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The local paper for the Upper per West Side p Sid

WEEK OF NOVEMBER CELEBRATING WITH A BARK ◄P.16

9-15 2017

Council Member Helen Rosenthal (right), pictured here at a May 2017 rally against the planned 668-foot residential tower at 200 Amsterdam Avenue, is backing an effort to appeal the tower’s building permit. Photo: Office of Helen Rosenthal

APPEALS FILED TO BLOCK 200 AMSTERDAM TOWER BUILDINGS Two groups, fearing similar “inappropriate developments,” file challenges to DOB building permit BY MICHAEL GAROFALO

Two Upper West Side groups have filed appeals with the city in an effort to block the construction of a 668-foot residential tower at 200 Amsterdam Ave. that would be the tallest building on the Upper West Side. Work on the controversial 55-story luxury condominium development was halted over the summer by the Department of Buildings in response to an earlier zoning challenge, but in late September the agency lifted the hold and issued the project a building permit. Two groups opposing

the tower, the Committee for Environmentally Sound Development and Landmark West, have now filed appeals with the city’s Board of Standards and Appeals in hopes of overturning the DOB’s decision to allow construction of the tower, which they claim would not fit the neighborhood’s scale or context. The Board of Standards and Appeals has not yet announced a hearing date on the matter, which could take months to resolve. In the meantime, construction can proceed on the tower. Olive Freud, the president of the Committee for Environmentally Sound Development, said she hopes to obtain an injunction halting work until the board decides the appeal. In its appeal, Freud’s group requested that the agency expedite

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A cyclist passes newly installed concrete barriers on the Hudson River Park Bikeway in Lower Manhattan, near the site of the Oct. 31 vehicle attack that killed eight people. Photo: Michael Garofalo

HARD LESSONS OF VEHICLE ATTACK STREETS Hudson River Bikeway fortified with concrete barricades as authorities plan new safety measures BY MICHAEL GAROFALO

More than a week after a man drove a truck nearly a mile down the Hudson River Bikeway at high speed, deliberately striking pedestrians and cyclists and leaving eight dead and another twelve injured in his wake, concrete barriers spaced along the riverfront bike path serve as an imposing reminder of what NYPD Commissioner

James O’Neill called “the worst terror attack in New York City since September 11th, 2001.” City and state transportation officials installed dozens of barriers along the Hudson River Greenway in the days after the Oct. 31 attack in hopes of preventing vehicles from entering the park’s pedestrian and bicycle paths in the future. The Oct. 31 vehicle attack started near Pier 40, at Houston Street, where the driver steered his rented truck from West Street onto the bike path and sped south, targeting users of the crowded, narrow trail. The driver was shot and apprehended by police after he collided with a school bus near Stuyvesant High School. Police iden-

tified the suspect as Sayfullo Saipov, 29, an Uzbek immigrant who they said was inspired by the Islamic State. The attack marked the second time this year that a driver left a Manhattan street to target bystanders. In May, an intoxicated driver made an abrupt u-turn onto a Times Square sidewalk and plowed through pedestrians for three blocks, killing one person and injuring 22 others. The vehicle in the Times Square attack came to a stop when it struck a metal bollard on a street corner, which likely prevented further injuries. Additional bollards were installed in Times Square after the incident.

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Westsider WEEK OF APRIL

SPRING ARTS PREVIEW

WestSideSpirit

WESTSIDE SPIRIT.COM @WestSideSpirit

Crime Watch Voices NYC Now City Arts

3 8 10 12

Restaurant Ratings Business Real Estate 15 Minutes

14 16 17 19

< CITYARTS, P.12

NEWS residents A vocal group of U.W.S. Transportation isn’t convinced the doing enough is Committee of CB7 BY LISA BROWN

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MANHATTAN'S APARTMENT BOOM, > PROPERTY, P.20

2015

In Brief MORE HELP FOR SMALL BUSINESS

PROTESTING THE COMMUNITY BOARD OVER TRAFFIC DEATHS

Zero, Mayor Bill One year into Visionreducing trafficfor de Blasio’s plan traffic the number of has related deaths, Upper West Side fatalities on the compared to last actually increased, year’s figures. Upper West Siders -That has some needs to be done convinced more of the Transstarting with members of the local comportation Committee munity board. West mother, Upper Lisa Sladkus, a member of TransSide resident and said she’s fed at portation Alternatives a silent protest up, and organized 7’s February board Community Board residents dozens of meeting, where Committee called for Transportation leaders to step down. against incredible “We have run up imto get safe street trying just problems said. “This was provements,” she our point across get another way to dissatisfied.” that we are very involved with Sladkus has been Alternatives since Transportation served as director 2002 and formerly Streets’ RenaisSide of Upper West She says becoming sance Campaign. really got her into a mother is what activism. streets around me “Just noticing the as a pedestrian I felt and how unsafe she said. “I wanted and as a cyclist,”

9-15

The effort to help small seems to businesses in the city be gathering steam. Two city councilmembers, Robert Margaret Chin and Cornegy, have introduced create legislation that wouldSmall a new “Office of the within Business Advocate” of Small the city’s Department Business Services. Chin The new post, which have up told us she’d like to would and running this year, for serve as an ombudsman city small businesses within them clear government, helping to get bureaucracy the through things done. Perhaps even more also importantly, the ombudsman and number will tally the type small business of complaints by taken in owners, the actions policy response, and somefor ways to recommendations If done well, begin to fix things. report would the ombudsman’s give us the first quantitative with taste of what’s wrong the city, an small businesses in towards step rst fi important fixing the problem. of To really make a difference, for developers will have to is a mere formality their projects course, the advocaterising rents, are the work complete precinct, but chances-- thanks to a looking to find a way to tackle business’ legally quickly. is being done which remain many While Chin their own hours,” of after-hours “They pick out boom in the number throughout who lives on most vexing problem. gauge what said Mildred Angelo,of the Ruppert construction permits said it’s too early tocould have Buildings one the 19th floor in The Department of the city. role the advocate number three years, the Houses on 92nd Street between on the She Over the past is handing out a record there, more information work perThird avenues. permits, bad thing. of Second and an ongoing all-hours number of after-hours of after-hours work problem can’t be a the city’s Dept. with the said there’s where mits granted by This step, combinedBorough according to new data project nearby jumped 30 percent, noise in construction Buildings has efforts by Manhattan to mediate data provided constantly make BY DANIEL FITZSIMMONS according to DOB from trucks. President Gale Brewer of Informa- workers offer transferring cement response to a Freedom the rent renewal process, they want. They city classifies knows the signs Act request. The between 6 “They do whateverthey please. They Every New Yorker some early, tangible small clang, the tion work come and go as of progress. For many sound: the metal-on-metal beeps of a any construction weekend, can can’t come piercing a.m., or on the have no respect.” at p.m. and 7 business owners, that hollow boom, the issuance of these reverse. A glance The increased a correspond after-hours. soon enough. truck moving in has generated can hardly as has led to

SLEEPS, THANKS TO THE CITY THAT NEVER UCTION A BOOM IN LATE-NIGHT CONSTR

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and you the alarm clock middle of the night, believe it: it’s the carries on fulland yet construction tilt. or your local police You can call 311

Newscheck Crime Watch Voices Out & About

The surge in permitsfees for the city in millions of dollars consome residents agency, and left application process vinced that the

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LETTERS TO THE EDITOR “CON-CON” BASICS While I no longer live in Manhattan, I enjoy reading Our Town and was particularly struck by the quality of Douglas Feiden’s article “Contesting The ‘Con-Con,’” (October 19-25). This is the only article I have seen that explains what the process is, what’s at stake and who is for and against a Constitutional Convention. Having read this piece I now feel that I know enough to make an informed decision. None of the other media I am saturated with bothered to take the time to explain the basics as well as the irony of the bedfellow combinations we are witnessing. Thank you, Our Town and Mr. Feiden. Ed Fitzell New Rochelle, NY

MENACE OF E-BIKES Re “City to Crack Down on Electric Bicycles” (October 26-November 1), Caroline Samponaro of Transportation Alternatives says: “According to NYPD data, drivers speeding and failing to yield are the ones causing

NOVEMBER 9-15,2017

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death and serious injuries.” No one is disputing that. However, the two things are not mutually exclusive. Ebikes are still a menace: traveling at higher speeds than bicycles, making no “warning” sound (like a car engine), going through red lights and the wrong way on streets and avenues, etc. — flagrantly violating safety laws that even pedaled bikes are required to observe. As to “Advocates for delivery workers have said that the crackdown would unfairly burden older delivery workers,” I say, Huh? I have lived on the Upper West Side for 50 years, and since the advent of the e-bike I have never seen an “older” bicycle delivery worker. They are mostly young and middle-aged people. Finally, it should be noted that no restaurant or other establishment that delivers went out of business when there was no such thing as ebikes. When the only things available were regular bikes, food and other things got delivered, and businesses made money. E-bikes must go. Period. Ian Alterman Upper West Side

with the State Department of Labor and wanted a quieter, less frenetic environment. I have loved everything about this neighborhood except for the noise (I just now had to stop typing to hold my ears as an ambulance passed eight stories down). Ellen Diamond Upper East Side

LOSING FAVORITE STOPS

Delegates to the state Constitutional Convention convened in the state Capitol in Albany in 1867 for a speech by William Wheeler, a future U.S. vice president, who argued that the concept of racial equality should be incorporated into the Constitution. Engraving: Stanley Fox, via New York Public Library collectioN

NOISE POLLUTION ON THE UPPER EAST SIDE I lived for over 30 years on Ninth Street and Broadway in Greenwich Village and never, ever had this kind of noise issue. I wrote to the mayor (I try!) asking why we can’t use the same siren system as in Europe, a repeating twonote pattern that’s not too loud and that doesn’t go up to very high notes.

