (74.60%) reported that they had submitted their work from home, whilst 143 (25.13%) reported submitting from somewhere upon the university campus. Satisfaction with types of submission: Respondents have submitted more than one type of coursework. Table 1 below shows the type of submission along with amount of respondents reporting completing that type, and the amount saying their experience had been good or excellent. Type of submission.

Essay style submission through Oasis Essay style submission through Turnitin Computer based test Portfolio submission via Oasisplus Portfolio submission via pebblepad

Respondents completing this type.

Reporting either a good or excellent experience of e-submission

347

245 (70.61%)

221

152 (68.78%)

31

16 (51.61%)

266

101

171 (64.29%)

63 (62.38%)

Table 1: Types of submission.

The majority of students appeared to be in favour on online submissions provided there was enough support for them and the technology was functional and reliable to support the process. 6


Although students were asked specifically about their experience during the semester on participating pilot modules, they often included perceived benefits, challenges, and worries, not directly experienced. Q: For you, what were the benefits of submitting your assessment online? Two adjectives stand out when students talk about the benefits of e-assessment: quick and easy. Students used the following words to describe the benefits of e-assessment: ● Easy ● Quick ● Comfortable ● Less stressful ● Convenient ● Flexible The main benefits were seen as: Submit anywhere Students appreciate that they can submit their coursework from anywhere as long as they have an Internet connection. They don’t need to travel to the campus and queue outside the student office during the limited opening hours. This is especially a nuisance if that is the only reason students have to travel to the campus on deadline day, when they live at a distance, or are working. They welcome that they can submit from anywhere in the world, from home, from work, even abroad. This is regarded as a major benefit for international students. Students commented that the possibility to submit coursework from the comfort of their home 24/7 made it a less stressful experience. Much more convenient as students do not have to come to Student Office which normally has long queue and avoid loss of assignment in the process. Moreover, it might be very beneficial for international students (who might be traveling back to their home country)

Its much quicker online then having too come into university and queuing up for a long period of time, just to hand in work, where as on the internet you can be anywhere at home, university at a friends house or in a internet cafe and send in your work. 7


Submit anytime Students like that they can submit coursework any time it fits their schedule rather than the limited opening hours of the student office. Online submissions often have a midnight deadline and students appreciate those extra few hours when they can make last minute reviews and changes to polish their final work. You don't have to waste time and money on travel, or waste paper printing it off, also the marker gets it directly to them, and most importantly, it's brilliant that you get to submit it up to 23:59pm on the day that its due. I don't have to worry about student office closing time and have more time to check my work. No printing Students see many advantages in not having to print out their essays to be able to hand it in. They save the cost of paper, ink, toner cartridge, printing fees. Online submission is also regarded as a more environmentally friendly way that contributes to saving trees and saving our planet. Save the trees!

Saving the planet by not using resources to get to uni. Time & money. Plus I can submit very late when the uni is closed. Able to submit at my own pace and time due to balancing lectures with a full time job. Also saves me the trouble of having to come down from home to submit my course work as I live quite a distance from the university Save time, save cost The reasons mentioned above culminate in students regarding online submission as a generally time-saving and cost effective activity. They save time by not traveling to campus and save cost by not having to pay travel and printing costs.

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Additional benefits Students perceived online delivery of coursework as a more secure way where their work can’t be lost. They get an e-receipt and can check that they have uploaded the correct file. Depending on the e-assessment tool used, students might be able to submit drafts or receive instant feedback on their referencing in the form of a Turn in in originality report. I was relaxed enough in the knowledge that the process wasn't difficult. After submission there is also a feedback in the form of an electronic receipt.

I am able to receive a feed back immediately, for instance the originality report from turnitin. It was really easy, the instructions were really easy to follow and the nice thing is that you didn't have to actually go into the campus to submit your work. As part of the pilot some courses required students to submit both a paper and an electronic copy of their coursework. Students prefer one single way to submit and think that having to also submit paper copies in the student office defeats the purpose of online submissions.

