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The local paper for the Upper per West Side p Sid

WEEK OF OCTOBER EYEWITNESS IN PUERTO RICO ◄ P.2

12-18 2017

SHELTER FROM THE STORM PETS An UWS dog-care center takes in 32 animals rescued from Puerto Rico in hopes of finding them homes BY SOPHIE HERBUT

After the devastation that Hurricane Maria left in Puerto Rico, Camp Canine, a dog-care center located on 73rd Street and Columbus Avenue, recently took in about 32 dogs from the island to care for them and find them homes. Tania Isenstein, the owner of Camp Canine, went to Puerto Rico to survey the damage at one of the shelters her center often partners with, El Faro de los Animales, in Humacao on the eastern coast of the island. “I packed my suitcase with things people needed,” she said. “It was 85 pounds. Surprisingly, it wasn’t any dog stuff.” Isenstein moved up a previously planned trip to Puerto Rico to help as soon as she could. She went for three days at the end of September and made it a point to bring back one small dog on her flight. The dog’s name is Nina and she’s already found a forever home. Isenstein stayed with people she knew from El Faro, since the hotels were closed. Isenstein said the people she was staying with asked her for basic supplies like toilet paper and batteries. While her trip was short, she was able to view and document the damage to the shelter and other parts of Humacao. She snapped pictures of trees that had fallen on the dog course as well as the shelter, which lost its roof. She said she did not see one government employee tending to the damage. “The shelter doesn’t exist anymore,” she said. “But thankfully, the animals are all safe.” (The dogs were fostered during the storm in people’s homes.)

Then-President Barack Obama with ex-President Bill Clinton after a 2009 lunch at Il Mulino’s on West Third Street in Greenwich Village. Barack and Michelle Obama have been coming to Manhattan for years, and are now thinking of living here. The First Couple have been touring duplexes at 10 Gracie Square. Photo: Official White House photographer Pete Souza, via flickr

OBAMAS EYE ‘FAR EAST SIDE’ Lucy, a Puerto Rico rescue dog, is under the care of Camp Canine while she nurses her puppies. The Upper West Side center recently rescued dogs from a shelter they often partner with, El Faro de los Animales. Photo: Sophie Herbut Thanks to a private donor, Camp Canine arranged to have about 21 dogs come from Puerto Rico on Saturday, October 7th. Most of those dogs are staying in foster homes associated with Camp Canine, though some are at the center. They also received 11 more dogs on Monday, October 9th, and most of them are at Camp Canine. Isenstein said that Puerto Rico already had a problem with stray dogs before the hurricane. She estimated there were about 200,000 strays on the island, and El Faro has only seen this increase after Maria. The dogs from Puerto Rico range from one month to four years old. They were chosen to come to Camp Canine based on size, health, and behavior around people. Not all have been put up for adoption yet because they have to be checked for health issues and vaccinated. Some are puppies that are still nursing and have to wait another month before they can be adopted. The ones that reside in the camp are being taken care of by Raquel Johnson, an employee at Camp Canine. “They’re very well-behaved,” Johnw-

REAL ESTATE The former POTUS and FLOTUS in a New York state of mind? They tour 10 Gracie Square, a storied 1930 riverfront coop known for wealth, discretion, social cachet — and the occasional tragedy

son said. “But they were really nervous and quiet when they came in.” Johnson teaches the dogs basic commands such as sitting and staying still. She’s also acclimating the dogs to such a populated city. Camp Canine had planned fundraisers to renovate El Faro before the hurricane. But with the damage, their goal has increased and they’ve already scheduled three events this month. “My heart is with Puerto Rico,” said Isenstein. “My dog is from there and I’ve done a lot of work there.” Camp Canine has a history of helping animals after hurricanes leave them stranded or owners have to abandon their pets because they can’t care for them. After Harvey, Isenstein’s group helped out in Texas. After Hurricane Sandy five years ago, Camp Canine provided assistance to other boroughs in the city. “The people who are there can’t [help],” Isenstein said of Puerto Rico. “As a member of the bigger dog-rescue community, you should help as much as you can.”

BY DOUGLAS FEIDEN

Balmy breezes blow off the East River in summer, so it’s cooler than the rest of the island. Frigid winds howl off the straits of Hell Gate in winter, so it’s colder. Floating leaves from the trees in Carl Schurz Park ride the updrafts of autumn, then softly rain down on terraces and penthouses. These are the micro-climates familiar to residents on the five short cul-de-sacs east of East End Avenue. In addition to their novel atmospheric conditions, the old-line coops in this semi-cloistered enclave known as the “Far East Side” offer another important feature: discretion. And that could explain why Barack and Michelle Obama have recently

been spotted touring duplex apartments at 10 Gracie Square. The city possesses few dwellings as dignified and decorous. Here, it is stately, but not showy. There is charm, cachet — and typically, circumspection. The exceptions, however, have been spectacular. While the coop seeks to keep its affairs private, its tragedies and scandals have exploded in the public eye, and tabloid headlines, while infrequent, have been jarring. At least three millionaires took their own lives in the building — two in plunges from penthouses, a third with a bullet to the temple — and one murderer was apprehended on the premises, but only after doormen delayed her arrest, keeping detectives at bay for 24 hours. Happily, longevity is also common among coop residents. A former first lady of pre-Communist China lived to be 105. A financier who saved a great Wall Street firm after the 1929 stock market crash died at 107. Gracing the dead end of East 84th Street, sporting 204 feet of riverand-esplanade frontage up to the

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Westsider WEEK OF APRIL

SPRING ARTS PREVIEW

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Crime Watch Voices NYC Now City Arts

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NEWS residents A vocal group of U.W.S. Transportation isn’t convinced the doing enough is Committee of CB7 BY LISA BROWN

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MANHATTAN'S APARTMENT BOOM, > PROPERTY, P.20

2015

In Brief MORE HELP FOR SMALL BUSINESS

PROTESTING THE COMMUNITY BOARD OVER TRAFFIC DEATHS

Zero, Mayor Bill One year into Visionreducing trafficfor de Blasio’s plan traffic the number of has related deaths, Upper West Side fatalities on the compared to last actually increased, year’s figures. Upper West Siders -That has some needs to be done convinced more of the Transstarting with members of the local comportation Committee munity board. West mother, Upper Lisa Sladkus, a member of TransSide resident and said she’s fed at portation Alternatives a silent protest up, and organized 7’s February board Community Board residents dozens of meeting, where Committee called for Transportation leaders to step down. against incredible “We have run up imto get safe street trying just problems said. “This was provements,” she our point across get another way to dissatisfied.” that we are very involved with Sladkus has been Alternatives since Transportation served as director 2002 and formerly Streets’ RenaisSide of Upper West She says becoming sance Campaign. really got her into a mother is what activism. streets around me “Just noticing the as a pedestrian I felt and how unsafe she said. “I wanted and as a cyclist,”

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The effort to help small seems to businesses in the city be gathering steam. Two city councilmembers, Robert Margaret Chin and Cornegy, have introduced create legislation that wouldSmall a new “Office of the within Business Advocate” of Small the city’s Department Business Services. Chin The new post, which have up told us she’d like to would and running this year, for serve as an ombudsman city small businesses within them clear government, helping to get bureaucracy the through things done. Perhaps even more also importantly, the ombudsman and number will tally the type small business of complaints by taken in owners, the actions policy response, and somefor ways to recommendations If done well, begin to fix things. report would the ombudsman’s give us the first quantitative with taste of what’s wrong the city, an small businesses in towards step rst fi important fixing the problem. of To really make a difference, for developers will have to is a mere formality their projects course, the advocaterising rents, are the work complete precinct, but chances-- thanks to a looking to find a way to tackle business’ legally quickly. is being done which remain many While Chin their own hours,” of after-hours “They pick out boom in the number throughout who lives on most vexing problem. gauge what said Mildred Angelo,of the Ruppert construction permits said it’s too early tocould have Buildings one the 19th floor in The Department of the city. role the advocate number three years, the Houses on 92nd Street between on the She Over the past is handing out a record there, more information work perThird avenues. permits, bad thing. of Second and an ongoing all-hours number of after-hours of after-hours work problem can’t be a the city’s Dept. with the said there’s where mits granted by This step, combinedBorough according to new data project nearby jumped 30 percent, in construction Buildings has make noise efforts by Manhattan to mediate data provided BY DANIEL FITZSIMMONS workers constantly from trucks. according to DOB President Gale Brewer of Informaoffer transferring cement response to a Freedom the rent renewal process, they want. They city classifies knows the signs Act request. The between 6 “They do whateverthey please. They Every New Yorker some early, tangible small clang, the tion work come and go as of progress. For many sound: the metal-on-metal beeps of a any construction weekend, can can’t come piercing a.m., or on the have no respect.” at p.m. and 7 business owners, that hollow boom, the issuance of these reverse. A glance The increased a correspond after-hours. soon enough. truck moving in has generated can hardly as has led to

SLEEPS, THANKS TO THE CITY THAT NEVER UCTION A BOOM IN LATE-NIGHT CONSTR

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CARMEN VS. MARIA HURRICANES Or how the president of a tenant association in Manhattan Valley survived the killer hurricane that lashed Puerto Rico — and used her organizing skills to heal and care for others BY DOUGLAS FEIDEN