They’re a pleasing middle-range (I’m a musician so I get to say stuff like that). Among the worst offenders are the police cars late at night. They do whatever they want with the sirens — and I mean whatever they want. I honestly don’t know how the animals survive the sirens, motorcycles and of course, Marathon Sunday. I moved to the Upper East Side in 2002 after I was diagnosed with leukemia in 1998. I had retired after 33 years

I was devastated when the vegan restaurant near Mt. Sinai Hospital on Madison Avenue closed last year. It was a restaurant both my husband and I used to enjoy. I come in from Long Island every other week to get an infusion at Mt. Sinai Hospital. It often takes me two hours to get there due to the traffic. I could actually get the same infusion 15 minutes from my house, but choose to come into NYC to experience the city briefly for one day. Just yesterday I saw that the Seattle Cafe closed, another favorite stop. Clearly, having what seems like a steady stream of customers is no indication of the longevity of the establishment. Pretty soon there won’t be as much reason to come into the city, and I may as well stay closer to home. Barbara Golden Long Island, NY

presents

Free NEIGHBORHOOD CONCERT

ENSEMBLE CONNECT Sunday, November 12 at 5 PM The New York Times called Ensemble Connect “the new face of classical music,” while New York Classical Review w said it is “one of the strongest ensembles in the city.” Music at Our Saviour’s Atonement (MOSA) | Our Saviour’s Atonement Lutheran Church 178 Bennett Avenue (at 189th Street) | Manhattan mosaconcerts.org | 212-923-5757 A program of Carnegie Hall, The Juilliard School, and the Weill Music Institute in partnership with the New York City Department of Education.

FREE CONCERTS IN ALL FIVE BOROUGHS! carnegiehall.org/NeighborhoodConcerts Artists, programs, and dates subject to change. © 2017 CHC.

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CRIME WATCH BY JERRY DANZIG STATS FOR THE WEEK Reported crimes from the 20th district for Week to Date

Year to Date

2017 2016

% Change

2017

2016

% Change

Murder

0

0

n/a

2

0

n/a

Rape

2

0

n/a

5

4

25.0

Robbery

1

0

n/a

56

51

9.8

Felony Assault

3

3

0.0

52

54

-3.7

Burglary

1

1

0.0

64

50

28.0

Grand Larceny

14

9

55.6

593 515 15.1

Grand Larceny Auto

1

3

-66.7

11

26

-57.7

Photo by Tony Webster, via Flickr

50 PAIR OF PANTIES STOLEN A gang of shoplifters likely has some happy lady friends now. At 5 p.m. on Sunday, November 5, between as many as perpetrators entered the Victoria’s Secret store at 2333 Broadway and stole 50 pairs of panties valued at $1,200, police said.

CVS DISTRESS

GAP TAP

How will a drugstore manager make up for the loss of makeup? At 7:45 p.m. on Wednesday, November 1, a man entered the CVS store at 200 West End Ave. and got away with cosmetics valued at $1,587.

Perhaps this shoplifting raid was the work of a criminal cowboy. At 7:30 p.m. on Friday, November 3, an unknown perpetrator entered the Gap Store at 1988 Broadway and took some $1,800 worth of denim clothing from store displays before fleeing the location.

DRESS, BOOTS STOLEN FROM CAR Yet another motorist learned the peril of leaving valuables in a parked car. At 1 p.m. on Friday, November 3, a 65-yearold woman parked her 2015 Jaguar at the corner of West 85th Street and Broadway. When she returned she discovered that items of clothing had been removed from the vehicle, including a Valentino dress and Chanel boots with a total value of $8,500.

BIKE THEFT At 2 p.m. on Saturday, October 21, a 55-year-old man parked his bicycle outside 40 Amsterdam Avenue. When he returned for his two-wheeler he found it was gone. The bike was a Trek valued at $5,000.

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Useful Contacts POLICE NYPD 20th Precinct

120 W. 82nd St.

212-580-6411

NYPD 24th Precinct

151 W. 100th St.

212-678-1811

NYPD Midtown North Precinct

306 W. 54th St.

212-760-8300

FDNY Engine 76/Ladder 22

145 W. 100th St.

311

FDNY Engine 40/Ladder 35

W. 66th St. & Amsterdam Ave.

311

FDNY Engine 74

120 W. 83rd St.

311

Ladder 25 Fire House

205 W. 77th St.

311

FIRE

CITY COUNCIL Councilmember Helen Rosenthal

563 Columbus Ave.

212-873-0282

Councilmember Inez Dickens

163 W. 125th St.

212-678-4505

State Senator Brad Hoylman

322 Eighth Ave. #1700

212-633-8052

State Sen. Jose M. Serrano

1916 Park Ave. #202

212-828-5829

STATE LEGISLATORS

Assemblymember Linda Rosenthal 230 W. 72nd St. #2F

212-873-6368

Assemblymember Daniel O’Donnell 245 W. 104th St.

212-866-3970

COMMUNITY BOARD 7 LIBRARIES

250 W. 87th St. #2

212-362-4008

St. Agnes

444 Amsterdam Ave.

212-621-0619

Bloomingdale

150 W. 100th St.

212-222-8030

Performing Arts

40 Lincoln Center

917-275-6975

HOSPITALS Mt. Sinai – Roosevelt

1000 10th Ave.

Mt. Sinai - St. Luke’s

1090 Amsterdam Ave.

212-523-4000 212-523-5898

CON ED TIME WARNER CABLE POST OFFICES

4 Irving Place

212-460-4600

2554 Broadway

212-358-0900

US Post Office

215 W. 104th St.

212-662-0355

US Post Office

700 Columbus Ave.

212-866-1981

US Post Office

127 W. 83rd St.

212-873-3991

Ansonia Post Office

178 Columbus Ave.

212-362-1697

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westsidespirit.com GENIUS OF DA VINCI, MICHELANGELO REVEALED WHEN TOURING SHOW DEBUTS IN NYC

BY GENIUS PRODUCTIONS

Leonardo da Vinci and Michelangelo were not besties. The men loathed each other from the start, says Mark Rodgers, curator of the “Da Vinci Machines” and “Michelangelo” exhib- Show Creator Mark Rodgers hosts “DaVinci & Michelangelo: The Titans Experience” at the Triad Theater. its for North America. Da Vinci was a workhorse who created These are only a couple of the tidbits to be had at a family friendly, multi- 44,000 inventions, 14,000 of which have surmedia performance of “Da Vinci & Mi- vived, including the ball bearing, underwachelangelo: The Titans Experience.” The ter breathing apparatus and original battle show features movies, 3D animations of ship. Michelangelo was one of the greatest, machines and inventions and images of if not the greatest, sculptors in the history of codices and artwork, including paintings the world. “We have to bring these two together,” Rodand sculptures. “The whole idea of the performance gers said. “I want to bring out their work ethis to not only compare the two, but ic. They had such incredible lives. We have connect them to today,” said Rodgers, that power to use every day of our life. We show creator and host. “By the end of the can make a difference.” Triad Theater, 158 West 72nd Street show, we’re talking about Van Cliburn www.triadnyc.com and Les Paul and Paul McCartney. The 212-279-4200 whole theme of the show is to discover the November 24th, 25th and 26th. 2 hours with 15 min intermission da Vinci in you.”

The indicted former Trump campaign boss wasn’t only a Beltway fixer — he was a high-living New York wheeler-dealer who funneled overseas cash into property, haberdashery and other illgotten goods, the feds say BY DOUGLAS FEIDEN

It’s a truism that New Yorkers will go to extraordinary lengths to obtain, maintain — and of course, profit from their own sliver of Manhattan real estate. The tradition dates to the Astors, Stuyvesants, Vanderbilts, Roosevelts, Rhinelanders and Rockefellers, and typically, a lot of corner-cutting has been involved. But the city’s great landowning families were lucky: Federal prosecutor Robert S. Mueller III wasn’t around back then to police their property purchases, flips, mortgages and other transactions. Ex-Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort wasn’t so fortunate. Thus, an opaque and suspicious Soho real estate play figured in his October 30th indictment by the Justice Department’s special counsel. The 12-count indictment alleges conspiracy, money laundering, false filings, tax fraud and a scheme to conceal millions in income he derived as an unregistered agent of the Ukrainian government. Manafort pleaded not guilty to the charges. The charging document also provides a window into the lifestyle of a super-lobbyistcum-part-time-Manhattanite, the one-percent variety, who plowed millions into trophy properties and hundreds of thousands into high-end creature comforts, like bespoke suits at a Fifth Avenue boutique.

Paul Manafort, then chairman of Donald Trump’s presidential campaign, at the Republican National Convention in Cleveland on July 20, 2016. Photo: ABC News, via flickr The only problem: It wasn’t kosher, Mueller alleges. Manafort, he says, deployed offshore accounts to evade taxes and wire vast sums into the U.S., buying everything from housekeeping services to pricey antiques. “Manafort used his hidden overseas wealth to enjoy a lavish lifestyle in the U.S. without paying taxes on that income,” Mueller wrote. All told, the indictment calculates, he laundered $18 million from abroad. Of that amount, roughly $4.5 million in offshore funds, 25 percent of the total, was used to purchase luxury goods, services and real property in Manhattan from 2008 to 2014, an analysis of the charges shows. The cash helped Manafort cut a wide swath across the island, where he periodically worked, played, politicked, patronized an exclusive cigar club, shopped for $7,500 custom-tailored suits and $8,500 silk sport coats — and dined with Russians and Ukrainians. His expenditures have

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already resonated in Chelsea. One enterprising familyowned business, Aronson’s Floor Covering, at 135 West 17th Street, took note of the indictment, referenced a mega-purchase he made in Alexandria, Virginia, and used it for a bit of savvy streetmarketing: On the sidewalk by its picture windows, the 150-year-old firm placed a large signboard proclaiming, “PAUL MANAFORT spent $934,350 at an antique rug store — & no money with us ... ” This portrait of Manafort’s New York was gleaned from the indictment, which doesn’t include his five months running the Trump campaign, the ongoing Congressional probes of a Trump-Russia connection, and legal filings in separate civil cases. Since 2006, the 68-year-old international political consultant has owned a 43rd floor aerie in Trump Tower, a condo unit 25 stories below Donald Trump’s gilded triplex penthouse. Current value: $6 million, according to Manafort’s proposed bail package. From apartment 43-G, it was just an 18-story elevator ride down to the 25th-floor office of Donald Trump Jr., where on June 9th, 2016 the two men and Trump son-inlaw Jared Kushner held their now-infamous meeting with several Russians, some with apparent ties to the Kremlin and Russian spy services, who offered to “bring dirt” on Hillary Clinton. While the encounter didn’t figure in the indictment, both Mueller and Congress have been scrutinizing it for