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Q: What challenges did you face when submitting assessment online? The challenges students encountered submitting coursework online centred around technical issues and the unfamiliarity of the process. Students used the following words to describe the challenges they faced: ● Confusing ● Unsure how to do it ● Not easy ● Not straightforward ● Not interactive ● Slow Technical issues It is only to be expected when introducing e-assessment for the first time that some students will encounter technical problems. These can be divided into three subcategories: ● Submission system-specific issues ● Computer problems ● Internet connection issues

Submission system-specific issues The submissions were made via oasisplus. For essay-type submission students used either the dropbox built into the system or the integrated Turn it in submission box. In addition, some courses use multiple-choice quizzes. The most commonly encountered problems were related to java. If students don’t run the correct version of java, they are not able to upload files or attach documents to the submission dropbox and potentially fail their assessment. ●

The fact that OasisPlus always wants to run a million Java applets on my machine is not cool. I tend to disable this; but the Oasis uploader (dropbox) is a Java applet. Poor Linux/BSD compatibility is also an issue.

It was very complicated and there were problems uploading and so on. :/ I had problems attaching the file....took me hours trying , but it worked finally

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Students also found that some browsers were flagged up as incompatible with oasisplus. The system was often slow to upload files, this was especially noticeable near deadline times. At busy times turn it in originality reports could take many hours to run, which was regarded as very inconvenient. Sometimes students encountered a system error and had to attempt submission several times before succeeding. Students also found the navigation of courses troublesome as some dropboxes were not placed in a logical place in the course and they were confused as to how to locate them. They also had trouble remembering their login details as there are too many usernames and passwords in use for all the different university systems. I could not submit my legal method course work via turn it in as the system kept rejecting my Oasis password which was changed thrice as a result i could not hand in my course work at the deadline of 4pm.

Crash under weight of all submitting on the final day. The fact that I now only submit once because the plagiarism percentage does not get reproduced is a pain as we are not able to correct referencing sufficiently. It was often remarked that a better system than oasisplus is needed if the university wishes to use more online submissions, a system that has fewer technical problems and is more easy to use. Computer problems Students computer related issues mostly concentrated on java issues. Availability of computers at home was not raised as a problem, though the need for more free computers at busy times at the university was expressed. â—?

Sometimes it would not let me upload my file, so I would have to log on into different computers.

Internet connection issues Students occasionally complained about a slow internet connection from home or had fears of losing their connection in the middle of a submission. This is especially important when uploading very large files or when doing a timed quiz, so that the quiz does not time out and they end up with partial submissions. â—?

Uncertainty about the process Students who are submitting assessment online for the first time were often unsure about what to expect or how the process works. Many remarked that at first they were uncertain,

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but have overcome the difficulties and managed to submit successfully. They did not have enough or clear instructions on what to do exactly on their course sites, how to locate the dropbox and what is the exact process of uploading and then submitting their work. Problems with browsers, internet connection shut down. Not knowing the process in which my submitted work is going through such as: Tutor received it, Stage 1,2 ,3 of making and result due date.

Depending on how the tutors set up a dropbox or Turnitin submission box, students might be able to submit drafts or do multiple submissions. Students were not always clear about the possibilities or limitations of the properties of their dropboxes, which might be different from course to course causing further confusion. Initially difficult to understand - limited help online (had to call help desk - in working hours)

Occasionally students could not submit online and were very anxious. They submitted in the student office or emailed the tutor their work instead, which indicates that there is a need for a backup process. Rejection or refusal to accept assignments or course work for no explainable reasons, which at the end of the day we have to submit by hand to the teacher a day late in class, which makes it seem like we didn't do our course work on time Online is not enough, tutor requires that I submit it by hand to the Student Office, so destroys the purpose of submitting something online. In fact, doubles the effort. Assessments should only be accepted online, not by hand. E-receipt Naturally students are concerned about the security of their submissions. There was some confusion about whether or how the oasisplus system issues receipts. They are used to getting a paper receipt from the student office and expected to find a similar system in place online. The system does give an e-receipt that students can print out if they wish. In addition, they can also log in and check the actual files submitted, but not all were aware of this.