Carmen Quinones had never seen anything like it: “It was almost like a movie where God opens up the oceans,” she said. She was describing the Biblical deluge she witnessed in Añasco on the west coast of Puerto Rico as Hurricane Maria mercilessly battered the town, and wind-whipped surging seas engulfed everything in sight. “Trees were falling, lampposts were falling, there were no houses around. A little black dog trying to swim got lost under the water,” she recalled. “You couldn’t see anything but a sea of water that went on for miles and miles and miles.” And then there was the sound of the wind. “It was enough to make you go

crazy,” she said. “It was like a wolf howling.” She corrected herself, “It was more like a pack of wolves howling and howling for two days.” Now, Quinones is pretty tough. Politically savvy, too. For the past three years, she’s been president of the tenants association at Frederick Douglass Houses, an 18-building, 4,500-resident city housing project in Manhattan Valley where she’s lived for 35 years. She’s also run political campaigns for 10 years through Grassroots Inc., her consulting firm, and has served as a Democratic district leader for eight years and Democratic state committeewoman for four years. None of that prepared her for Maria. Or did it? The 59-year-old Quinones had come to the island to say goodbye to her 84-year-old father, Mario Quinones, who doctors said had about a week to live. “Daddy, I’m coming,” she told him via phone from New York. “Wait for me.” Apparently, he listened. His last words were, “I love you,” she says. “Then he kissed me and went into a coma.” He died on September 14 in his hometown, Mayajuauev, a couple of miles from Añasco.

Carmen Quinones and her sister Elba before the onset of Hurricane Maria in Añasco, Puerto Rico. Photo courtesy of Carmen Quinones After a wake, and then the viewing and cremation on September 19th, she went back to the one-story home of her sister, Elba Quinones. It started to rain, and that night, the lights went out. The next day, water began to enter the apartment. Efforts to bail it out were futile. “Soon, the water was up to my neck,” she says. Somehow, she was able to find the strength to open the door. “The water outside was up to my neck, too.” But she couldn’t leave just yet. “My sister was in danger of drowning.” So she went back, put one arm around her sister to guide her out of the house, held the family dog, Max, in another arm, waded through the torrents, and found refuge in the sec-

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ond-floor apartment of a friend of her sister, whom she knew only as Juan. And that’s where they lived for two days, September 20th and 21st — subsiding on some water and a bag of pretzels, soaking wet, huddled in a corner, as doors and poles and wires and cars and houses went flying by outside, as the howling intensified — until finally, Hurricane Maria ran its course. Then, they ventured into a world of knee-high mud and tree trunks and auto parts and made their way to the makeshift shelter at the Isabel Suarez Añasco Elementary School that would be their home for the next eight days. “At first, I was bugging out,” she says. “And thinking selfishly, ‘I want to get the hell out of here. I don’t belong here,

OCTOBER 12-18,2017 I belong in New York.’” Who could blame her? Her three children — Nadine, 44, Stephanie, 40, and Monday, 37 — hadn’t heard from her in nine days and didn’t know if she was alive or dead. She suffers from lupus and a thyroid condition and didn’t have all her medications. But then a funny thing happened. The tenant activist, organizer and political savant rose to the fore. There were 250 people in the shelter, 15 of them in wheelchairs, and three pregnant women, and she began to take care of the seniors. “Remember, I had just lost my dad, and so this was my way of honoring him,” she said. “I didn’t want to bug out, I wanted to help. ‘You cannot break down, lady,’ I told myself, ‘You cannot do this.’ “There was a 95-year-old man, so I got him cleaned up ... I started using my political pull from New York, talked to social workers, talked to the elected officials who stopped by.” And lo and behold, conditions in the shelter began to improve. Yes, Maria, has been vicious and catastrophic. But there were angels and kind hearts in Añasco who were laboring mightily to mitigate its ruinous impact. Before she finally returned to New York, Quinones got a refresher course in the power of faith in times of adversity: “We did a lot of prayers,” he said. “We had a prayer circle. We sang. We kept ourselves sane.”


OCTOBER 12-18,2017

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CRIME WATCH BY JERRY DANZIG STATS FOR THE WEEK Reported crimes from the 20th district for Week to Date

Year to Date

2017

2016

% Change

2017

2016

% Change

Murder

0

0

n/a

1

0

n/a

Rape

0

0

n/a

3

4

-25.0

Robbery

1

2

-50.0

53

48

10.4

Felony Assault

0

0

n/a

47

48

-2.1

Burglary

2

2

0.0

57

46

23.9

Grand Larceny

15

10

50.0

523

475

10.1

Grand Larceny Auto

0

0

n/a

10

21

-52.4

HIGH SCHOOL LOW

PURSE SNATCH

DISPIRITING EPISODE

FORGED CHECKS

IMPLEMENT INCIDENT

At 2 p.m. on Sunday, September 24, a 17-year-old male youth left his property in a locker inside the York Prep School at 40 West 68th Street. When he returned, he discovered that his Mac Air and a pair of earbuds were missing, a total value of $1,800.

A visit to Starbucks proved quite costly for a young woman. At 3:41 p.m. on Monday, October 2, a 31-year-old woman laid her purse down on top of a stool in the Starbucks at 2045 Broadway. When she next looked, her purse was gone. Its contents included a wallet, keys, cash, and more, totaling $180.

Local liquor store managers probably needed a stiff drink after getting stiffed on payments. On Friday, September 29, the management of the Renaissance Fine Wine and Spirits store at 161 Freedom Place discovered that they had received four fraudulent checks amounting to $4,951.

Another area resident became a victim of ID theft. At 3 p.m. on Thursday, September 28, a 56-yearold woman living at 115 Central Park West found out that someone had written forged checks totaling $3,100 against her bank account.

A burglar was apparently very much in need of kitchen utensils. At 8 a.m. on Monday, September 25, personnel at 62 West 71st Street saw that someone had broken a window overnight and taken knives, spoons and a coffee pot worth a total of $20.

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Useful Contacts POLICE NYPD 20th Precinct

120 W. 82nd St.

NYPD 24th Precinct

151 W. 100th St.

212-580-6411 212-678-1811

NYPD Midtown North Precinct

306 W. 54th St.

212-760-8300

FDNY Engine 76/Ladder 22

145 W. 100th St.

311

FDNY Engine 40/Ladder 35

W. 66th St. & Amsterdam Ave.

311

FDNY Engine 74

120 W. 83rd St.

311

Ladder 25 Fire House

205 W. 77th St.

311

FIRE

CITY COUNCIL Councilmember Helen Rosenthal

563 Columbus Ave.

212-873-0282

Councilmember Inez Dickens

163 W. 125th St.

212-678-4505

State Senator Brad Hoylman

322 Eighth Ave. #1700

212-633-8052

State Sen. Jose M. Serrano

1916 Park Ave. #202

212-828-5829

STATE LEGISLATORS

Assemblymember Linda Rosenthal 230 W. 72nd St. #2F

212-873-6368

Assemblymember Daniel O’Donnell 245 W. 104th St.

212-866-3970

COMMUNITY BOARD 7 LIBRARIES

250 W. 87th St. #2

212-362-4008

St. Agnes

444 Amsterdam Ave.

212-621-0619

Bloomingdale

150 W. 100th St.

212-222-8030

Performing Arts

40 Lincoln Center

917-275-6975

HOSPITALS Mt. Sinai – Roosevelt

1000 10th Ave.

Mt. Sinai - St. Luke’s

1090 Amsterdam Ave.

212-523-4000 212-523-5898

CON ED TIME WARNER CABLE POST OFFICES

4 Irving Place

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2554 Broadway

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US Post Office

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US Post Office

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US Post Office

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WHITNEY PITCHES GANSEVOORT PENINSULA INSTALLATION MUSEUMS Proposed sculpture evokes waterfrontâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s past BY MICHAEL GAROFALO

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The area now known as Gansevoort Peninsula, a strip of land that juts into the Hudson River near 13th Street, has been a location of significance on the Manhattan waterfront for about as long as humans have inhabited the island. Lenape settled the area and harvested oysters and lobsters from the estuaryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s rich waters. Later, Fort Gansevoort was built at the site to defend the Hudson during the War of 1812. Bustling piers serviced the produce markets and meatpacking plants lining the neighborhoodâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Belgian block streets during the commercial booms of the late 19th and early 20th centuries, but by the 1970s post-industrial decay had taken hold. Artists in search of cheap studio space moved into the neighborhood, and the piers, then largely abandoned, emerged as gathering places for the local gay community. The Meatpacking District as it is today, with its droves of tourists flocking to trendy boutiques and hotels, anchored by the High Line and the new home of the Whitney Museum of American Art, was scarcely imaginable.

The waterfrontâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s bygone days are invoked in the conceptual and literal framework of â&#x20AC;&#x153;Dayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s End,â&#x20AC;? a major public artwork by the artist David Hammons that the Whitney hopes to build on the banks of the Hudson. Hammonsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; proposed sculpture, formally unveiled October 4, is an ethereal representation of the past that Adam Weinberg, the museumâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s director, described as â&#x20AC;&#x153;a kind of ghost monument.â&#x20AC;? Plans for â&#x20AC;&#x153;Dayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s End,â&#x20AC;? a spare steel structure that would stand mostly over the water on the southern side of the Gansevoort Peninsula, opposite the museum, were presented to the public for the ďŹ rst time at a meeting of Community Board 2â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Park and Waterfront Committee hosted by the museum. Hammons draws the title of the proposed piece from a 1975 work of the same name by the artist Gordon Matta-Clark. For his â&#x20AC;&#x153;Dayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s End,â&#x20AC;? Matta-Clark cut large holes in the derelict pier shed that then stood on the site, letting in sunlight and reďŹ&#x201A;ections from the river outside to create what he called a â&#x20AC;&#x153;sun and water temple.â&#x20AC;? Hammonsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; â&#x20AC;&#x153;Dayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Endâ&#x20AC;? would stand on the exact site of the since-demolished pier shed, and recreate the buildingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s exact dimensions in an outline formed of brushed steel beams eight inches in diameter. The sculpture would not be lit, and renderings shared at the meet-

ing showed how the frame would seem to disappear in fog and twilight. At 373 feet long and 50 feet tall, but built with thin material to convey a light, almost hovering quality, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Dayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Endâ&#x20AC;? as Weinberg described it would be a representation of the siteâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s past at once monumental and evanescent. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The idea is that it is a ghostrepresentation of the pier shed that was originally there, so that what youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re looking at is an evocation not just of Gordon Matta-Clarkâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Dayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s End,â&#x20AC;&#x2122; but an evocation of the previous pier sheds and also of all the history of the waterfront,â&#x20AC;? Weinberg said. Hammons conceptualized the piece and presented it to the museum after touring the new Whitney building on Gansevoort Street soon after it was completed in 2015, Weinberg explained. Hammons, 74, an African-American artist whose works have explored race and impermanence, is based in New York City and has a reputation for closely guarding his privacy and independence. His works are represented in the collections of the Whitney, the Museum of Modern Art and the Tate, among other notable museums, but Hammons, who rarely speaks to the press and was not present at the community board meeting, has often turned down proposals to stage exhibitions of his work.

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OCTOBER 12-18,2017 â&#x20AC;&#x153;David is truly one of the greatest living American artists,â&#x20AC;? Weinberg said. Gansevoort Peninsula, the former site of a city Sanitation Department facility, is slated to soon be converted to a public park by the Hudson River Park Trust, which operates a four-mile stretch of public space along the West Side waterfront. The trust would own â&#x20AC;&#x153;Dayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s End,â&#x20AC;? which would be funded and maintained by the Whitney through contributions from private donors. Weinberg said that the final price of the sculpture is unclear, and declined to provide an estimate beyond stating that it would cost â&#x20AC;&#x153;millions of dollars.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Dayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Endâ&#x20AC;? would stand on 12 concrete piles, several of which would be anchored to the southern edge of the peninsula, which will be bordered by a â&#x20AC;&#x153;rocky shoreline beach,â&#x20AC;? according to the trustâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s plans. The remaining piles would stand in the water. Weinberg said that access to the water would be preserved and assembly of â&#x20AC;&#x153;Dayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Endâ&#x20AC;? would not require the pouring of any concrete to set the piles. Construction of the sculpture, much of which would be prefabricated off-site, would take approximately eight to 10 months.

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The Spirit|Westsider westsidespirit.com â&#x20AC;&#x153;It would not impinge on any uses of the Gansevoort Peninsula,â&#x20AC;? Weinberg said. The Whitneyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s announcement came less than a month after the dissolution of an unrelated, but similarly high-proďŹ le waterfront project nearby backed by the media executive Barry Diller. The proposal, which called for the construction of a $250 million pierborne performance venue just north of Gansevoort Peninsula â&#x20AC;&#x201D; â&#x20AC;&#x153;Diller Island,â&#x20AC;? as the project came to be known â&#x20AC;&#x201D; was withdrawn in September in the face of legal challenges centering on the pierâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s environmental impact. Whitney officials had intended to present â&#x20AC;&#x153;Dayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Endâ&#x20AC;? to the public for the ďŹ rst time at the community board meeting, but some details about the plan, including Hammonsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; involvement, leaked to the New York Times in the wake of the Diller projectâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s demise. Weinberg emphasized the Whitneyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s desire to engage with the public, but downplayed any relationship between Diller Island and the Whitneyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s proposal, saying the projects â&#x20AC;&#x153;came about completely separately in completely different ways.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;For me whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s important is not so much what they did or didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t do, but how I feel very

A rendering of the proposed project â&#x20AC;&#x153;Dayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Endâ&#x20AC;? by David Hammons. Image: Guy Nordenson and Associates strongly that it has to be something thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s connected to the community, thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s environmentally sound, and that really connects to this history,â&#x20AC;? he said. The museumâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s proposal was met with a largely positive reception at the community

board meeting. Several attendees who spoke at the meeting praised the design and its connection to local history. Vincent Inconiglios, an artist who has lived on Gansevoort Street since 1969, called the work â&#x20AC;&#x153;a resurrectionâ&#x20AC;? of the bygone waterfront that presents

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educational opportunities to engage with the past. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I think that the spiritual quality is fantastic,â&#x20AC;? he said. One woman, who described herself as a longtime resident of Jane Street, expressed concern about the submerged pilings contributing to the accumulation of debris in the water along the south side of the peninsula. Madelyn Wils, the president and CEO of the Hudson River Park Trust, said that an environmental assessment will be completed before any work on the project proceeds and that steps will be taken to minimize debris collection whether the sculpture is built or not. Another resident asked whether the sculpture would interfere with the natural

gas pipeline that runs underground near the site. Whitney officials said that it would not. In conjunction with â&#x20AC;&#x153;Dayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Endâ&#x20AC;?, the Whitney plans to present a range of programming focused on the history of the Hudson River waterfront, including tours, publications, a documentary film, and oral histories constructed from interviews with local residents. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This piece is about not just what is here, but what is gone,â&#x20AC;? Weinberg said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This is, in a sense, a monument for all the things we lose on the waterfront â&#x20AC;&#x201D; for loss, erasure. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not about doing something thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s modern, contemporary, edgy. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s about talking about history that was, and also, in the sense of its openness, what can be.â&#x20AC;?

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OCTOBER 12-18,2017

The Spirit|Westsider westsidespirit.com

Voices

Write to us: To share your thoughts and comments go to westsidespirit.com and click on submit a letter to the editor.

NEGATIVE AND POSITIVE CURRENT GRAYING NEW YORK BY MARCIA EPSTEIN

Sometimes I think that growing old must be the way athletes feel when they suddenly understand that they will never play again the way they did at 20. For athletes, “old” is in the 30s. The rest of the population in that bracket is in the process of settling down, finding themselves, marrying, having children and nailing down careers. For athletes, the glory days are beginning to be over. Most other people

can take solace in the fact that 35 means being hopeful, healthy and on the way up. But what about 65? 75? 85? Unless a major event happens, the realization that things are different happens slowly, but no less shockingly than a baseball player must feel when he doesn’t run as fast or hit as far, or when a tennis player understands that she’s lost a step somewhere. So it is with aging. One day a knee hurts. The next month a shoulder aches. Your grandson says, “I know you’re old, Grandma, but you can

walk fast like me.” You have to tell him that, no, you can’t, and he’ll have to slow down. Someone I know loves canoeing but can no longer walk down the hill to get to the canoe. The back starts to ache, maybe a hip, maybe two. Oh, I know, jolly aging is “in” right now. And really, what can we do but take one thing at a time. But if you get right down to it, aging isn’t very jolly at all. A little memory loss, anyone? Long lists of medications? I know women terrified of being alone and unable to take care of themselves. I know women (I am one) afraid that, even though they have a partner, they will end up alone. Who is not afraid of that? And the doctor visits pile up, the

tests pile up, the “findings” pile up, and so do the “incidental” findings (if you’re diligent and do the right thing). Maybe a cane or walker is in your future. I know I will be getting furious feedback saying I am “depressing” and have the wrong mindset. Well, I envy those who don’t have these worries, at least in the back of their minds. And if you’re dealing with all those aches and pains with cheer and fortitude, good for you. Aging isn’t for sissies, as Bette Davis is famous for saying. But now allow me to be a little more positive. Have you checked out the Senior Planet website? There you can find myriad ways to be an involved and engaged senior. They have their own center with many

activities, as well as listings from other organizations. Check out their Massive Open Online Courses. Here is just a small sample: Poetry workshops; introduction to guitar; fiction writing; moralities of everyday life, and history of architecture. So I’m not a total sourpuss, I like to show what’s positive about being a senior as well as the negative. Here are more positives: many free courses, on- and off-line; free museum days; access to public transportation; free time to pursue one’s interests; lunches with friends; daytime movies without crowds. Good and bad; doesn’t that describe all of life?