NOVEMBER 9-15,2017 months. Manafort’s real estate portfolio also went under the special counsel’s microscope, with special attention paid to his two-bedroom, two-bath, 2,150-square-foot, fourth-floor loft condo at 29 Howard Street in Soho’s cast-iron district. To purchase it in 2012, he turned to Cyprus, the Mediterranean tax haven and traditional transfer point for Russian funds. The entire $2.85 million cost was wired from offshore Cypriot entities, which he controlled but never reported as taxable income, Mueller alleges. The plot thickens: Manafort rented the Soho loft for tens of thousands of dollars on Airbnb, took advantage of favorable rental tax breaks, then applied for a mortgage — falsely telling his bank that condo unit 4-D was owneroccupied by his daughter and son-in-law, enabling him to tap a larger loan at a cheaper rate than would otherwise have been available, the indictment says. There’s more. He allegedly compounded the bank fraud by instructing his son-in-law in January 2016 to lie to a bank appraiser who assessed the condo. “Remember, he believes you and [Manafort’s daughter] are living there,” Manafort wrote, according to Mueller’s account. “He had the benefits of liquid income without paying taxes on it,” the special counsel noted. The feds are seeking forfeiture of the Howard Street home. “I’ve never seen a property transaction more murky or convoluted in 17 years in the business,” said Michael Rose, a retired independent real estate agent who sold downtown properties. Just as sketchy was Manafort’s $849,125 purchases of hand-tailored suits and other items between 2008 and 2014 from a men’s clothing store Mueller called “Vendor E.” A chunk of those wares came from the Boutique of Bespoke Atelier, at 3 West 56th Street, the Associated Press found. In what could be a first in the history of haberdashery, Manafort stands accused of using 34 wire transfers, from undisclosed offshore accounts in Cyprus and the Grenadines in the Caribbean, to pull together his wardrobe. All told, Mueller dryly notes, Manafort wired a $12 million windfall to multiple vendors to buy “personal items,” adding, “He did not pay taxes on this income, which was used to

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Paul Manafort, Donald Trump’s excampaign manager, cut a wide swath through New York – where he lived, worked, played, shopped, and huddled with Russians. Among the locales he frequented, a handful figure in his indictment for conspiracy to launder money and tax fraud

5 6 1. Boutique of Bespoke Atelier, 3 West 56th Street Manafort used wire transfers from Cyprus on which he paid no taxes to buy $849,215 in clothing from a men’s store, the indictment says. A big chunk was spent on suits at the high-end tailor, the A.P. reported 2. Trump Tower, 721 Fifth Avenue A. 43rd floor: Manafort has owned condo unit # 43-G since 2006 B. 66th, 67th and 68th floors: Neighbor Donald Trump owns the triplex penthouse C. 25th floor: Manafort, Donald Trump Jr. and Jared Kushner met on June 9th, 2016 with several Russians who pledged to “bring dirt” on Hillary Clinton 3. 432 Park Avenue Manafort teamed up with a pair of Russian and Ukrainian moguls in a failed 2008 bid to buy the Drake Hotel and convert it into a luxury complex, Bulgari Tower. Harry Macklowe’s 1,396-foot residential condo was built on the site instead 4. Grand Havana Cigar Club, 666 Fifth Avenue 39th floor: Scene of an August 2, 2016 meeting between Manafort and a Ukrainian businessman suspected of ties to Russian intelligence. The tête-à-tête was held as questions mounted over the

make the purchases.” The Bespoke Atelier, which once advertised in Trump Magazine, has since closed. Manafort tailor Eugene Venanzi, now operating from a shop in Greenwich, Pitagora & Venanzi, didn’t return calls. Even a $20,000 payment to his unidentified New York housekeeper, “Vendor S,” was allegedly sourced to Cypriot and Grenadian wire transfers. And Mueller says a local antiques dealer, “Vendor G,” was wired $623,910 from abroad.

scope of Moscow’s interference in the presidential election 5. 29 Howard Street in Soho Fourth floor: Manafort in 2012 wired $2.85 million from offshore accounts in Cyprus to buy condo unit # 4-D Cyprus in a scheme to profit illicitly and evade taxes, the indictment says 6. 123 Baxter Street in Chinatown Fifth floor: Manafort spent $2.5 million to purchase condo unit # 5-D in 2007. Now valued at roughly $3.5 million, it was one of the properties he offered to post in a bail package ? Unknown location of “Vendor G,” an antiquarian Manafort sent five wire transfers from Cyprus, allegedly laundering funds on which he paid no taxes, in order to buy $623,910 from an unidentified antiques dealer in New York between 2010 and 2013 ? Unknown location of “Vendor S,” a housekeeper Manafort deployed three wire transfers from Cyprus and the Grenadines, concealing income on which he paid no taxes, in order to pay $20,000 for an unidentified housekeeper in New York, the indictment says

YOUR FATHER KEEPS WANDERING AWAY FROM HOME. BUT IT’S YOU WHO FEELS LOST.

THE ALZHEIMER’S DISEASE AND RELATED DEMENTIAS FAMILY SUPPORT PROGRAM. Caring for a family member who has trouble with thinking and memory can be extremely challenging. So challenging, in fact, that caregivers may feel overwhelmed, struggling to maintain their own health and well-being. NYU Langone’s Family Support Program provides convenient, personalized, and ongoing support to people caring for someone with Alzheimer’s or other thinking and memory disorders. The program is provided free of charge to individuals living within the five boroughs. You will receive access to counseling; connections to doctors and support groups; and compassionate guidance by being paired with a caregiver who has had a similar experience.

Douglas Feiden

Join a community dedicated to providing the support and guidance you need, for as long as you need it. Manafort’s attorney, Kevin Downing, pooh-poohed the transfers, arguing in court papers, “It goes without saying that in an international scheme to conceal assets, individuals generally move them offshore, not to the U.S.” But there was an odd typo in Downing’s filings: Referring to Cyprus, the island, he confused it with cypress, the tree: All the “funds deposited in the Cypress accounts were from legal sources,” he wrote.

For more information or to enroll, call us at 646.754.2277 or visit nyulangone.org/memorydisordersupport. The Alzheimer’s Disease and Related Dementias Family Support Program is supported by a grant from the New York State Department of Health.

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Voices

Write to us: To share your thoughts and comments go to westsidespirit.com and click on submit a letter to the editor.

LOSING THE STREETS BY BETTE DEWING

Rome is burning but the kind we planned to rail about before the heinous deadly truck attack was the record number of small biz closures in 2017 and how we’ve just got to stop fiddling. But first, thankfully, there’s no fiddling reaction to a one-man terrorist fatally mowing down eight young people bicycling and walking on a secure bike/walking path in Manhattan. Many others were terribly injured. The whole world is appalled and concerned that such abominable acts can happen — anywhere. But while all-out attention is being paid to prevention and justice, let’s not forget the continuing all-out support the grieving and the injured desperately need. But the Burning Rome we’ve long

been concerned about — losing our neighborhood small-business lifelines, was brought further to the fore by Arlene Kayatt’s Nov. 1 column in this space, “Beauty Street and Future Avenue,” warning about East 86th Street’s stores and eateries likely being replaced by yet more condo high-rises. That is except for a bevy of “beauty salons” we really don’t need. The last 86th Street movie house may also go. Even a medical center seems doomed. So many small retail stores and eateries have already been lost, including my favorite corner diner on First Avenue. And not to mention the loss of relatively affordable rental housing — homes. But where is the protest? We’ve got to get Nero to stop fiddling — in general, all over the city,

to save and restore these veritable lifelines, which make the city so livable for all. Why, oh why is Nero still fiddling? I recall U.S. Rep. Carolyn Maloney’s press conference welcoming Fairway to East 86th, which some of us worried could burden small grocery stores and even the large corner Gristedes, which is now also a memory along with the East End Gristedes where its longtime staff are still in touch with some of their elder patrons, Ah, far too little is said about the profound loss also felt by displaced business workers. Again, not only on the East Side I’m most familiar with, but all over the city — all over the city. Sure, of course, you’re concerned and want to help if you just knew how or “had more time.” Well, again, for starters, check out this paper’s Useful Contacts column and call the officials listed there. Sure thank them, but also gently

(at first) remind them that government’s first duty is to protect public welfare and these small stores and affordable eateries are veritable lifelines, especially, but not only for disabled or elder New Yorkers. They create community and neighborliness – prevent isolation. They make the city safer. Ah, yes, tell them how you suffer from the loss of your neighborhood lifelines. And use that strong verb! Indeed so much untold suffering results – and these stories must get out there, and in media, media, media. Not to mention the “social kind.” Most unfortunately, these losses have not become an election issue, which could get voters out, if not in record numbers, then in higher ones that the record low we could approach. And it might just be standing-room-only at civic meetings where saving and restoring these lifelines are the number one order of public business. I wish the

so many times during the day, you would’ve thought the food was animated, and I was peeking in to say hi and make sure everyone was OK. Now that I’m working outside the home, I’m down to three squares a day and actually seeing — in small increments — the numbers on the scale going in a more positive direction.

SELF-IMPROVEMENT THROUGH SEASONAL WORK BY LORRAINE DUFFY MERKL

I have not had a job in 22 years. That’s not to say I haven’t worked. My time was divided between shuttling my children around the Upper East Side for school as well as activities and doing freelance writing jobs. (I was an original member of New York’s gig economy.) My assignments were done at home, with the occasional attendance at on-site meetings, which could be considered more like drive-bys than working on premises. With both kids in college now, I began to consider my re-entering the workplace. But since my writing life from a home office has served me well, I thought I’d look for a new challenge. Enter an opportunity for seasonal (aka holiday) work at a high-end midtown store that would allow me to dip my toe in the full-time employment waters and try my hand in an industry that was new to me. So far, it has not only let me once again be known as a staffer, but has offered some forced

6. “No Vacancy”

self-improvement that I want to last well beyond my twelve-week stint.

1. Lorraine Unplugged Have iPhone Will Travel has been my motto since I got my first circa 1995 (also the year I began contract work). Throughout my day, I looked at the screen constantly, checking my email, texts, Facebook, and Twitter as though national security depended on my being updated. Because no devices are allowed on the sales floors of my new company, and I can only check social media and email at lunch and on breaks, I realized that most of what I get is either junk, or a message that can wait at least a couple of hours to answer.