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Additional issues Some international students raised the issue of deadlines and what time zone they represented, GMT or their local time zones. The system uses GMT to manage deadlines, but it was not clearly indicated to some students. There were a few worries about the security of the database and that it could be hacked. Some students felt that their IT skills needed updating to be able to manage the submission process.

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Q: How would you like to submit coursework in future? Please explain why. When asked 406 students (71%) preferred to submit their assessment online in future, 107 in the student office (19%) and the rest preferred a combination or alternative arrangement.

Many of them have explained their choice by listing similar benefits and challenges as mentioned above. It has to be noted that several courses required students to submit both online and in the student office and students felt that this negated the purpose of online submissions. While students like to have alternatives, they agreed that only one method should be used to avoid unnecessary extra work. I don't mind either way but i wish all the modules were submitted the same way as it becomes confusing.

[submitting in the student office] is easy and safe but if the online system is to be improved then I would prefer submitting online. I don't mind either way. As long as there confirmation with both that it's submitted.

In favour of online submission Those in favour of online submission have reinforced the benefits mentioned above provided that enough and appropriate support was available to help them should they encounter technical problems. I do not trust bits of paper that can easier be lost and it means trekking into Uni, which incurs both costs in time and money.

I have been going through some really touch financial times and could not go in uni because I was providing for myself. Online submitting really helped me. You don't have to waste time and money on travel to bring your work to uni, or waste paper printing it off, also the marker gets it sent directly to them, and most importantly, it's brilliant that you get to submit it up to 23:59pm on the day that its due. Quick, safe, and easy, reliable method. Also allows u to see the originality report which is very helpful.

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In favour of submission into the student office Students in favour of submitting assessment in the student office the online process too complicated and preferred the familiar and easy way of going to the student office. It was very complicated to try and figure out how to upload my file and so in the end it would have just been easier to hand in a paper copy to the student office.

Students expressed very strongly their need for a proof of submission and a tangible receipt and to have confirmation that their work reached their tutor. They felt that with online submission this was not guaranteed. I prefer the paper submission because it was submitted by myself to the student office directly. With online submission I am worried there is a chance the submission did not go through Because I have no proof of submitting it on time, or at all, via the web With Internet you never know if the lecturer actually got it, if everything went correctly. Creates insecurity. There was also concern about technical issues that might affect the successful and timely submission of their coursework and whether it was possible to preserve the original presentation of their work. Receipt from student office serves as sufficient proof of submission. Online submission should not be subjected to deadline if technical issues are beyond student's/faculty's/university's control.

I like submitting my work online, but I prefer submitting it in the paper form so that i can bind the work and present it in a very good form, that is with colored printed sheets and binding the work.

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E-feedback At the time of filling in the questionnaire 166 (29.12%) of respondents reported having not received any feedback upon their work. 300 (52.63%) respondents stated that they had found the feedback they had received useful.

Table 2 shows the types of feedback persons reported having received along with the count of persons receiving a particular type of feedback and the count of persons declaring it helped. Type of Feedback received.

Respondents receiving this type.

Audio online Oral in person Written offline Written online

6

Agreed helpful

5 (83.3%)

98

79 (80.61%)

234

172 (73.50%)

103

82 (79.61%)

Table 2: Types of Feedback received.

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Q: The feedback I received helped me to clarify things I did not understand. Please explain your answer Helpful feedback The students who felt that the feedback received helped them clarify things they did not understand highlighted the general qualities of effective feedback, such as detailed, personal and clearly communicated. They felt that the feedback explained the weaknesses and strengths of their work, justified the mark given and gave them advice on how to improve it next time in order to get a better mark. I was able to see what made my work get that particular grade and it helped me understand what I had to do to make it better.

It just clarified a few expectations of me that weren't really explicit in the coursework instructions. Things to bear in mind for submissions in future. This is especially important in the case of international students who might be used to a different academic and essay writing culture.

I am an international student from Korea. the way to write essay or submit assignments is totally different from there. so at first i did not know the way to do it. but i am getting used to how to do it and i have got some information from the feedback.