THE NEED TO KNOW WHAT BY BETTE DEWING

Most so achingly young, so much to live for, and oh, so many to mourn them — forever. This is WHAT needs to get out there first and foremost, not WHY? Or about WHO perpetrated this beyond words evil massacre of 59 mostly young people. Stress as well, the stories of the hundreds of grievously injured of this latest mass shooting. But, as usual, we mostly hear about the killer — WHY did he do it? And way too much about this doer of such unthinkable evil. Of course, this needs to be learned, but it’s the beyond-wordsawfulness of these unspeakable acts which need to be stressed — the unending heartbreak and the need for continuing support for the hundreds of mourners and the injured. And again the beyond-words-awfulness of the taking of innocent life — and this time, so many, so many, so many. Yom Kippur just past and surely it relates. “Thou shalt not kill” is part of the Ten Commandments and let’s hope that this again beyond-words massacre makes it a subject of sermons from all faith groups. Like East Side pastor Msgr. Harry Byrne did in the high crime 1970’s after several fatal muggings of parishioners. And he also went public with his “The First Civil Liberty” aired on The Times

Op-Ed page, sharply reminding government its first duty was to protect public safety, especially, he said, from criminal violence. Harry was a great friend to this paper and very much involved with affordable housing and other unmet community needs, truly a man for all seasons — a role model preacher and pastor whose church pews were always full. Struggling faith groups might take note. Of course, infinitely more must be done to regulate guns, but that must not be the foremost reaction, or action, or again not so much about the killer who shall be nameless here. He should not have a moment of fame too many mindless want to achieve. But again, what are the beyond-words consequence of this horrific evil — any evil really, to the victims and to their loved ones — their stories must continue to be told so their names are household kind — not those who wreak such ultimate crimes. And why is TV again doing a show about the Menendez Murders — two sons killing their mother and father ? Why is so-called entertainment ever more rife with the ruthless fictional taking of life — even in the once G-rated soaps? Ah, too few remember Hillary Clinton when as first lady admonishing Hollywood, the entertainment business, for excess violence which she said could desensitize young-

A Philadelphia vigil commemoration for the victims of Las Vegas shootings. Photo: Office of Gov. Tom Wolf

sters. “Not only youngsters,” some of us said. And Tipper Gore took a strong stand against pop music violence, which unfortunately got derailed. But, for now, we’ll stay with the WHAT? What are the terrible last-

ing consequences of such ultimate real life murderous evils? The magnitude of the ongoing suffering must be stressed and remembered as a primary prevention measure. And yes, to more truly and reverently remember

all innocent victims and those who mourn them. And never forget how the heart-broken bereaved need our ongoing support — our ongoing support!

President & Publisher, Jeanne Straus nyoffice@strausnews.com

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Director, Arts & Entertainment/ NYCNow Alizah Salario


OCTOBER 12-18,2017

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The Spirit|Westsider westsidespirit.com

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR HEFNER CON AND PRO There is little argument that Hugh Hefner (“Hugh Hefner’s New York,” Oct. 5 - 11) did more to increase the objectification of women than anyone else (though he was not the first, and would certainly not be the last). However, it would be myopic to focus on that single thing. Because there was much more to him than that. He was (quite obviously) a huge champion of First Amendment rights — for all. The old joke that “I buy Playboy for the articles” became, for many, a truth: not only did Playboy run some of the most well-read and well-respected interviews of its time, it also published long-form pieces on a variety of political, social and cultural issues. Hef was also among the first high-profile people to come out in favor of a woman’s right to choose (both abortion and contraception), and was also among the first high-profile people to speak up in favor of the decriminalization (and possible legalization) of marijuana. Finally, he was a major philanthropist, not only supporting women’s rights, gay rights, and animal rights, but it was he who, in 1978, spearheaded the project to replace the old, dilapidated “Hollywood” sign with a new, more permanent one (he personally paid for the “Y”). He also spearheaded the move to prevent the land immediately around the sign from being developed. Yes, Hef can certainly be blamed for his role in the objectification of women. But he should be remembered for his “good works” as much as for his “sins.” Ian Alterman Upper West Side

PROTESTING COLUMBUS Every Columbus Day you will find native people in front of the Christopher Columbus statue on 59th Street and Central Park West in protest of Columbus. Angelo Vivola, President of the Columbus Citizens Foundation, has promised to go after politicians who do not agree with his position on the statue, instead of an honest appraisal of the statue. I do not think that a statue of an honorable Italian-American would be opposed. There are many to choose from. The argument native people put forth is that Christopher Columbus was a man who was a rapist, murderer and thief. Is that truly the man Italian-Americans want to represent who they are as a people? Christopher Columbus committed all his crimes in the name of Spain, not Italy or the Americas. Christopher Columbus comes with a history that is extremely painful to so many New Yorkers. He is an individual that many have acknowledged enslaved and murdered many indigenous people. His ships never made it to the mainland. It is confusing to me why we are celebrating this man. That statue is a constant reminder of all the crimes committed against indigenous people. It is a constant display of the unequal relationship between Europeans and native peoples. Even though natives feel uncomfortable about the presence of the statue, their feelings are being ignored. I believe that Governor Cuomo’s support of this statue is just another example of how out of touch he is with the people of New York City. The

Community Collaboration Diversity Innovation

Admissions for 2018-19 deadline October 15, 2017 Columbia families and neighborhood families residing in Public School Districts 3 & 5 are welcome to submit inquiry/lottery forms. www.theschool.columbia.edu/admissions 212-851-4216 admissions@theschool.columbia.edu Statue at Columbus Circle. Photo: John Wisniewski, via flickr voices that protest in favor of keeping the statue do not care about the pain that it represents, nor do they care about the real historical relevance of the figure. They have stated that they want an Italian figure to be represented, but there are many great Italian historical figures that should have a spot on 59th Street and Central Park West. Sharon Canns Upper West Side

SUBWAY SEATS: LEAD BY EXAMPLE Removal of corner seats on A, E, F and R line subway cars to accommodate more riders is the equivalent of putting lipstick on a pig. Imagine if they do this for all the other lines. Homeless people gravitate to both the E & R lines since the routes run 100 percent underground, providing consistent warmth in the winter and cool in the summer. Now they will gravitate to the middle seats, depriving regular riders. Let MTA Chairman Joe Lhota, board members, agency presidents and other staff lead by example. Give up your seats at future MTA board meetings. Try standing for one hour like riders do and see how you like it. MTA needs to find $17 billion of the $20 billion needed to bring the subway signal system up to a state of good repair. Purchase 1,000 new in addition to routine replacement subway cars to expand the existing fleet. Support the larger car fleet with new and additional yard and shop space. This will provide a real solution to increase capacity necessary to deal with all the new riders. Larry Penner Great Neck, NY

REDISCOVER NYC Through Food, Art, and Diplomacy TASTING NYC FOOD CULTURE | Professor Fran Alswang October 21 to November 1 Saturdays from 10 am to 1 pm | $575 TOURING NYC MUSEUM AND GALLERY CULTURE | Professor Bruce Weber October 28, November 11, December 2, and December 16 From 10 am to 1 pm | $500 EXPERIENCING NYC DIPLOMATIC CULTURE | Professor Amit Bhattacharyya October 21 to November 11 Saturdays from 10 am to 1 pm | $475

www.mmm.edu/cultural-immersion-intensives 221 East 71st Street 1 New York, NY 10021

   


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The Spirit|Westsider westsidespirit.com

Health & Wellness Seminar Series

OCTOBER 12-18,2017

Discover the world around the corner. Find community events, gallery openings, book launches and much more: Go to nycnow.com

!tÂĽÂĽ2017

@Â&#x20AC;Ă&#x2030;²Â&#x2030;Âż Ă°Ăś

Prostate Cancer: Your Guide to Prostate Health and eÂ&#x2014;tĂ&#x2030;Ă&#x2030;²1²Ă&#x2DC;²Ă&#x17D;Ă&#x2030;Ă&#x2030;Â&#x2014;Â&#x2030;3Â&#x2030;tÂ&#x2026;Â&#x2122;ÂŹÂ&#x201C; tÂŹÂ&#x20AC;Â&#x2030;ÂżÂ&#x2122;ÂŹ9Â&#x2030;ÂŹ David M. Nanus, MD Scott Tagawa, MD, MS

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ùó

You Are One of A Million: Precision Medicine and the Future of Healthcare

Through Oct. 30

M.Elizabeth Ross, MD, PhD 1Â&#x2030;ÂĽÂĽĂ&#x17E;eÂ&#x2122;ÂĽÂĽÂ&#x2122;tÂŤĂ&#x192;Ä?9Ä?Q:Ä?M:

PRINTS BY JIHOE KOO

Time 6:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;8:00 pm Place All seminars held at Uris Auditorium Meyer Research and Education Building Weill Cornell Medicine 1300 York Avenue (at 69th St.)