2. Water, Water Everywhere I’ve been hearing since childhood: drink eight glasses of water a day. I have ignored that dictum for that same length of time, living a cactuslike existence. Now that I need stamina to stand most the day, sometimes in one place, drinking as much water as I

meeting notice for the highly active East 79th Street Neighborhood Association read “ROME IS BURNING – HELP US SAVE NEIGHBORHOOD BIZ!” It’s Thursday, Nov. 9 at 6 p.m. — at Temple Shaaray Tefila (79th and Second). Oh, the association’s catchment area includes much of the Upper East Side and with citywide concerns. Ditto also for the 19th Precinct Community Council meetings that take place each first Monday of the month at the 67th Street precinct. Next time make it “HELP SAVE OUR NEIGHBORHOOD BIZ TO PREVENT CRIME!” but do urge community relations officers (They’re at 212-4520613) to make this a priority. Rome is burning. And again, it can be done if enough of us try — if enough of us try. Thank you, Arlene, for your warning bells. Concerned thoughts/ideas to dewingbetter@aol.com. To be continued, of course.

Have iPhone, Will Travel: commuters on the 2 train. Photo: susanjanegolding, via flickr can throughout the day keeps me alert and simply feeling better.

3. A Not So “Remote” Possibility For decades, parents have been accused of using television as a babysitter. The adult version of that is stayat-home mothers and/or freelancers using it as background, when home alone all day. Every now then, however, something would catch my ear and I’d sit and watch. I then started to have a program or two, for which I’d stop chores or assignments. I also tried to have at least one show per evening for my viewing pleasure, even if it was a Law & Order rerun. Now, when I come

home from work, I’m more than a little beat. I don’t want to spend my few pre-bedtime hours with a glaring blue light in my face. If there’s something that really interests me, I watch it on demand at a more convenient time.

4. Efficiency Expert When I made my own schedule, tomorrow was always another day for my to-do list. Now with only two days off, productive is my middle name.

5. Food: My BFF No More As a home-based worker, I never snacked — I grazed. There was no candy/fruit bowl safe from my automatic grasp. I opened the fridge door

I read a quote once that said: “Writers have to convince people that they’re actually working when they’re staring out the window.” Yes, in order to compose, scribes sometimes have to let their minds wander. Sometimes it is fruitful. Other times, something triggers a recall of an unpleasant situation that results in renting space in my head to people I don’t even know anymore. In my current position, I need to be present and focused. Brain clutter is not an option. 7. I’m more interesting I really don’t think I was a bore before, but my topics had gotten a little stale. Now with a new job to talk about, colleagues to describe, tales of customer escapades, and the goings-on in my company’s active neighborhood, when my family asks about my day, I tell them — ad nauseam. Lorraine Duffy Merkl is the author of the novels “Back to Work She Goes” and “Fat Chick,” for which a movie is in the works.

President & Publisher, Jeanne Straus nyoffice@strausnews.com

STRAUS MEDIA your neighborhood news source nyoffice@strausnews.com 212-868-0190

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NOVEMBER 9-15,2017

VEHICLE CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 Mayor Bill de Blasio said after the bike path attack that while it would be “very hard” to put bollards on every corner in the city, the city will install them in “key places” and learn from each incident. Bills have been introduced in both the House and Senate that would dedicate federal money to fund the installation of such barriers. Jenni Hesterman, a retired Air Force colonel and author of the textbook “Soft Target Hardening,” said that she recognizes that traffic safety measures can sometimes inconvenience bikers and pedestrians. “When you put up bollards and barricades it can really start to impact daily life for people, but there are examples of how to do it effectively,” she said. “In a city like New York, there’s just a soft target on every corner,” Hesterman said, adding that authorities must focus on areas of particular

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The Spirit|Westsider westsidespirit.com vulnerability. “What towns and cities need to look at is where these promenades are where a vehicle could mount the curb and get to a high rate of speed,” she said. Hesterman said that decision makers can find useful input about vulnerable locations from the people who use public spaces every day and know them best. “The users often see spaces through different eyes than the people who design them,” she said. “The bad guys want us to get comfortable and complacent and not fight back,” she added. “We can’t feel helpless. There are things that we can do based on learning from past attacks.” Officials said that the bulky concrete barricades placed along the West Side bike path last week were a temporary measure until permanent solutions, possibly including metal bollards, could be put in place. Paul Steely White, executive director of the bicycle safety advocacy group Transportation Alternatives called the

temporary barriers a “safety hazard,” claiming in a statement that the concrete walls dangerously channel two-way bike traffic into narrow spaces. White called on authorities to “immediately remove these concrete barriers, and instead install permanent, precisely placed bollards on high volume bike and pedestrian paths citywide” A week after the attack, Ryan Thomas, 25, biked to the site of a makeshift memorial to the victims near Pier 40 to pay his respects. Thomas, a Staten Island resident who until recently worked on the West Side and used the path every day, said that he hadn’t noticed much of an impact from the concrete barriers on light midday bike traffic as he rode to the memorial. “It could create a bottleneck of bikers when it’s crowded, but I see the need for them,” he said. “It’s a precaution that we can see now should probably already have been in place.”

REGISTERED NURSES REHABILITATION THERAPISTS MEDICAL SOCIAL WORKERS CERTIFIED HOME HEALTH AIDES

Your elderly mother just told you she fell in the bathroom last night at 4 A.M. Now what? Your parents want to live in their own home. You can’t be with them 24/7. That’s why the Visiting Nurse Service of New York offers more senior home care services than any other home healthcare organization in New York. With care options to help both generations feel better – including nursing, personal care and companionship – the Visiting Nurse Service of New York is the right care now.

ACTIVITIES FOR THE FERTILE MIND

thoughtgallery.org NEW YORK CITY

A Good American: Screening + Talk with William Binney

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 12TH, 4PM

CALL NOW TO LEARN MORE ABOUT PROFESSIONAL, PERSONALIZED CARE TO MEET YOUR LOVED ONE’S INDIVIDUAL NEEDS. 1-855-VNSNY-NOW • VNSNY.ORG

Symphony Space | 2537 Broadway | 212-864-1414 | symphonyspace.org Cryptanalyst-mathematician William Binney speaks about his experience as a whistleblower and his contention that the National Security Agency’s collection of mass data is part of a “deliberate violation of the U.S. Constitution” ($25).

Lenin: The Man, the Dictator, and the Master of Terror

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 14TH, 7PM Book Culture | 450 Columbus Ave. | 212-595-1962 | bookculture.com Join Victor Sebestyen and Harper’s Magazine for a discussion of a new biography of Vladimir Ilyich Lenin—the first major English examination in nearly two decades—which goes beyond politics and history to portray Lenin the man (free).

Just Announced | ScreenTimes: “The Shape of Water” with Guillermo del Toro

MONDAY, NOVEMBER 27TH, 7PM FIAF/Florence Gould Hall | 55 E. 59th St. | 212-355-6100 | timestalks.com Director and screenwriter Guillermo del Toro is joined by New York Times journalist Logan Hill for a preview screening of del Toro’s latest fantasy, The Shape of Water, and a conversation ($50).

For more information about lectures, readings and other intellectually stimulating events throughout NYC,

sign up for the weekly Thought Gallery newsletter at thoughtgallery.org.

Services are usually covered by Medicare, Medicaid and most insurers. VNSNY also offers private care. © 2017 VNSNY


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Discover the world around the corner. Find community events, gallery openings, book launches and much more: Go to nycnow.com

Manhattan at your fingertips at a price within your reach. Manhattan has never been so close at hand. Enjoy the daily support of staff who handle the burden of everyday tasks — including creating delicious meals — while you enjoy the center of the universe. Call us today at (212) 586-4546 to schedule a tour.

The Value of Independence. 519 West 49th Street, New York, NY 10019 (212) 586-4546 | RiverviewNYC.org Living@RiverviewNYC.org

EDITOR’S PICK FALL FOLIAGE TOUR: TURTLE POND AND THE GREAT LAWN ▲ Fri 10 Central Park, meet at the entrance at West 81st Street and Central Park West 10 a.m. $35 212-415-5500 92y.org/event If you think New York City’s wildlife is limited to subway rats and pigeons, then you haven’t been looking hard enough. At the base of Belvedere Castle lies Turtle Pond, where numerous species of birds, fish, frogs, dragonflies and, yes, turtles, lie on the shoreline. Many species thrive in this natural habitat, and you can discover them, along with obscure footpaths and architectural features, with the help of artist and urban naturalist Ken Chaya on this unique Central Park walking tour. Chaya spent over two and half years walking every acre of Central Park to map its many trails, architecture and landscape features and to locate and identify thousands of its magnificent trees. The result of his epic journey is “Central Park Entire,” an illustrated map detailing the park’s varied topography. Even if you think you know Central Park, this tour will reveal its myriad mysteries. Register in advance, and don’t forget your binoculars.

Thu 9

Sat 10 Sat 11

DANCE WORKSHOP WITH PILOBOLUS

‘CRY HAVOC’: WAR, PTSD AND REENTRY

THE KING AND QUEEN OF BANJO ►

West Side YMCA 5 West 63 St. 1 p.m. Free Get grooving with teaching artist Jessie Sector from the renowned dance company. She will lead warm ups, kinesthetic exercises and group improvisations at this dancemaking workshop for adults 55 and older. 212-630-9600 ymcanyc.org/westside

New-York Historical Society 170 Central Park West 7 p.m. Pay as you wish Army veteran turned actor Stephen Wolfert struggled to make sense of his experiences during the Persian Gulf War. “Cry Havoc,” an autobiographical solo show that grapples with post-traumatic stress and the question of how civilians and veterans learn to live together, chronicles his experience. Panel discussion with the actor and other veterans to follow. 212-873-3400 nyhistory.org

The Concert Hall at the New York Society of Ethical Culture 2 West 64th St. 8 p.m. $42+ Bela Fleck and Abigail Washburn, aka “the king and queen of the banjo,” bring their Appalachian murder ballads, gospel, chamber and blues to the Big Apple. This pair is sure to wow with their unique Grammywinning sound at this intimate performance space. 212-874-5210 nysec.org/music


NOVEMBER 9-15,2017

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West Side YMCA 5 West 63 St. 10 a.m. $20 donation requested Stretch and tone for a good cause at this Healthy Lifestyles fundraiser. Come for one session, or stay for a marathon workout. Take your pick from chair Pilates, Yogilates, Pilates with a foam roller and more. Check website for full schedule. 212-912-2600 ymcanyc.org/westside

The New York Academy of Medicine, 1216 Fifth Ave. 6 p.m. $12 By examining asthma hospitalization rates, public housing records and the work of New York Cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ďŹ rst commissioner of Air Pollution Control, Leonard Greenburg, this talk explores how emerging asthma research in the 1950s and 1960s bolstered broader African-American struggles for equity in New Orleans and New York. 212-822-7200 nyam.org/events/event

Book Culture on Columbus, 450 Columbus Ave. 7 p.m. Free Following in the footsteps of authors such as Saul Bellow and Philip Roth, Ruby Namdar makes his literary debut with a nuanced search for meaning in contemporary American life. Namdarâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s novel, interspersed with pages from an ancient Talmudic text, follows a celebrated professor headed for a downfall. 212-595-1962 bookculture.com/upcomingevents

Mon 13 THE ZOOMABLE UNIVERSE American Museum of Natural History, Central Park West at 79th Street 7:30 p.m. $15 Inspired by the bestselling book and classic ďŹ lm â&#x20AC;&#x153;Powers of Ten,â&#x20AC;? the awardwinning Columbia University astrobiologist Caleb Scharf leads this epic tour through all known scales of reality. Drawing on the latest research, he begins at the edge of the observable universe and ends where the fabric of space-time itself seems to warp. 212-769-5100 amnh.org

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F REE POPCORN! F ESTIVAL PASS $2 5 (GOOD FOR TWO) Walter Reade Theater, 165 West 65th Street . Buy Tickets: ďŹ lmlinc.org OFFICIAL

MEDIA

This project is supported in part by an award from the National Endowment for the Arts. New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew M. Cuomo and the New York State Legislature.