Unsatisfactory feedback Students dissatisfaction with their feedback can often be traced back to the content/ quality of feedback rather that way it was delivered (e.g. Online, in writing, in person).students complained about feedback that was not clear, was too generic and not detailed enough or personal enough.

It said referencing is good- now make it perfect, but I don't know how exactly to make it perfect. (and it’s the first essay so maybe even if it’s spoonfeeding, it would be nice so I know in future) Some feedback was pathetic in terms of how little they helped considering it was the formative stage, I was disappointed even though my grade was high that they failed to add useful comments.

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The feedback was very vague and didn't feel like it was aimed at me. VERY BAD! I received 45% which I understand, however the feedback was awful and it did not help me at all. It was a sentence long and did not give me any instructions on how to improve it. Timeliness was also raised as an issue. Feedback received too late after the submission date made it harder for students to relate it to their work. I received feedback from London after many weeks of my submitting the essay so had partially forgotten what I had written and so when the tutor here in my campus retold me the London tutor's remarks, I could not relate the comments with my essay. Quick feedback or feedback discussion once I have had the chance to go through the essay+comments again.

Sometimes different tutors gave conflicting advice, which resulted in confusion as to how students can improve their work or why they received a certain grade. They have also commented on the discrepancy between tutors, some giving useful, detailed feedback, others don’t.

I don't agree with my feedback as one teacher told me to do my essay in a certain way and the person that marked it seemed to be the wrong way of doing my essay I was very annoyed by this, I think that each tutor should mark your work not give advise and someone else marks it after a tutor has told you to do the work in a certain way.

Different tutors give back different types of feedback. Some tutors give really informative, detailed feedback but others don't.

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Q: How would you like to receive feedback in future? Please explain why. Combination of online and face to face feedback

Students expressed a need for written feedback delivered online to them with the opportunity to follow this up with a face to face session with their tutor. Both online and in person. Electronic feedback means that I can file it on my computer. oral feedback enables me to ask questions/explore outcome

Feedback online would be a good idea for a start, as soon as tutors were made available for further/more detailed feedback. Depends on the task. I prefer oral discussion of a summative task as it allows for some degree of debate and allows me to ask further questions. I like to have written feedback for my records.

Online feedback

Receiving email was a popular option as it was perceived as personal, quick and confidential. Many of them were in favour of online feedback as it is more convenient, quicker and saves their printing and traveling costs. I would like to receive feed back online because it is more efficient, faster and more convenient. i don't need to wait for feed back in the class.

Online, so I can save it & not worry about losing it, in a mountain of paper. Plus I have the option to print it out. Also it’s environmentally sound. In writing

Feedback in writing was perceived as easy to refer back to later, allow students time to digest and reflect on it and discuss it with others. It was also seen as an opportunity for the tutors to provide them with more personal, detailed advice on how to improve their coursework in future so that the students could learn from their mistakes. Some students remarked that they’d like to receive detailed feedback on their actual essays in addition to the generic feedback provided. 19


I was happy with the online feedback, but I felt that it just wasn't elaborate enough, I would've liked to see the corrections on my essay itself. I would like to receive my feedback online as comments in the document and general comment so I know where I made mistakes and what I should do to improve. I would like the online written feedback to be more explicit. Most of the feedback I received were not helpful. I find somehow too general and it goes to my detriment as I could not fathom what my lecturer wants from me. I am a student on international campus and receiving detailed feedback from UK lecturer would pave my way. Personal

Receiving feedback in person from their tutor was seen as very valuable. It offered them an opportunity to clarify their written feedback and ask follow-up question in order to improve their work in future. I would like to receive feedback in person as I don't really understand the comments that are left sometimes, so it would allow me to question the tutors.

[Oral feedback] (IN PERSON PLEASE) and this feedback that I have received in the past isn't and I repeat isn't enough, it’s very brief and I find it hard to get a clear idea on what the feedback is about due to the fact it’s so brief. Some students expressed a preference for audio feedback.

I wouldn't mind an audio feedback online, as it would be more easier to understand the problem.