All seminars are FREE and open to the public. Seating is available for 250 people on a firstcome, first-served basis. If you require a disability-related accommodation, please call 212-821-0888 and leave a message.

eÂ&#x2030;Â&#x2030;ÂŹÂ&#x20AC;²Ă&#x17D;ÂżtÂ&#x201C;Â&#x2030;Ă&#x17E;²Ă&#x17D;Ă&#x2030;²ÂżÂ&#x2030;Â&#x201C;Â&#x2122;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x2030;Â&#x2030;ÂżĂ&#x2014;Â&#x2122;tĂ&#x2014;Â&#x2030;ÂŹĂ&#x2030;ÂżÂ&#x2122;Ă&#x2030;Â&#x2030;Â&#x2014;Â&#x2030;ÂżÂ&#x2030;Ä&#x17D; Â&#x2014;Ă&#x2030;Ă&#x2030;ÂźĂ&#x192;Ä&#x17D;Ä&#x161;Ä&#x161;Â&#x2019;t¼¼ùïðÜÂ&#x2014;Â&#x2030;tÂĽĂ&#x2030;Â&#x2014;tÂŹÂ&#x2026;Ă&#x2DC;Â&#x2030;ÂĽÂĽÂŹÂ&#x2030;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x192;Â&#x2030;ÂŤÂ&#x2122;ÂŹtÂżĂ&#x192;Ä&#x201D;Â&#x2030;Ă&#x2014;Â&#x2030;ÂŹĂ&#x2030;ÂżÂ&#x2122;Ă&#x2030;Â&#x2030;Ä&#x201D;Â&#x20AC;²

Bloomingdale Library, 150 West 100th St. Free, on display Artist Jihoe Koo was born in Seoul, Korea, educated in Paris and today lives in New York City. This great urban triumvirate would provide fodder for any artist; for Koo, a mom raising three kids, her cross-cultural experience brought about both concern and inspiration. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I worried about cultural dissonance between my children and me as a foreign mom,â&#x20AC;? writes Koo. After ďŹ&#x201A;icking through an old family album, Koo began a series of etchings that explore the concepts of time and memory. Many of her prints depict children who are colorfully dressed, but their faces are colorless, representing the way children can be mirrors of their parents. The children in her work are portrayed in various emotional states, their moods captured through subtle gestures and poses. Koo, who works in multiple mediums, began each piece with the meticulous process of etching, then incorporated drawing and collage by using pencil, ink, marker, watercolor, paper and threads, which she glued onto the surface or stitched into the paper. The result is Prints by Jihoe Koo, a delightful exhibit on display at the Bloomingdale library. This local exhibition has global roots: Koo has participated in numerous national and international exhibitions including the 5th Sapporo International Print Biennale Exhibitions, the Dumbo Arts Festival in Brooklyn and the 6th Governors Island Art Fair. And as for cultural dissonance between her and her children, Koo need not worry. Writes Koo, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Au contraire, their childhood is my childhood, a series of memories and sensations long forgotten. I believe that my work is created from borderless life in myself.â&#x20AC;? 212-222-8030. nypl.org/events


OCTOBER 12-18,2017

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The Spirit|Westsider westsidespirit.com

Thu 12 MAKE PAPER NOT WAR American Folk Art Museum, 2 Lincoln Square 2 p.m. Free with registration Combat Paper, an artist collective that transforms military uniforms into handmade paper, takes recycling to a whole new level. Join Ithaca-based artist and veteran Nathan Lewis as he demonstrates how to transform uniforms into pulp, while discussing the myriad ways that textiles carry stories. 212-595-9533. folkartmuseum.org

Fri 13 A MONSTROUS CREATION ▲ Theater at Blessed Sacrament, 152 West 71st St. 7 p.m. $25+ Spook the kids on this most inauspicious day with “Kid Frankenstein: The Musical.” This delightful show tells the tale of boy genius Frankie Steiner, whose entry for the annual robotics competition turns out to be more than he can handle. Performances continue Fridays and selected Saturdays and Sundays through Nov. 5th. 212-579-0528. vitaltheatre. org/kidfrankenstein

Nelida Tirado. This performance will feature special guests and brings the Flamenco nightclub scene to the intimate Penthouse Studio of Ballet Hispánico. 212-362-6710. ballethispanico.org

Sun 15 YIDDISH FOR DOGS▼ Central Park, exact location provided with RSVP 10 a.m. $10 Yes, you read that right: Miguel Rodriguez, certified master dog trainer, along with expert Yiddishist Adrian Silver. will teach your bester fraynd (best friend) to respond to commands like zits (sit) and shtai (stay). Doggy bags with kikhl (cookies) and bandanas asking whether your pup is a meshugena or a mensch for all. circle.org/yiddish-for-dogs

Sat 14 Mon 16 BALLET HISPÁNICO’S TABLAO SERIES

167 West 89th St. 8 p.m. $20 Don’t miss the inaugural performance of the Tablao series headlined by celebrated dancer

UNCONVENTIONAL CLASSICAL Merkin Concert Hall at Kaufman Music Center, 129 West 67th St. 1 p.m. $30

Hear classical musicians like never before at this innovative concert series from celebrated soprano Allison Charney, who breaks down the traditional barriers between performers and audience members. A portion of the proceeds from all ticket sales supports cancer research of the Basser Center for BRCA. 212-501-3330. kaufmanmusiccenter.org/mch

How a child learns to learn will impact his or her life forever.

City and Country School Keeping the progress in progressive education. Two-Year-Olds – 8th Grade

Open House: Thursday, November 16, 6:00 - 8:00pm

Tue 17

146 West 13th Street, New York, NY 10011 Tel: 212.242.7802

www.cityandcountry.org

CAMARADERIE AND CONVERSATION New York Society For Ethical Culture, 2 West 64th St. 7 p.m. Free, register to receive reading assignment in advance This monthly conversation group focuses on newsworthy and timely topics and is informed by readings on ethical culture and humanism. The discussions will aim to illuminate the philosophical concepts and values. 212-874-5210. nysec.org

Wed 18

29th

BLOOMINGD$L($5($ CO$LITION BOOTH: 97 - 98 Sts. Please come meet us and give us your input about the neighborhood.

Oct.15 6PM

Entertainment: Main Stage (

100 WORD HAPPENINGS West Side YMCA, 5 West 63 St. 6:30 p.m. $10 donation suggested Discover the magic that can happen in 100 words at this annual interactive story sharing event. Try your hand at writing your own 100-word happening, or just hang out for stories and a lively reception afterwards. 212-630-9600. ymcanyc. org/westside

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The Spirit|Westsider westsidespirit.com

OCTOBER 12-18,2017

DRAWN TO COLLECTING The Thaw Collection is celebrated with a new show at The Morgan BY VAL CASTRONOVO

Eugene Thaw is a native New Yorker who had a passion for collecting old master and modern drawings. This year, he completed a promised gift of his entire collection to The Morgan Library & Museum, which is celebrating his generosity — and 90th birthday — with a show of some 150 items out of a total 450 acquired over the course of more than 60 years. The exhibit is a showcase for Thaw’s connoisseurship, with works spanning six centuries — from the Renaissance to the 20th century, from Mantegna to Diebenkorn. It’s a primer in the history of draftsmanship, but in the end, a testament to the taste of the collector, who chose works by artists that appealed to him. As Jennifer Tonkovich, the museum’s Eugene and Clare Thaw Curator of Drawings and Prints, writes in the exhibit catalog: “Thaw sought to build

IF YOU GO WHAT: “Drawn to Greatness: Master Drawings from the Thaw Collection” WHERE: at The Morgan Library & Museum, 225 Madison Ave., at 36th Street WHEN: through January 7 www.themorgan.org/

groups of drawings by favorite artists, collecting in depth and capturing a range of an artist’s draftsmanship rather than seeking comprehensive coverage in any one school or century.” In an interview, she added, “Gene was a dealer, so he had all these opportunities. He was really interested in moments of innovation and in artists who were really exceptional at their craft and also with their content.” He eschewed a collection of one-onlys for one replete with multiple works by the

Edgar Degas (1834 - 1917), “Seated Dancer,” 1871-72, oil paint over graphite on pink paper, Thaw Collection, The Morgan Library & Museum. Photo: Steven H. Crossot

Jackson Pollock (1912–1956), “Untitled [Drawing for P.G.],” ca. 1943, pen and black ink and wash, green ink wash, red colored pencil, and orange watercolor pencil © 2017 The Pollock- Krasner Foundation / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York masters — Rembrandt (10), Goya (8), Delacroix (10), Daumier (5), Degas (14), Cézanne (9), Redon (11) and more. Born in Washington Heights in 1927, Thaw took classes at The Art Students League on Saturdays when he was a teenager, a formative experience that sparked his interest in drawings. At 15, he entered St. John’s College in Annapolis, where proximity to the National Gallery and The Phillips Collection in Washington fueled his interest in art, artists and the creative process. He decided to pursue a career in fine art after enrolling in a master’s degree program in art history in 1947 at Columbia, where he studied with the inspirational Meyer Schapiro. But he shied away from an academic career, opting instead to become a dealer and collector. As Tonkovich said, “He was really absolutely drawn to being in a position where he was handling works of art and working with artists.” By his own account: “I can’t create the objects I crave to look at, so I collect them.” In 1950, when he was only 23, he borrowed $4,000 from his father and opened The New Book Store and Gallery with a college pal above the Oak Room of the Algonquin Hotel on West 44th Street. After his partner left a few years later, he dropped the

bookstore and focus on contemporary abstract art and began collecting and dealing modern and old master works. In 1954, he moved his wares uptown to a tony location on Madison Avenue, between 57th and 58th streets, and with the encouragement of his assistant and wife, Clare Eddy, began to collect for himself. He subsequently set up shop at various venues on the Upper East Side, where he privately dealt to leading museums and collectors. It was Clare who suggested that Eugene collaborate with The Morgan, which had a world-class drawing collection started by Pierpont Morgan in 1909, but relatively few works after 1800. The Thaws made their first gift in 1968 and, in 1975, promised the whole cache, a commitment fully realized earlier this year after decades of regular donations and shows celebrating the acquisitions. The current exhibit is an embarrassment of riches, beginning with Mantegna’s “Three Standing Saints” (ca. 1450-55), studies of the apostle St. Andrew or St. Philip with a book and a cross. Per the curator: “Drawings by Mantegna are so rare that the chance to get to see him making a series of studies is something that is pretty exceptional. It’s a great early example of a study sheet.”