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NOVEMBER 9-15,2017

VIENNESE STYLE IN NEW YORK At the Neue Galerie, the first major American retrospective of the Wiener Werkstätte, the Austrian design collective BY VAL CASTRONOVO

It’s been more than a century since architect Josef Hoffmann, artist Kolomon Moser and textile industrialist Fritz Waerndorfer rfer founded the WieWie ner Werkstätte e (Vienna Workshops) to unify the arts rts and marry form and function in the manner of the 19th century English sh Arts and Crafts afts movement. Its goal: to sow beauty into to everyday life. The collective’s e’s idealistic principle, Gesamtkunstwerk unstwerk (total work of art), adopted ed from the Vienna Secession, has been taken to heart by co-curator Christian Witt-Dörring, whose team am has created three rooms at the Neue eue Galerie that immerse visitors in the modern aesthetic of Vienna a in the early 1900s. “You are going ng to be dipped in three differentt atmospheres going through the e exhibition,” WittDörring said on n a tour of the show, which eschewss labels in favor of booklets in each h room to guide visitors. “I first create eate an atmosphere before you even en read a label or a text. You are putt in this atmosphere and then you start questioning.” Let your senses es get the better of you and allow itt to seep in. “Every Wienerr Werkstätte exhibit was designed d as a total work of art. That’s whatt we wanted to create here. A totall work of art means they dealt with every aspect of the arts — from the he architecture to

Josef Hoffmann ((1870-1956). Table, 1904. Execution:: Wiener Werksta¨tte. th pores chalked white; Ebonized oak with lver-plated mounts. boxwood inlay, silver-plated itute of Art. The Minneapolis Institute nwoody Fund William Hood Dunwoody

IF YOU GO WHAT: “Wiener Werkstätte, 1903-1932: The Luxury of Beauty” WHERE: Neue Galerie New York, 1048 Fifth Ave. (at 86th Street) WHEN: through January 29 www.neuegalerie.org/

interior decoration to jewelry to graphic design.” Faithful to the concept, there’s silverware, ceramics, glass works, furniture, lamps, leatherwork, metalwork, textiles, wallpaper, friezes, postcards and architectural models and design drawings displayed in tall vitrines that line the walls and in n free-standing cases, some e of them hand-paint-ed with florall edwith

decorations. The more than 400 objects and their distinct environments illustrate the design group’s full range and evolving aesthetic. The first, very austere room pays tribute to the early production — the “Founding Years” from 1903 to 1905 — when black-and-white designs and the simple geometric forms of Josef Hoffmann Hoffmann for the luxury market ruled. The second room, showcasing products from the “Harvesting Years” from 1906 to the outbreak of World War I in 1914, introduces color and ornamentation and bears witness to the beginning of mass-produced goods like postcards and fabrics. The third room, WittDörring’s favorite, is devoted to the later production — the “Years of Reinvention” from 1915 to the liquidation of the firm in 1932 — when exclusive, one-of-a-kind

Josef Hoffmann (1870-1956) Centerpiece, 1924. Execution: Wiener Werksta¨tte Brass. Minneapolis Institute of Art. The Modernism Collection, gift of Norwest Bank Minnesota pieces in gold, silver and semi-precious stones increasingly gave way to cheaper, mass-produced items in glass, ceramics, wood and paper. (No worries, though, luxury was hardly dead as the silver bottle-stoppers attest.) As the curator said: “In 1914, this world that was enabling this kind of luxury production collapses. The country is suffering an economic disaster. There’s no food, no heating material. The haute bourgeoisie that was the main clientele of this production lost most of its money because they were signing up for war bonds. That was all problematic, so [the workshops] have to reinvent themselves, which leads us to the last room.” Because of conscription, the Wiener Werkstätte lost most of its male craftsmen; next generation designers like Dagobert Peche were drafted. In response to the talent drain and scarcity of materials, in 1916 the group established artists’ workshops on the premises, which were dominated by women, and started making ceramics, which until then had been outsourced. “It’s the beginning of expression-

ist ceramic production,” Witt-Dörring said. Female artists also began creating their own designs for textiles and fashion accessories. Relics from Vienna’s extravagant Cabaret Fledermaus, established in 1907 with interiors designed by the Wiener Werkstätte, can be seen in the second room and illustrate the group’s early spare-no-expense vision. “This is a program for a production that maybe lasted one week—all hand-printed,” the curator said, surveying the remnants. “Hoffmann designed the famous Fledermaus chair for it in bentwood. bentwood It was this idea that the quality has to be in every detail. They brought the cook from Paris to produce the meals in the cabaret” and designed the gravy boats, serving dishes, cutlery and more. “It’s wonderful this saucepot.” But a parallel aesthetic developed in response to the collapse of the Austro-Hungarian Empire after defeat in World War I and the subsequent loss of the empire’s markets. The Arts and Crafts philosophy, which elevated functional items into works of art, was called into question and an effort was made to appeal to a wider audience. “A small class of major industrialists serving as patrons was increasingly replaced by the broad class of bourgeois customers,” Witt-Dörring writes in the lavishly illustrated catalog. Form and function were no longer married. “Either it’s art or it has to function,” he said, invoking Dagobert Peche. Hence the reemergence of old techniques, like overlay glass, and retro styles — tea services with baroque shapes and handles. As he concluded about an ornate centerpiece designed by Hoffmann, circa 1924: “Designers were not afraid of the old styles any more. They could be inspired by them again and create something new from them. It’s like a piece of Rococo. You could buy it in brass or silver.”


NOVEMBER 9-15,2017

The Spirit|Westsider westsidespirit.com

AMSTERDAM CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 its review of the matter, citing its expectation that, barring an injunction, “construction will proceed as rapidly as possible in a ‘race to the finish line’” with the appeal. The board, which is the city agency responsible for ruling on appeals of zoning determinations, consists of five commissioners appointed by the mayor. “The Board of Standards and Appeals is independent of the Department of Buildings, but ultimately they work for the mayor, just like the Department of Buildings does,” said George Janes, a planning consultant who has worked on the case with Freud’s group. “So you have long odds whenever you go to Department of Buildings, but we feel we have a very good case.” The case against the tower focuses on the massive, irregularly shaped zoning lot that the building would occupy. The tower itself would occupy just a small portion of the zoning lot, at the former site of Lincoln Square Synagogue, near Amsterdam Avenue and 69th Street, but the lot itself is significantly larger — a 110,000-square-foot parcel that stretches across much of the block. As Landmark West’s appeal states, the zoning lot “ties together irregularly shaped pieces of existing tax lots with long, extremely narrow, corridors,” meandering from the site of the proposed tower all the way to West End Avenue. The lot’s footprint winds between and around the high-rises of the neighboring Lincoln Towers housing complex to include thousands of square feet of open space on the interior of the block, including walkways, driveways and parking spaces used by Lincoln Towers residents. The building derives its exceptional height from this open space — there are no absolute height limits in the zoning district, and developers can build taller buildings by including more open space in a zoning lot. The groups opposing the tower argue that the zoning lot was improperly formed and does not meet the definition of a zoning lot because it consists of portions of several tax lots, which they contend the law does not permit. “They took pieces of tax lots to create a zoning lot rather than entire ones,” Freud said. Further, the groups argue that much of the area in the zoning lot that is counted as open space — the walkways,

Community groups have appealed the DOB’s decision to issue permits for a proposed 668-foot residential building at the former site of Lincoln Square Synagogue on Amsterdam Avenue near 69th Street. Photo: Daniel Fitzsimmons driveways and parking spaces that form the basis for the tower’s height — does not meet the zoning definition of open space, which must be “accessible to and usable by all persons occupying a dwelling unit or a rooming unit on the zoning lot.” Parking spaces and driveways used by Lincoln Towers residents, they say, would not be usable by the residents of the proposed new tower at 200 Amsterdam. “They shouldn’t have allowed parking spaces that are already owned by other people to be counted as open space,” said Landmark West board member Susan Nial. “They are not open space.” A spokesperson for the developer, SJP Properties, said the application was given “an exhaustive review and subsequent audit” by DOB. “In fact, it is the same zoning that was employed by three other completed buildings on the same block: 170 Amsterdam, 200 West End Avenue, and the Lincoln Square Synagogue. Upon receiving all necessary building permits on September 27, we commenced construction for 200 Amsterdam,” the spokesperson said in an emailed statement. “We look forward to continuing to efficiently and safely complete a building that will be a great addition to the neighborhood. We remain committed to work-

ing closely with neighborhood and community officials throughout this process.” The appeals mark the latest development in a months-long effort to block the tower’s construction. The project was stalled from June to September of this year following a zoning challenge filed with the DOB by the Committee for Environmentally Sound Development, which cited several of the same objections now cited in the group’s BSA appeal. In response, the DOB put a hold on the project and requested additional documentation from the developer “to verify the open space ratio and that the zoning lot was properly formed.” According to a DOB spokesperson, the developer provided the DOB with additional information and zoning calculations that resolved the department’s objections, after which the hold was lifted and a building permit was issued Sept. 27. Sean Khorsandi, the executive director of Landmark West, said that if the project proceeds, it could pave the way for other developers to make use of irregularly shaped zoning lots to build taller buildings on the Upper West Side. “We feel that this could be the first of many inappropriate developments if this goes through,” Khorsandi said.