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Support Table 3 shows the types of support available to students along with the number of persons highlighting that type as being available to them. The final column shows the number of persons reporting a good or excellent experience of e-submission having highlighted that type of support as being available to them. (NB. not all persons in the final column may have specifically used the support, however, they did know it was available.) Type of support.

Respondents reporting this type as available to them. (% of total sample, n570)

Students reporting a good or excellent experience having known this support available.

204 (35.79%)

161 (78.92%)

69 (12.11%)

48 (69.57%)

Peer to Peer support

128 (22.46%)

92 (71.88%)

none

110 (19.30%)

68 (61.82%)

Online guides and handouts Tutor support Web helpdesk

251 (44.03%)

196 (78.09%)

Table 3: Types of support available.

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Q: What additional support would aid you in successfully submitting your assessment online in the future? Many students thought the support they had in place was sufficient.

Give me a submitted successfully code...for reference. Otherwise the experience is great I felt that I had all the necessary support to successfully submit my assessment.

A variety of support methods Students answers show that they have a preference for a variety of support, both online and in person. They prefer detailed, step-by-step guides that explain exactly what to do specific to their course, in the form of leaflets or video guides. These are especially important if eassessment is not covered in the handbook or during induction week.

Timely support

They also like to talk to a real person if they have problems, for example their tutor or a helpdesk support person who can advise them with their specific issues. Only submitted it once so far. Had to call a friend. But now I know the procedure. Having written clear instructions online on the front page are needed.

A helpdesk phone number to call with someone to talk to so if I ran into trouble I could speak to someone and they could assist me. Do a demonstration of how to submit either online or during the first or second week of induction. Practice sessions They have mentioned that a live demo in class or a walk though would be helpful, as well as a practice or mock submission so that they are more confident submitting their actual coursework. Maybe to do a class demonstration to make sure we are doing correctly I don't need it now but at the beginning it would have been useful.

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Practice submission during tutorials/lab sessions/library induction or even online mock submission. Keep them informed Many students called for more information and explanation on how the system they use works exactly to help them demystify the submission process. This should include advice on technical issues and compatibility with systems, browsers. In addition a clear organisation of content and activities on the course would also ease some of the stress of the experience. If tutors made it the same way to submit, some put the link in a folder others under assessment, and some use Turn it in, others do not!

It would have been nice to know that we could submit work as many times as we like and that the system gives us feedback on what we can do to improve work Make sure that the software is working right and accurate specially when a lot of students submitting at a time.

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Discussion: The descriptive statistics and qualitative statements above show that the student experience of e-submission has been very positive. The majority of the sample reported their experience as being good or excellent, and almost three quarters of respondents reported the desire to submit online in the future.

The main benefits of e-submission described by respondents were that it is quick, easy, and allows for the fitting of submission into their lives and not dictating their lives by needing to travel into the University. At a time in which the government are pushing an agenda to open higher education to part-time and professional learners these benefits are likely to be perceived as attractive by these persons. The cost savings made by students in not needing to purchase paper, ink and travel costs was also highlighted as benefits of e-assessment. These savings may again prove important given the current restricted financial situation in which higher education finds itself.

The challenges which students reported facing when submitting online included system specific issues as well as wider technical problems such as connection issues. Some students also seemed less happy with online submission due to uncertainty of what is a new process. Students reporting they would prefer to continue submitting to the student office in the future may have been in the minority, however, they show important areas in which development may be needed for the future success of e-assessment. It is important to note that the systems used for e-submission are different from those used in everyday life by students and so students declaring they are confident using computers and the web may still need training and support to successfully complete the specific task of submitting assignments online. The issues in comparison to the benefits appear to be more developmental and technical rather than endemic to the e-assessment process as a whole. The results suggest that students are willing to deal with the issues in order to receive the higher level benefits attributed to the e-assessment process.

Only a minority of respondents had received feedback in any medium when responding to the questionnaire. The majority of those having received feedback had done so through written online feedback. The responses suggest that it is not the medium of feedback which is of utmost importance to students but rather the perceived quality of the feedback itself. This being said a number of respondents did comment upon liking emailed feedback saying that it felt more personal and confidential. The small amount of students receiving audio online feedback expressed satisfaction with this medium. It is important to note that in addition to their need for written online feedback, the respondents attributed a high value

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to face to face contact and feedback from their tutors. This is deemed important as it allowed respondents to gain clarification about, and a deeper understanding of, the initial feedback received.