Thaw’s works help fill gaps in The Morgan’s collection. Rembrandt’s “The Bulwark De Rose and the Windmill De Smeerpot, Amsterdam” (ca. 1649-52) is an elevated view of a rope factory (left) and back of a windmill (right). “It is truly one of the greatest Rembrandt landscape drawings from his walks around Amsterdam. We have a collection that is famous for the Rembrandt drawings, but we didn’t have a great landscape,” Tonkovitch said. The show also offers a Turner, “The Pass of St. Gotthard, near Faido” (1843), that critic John Ruskin deemed “the greatest work he produced in the last period of his art.” Sketched on a tour of the Swiss Alps in 1842, the finished watercolor over graphite depicts winter ice melting and making waves in the Ticino River. There’s a blowup photo of the work in the hallway separating the two exhibit galleries. “You can actually see in the blowup where Turner used his thumb to smudge some blue watercolor,” Tonkovich said. “He had this really active way of working the sheet—he’s scraping it, he’s smudging it. You just have this incredible production that captures the sublime, which is so emblematic of the Romantic moment.”


OCTOBER 12-18,2017

The Spirit|Westsider westsidespirit.com

Chinòn Maria’s “One World, Our Children” in progress at Albany Plaza. Photo: Chinòn Maria

PAINTING WALLS, ERASING BORDERS ART Chinòn Maria’s “One World, Our Children” will soon be downtown’s largest mural BY MIHIKA AGARWAL

Late last month, Chinòn Maria, a street artist from Vermont, laid down tarp, rollers and 10 gallons of white primer along a nondescript wall on the World Trade Center campus. Before long, she and a few colleagues had readied the 12-foothigh partition behind Site 5 in Albany Plaza for a more creative endeavor: a colorful panoply that, when finished, will be the largest mural in Lower Manhattan. In Maria’s signature style — bold strokes and a vivacious color palette, with no two adjacent panels precisely the same tone — the 200-foot-long project-in-progress depicts refugee girls of diverse races and ethnicities, all of them united by a ribbon running across the length of piece. The ribbon includes the words of children invited by the artist to describe an ideal future and symbolizing, the artist said, “the fabric that holds us together as global citizens.” “I was raised in a vibrant household and I want my work to reflect my roots and heritage that I am deeply connected to,” said Maria, who is of Colombian heritage. “One World, Our Children” was commissioned by the Downtown Alliance after the organization’s president, Jessica Lapin, saw the artist’s work

Chinòn Maria and a colleague at work on “One World, Our Children” in Albany Plaza. Photo: Scott Townell on the 69th floor of the World Trade Center. “The project began with an idea that it would be very powerful to create a mural that includes the words of children globally, and bring about a positive change to the dialogue surrounding the refugee crisis,” said Maria, an ambassador to the United Nations High Commission of Refugees. The project echoes the Allia nce’s 2007 in itiative, “Re:Construction,” which repurposed construction sites in Lower Manhattan as temporary canvases for public art. That initiative brought nearly 30 installations to unexpected locations, including scaffolding, subway entrances and Jersey barriers to enliven outsized construction projects. They also encouraged the public to interact with the pieces. In a similar vein, the current installation, also temporary, is accessorized with park furniture, pingpong tables and a selfie kiosk to facilitate por-

traits with One World Trade Center as a backdrop. “All of our efforts have been to make Albany Plaza more welcoming to people who live and work in the area as well as for those who are passing through while they visit the neighborhood from afar,” Elizabeth Lutz, a spokesperson for Downtown Alliance, said. “One World, Our Children” is open as a work-in progress for the public to view from 1-6p.m., Monday through Saturday, for the next two weeks. Maria, 32, has long advocated on behalf of social causes globally, particularly art education for children, history and immigration rights. “This is the best experience I have ever experienced while painting!,” said Maria, a former professional alpine skier whose artwork has been exhibited in galleries and on walls across North America and Europe. “I hope this piece will make the viewer reflect on the world and how we need to unite together.”

13


14

OCTOBER 12-18,2017

The Spirit|Westsider westsidespirit.com

RESTAURANT INSPECTION RATINGS

Acknowledge The People Who Keep Our Homes & Offices Running Smoothly Call For Sponsors

2017

The following listings were collected from the Department of Health and Mental Hygiene’s website and include the most recent inspection and grade reports listed. We have included every restaurant listed during this time within the zip codes of our neighborhoods. Some reports list numbers with their explanations; these are the number of violation points a restaurant has received. To see more information on restaurant grades, visit www.nyc.gov/html/doh/html/services/restaurant-inspection.shtml. Broadway Restaurant

2664 Broadway

Grade Pending (26) Hot food item not held at or above 140º F. Food worker does not use proper utensil to eliminate bare hand contact with food that will not receive adequate additional heat treatment. Food contact surface not properly washed, rinsed and sanitized after each use and following any activity when contamination may have occurred. Sanitized equipment or utensil, including in-use food dispensing utensil, improperly used or stored.

Mana

646 Amsterdam Avenue

A

Mila Cafe

694 Columbus Avenue

A

Amsterdam Tavern

938 Amsterdam Avenue

Grade Pending (78) Raw, cooked or prepared food is adulterated, contaminated, crosscontaminated, or not discarded in accordance with HACCP plan. Filth flies or food/refuse/sewage-associated (FRSA) flies present in facility’s food and/or non-food areas. Filth flies include house flies, little house flies, blow flies, bottle flies and flesh flies. Food/refuse/sewageassociated flies include fruit flies, drain flies and Phorid flies. Live animals other than fish in tank or service animal present in facility’s food and/or non-food areas. Food not protected from potential source of contamination during storage, preparation, transportation, display or service. Duties of an officer of the Department interfered with or obstructed.

Taqueria Y Fonda La Mexicana

968 Amsterdam Avenue

B

Szechuan Garden

239 W 105Th St

Grade Pending (23) Cold food item held above 41º F (smoked fish and reduced oxygen packaged foods above 38 ºF) except during necessary preparation. Food not protected from potential source of contamination during storage, preparation, transportation, display or service.

Corner Cafe

2518 Broadway

A

Red Hot Hot Pot

1000 Columbus Ave

A

Junzi Kitchen

2896 Broadway

Grade Pending (22) Raw, cooked or prepared food is adulterated, contaminated, crosscontaminated, or not discarded in accordance with HACCP plan. Filth flies or food/refuse/sewage-associated (FRSA) flies present in facility’s food and/or non-food areas. Filth flies include house flies, little house flies, blow flies, bottle flies and flesh flies. Food/refuse/sewageassociated flies include fruit flies, drain flies and Phorid flies.

Earth Cafe

2580 Broadway

Grade Pending (18) Filth flies or food/refuse/sewage-associated (FRSA) flies present in facility’s food and/or non-food areas. Filth flies include house flies, little house flies, blow flies, bottle flies and flesh flies. Food/refuse/sewageassociated flies include fruit flies, drain flies and Phorid flies. Food contact surface not properly washed, rinsed and sanitized after each use and following any activity when contamination may have occurred.

Maison Pickle

2309 Broadway

Grade Pending (24) Hot food item not held at or above 140º F. Cold food item held above 41º F (smoked fish and reduced oxygen packaged foods above 38 ºF) except during necessary preparation. Food not protected from potential source of contamination during storage, preparation, transportation, display or service.

Baznga Cafe

426 Amsterdam Ave

A

Columbus Ave Deli & Cafe

556 Columbus Ave

A

New Kam Lai

514 Amsterdam Ave

Not Yet Graded (18) Cold food item held above 41º F (smoked fish and reduced oxygen packaged foods above 38 ºF) except during necessary preparation. Live roaches present in facility’s food and/or non-food areas.