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MATH TUTOR Olivia Lodge K-12, COLLEGIATE, SAT PREP. 843-323-6855 olivialodge222@gmail.com Referrals and Rates upon request

at alexanderrobertson.org/admissions or call 212-663-2844 to make an appointment for your visit.

13


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NOVEMBER 9-15,2017

The Spirit|Westsider westsidespirit.com

RESTAURANT INSPECTION RATINGS OCT 20- NOV 1, 2017 The following listings were collected from the Department of Health and Mental Hygiene’s website and include the most recent inspection and grade reports listed. We have included every restaurant listed during this time within the zip codes of our neighborhoods. Some reports list numbers with their explanations; these are the number of violation points a restaurant has received. To see more information on restaurant grades, visit www.nyc.gov/html/doh/html/services/restaurant-inspection.shtml. Forty Carrots

2085 Broadway

A

Zurutto Ramen & Gyoza Bar

142 W 72Nd St

Grade Pending (22) Hot food item not held at or above 140º F. Raw, cooked or prepared food is adulterated, contaminated, crosscontaminated, or not discarded in accordance with HACCP plan. Tobacco use, eating, or drinking from open container in food preparation, food storage or dishwashing area observed.

Alice’s Tea Cup

102 West 73 Street

A

Piccolo Cafe

313 Amsterdam Avenue

Grade Pending (48) Cold food item held above 41º F (smoked fish and reduced oxygen packaged foods above 38 ºF) except during necessary preparation. Food not cooled by an approved method whereby the internal product temperature is reduced from 140º F to 70º F or less within 2 hours, and from 70º F to 41º F or less within 4 additional hours. Food Protection Certificate not held by supervisor of food operations. Evidence of mice or live mice present in facility’s food and/or non-food areas. Food contact surface not properly washed, rinsed and sanitized after each use and following any activity when contamination may have occurred.

Gina

2028 Broadway

Not Yet Graded (25) Food Protection Certificate not held by supervisor of food operations. Filth flies or food/refuse/sewage-associated (FRSA) flies present in facility’s food and/or non-food areas. Filth flies include house flies, little house flies, blow flies, bottle flies and flesh flies. Food/refuse/sewageassociated flies include fruit flies, drain flies and Phorid flies.

Le Pain Quotidien

494 Amsterdam Avenue

A

Good Enough To Eat (A.G. Bistro)

520 Columbus Avenue

A

Pizza Pete’s

528 Columbus Avenue

A

The Great Burrito Mexican Kitchen

405 Amsterdam Avenue

Grade Pending (20) Cold food item held above 41º F (smoked fish and reduced oxygen packaged foods above 38 ºF) except during necessary preparation. Personal cleanliness inadequate. Outer garment soiled with possible contaminant. Effective hair restraint not worn in an area where food is prepared. Food not protected from potential source of contamination during storage, preparation, transportation, display or service.

Hot & Crusty

2393 Broadway

A

Amsterdam Ale House

340 Amsterdam Avenue

Grade Pending (24) Food worker does not use proper utensil to eliminate bare hand contact with food that will not receive adequate additional heat treatment. Filth flies or food/refuse/sewage-associated (FRSA) flies present in facility’s food and/or non-food areas. Filth flies include house flies, little house flies, blow flies, bottle flies and flesh flies. Food/refuse/sewageassociated flies include fruit flies, drain flies and Phorid flies. Food contact surface not properly washed, rinsed and sanitized after each use and following any activity when contamination may have occurred.

Pick-A-Bagel/Dumpling Room

35 West End Avenue

A

Big Nick’s Pizza & Burger Joint

70 West 71 Sreet

A

Tavern On The Green

0 67Th Street And Central Park West

A

Joe

187 Columbus Ave

A

Barnes & Noble Cafe

2289 Broadway

A

Silk Cafe One

160 Columbus Ave

Not Yet Graded (40) Hot food item not held at or above 140º F. Filth flies or food/refuse/sewage-associated (FRSA) flies present in facility’s food and/or non-food areas. Filth flies include house flies, little house flies, blow flies, bottle flies and flesh flies. Food/refuse/sewageassociated flies include fruit flies, drain flies and Phorid flies. Food not protected from potential source of contamination during storage, preparation, transportation, display or service. Food contact surface not properly washed, rinsed and sanitized after each use and following any activity when contamination may have occurred. Sanitized equipment or utensil, including in-use food dispensing utensil, improperly used or stored.

El Rey De La Caridad

973 Amsterdam Avenue

Grade Pending (29) Hot food item not held at or above 140º F. Cold food item held above 41º F (smoked fish and reduced oxygen packaged foods above 38 ºF) except during necessary preparation. Food not protected from potential source of contamination during storage, preparation, transportation, display or service. Food contact surface not properly washed, rinsed and sanitized after each use and following any activity when contamination may have occurred.

The Heights Bar & Grill

2867 Broadway

Grade Pending (18) Cold food item held above 41º F (smoked fish and reduced oxygen packaged foods above 38 ºF) except during necessary preparation. Food not protected from potential source of contamination during storage, preparation, transportation, display or service.

Dunkin’ Donuts

687 Amsterdam Avenue

A

Hunan Chen’s Kitchen

1003 Columbus Ave

Grade Pending (22) Hot food item not held at or above 140º F. Evidence of mice or live mice present in facility’s food and/or non-food areas. Food not protected from potential source of contamination during storage, preparation, transportation, display or service.

Ollie’s Chinese Restaurant

2705 Broadway

A

M2m Mart

2935 Broadway

A

Cafe Roma Pizzeria

854 Amsterdam Avenue

A

Tap Nyc

267 Columbus Ave

A

Joe & The Juice Colombus

247 Columbus Ave

A

Da Capo

322 Columbus Ave

A

Starbucks

1841 Broadway

Grade Pending (9) Evidence of mice or live mice present in facility’s food and/or non-food areas.

Cafe 71

2061 Broadway

A

La Dinastia Latin-Chinese Cuisine

145 W 72Nd St

A

Floating Mountain

239 W 72Nd St

A

Starbucks Coffee

141 Amsterdam Ave

A

Juicy Cube

166 W 72Nd St

A

Texas Rotisserie & Grill

2581 Broadway

A

My Pie Pizzeria

166 W 72Nd St

A

Absolute Bagels

2788 Broadway

Grade Pending (2)


NOVEMBER 9-15,2017

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The Spirit|Westsider westsidespirit.com

NONPROFIT BUYS INDEPENDENCE HOUSE HOUSING Planned rent increase has tenants fearful, but city officials say no one will pay more than 30 percent of income BY SOPHIE HERBUT

Some tenants of Independence House have been there since the final brick was laid on the West 94th Street development. The building has provided affordable housing for middle-class earners since 1967. Tenants have experienced many changes in that time, including, recently, three ownership and management changes within a few years. Many now fear they may no longer be able to live there. Independence House, a 120unit building on the corner of Amsterdam Avenue, has been bought by a nonproďŹ t, the West Side Federation for Seniors and Supportive Housing, with the help of a grant from the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Housing Preservation and Development Department. WSFSSH, which owns 26 affordable-housing developments in the city, most of them on the Upper West Side, recently received approval from the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Department of Housing Preservation and Development to raise rents 221 percent, which city officials said was necessary to, paradoxically, keep rents at a minimum by allowing the nonproďŹ tâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s owners to maximize payments and other benefits from state and federal sources, including through the Section 8 subsidy program, and keep tenantsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; rents at the maximum of 30 percent of their income. WSFSSHâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s executive director, Paul Freitag, said the nonproďŹ t was committed to keeping

rents affordable and said tenants should be more at ease in the coming months. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re going to have tenants see their rents go down by a couple hundred dollars,â&#x20AC;? he said. Tenants, though, are skeptical and are fighting the increase in court. â&#x20AC;&#x153;As a senior, we donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t want to be forced to sign a lease we canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t afford,â&#x20AC;? said Genovia Wheeler, an Independence House tenant since it opened. Wheeler detailed how four leases came to her door, one slightly different than the other. She said the way the rent hikes are being presented has made tenants nervous. Jack Lester, the attorney representing the Independence House Tenantsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Association, called the rent hike â&#x20AC;&#x153;illegalâ&#x20AC;? because it did not follow statutory obligations stipulated by the stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Mitchell-Lama affordable-housing program. Accordingly, he said, rents are supposed to be based on cost and projected proďŹ ts of the management company, with increases determined by subsidies received, costs incurred and some ďŹ nancial return to ownership. Lester said the planned rent increase â&#x20AC;&#x153;is not supported by any legitimate rationale.â&#x20AC;? Freitag dismissed those allegations, saying WSFSSH had submitted a budget-based rent increase to city officials, who in turn facilitated an increase in Section 8-eligible apartments. WSFSSH closed on the property two weeks ago. Freitag said contractors have begun doing exploratory work on about $10 million in needed infrastructure renovations, including the buildingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s roof apartment interiors. The previous owners, an LLC with ties to a Maine concern, were said to be exploring how to take the building out of affordable housing. A deal was subsequently brokered to allow

WSFSSH to buy the development. A conďŹ dentiality agreement precludes WSFSSH from disclosing its purchase price, but Freitag said it amounted to 80 percent of market value. City officials said that although the building was eligible to come out of the MitchellLama housing program, which helps keep rents below marketrate by providing building owners tax breaks and other beneďŹ ts, Independence House will remain in the program for 40 years, although Freitag said the building would remain affordable for much longer. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Independence House will be acquired by a reputable nonprofit developer and will receive much-needed rehabilitation of all of the developmentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s major systems,â&#x20AC;? a spokesman for the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Department of Housing Preservation and Development said in an email before WSFSSH closed on the building. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Notwithstanding the officially stated increase, because of subsidies, no tenant will have more than a 2.5% increase in rent, while some tenants will actually experience a rent reduction. Additionally, the terms include a guarantee that for the next 20 years, no tenant will pay more than 30% of their income towards rent.â&#x20AC;? According to a transcript of her deposition in the court action by tenants fighting the rent increases, Gale Brewer, the Manhattan Borough president, said rents at Independence House needed to be â&#x20AC;&#x153;restructuredâ&#x20AC;? to insure that all of the buildingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s tenants, and not just its Section 8-eligible renters, would be spared increases they could not afford. â&#x20AC;&#x153;In this way, WSFSSH could provide rental assistance to the non-Section 8 tenants, keeping their rent at no more than thirty percent of their income,â&#x20AC;? Brewer said.