Interestingly many students were unable to, or did not, report the types of support available to them. However, most students identifying a support structure as being available to them subsequently reported a good or excellent experience of e-submission. This again shows the massive importance of adequately supporting students in new endeavours in order that they may best experience the benefits which they highlight as coming with e-assessment. The students report the importance of a range of online and face to face support options that are timely and assessment/course specific. The benefits of practice submissions are also highlighted as of developmental importance to the students. In conclusion this report shows that Students are widely accepting of e-submission. They have highlighted a number of benefits to submitting work electronically, and most report their experience as being positive. The challenges faced by some highlight the necessity for introductions to e-submission tools; as well as timely and varied mediums of support which students need if they are to be successful in their submissions and so able to receive the perceived benefits of e-submission.

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This next section will offer school specific breakdowns of the data set.

School of Health and Social Sciences. Respondents:

256 Persons completed the e-assessment student survey from the School of Health and Social Sciences.

Within this 256 respondents, 210 (82.03%) reported as studying within yearr 1. This shows a very large weighting of first year students within the HSSC sample. The HSSC sample was heavily weighted by female students: 207 (80.86%) of HSSC respondents reported being female. 236 (92.19%) of HSSC respondents reported as studying within a full-time mode. 231(90.23%) were studying on a UK campus.

240 (93.7%) of HSSC respondents reported being confident using computers whilst, 239 (93.3%) said they were confident using the web.

Results: E-submission Of students responding from HSSC, 175 (68.36%) reported their experience of E-submission as having been excellent or good. 208 (81.25%) of respondents reported having submitted from home with only 39 (15.23%) saying they had submitted from on campus. If given a choice 188 (73.44%) reported a preference for submitting online in the future. Satisfaction with types of submission: Type of submission. Essay style submission through Oasis Essay style submission through Turnitin Computer based test

Respondents completing this type. 136

Reporting either a good or excellent experience of e-submission 97 (71.32%)

135

96 (71.1%)

94

66 (70.21%) 26


Portfolio submission via Oasisplus

27

17 (62.96%)

Portfolio submission via pebblepad

1

1 (100%)

Table 4: Types of submission HSSC. E-feedback

Upon filling out the questionnaire 71(27.73%) of HSSC respondents reported that they had not yet received any feedback. 135 (52.73%) of respondents said that they agreed that the feedback they had received was helpful. Type of Feedback received. Audio online

Respondents receiving this type.

Agreed helpful

28

22 (78.57%)

119

88 (73.95%)

Oral in person Written offline Written online

2

57

1 (50%)

44 (77.19%)

Table 5: Types of Feedback received HSSC.

27


Business School Respondents:

163 persons completed the E-assessment student survey from the Business School.

Of all the schools the Business School had the most representative sample when looking at year spreads. Business School respondents were equally represented from all three years of a typical undergraduate programme: year 1; 49 (30.06%), year 2; 47 (28.83%), and year 3; 54 (33.13%). 96 (58.9%) of respondents from the Business School were female, 153 (93.8%) studied within the full-time mode and 129 (79.14%) reported studying on a UK campus.

When asked about their confidence with computers; 160 (98.1%) reported being confident. 156 (95.7%) reported being confident using the web.

Results: E-submission Of persons responding from the Business School 102 (62.58%) reported their experience of e-submission as having been excellent or good. Interestingly the Business School had a higher proportion of persons reporting having submitted from on campus than any other school: 90 (55.21%) reported submitting from home whilst, 69 (42.33%) reported they submitted from on campus. 102 (62.58%) of Business School respondents reported a preference for submitting online in the future. Satisfaction with types of submission: Type of submission. Essay style submission through Oasis Essay style submission through Turnitin

Respondents completing this type. 58

112

Reporting either a good or excellent experience of e-submission 34 (58.62%) 80 (71.43%)

28


Computer based test Portfolio submission via Oasisplus Portfolio submission via pebblepad

78

54 (69.23%)

23

14 (60.87%)

47

31 (65.96%)

Table 6: Types of submission BS.