B UILDING SERVICE WORKER

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Tuesday October 24

%PPSNBOt4VQFSt1PSUFSt0ó DF$MFBOFS 4FDVSJUZ(VBSEt)BOEZQFSTPO $POUBDUVincent Gardino (212) 868-0190 4QPOTPSFE#Z The local paper for the Upper East Side

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Consultants and Actuaries to Collectively-Bargained Plans www.segalco.com


OCTOBER 12-18,2017

OBAMAS CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 dead end on 83th Street, the 15-story, 43-unit, limestoneand-brick building has been the historic pied-Ă -terre for generations of Whitneys, Vanderbilts, Mellons, Burdens, Hitchcocks, Astors, Stantons, Rudins, Fairchilds and Havemeyers. Will it now house a First Family? Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not yet clear. The Obamas have been mum about their intentions. All thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s known with certainty is that the ex-President and ex-First Lady have viewed listings in the 1930 residence, which boasts a private, double-gated security breezeway-cum-driveway that runs through the building at street level and has long masked the comings and goings of highproďŹ le homeowners. The real estate brokerage community has been abuzz at the prospect: Will the ďŹ rst couple buy the ďŹ ve-bedroom, ďŹ vebath, 12-room, $12.5 million penthouse replete with library, wrap-around terrace, twin balconies, four ďŹ replaces, private elevator landing, 12-foot ceilings and 66-foot windowed expanse fronting the East River? Agents flagged two other available coops at 10 Gracie Square that the Obamas might fancy, including a five-bedroom, sixbath, three-fireplace, nine-room penthouse with paneled library, â&#x20AC;&#x153;chefâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s kitchenâ&#x20AC;? and formal dining room seating 20. The price is $15 million, according to the listing on StreetEasy, the online realty data and marketplace. There is also a reimagined, reconfigured, sun-bathed, nineroom duplex, which emerged from a 12-room original and went into contract for $10 million last month, StreetEasy reports. Does it make sense for the Obamas? Well, as global travelers, they could exit town fast. Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d literally be on top of the FDR Drive. And while the White House basketball court and South Lawn vegetable garden are hard to top, the coopâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s indoor basketball court and private gardens could stand in nicely for him and her respectively. The Obamas should know one part of the buildingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s quirky legacy: The Robert E. Lee Memorial Foundation held its annual tea here from 1957 to 1964. It also won a place in Cold War history in 1961 as Manhattanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s first big apartment house to develop a fully stocked basement fallout shelter. And in 2003, it became one of the first to organize a â&#x20AC;&#x153;Holiday Tipping Pool.â&#x20AC;? To ease Christmas-tip anxiety, each resident

15

The Spirit|Westsider westsidespirit.com was asked to pony up thousands of dollars, which are then distributed to staff. A more important issue: What will the coop board say? Manhattan boards are famously finicky and arbitrary. Just ask Gloria Vanderbilt. In 1980, the heiress and jeans designer was rejected by River House on East 52nd Street at a time she was romantically involved with Bobby Short, the African-American cabaret singer. Board members claimed the reason was her celebrity status, not the interracial relationship. Still, the mother of CNNâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Anderson Cooper clearly needed a more tolerant board. And at 10 Gracie Square, she found just that, securing a green light to buy a 14th-floor penthouse. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Anyone can have trouble with the coop board. You can have a billion dollars and still have trouble with the coop board! You can look at someone funny and have trouble with the coop board,â&#x20AC;? said Michael Gross, author of â&#x20AC;&#x153;740 Park: The Story of the Worldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Richest Apartment Buildingâ&#x20AC;? and editor-in-chief of Avenue, the society magazine. â&#x20AC;&#x153;But in this day and age, rejecting a couple like the Obamas would be tantamount to board suicide and financial malfeasance,â&#x20AC;? he added. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re not a security problem, not a behavioral problem, and this coop is well used to residents and visitors employing bodyguards. â&#x20AC;? Whatever the upshot, 10 Gracie, from a real estate perspective, is already in play, and has been ever since The New York Postâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Page Six first reported on October 2 that the Obamas had been quietly checking out residences. The bottom line: The coop will go under the microscope in the days and weeks ahead. Asking prices will likely rise. Other moneyed buyers may surface. So weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve done the due diligence for the Obamas and offer this primer on the lives, times, foibles and tragedies of residents past: â&#x20AC;˘ Soong Mei-ling, better known as Madame Chiang Kai-shek. Dubbed the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Last Empress,â&#x20AC;? she was the former first lady of nationalist China. Married to Generalissimo Chiang Kai-shek â&#x20AC;&#x201D; ruler of China from 1928 until the Communists ousted him, ruler of Taiwan until his death in 1975 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; she lived in a 19-room spread from 1976 until her own death in 2003 at the age of 105. Her servants, all 24 of them, got her in trouble with the board. They operated a living-room smokehouse, creating a rodent problem, and the entire building had to be fumigated, according to society writer David Patrick Columbia of website NewYorkSocialDiary.com.

During the room-by-room health inspection that followed, a certain locked closet near the kitchen had to be opened. The contents? â&#x20AC;&#x153;The entire space was packed with gold bars, floor-toceiling, wall-to-wall, back-tofront,â&#x20AC;? Columbia writes. â&#x20AC;˘ Albert Gordon, once known as the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Savior of Wall Street.â&#x20AC;? He rescued old-line Kidder Peabody after the wipeout of 1929 and built it into a powerhouse. The financier may also have set the coopâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s longevity record: Still jogging in Carl Schurz Park into his early 90s and strolling into the office at age 103, he died in 2009 at the age of 107. â&#x20AC;˘ William Lloyd-Smith, sportsman, explorer, birder, big-game hunter, member of 16 clubs. After contracting debilitating Malta Fever in India, he went into his library, sat in the window seat and shot himself in the head with a .25-caliber pistol in February 1940, according to his New York Times obituary. The body was found by his butler. He was 45. â&#x20AC;˘ Carter Cooper, Princeton graduate, son of Gloria Vanderbilt, older brother of Anderson Cooper. Under treatment for depression in 1988 and staying at his motherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s penthouse, he ran to a terrace, sat on the ledge and jumped as she tried to talk him back from the brink. He was 23. Shortly after, Vanderbilt moved to Beekman Place. â&#x20AC;˘ Jean Stein, author of oral histories about Robert F. Kennedy and Andy Warhol star Edie Sedgwick. After an earlier unsuccessful suicide attempt, she plunged to her death from another penthouse on the buildingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 15th floor on April 30. She was 83. â&#x20AC;˘ Frances Bernice Schreuder, Utah auto parts heiress, New York City Ballet board member, convicted murderer. Fearing sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d be disinherited from her fatherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s $400 million estate, she convinced her 17-year-old son to shoot him. When cops came to arrest her in 1982 for the 1978 Salt Lake City murder, doormen denied entry. They demanded a search warrant. Only the next day was the arrest effected. â&#x20AC;˘ Tommy Hitchcock Jr., ďŹ ghter pilot, World War I hero, polo player, investment banker. His friend F. Scott Fitzgerald used him as the model for Tom Buchanan in â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Great Gatsby.â&#x20AC;? While testing a new fighter plane over England in 1944, he died in a crash. He was 44. Obama was a Time magazine Person of the Year in 2008 and 2012. If he moves in, he wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be the only resident so honored. Madame Chiang Kai-shek and her husband were named â&#x20AC;&#x153;Man and Wife of the Yearâ&#x20AC;? in 1937.

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The Spirit|Westsider westsidespirit.com

OCTOBER 12-18,2017

Business

HOOKING UP, FOR NEARLY 75 YEARS Viola Goodman has been selling bras at her Upper East Side lingerie boutique since 1943 BY CARSON KESSLER

Viola Goodman can guess a woman’s bra size with a quick glance. Goodman’s cultivated her expertise over time, nearly 75 years’ worth, which is how long she’s been in the lingerie business, all of it on the Upper East Side. A life in lingerie was not what Goodman had imagined for herself after she earned a master’s degree in history from Columbia University. But soon after graduating, Goodman’s husband, Max, a mechanic, was stricken with an infection in his knees and could no longer ply his trade. “Somehow this store was empty,” Goodman recounted last week. “It was dry and clean, and my husband needed work.” Viola and Max opened Viola’s Smart Shop in 1943. “Every woman needs a brassiere, so I decided it was a good product to sell,” she said. The lingerie boutique, on First Avenue just north of 77th Street, is sandwiched between a children’s clothes shop and a vacant storefront. Racks of nightgowns and robes dressed in plastic covers border the right side of the store, while sets of packaged underwear decorate the left.

Viola Goodman has owned and run her First Avenue lingerie boutique since 1943. Photo: Carson Kessler Behind the counter, an assortment of bras are tucked in individual boxes, each with a hand-written label noting its size and style. Goodman knows exactly where each item resides and who it will best fit. “When I first came in here, I was asking for the wrong size. I’d been wearing this size for 20 years,” said Rochelle Pillar, an Upper East Side resident and Smart Shop regular. “Viola hooked me up with the correct size and it fit me so much better!” For 74 years, Goodman, who preferred to let people guess her age, has

personally serviced women such as Pillar, ensuring each leaves her shop with the best fit. She prides herself on style and quality. It’s a selling point for many of her longtime and newer customers that Viola’s Smart Shop is no Victoria’s Secret. Experience and quality is what Goodman believes sets her boutique apart. “Many women come in here, and the garment is so tight, they can’t breathe!” Goodman said, suggesting that big-name stores in her industry train young women to sell bras for commission. “I know they’re going to come to me because I give them what’s right.” Goodman’s co-worker, Connie Norkin, shopped at Viola’s for many years before she started working there this spring. After noticing a sign in the window on the way to her gym, Norkin, a graphic designer, stopped to talk to Viola about possibly helping her spruce up the displays in the windows. Goodman had little interest in modernizing. Instead, she asked Norkin to help inside the shop as a salesperson. “I’m Viola’s ladder,” Norkin said with a smile. “That was one of my selling points.” Grateful for the part-time job, Norkin helps Goodman with just about anything from inventory to working on the windows to showing and fitting customers with a variety of nightgowns.

