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FAST FACTS

{DESIGN BY KAITLYN MCCURDY}

The disparity between the levels of students receiving free or reduced lunch among schools is changing as the district grows. According to the diversity policy, the difference between FRL rates at the junior high level should be 15% and 10% at the high school level.

JUNIOR HIGH FRL Levels

PROJECTED

District Growth

HIGH SCHOOL FRL Levels

COMPILED BY// KAITLYN MCCURDY & LUSHIA ANSON

*Due to rounding, percentages may not equal 100.

serve to be heard. Specifically, the families on the Free and Reduced Lunch Price Policy must have their inputs considered because they will be the most directly affected. Simply put, delaying the decision will bring only improvements in the draft and poses no possible harms to the community,” he said. Borde said that he is not necessarily arguing against the implementation of the policy, but instead against the timeframe which he believes will allow for “less thought and input [to go] into the decision.” Andre Echols, a math teacher at West, also voiced his concerns about the policy at the listening post. “One of the things I questioned is how the policy is based on socioeconomic status, but our [school district’s] equity statement says we’re not supposed to discriminate on things such as race, sex or socioeconomic status … I understand the heart of what they’re trying to do, but I feel like [it should not] be based upon class or how much money you make,” he said. Borde, like most current high school students in the district, will not experience firsthand many of the effects of the policy if passed. This is, as Hoelscher explained, because the board believes the need for redistribution of FRL

students is more urgent among the district’s elementary schools. “At the secondary level … the disparity is not as great as at the elementary level … If you look at the schools that are going to feed into City High and West High if it’s unchecked, eventually there will also be a large disparity at the high schools,” she said. City High Student Senate School Board Representative Mohamed Rouabhi ’13 believes the policy is crucial in improving learning environments within ICCSD elementary schools. “I think the main thing the policy will help is the situation [in] the elementary schools. We have some schools on the east side … that are around the 80 percent mark [in terms of FRL students]. It’s hard to learn in a situation where it’s hard to eat at home, and it’s difficult to manage a classroom where 20 out of 25 students are hungry,” Rouabhi said. Hoelscher added that she hopes that the district might incentivize movement between the schools. She cited the example of instating an International Baccalaureate program at only one high school in order to prompt some students to choose one school over the other. Currently, all board members are backing the same opin-

ions that they held at the second vote, meaning the policy will be passed during the third and final vote if no members change sides. FOR MORE OF THIS ARTICLE GO TO WSSPAPER.COM

I understand the

heart of what

they’re trying to do, but I feel like [it should not] be based

class or how much money upon

you make.”

-Andre Echols, West math teacher

A CLEAR CONSCIENCE IS A SOFT PILLOW. - GERMAN PROVERB } FEBRUARY 2013 NEWS 5

Feb. 1, 2013 issue  

West High's newsmagazine

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