WSFSSH bought the 12-story building with the help of a $25 million city grant that had initially been earmarked for new construction. The grant came from a $50 million payment from the Collegiate School to the city. The school made the payment in exchange for city approval for a new complex at Riverside South. It had initially proposed building affordable nearby but that plan and another ďŹ zzled. Lester said he was highly skeptical of that arrangement. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This is the smoking gun,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This is just money lining pockets.â&#x20AC;? Told of Lesterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s contention, Freitag reiterated that tenants would not pay more than 30 percent of their income on rent. He said that tenants that donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t qualify for Section 8, WSFSSH would offer what he called a Landlord Assistance Program, a 20-year legal agreement that has the added beneďŹ ts of Section 8 without the government subsidies. For now, pending resolution of the court action, the rent increases are on hold.

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Despite a projected 221 percent rent hike at Independence House, city officials and the nonproďŹ tâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s management say rents will be kept at a minimum through state and federal programs. Photos: Sophie Herbut

Independence House, a 120-unit building on the corner of Amsterdam Avenue and West 94th Street, was recently bought by a nonproďŹ t.

".ČŞ". 1.ČŞ1. ".ČŞ". ".ČŞ". ".ČŞ". ".ČŞ". 1.ČŞ1. ".ČŞ".

3471CZSFHJTUFSJOHPOMJOFBUZPSLQSFQPSH "OZGVSUIFSRVFTUJPOT FNBJM,FMTJFJO"ENJTTJPOTBULQBUSJDL!ZPSLQSFQPSH York Prep is a coeducation college preparatory school for grades 6-12


16

NOVEMBER 9-15,2017

The Spirit|Westsider westsidespirit.com

Business

FROLIC CELEBRATES GRAND OPENING WITH A BARK Kids can bond with service dogs at this new Upper East Side spot BY CHARMAINE P. RICE

It’s an animal lover’s dream on First Avenue between 80th and 81st Streets. For cat owners, there’s Feline Health, a cat-centric veterinary practice.

Taking Patience through the agility course. Photo courtesy of Frolic

Right next door is Biscuits & Bath, the popular doggy day care and wellness center. And on October 3, Frolic Kids joined the furry fray, opening its doors to welcome kids and their parents. Launched by Biscuits & Bath, Frolic Kids offers educational programming geared to children ages 4 to 12, with space for hosting birthday parties and special events. The heart of Frolic’s programming is centered on the service dogs adopted from the Guide Dog Foundation, a nonprofit organization based in Smithtown, Long Island that has trained and placed guide and service dogs for over 70 years. The Frolic dogs include Patience, a yellow lab Golden Retriever mix, and Galileo, a black lab. Two more dogs are slated to join the Frolic family. “Patience and Galileo are service dogs and [are trained] to help people with special needs. Though these dogs did not obtain the certification needed to become service dogs, they were raised as working dogs and we want them to keep that honor,” explained Lina Lerentracht, Frolic’s director. “These dogs formally undergo what is known as a “canine career change” and they are going to be utilized in programming for kids.”

Lerentracht holds a master’s degree in child development and early childhood education. Prior to overseeing Frolic’s programming, she ran her own day care center in Brooklyn for 16 years and is an experienced volunteer with animal rescue groups, having fostered more than 40 dogs in the past year. To get the word out, Lerentracht canvassed in the immediate area, going to nearby schools, local shops and attending events geared to kids all over the city. “I literally attended every kid event this summer,” said Lerentracht. “Word of mouth has been great. The first birthday party we hosted came from a Biscuits & Bath client and the one following that came from a school administrator who I reached out to. We’re now booked through November and December.” An open house on Halloween allowed kids and their parents to come in, trick-or-treat, meet the dogs and tour the space. During the birthday parties, Lerentracht begins with explaining Frolic’s mission and how the dogs are adopted from the Guide Dog Foundation, followed by a brief lesson on how to properly approach a dog. A stuffed animal dog is on hand to allow more jittery

Kids and dogs at Frolic Kids. Photo courtesy of Frolic kids to practice before Patience and Galileo are brought out by their trainers who remain alongside the dogs throughout the party. The dogs demonstrate their learned behaviors including sitting, staying, turning on the lights, opening the door, and giving kids high-fives. Kids have the opportunity to take the dogs through an agility course. Photo-ops and a dance party further encourage the kids to interact directly with the dogs. Frolic offers an “Ambassadorship Program” for kids who love dogs, eager to learn more, and potentially explore future career paths working with dogs. Kids are designated as ambassadors after completing the program’s three levels.

For the younger set, smaller classes comprised of three or four kids include “Tea time with Patience,” which gives them the opportunity to have a tea party and cuddle with Patience. “Hero day with Galileo” encourages kids to put on superhero outfits while they learn about all the heroic things Galileo is trained to do, such as open doors, turn on the lights, and bring things to people. Frolic recently hosted an event with a local Girls Scout troop who made signs for a local adoption event and decorated dog collars for a rescue group. “Unleash your inner dog is our motto,” said Lerentracht. “Kids can come here and have fun while learning about dogs.”

NEIGHBORHOOD SIDE STREETS MEET 72ND STREET

sideways.nyc

FINE & SHAPIRO 138 WEST 72ND STREET When a friend or family member comes to visit, they inevitably request a fabulous New York deli sandwich at some point during their stay. It is always easy to comply, as there are not many other places that can compete with Fine & Schapiro. Open since 1927, Fine & Schapiro is the oldest kosher deli in the city. David, one of the co-owners, said, “people tell me it’s the best matzo ball soup in the city.” The pastrami and corned beef are also legendary. David attributes their popularity to the fact that most items on the menu, including the oft-requested chicken in a pot, are made in-house. “It would be easier to tell you what we buy,” David said, listing pickles, coleslaw, and macaroni salad among the items not made by his team. For more photos and side streets, go to sideways.nyc


NOVEMBER 9-15,2017

17

The Spirit|Westsider westsidespirit.com

   



  

 

 



  

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in print & online is still here providing neighborhood news that matters to you. Sign up for our e-newsletter @ westsidespirit.com Want a copy in print? Call 212 868 0190 â&#x2013;

â&#x2013;

NOVEMBER 9-15,2017


NOVEMBER 9-15,2017

19

The Spirit|Westsider westsidespirit.com

YOUR 15 MINUTES

To read about other people who have had their “15 Minutes” go to westsidespirit.com/15 minutes

KEEPING THE UPPER EAST SIDE IN STEP Founder and director of Dance Workshop New York on her new studio BY ANGELA BARBUTI

As the daughter of a dance teacher, Nanci Grasso she was born into studio life. At two-and-a-half, she started dancing at her mother’s on Long Island. “And when I wasn’t dancing, I was soaking up every aspect of the business,” she said. Since dance was an inherent part of her being, she didn’t consider it a future profession, and went on to attend FIT, eventually becoming a celebrity stylist. She did, though, continue to keep a foot on the dance floor, traveling back to Lynbrook to teach for her mother. Two years ago, she moved to the Upper East Side and fell in love with the neighborhood. But it was lacking something — a dance studio for the neighborhood’s youth. So, last year, she took a leap, and opened Dance Workshop New York on East 64th Street, right off of Lexington. Offering classes in ballet, tap, jazz, modern, hip hop and pointe, the studio’s focus is children. But the studio also hosts tap and ballet classes for adults and Grasso plans to start offering fitness classes as well. Along with managing the studio, Rossi teaches several hours a day, six to seven days a week. She wouldn’t have it any other way. The 31-yearold spoke of the rewards of watching long-term students grow and getting to play an intimate role in their lives. “That coming of age with them is a one-of-a-kind experience,” she said.

How did your mom get her start in the business? She is from Brooklyn originally and then migrated to Rosedale, Queens. She grew up dancing at a local studio. And very early on, I would say at around 11 years old, she started working at that studio so she could barter dance classes. And then it grew from there. Probably by the time she was 16, she was really teaching and then started helping with the administrative aspects of this woman’s studio in Queens. And by the time she was 21, she decided to take the plunge and open her own studio and that’s when she opened on Long Island. Did you ever think you’d have your own studio one day? I think that studio life was just such a part of my being that I didn’t think about it, really. It was my life and our

family business. I didn’t separate it from myself and always aspired to work in fashion, so that was really the goal. However, I danced almost every day all through my childhood, up until high school and college. But I wanted to work in the fashion industry and ended up doing that.

What was your experience like at FIT? Tell us about the career that followed. I majored in fashion business there. And obviously living in Greenwich Village, I soon realized I needed to start working to support every aspect of city life. I was going to school full time and took a job at Intermix as a salesperson. And that quickly led to my first job as a stylist. At 19, I started working for CBS Watch Magazine. And I was styling celebrities for editorials, cover shoots, red carpets, press junkets and doing that for many years. Simultaneously, I started teaching for my mother on Long Island. I couldn’t really quit either thing; I was really passionate about both.

When did you decide to open your own studio? I would say probably about five years ago, I decided to fully commit myself to my mom’s business and we became co-directors. And I really started building that business and falling in love with it.

How did you choose the Upper East Side as its location? I moved to the Upper East Side two years ago and was loving my neighborhood. I started to think, “Wow, we need a dance studio here.” We really needed a neighborhood place for children to call home and report into every week with friendly faces. I would say I signed two leases within six months, my personal lease and then I found a place on 64th Street and it happened at lightning speed. It was probably just meant to be.

As far as your demographic, are there a lot of local students or do they travel to get there? I would say primarily our base is local, however, because there are so many schools on the Upper East Side, we do have students who go to school up here, take their dance classes after school by us, and then go home and that may be Chelsea or Midtown, it depends.

How involved is your mother in the city studio? What are the pros and cons to working with her?

Nanci Grasso at her dance studio on East 64th Street. Photo: Dance Workshop New York  I would say there are all pros. We are extremely close and I couldn’t imagine doing this without her. She has been my mentor as a woman and as a business owner. And she has loved every second of opening this business, so she’s in the city quite a bit. She’s based on Long Island and still has her studio there, 39 years strong, and I’m still teaching there as well.

for dancing in front of 300 people and ease that fear. That’s been such a special thing; to be part of someone’s wedding day is just really wonderful. Any time we have the opportunity to work with a couple, we jump on it, because it’s just priceless.