E-feedback

50 (30.67%) of respondents from the Business School responded saying they were yet to receive feedback. Of those people receiving feedback 82 (50.31%) reported agreed to having found it helpful. Type of Feedback received. Audio online

Respondents receiving this type.

Agreed helpful

27

19 (70.37%)

62

46 (74.19%)

Oral in person Written offline Written online

2

23

2 (100%)

19 (82.61%)

Table 7: Types of Feedback received BIS.

29


School of Engineering and Information Science Respondents:

95 persons responded to the e-assessment student survey from EIS.

69 (72.63%) of respondents from EIS declared to be studying within their 1st year. Interestingly a fifth of EIS respondents were 3rd yr students: 69 (20.00%).

Unlike other schools the majority of respondents from EIS were male; 61 (64.21%). 91 (95.79%) studied within the Full -time mode and 82 (86.32%) responded as studying on a UK campus. All students from EIS agreed to being confident at using computers. 94 (98.1%) declared themselves as being confident using the web.

Results: E-submission 60 (63.16%) of EIS respondents reported their experience of E-submission as being good or excellent. 65 ( 68.42%) reported submitting from home whilst 25 (26.32%) said they had submitted from on university campus. 73 (76.84%) of EIS respondents said that if given a choice they would choose to submit online in the future. Satisfaction with types of submission: Type of submission. Essay style submission through Oasis Essay style submission through Turnitin Computer based test Portfolio submission via

Respondents completing this type. 34

Reporting either a good or excellent experience of e-submission 14 (41.18%)

69

46 (66.67%)

39

24 (61.54%)

22

13 (59.09%) 30


Oasisplus Portfolio submission via pebblepad

2

1 (50%)

Table 8: Types of submission EIS. E-feedback

Of persons responding from EIS only 24 (25.26%) reported as not having yet received any feedback. 53 (55.79%) reported that they agreed that the feedback they received had been helpful. Type of Feedback received. Audio online

Respondents receiving this type.

Agreed helpful

28

27 (96.43%)

24

16 (66.67%)

Oral in person Written offline Written online

2

17

2 (100%)

15 (88.24%)

Table 9: Types of Feedback received EIS.

31


School of Arts and Education respondents:

54 respondents identified themselves as studying within the School of Arts and Education.

Interestingly 36 (66.67%) of respondents from A&E were from Postgraduate or ‘other’ (foundation or Phd) years of study. This was the only school not to have the majority of it’s respondents drawn from the undergraduate years. 29 (53.37%) of A&E respondents were male and all were studying upon full time courses. 33 (61.11%) were studying on uk based campuses. 53 (98.15%) of respondents from A&E respondents declared that they are confident using computers whilst all said they were confident using the web.

Results:

E-submission 35 (64.81%) of A&E respondents reported their experience of E-submission as being good or excellent. 44 (81.48%) reported having submitted from home, and 42 (77.78%) reported a preference for submitting online in the future. Satisfaction with types of submission: Type of submission. Essay style submission through Oasis Essay style submission through Turnitin Computer based test Portfolio submission via Oasisplus

Respondents completing this type. 36

Reporting either a good or excellent experience of e-submission 25 (69.44%)

29

11 (75.86%)

8

7 (87.50%)

5

4 (80.00%)

32


Portfolio submission via pebblepad

5

4 (80.00%)

Table 10: Types of submission A&E. E-feedback

21 (38.89%) of respondents from A&E reported having not received any Feedback at the time of completing the questionnaire. 28 (51.85%) reported that the feedback they had received had helped them. Type of Feedback received.

Audio online

Respondents receiving this type.

Agreed helpful

11

10 (90.91%)

23

20 (86.96%)

Oral in person Written offline Written online

0

5

0

4 (80%)

Table 11: Types of Feedback received A&E.

33


Appendix A https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/esubmission

34

e-assessment student survey results  

e-assessment student survey results

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