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District energy

WE SEE DISTRICT ENERGY AS A WAY OF THE FUTURE AND ANTICIPATE WORKING ON SIMILAR INITIATIVES IN OTHER PARTS OF AUSTRALIA.

The Central Park plant.

UTS Green Infrastructure Project Manager Jonathan Prendergast said the move additionally frees up much needed space. “Investment in new chilling infrastructure can be capital and space intensive, requiring new chilling plant, pumps, connecting pipework, cooling towers and electrical infrastructure. By procuring a portion of UTS’s cooling from an off-site supplier, UTS can invest in its core business and free up space for teaching, offices and a more active roof space without cooling towers. “UTS already operate a large central plant that supplies heating and cooling to eight UTS Broadway Campus buildings. Off-site supply of chilling energy from Brookfield provides greater diversity of supply and redundancy for cooling the Broadway campus, reducing the risk of failure and outages,” Prendergast said. This initiative is made even more feasible as it takes advantage of the peak and off-peak demands of the plant’s current customer, Central Park. The plant currently provides chilled energy to the Central Park apartments, whose main peak demand is typically in the evenings and on weekends. Conversely, UTS’s peak demands are weekdays and during the hot afternoons in summer months including February and November. Heating, cooling and ventilation accounts for approximately 62% of UTS’s total electricity usage. The partnership will see UTS’s greenhouse gas emissions reduced by approximately 2.2% or 1111 tonnes CO2-e per annum. District energy systems are widely used internationally, particularly in North America and Europe. The Chicago District Cooling System supplies chilling to over 100 buildings in the Chicago CBD

from just four energy plants and the Toronto system services over 140 buildings. In Sweden, seven cities incorporate district cooling systems.

Commitment to sustainability UTS has a history of commitment when it comes to sustainable projects. As part of its Campus Masterplan, UTS is upgrading existing buildings to reduce water and energy use, and is constructing new buildings that are certified to a minimum 5-star Green Star rating, as well as improving cycling facilities, constructing green roofs and walls, installing stormwater recycling and rooftop renewable energy, and setting ambitious recycling targets for demolition and construction waste. Three recently completed buildings — the Dr Chau Chak Wing, the Faculty of Engineering and IT and the Faculty of Science and Graduate School of Health — have won multiple awards for design, architecture and construction, with the latter winning a hat trick of sustainability awards including a NSW Government Green Globe award, AIRAH Excellence in Sustainability award and an Architecture and Design Sustainability award. More recently, UTS has entered an agreement to source 15% of the annual electricity consumption of the Dr Chau Chak Wing building from a solar farm in Singleton, New South Wales, in Australia’s first off-site solar corporate direct Power Purchase Agreement (PPA). The cooling contract will see the purchase of chilling energy requirements for a 15-year period and is due to be implemented in 2018. University of Technology www.uts.edu.au

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Profile for Westwick-Farrow Media

Sustainability Matters Dec 2016/Jan 2017  

Sustainability Matters is a bi-monthly magazine showcasing the latest products, technology and sustainable solutions for industry, governmen...

Sustainability Matters Dec 2016/Jan 2017  

Sustainability Matters is a bi-monthly magazine showcasing the latest products, technology and sustainable solutions for industry, governmen...