You also teach classes to couples who are getting married.

We’re actually going to have our first event in a couple of weeks. We partnered with them and we’ll go back and forth between hosting events at our location and then hosting events at the different satellites of the New York Public Library. And the idea is to increase interest in both our studio and the library and the wonderful, free opportunities that they have. So es-

That’s been a really great thing for us. Obviously for a wedding couple, their first dance can be a bit scary. So we try to assist in that respect. So they’ll typically bring in their wedding song and we can choreograph something elaborate for them or just give them the basics to prepare them

On your Instagram page, there was a recent post about a partnership with the library. Explain what that entails.

sentially, we’ll be incorporating some creative movement and dancing to their book readings at their locations and then they’ll be coming to us to do some readings and storytime. And our dancers and friends-this is open to the public as well-will be able to get their library cards. We’re really focusing on kids from 2 to 6 and are just so thrilled to partner with such a great organization and be part of such a special thing. www.danceworkshopny.com

Know somebody who deserves their 15 Minutes of fame? Go to westsidespirit.com and click on submit a press release or announcement.


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CROSSWORD

Westsider

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M V C A B I N E T S J L S G O

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SUDOKU by Myles Mellor and Susan Flanagan

by Myles Mellor

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NOVEMBER 9-15,2017

The Spirit|Westsider westsidespirit.com


NOVEMBER 9-15,2017

The Spirit|Westsider westsidespirit.com

PUBLIC NOTICES

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The Spirit|Westsider westsidespirit.com

PUBLIC NOTICES

NOVEMBER 9-15,2017


NOVEMBER 9-15,2017

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The Spirit|Westsider westsidespirit.com

CLASSIFIEDS PUBLIC NOTICES

PUBLIC NOTICES

Telephone: 212-868-0190 Fax: 212-868-0198 Email: classified2@strausnews.com

POLICY NOTICE: We make every eďŹ&#x20AC;ort to avoid mistakes in your classiďŹ ed ads. Check your ad the ďŹ rst week it runs. The publication will only accept responsibility for the ďŹ rst incorrect insertion. The publication assumes no ďŹ nancial responsibility for errors or omissions. We reserve the right to edit, reject, or re-classify any ad. Contact your sales rep directly for any copy changes. All classiďŹ ed ads are pre-paid.

Driver/Guards Wanted

Armored Car Company is seeking Driver/Guards for our New York daily operations. We are a well diverse company with business all over the Tri-State. We are looking for dedicated individuals to join our team. We are a 24 hour operation, which includes extended hours, weekends and holidays. Responsibilities include: driving an armored vehicle, guarding, delivering and picking up shipments. Qualifications: Must be at least 21 years of age and able to lift at least 50 pounds. Able to obtain a valid City Of New York Carry Permit for a handgun. Must have a valid State of New York driverâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s license at least Class D. The 47-hour armed guard course certificate is a plus. A home Premise Permit is a plus. Previous armed driver/ messenger or related driving experience is a plus.

MERCHANDISE FOR SALE

We offer a competitive salary, benefits including 401(K). Union Subsidized medical benefits tenure bonus depending on qualifications and continuous good-stand employment and an employee referral program. Interested Applicants should send their resumes to: hr@payomatic.com with the subject line â&#x20AC;&#x153;Rapidâ&#x20AC;?. You can also fax them to 718-366-2577. Only qualified applicants will be contacted.

Directory of Business & Services To advertise in this directory Call #BSSZ (212)-868-0190 ext.4 CBSSZMFXJT@strausnews.com

Antique, Flea & Farmers Market SINCE 1979

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REAL ESTATE - RENT

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Paintings & Icons Conservation and Restoration Manhattan location

Volunteering is Ageless Learn why organizations want you and how to get started!

Volunteers of All Ages Needed

Thursday, November 16, 2017 2:30²4:00 Rutgers Presbyterian Church 236 West 73rd Street (Subway 1, 2, 3 to 72nd St; one block north) (Bus²FURVVWRZQ0WR%¶ZD\RQHEORFNQRUWK

Admission is FREE! Light Refreshments

RSVP to reserve your place 212 889-4805 or www.volunteer-referral.org

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At Patina Studio your artwork will be restored, with personal and professional care, to give you pleasure for many years to come.

rXXXQBUJOBQBMDPN *Free on-site consultation*


24

NOVEMBER 9-15,2017

The Spirit|Westsider westsidespirit.com

It’s Happening at

Columbia in November

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 8

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 11

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 17

Guided Historical Tour

Columbia Women’s Volleyball vs. Yale

Harlem Chamber Players Annual Bach Concert

5:00 P.M.

7:00 P.M. to 9:00 P.M. Broadway Presbyterian Church, 114th and Broadway

213 Low Library, Visitors Center, Morningside campus Learn about the history, architecture and sculpture of Columbia and the Morningside Heights campus. All are welcome. To request a disability accessible tour, contact us 5 days in advance. To make a reservation for a group of 10 or more, call us at (212) 854-4900.

Francis S. Levien Gymnasium, Dodge Physical Fitness Center, Morningside campus. For more info, call (212) 854-2535 or visit gocolumbialions.com.

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 12 Visual Arts Open Studios

Being the First: A Conversation With Georgia Pestana 6:30 P.M. TO 7:30 P.M. Sulzberger Parlor, Barnard Hall, Barnard campus Someone has to do it first, but what does it take? Georgia Pestana, Barnard alumna and the first woman and person of Hispanic heritage to hold the position of first assistant corporation counsel in New York City, kicks off this new series about trailblazers and pioneers. For more info, email events@barnard.edu.

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 9 Professional Journalism, Polarization, Post-Truth, and Post-Trump 5:00 P.M. TO 7:00 P.M. 418 Barnard Hall, James Room, Barnard campus A discussion of fake news and politics, and how lessons from the past can help journalism face the onslaught against truth. With Professor Michael Schudson and editors from the Washington Post and The New York Times. For more info, email kah2213@columbia.edu.

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 10 Lecture & Stargazing: Going Out in Style

3:00 P.M. TO 6:00 P.M. Prentis Hall, 632 W. 125th St.

Premiere: Above the Drowning Sea 5:00 P.M. TO 7:30 P.M. Butler Library, Morningside campus, Room 203

An evening with some of the most beautiful concertos and arias by Bach. Tickets start at $15. Children 12 and under free. For more info, visit harlemchamberplayers.org.

BioBus

Columbia Football vs. Brown

10:00 AM TO 1:00 P.M. Low Plaza, Morningside campus

Second-year M.F.A. students show work in process. For more info, email gdb2106@columbia.edu.

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 14

For more info, call (212) 854-2535 or visit gocolumbialions.com.

Mikhail Karasik: The USSR’s Tower of Babel

Saturday Science: Ready, Set, Go!

6:00 P.M. TO 7:00 P.M. International Affairs Building, 12th Floor, Morningside campus

1:00 P.M. Jerome L. Greene Science Center, Education Lab, 609 W. 129th St.

Opening reception for new exhibit featuring 22 lithographs dedicated to the hundred-year anniversary of the 1917 Russian Revolution. Exhibition runs through January 11, 2018. For more info, visit harriman.columbia.edu.

Come and explore the workings of the brain through hands-on activities and family-friendly scientific resources. Free, but RSVP online to guarr antee entrance at zuckermaninstitute.columbia.edu.

Students K-12 have a chance to experience the excitement of discovery on the BioBus, a science lab built on a bus. BioBus mobile labs have research-grade microscopes and are staffed by scientists who provide an introductory science experience. For more info, visit biobus.org.

THROUGH DECEMBER 17

MONDAY, NOVEMBER 20 WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 15 Piano: Magdalena Baczewska 7:00 P.M. TO 9:00 P.M. Italian Academy, 1161 Amsterdam Ave., Morningside campus Pianist and harpsichordist Baczewska performs works by Berio, Clementi, Debussy, Monteverdi and Scarlatti. For more info, email itacademy@columbia.edu.

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 16 Poetry Reading: A Centennial Celebration of Gwendolyn Brooks 7:00 P.M. TO 8:30 P.M. 309 Low Library, Morningside campus Don’t miss this tribute to Gwendolyn Brooks, one of the 20th century’s finest poets, featuring Jericho Brown, Rigoberto Gonzalez, Darryl Pinckney and others. For more info, email english@barnard.edu.

events.columbia.edu · For disability services, call 212-854-2284 prior to the event.

Free screening of a new documentary about Jewish refugees in Shanghai during World War II. Followed by a Q&A with the filmmakers. For more info, email rkb7@columbia.edu.

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 30 SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 18 1:00 P.M. Robert K. Kraft Field, Baker Athletics Complex, 218th Street and Broadway

7:00 P.M. TO 9:00 P.M. 704 Pupin Hall, Morningside campus Lecture on the beauty and importance of nebula; followed by telescope observations of the night sky. For more info, visit outreach.astro.columbia.edu.

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 28

Book Reading: Orhan Pamuk 6:30 P.M. Miller Theatre, 2960 Broadway at 116th St. Nobel laureate Orhan Pamuk reads from his new novel, The Red-Haired Woman. Followed by conversation with Professor of English and Comparative Literature Bruce Robbins. Free, but registration required at arts.columbia.edu.

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 21 Brazilian Choro Music with Regional de NY 6:00 P.M. TO 7:00 P.M. Miller Theatre, 2960 Broadway at 116th St. Regional de NY is keeping the Brazilian choro tradition alive with concerts that are energetic and full of joy. Admission first-come, firstserved. Doors open at 5:30. For more info, visit millertheatre.com.

Frank Lloyd Wright, Harlem & Modern Housing 10:00 AM TO 1:00 P.M. Lenfest Center for the Arts, 615 W. 129th St. Presented as interwoven narratives, the Living in America exhibition includes drawings, photographs and other materials that track Wright’s idealized concept for housing development and the development of public housing. Gallery hours vary. For more information, visit columbia.edu/cu/wallach.

Manhattanville Course Auditing and Lifelong Learners Program Columbia University funds up to 150 courses each academic year for residents of Manhattanville Houses, Grant Houses and others in the local community. The programs provide adults not currently enrolled in college with the opportunity to attend selected lectures drawn from University offerings in the arts and sciences. The application deadline for the spring semester is Jan. 5. For more information, visit http://sps.columbia.edu/auditing/ lifelong-learners-auditing-program.

Columbia University in the city of new york

West Side Spirit - November 9, 2017