Viola’s Smart Shop occupies the first floor of a First Avenue building constructed in 1910. Photo: Carson Kessler “I had always loved the fact that Viola had this store for a very long time and kept it going,” Norkin said. “That’s really a testament to Viola and her passion, commitment and energy to keep this store going in a neighborhood that is changing.” And it has changed. Goodman recalls a time when all of her customers were Eastern European. Rudy Giuliani is perhaps her most memorable client. Goodman recounts how Guliani, during his mayoral tenure, and an army of security personnel paraded into her narrow shop, in search of a few nightgowns for his

elderly mother. Goodman, of course, knew the perfect style and fit, and insisted Giuliani buy three or four. Max passed away about 10 years ago. But many customers continue to ask for him. “The old timers,” Goodman laughs. With her children and grandchildren in all different states, Goodman works six days a week, reserving Sundays for cooking her favorite pot roast with fresh vegetables (“and no salt!”). “I’m busy, and I’m happy,” Goodman said of her 48-hour workweek. “My work keeps me going.”

NEIGHBORHOOD SIDE STREETS MEET 72ND STREET

sideways.nyc

FRAMES FOR YOU 136 WEST 72ND STREET Alexander, the current owner of Frames For You, came to the United States from the former Yugoslavia, where he was a film director. He could not be a film director in the United States “for many reasons,” he explained, but he wanted to find a job related to art in some way. While showing some of his favorite framed pieces, Alexander said that he works with everything from small family photographs to big projects for the Metropolitan Opera. Surprisingly, many of the picture frames at Lincoln Center have come from this little workshop. Alexander also shared that he does smaller projects for the Metropolitan Museum of Art and the Natural History Museum, such as gifts for donors. For more photos and side streets, go to sideways.nyc.


OCTOBER 12-18,2017

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The Spirit|Westsider westsidespirit.com

OCTOBER 12-18,2017


OCTOBER 12-18,2017

19

The Spirit|Westsider westsidespirit.com

YOUR 15 MINUTES

To read about other people who have had their “15 Minutes” go to westsidespirit.com/15 minutes

CLASSICS, WITH A CONTEMPORARY SENSIBILITY Artistic director of Hunger & Thirst Theatre company on celebrating theater’s past today BY ANGELA BARBUTI

In 2012, Patricia Lynn founded Hunger & Thirst Theatre around the idea of finding universal themes in classic works. She notes the name was derived from the notion of the starving artist. “You know, we’re hunger and thirsting for theater,” she explained. The company stays true to its roots and offers half-price tickets to those who bring non-perishables for their food drive. There is also an outreach component build around a theme from each show. At their past production of “Dracula,” for example, they passed the hat for the New York Blood Center. And for their upcoming reimagining of “Pericles,” “Pericles: Born in a Tempest,” they are collecting donations for those affected by all the hurricanes this season, in keeping with the shipwrecks and storms in the play. As artistic director, Lynn wears multiple hats and has done virtually every theater task imaginable, from designing costumes to hanging lightbulbs. When asked to describe her role, she said it encompasses having a vision for the piece they’re producing, seeing how it fits into modern-day sensibilities, determining what its message will be and articulating that on stage.

When did you come to New York? What was it like when you first arrived? I moved here in 2009. I graduated from Brown/Trinity that same year and pretty much did what all MFA actors do, and moved out to New York to try to start doing this professionally.... It’s overwhelming, but kind of great though. I was lucky in that both schools I went to — University of Evansville and Brown/Trinity — have a lot of graduates living here, so there is a support system. At Brown/Trinity, in particular, one thing they really teach us is to make your own opportunities and produce your own works. There are a lot of Brown/Trinity companies working in New York, such as Fiasco and Guerilla Shakespeare, so having those people as inspiration and there to talk to about what it’s like living here really eased the transition for sure.

How did you come to found Hunger & Thirst?

Patricia Lynn and Tom Schwans in a 2016 production of “Dracula,” adapted by Lynn from the novel by Bram Stoker. Photo: Ian Friedman

It was just a couple of University of Evansville graduates and me talking about how we just wanted to make our own opportunities. And I had just read a Chekhov play. I had read it

Patricia Lynn and Jordan Kaplan in a 2015 production of “Animal Kingdom 2.” Photo: David Anderson when I was in my early 20s and then read it again in my late 20s, and it was a completely new experience just being six years older and understanding where these people are coming from and what these characters are talking about.... So it really started with that one play that I was inspired by. And I was like, “Oh, I can direct, produce and act in it. This is a great idea.” Then I had a couple of other artists who came along with me.

How can you describe the company? On your website, it says it produces classic stories, not classical theater. My definition of a classic story is one that has universal themes and ideas. So basically anything that no matter how old you are, your gender, occupation, ethnicity — no matter who are — you understand the theme as a human being alive today. And that’s what makes a classic because it makes it relevant in any time period. And a lot of classical plays do fall under that category. We did a Philip Barry play in 2015, which was a very 1930s romantic comedy. But when we read it, we were like, “Dating back then is exactly like dating today. Nothing has changed.” [Laughs] Something Hunger & Thirst always tries to do is bring classic stories to the modern age. So what are the things in this classic story that we feel are relevant in 2017 that we can highlight for our audience? Either by setting it in modern day, or just by simply highlighting those themes and ideas.

You’re doing “Pericles” now. What is your take on the story? A young woman has just lost her father and his last gift to her was a handwritten book of stories with the central character being Pericles, who was the character he told her stories about in her childhood. So it’s her opening

the book and theatricality and imagination takes over. So it will be a very magical kind of feeling, which is exciting for us because this is our first time doing something like that with the company. We’re doing it in association with the Guerilla Shakespeare Project, which is another Brown/Trinity company, founded by alumni who have worked with Hunger & Thirst previously. So it ended up just being a natural collaboration between the two. Jordan Reeves is the director, who is kind of the visionary who has cut the text. It’s all still Shakespeare; none of it is modern day. But he’s moved the text around to highlight the story of a woman understanding her father through this story of Pericles.

I saw that one of the nonprofits you raised money for was IndyKids newspaper, where I was once a mentor. How did you partner with them? We pick an organization based on the show. So we were doing “Messenger #1,” which was a retelling of “Oresteia” from the point of view of the servants, the messengers. So a major theme of the show was finding your voice and speaking your mind. So we found IndyKids and contacted them, and handed out the newspaper at the end of the show and also passed the hat for them a curtain call. “Pericles: Born in a Tempest” runs at the West End Theatre, 263 West 86th Street, November 2-18. www.hungerandthirsttheatre.com

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H L D N N E K N C D P M O M N

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F Y V G T L D R P S H T J A M

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L P S A T E L L I T E L W Y B

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WORD SEARCH by Myles Mellor

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450 West 55th Street, Apt 3RWU a/k/a 3-RW, New York, NY 10019 Sale held to enforce rights of Citibank N.A., who reserves the right to bid. Ten percent (10%) Bank/CertiďŹ ed check required at sale, balance due at closing within thirty (30) days. The Cooperative Apartment will be sold â&#x20AC;&#x153;AS ISâ&#x20AC;? and possession is to be obtained by the purchaser. Pursuant to Section 201 of the Lien Law you must answer within 10 days from receipt of this notice in which redemption of the above captioned premises can occur. There is presently an outstanding debt owed to Citibank N.A. (lender) as of the date of this notice in the amount of $65,362.98. This ďŹ gure is for the outstanding balance due under UCC1, which was secured by Financing Statement in favor of Citibank, N.A. recorded on April 6, 2004 in CRFN 2004000205951. Please note this is not a payoff amount as additional interest/fees/penalties may be incurred. You must contact the undersigned to obtain a ďŹ nal payoff quote or if you dispute any information presented herein. The estimated value of the above captioned premises is $335,000.00. Pursuant to the Uniform Commercial Code Article 9-623, the above captioned premises may be redeemed at any time prior to the foreclosure sale. You may contact the undersigned and either pay the principal balance due along with all accrued interest, late charges, attorney fees and out of pocket expenses incurred by Citibank N.A.. and the undersigned, or pay the outstanding loan arrears along with all accrued interest, late charges, attorney fees and out of pocket expenses incurred by Citibank N.A., and the undersigned, with respect to the foreclosure proceedings. Failure to cure the default prior to the sale will result in the termination of the proprietary lease. If you have received a discharge from the Bankruptcy Court, you are not personally liable for the payment of the loan and this notice is for compliance and information purposes only. However, Citibank N.A., still has the right under the loan security agreement and other collateral documents to foreclosure on the shares of stock and rights under the proprietary lease allocated to the cooperative apartment. Dated: August 17, 2017 Frenkel, Lambert, Weiss, Weisman & Gordon, LLP Attorneys for Citibank N.A. 53 Gibson Street Bay Shore, NY 11706 631-969-3100 File #01-085550-#9286

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