Page 1

The local paper for the Upper per West Side p Sid

WEEK OF OCTOBER

11-17 2018

THE SHED’S OPEN CALL ▲ P.12

UWS SHELTER MOVING, GETS NEW PROVIDER COMMUNITY Residents raise concerns at announcement BY MICHAEL GAROFALO

Freedom House, an Upper West Side homeless shelter long a source of neighborhood grievances, will soon close and be replaced by a new facility nearby. The city’s Department of Homeless Services plans to close the shelter, at 316 West 95th St., between West End Avenue and Riverside Drive, late this fall. A new 200-resident shelter operated by a different nonprofit provider will open one block south on West 94th Street by December. Since it opened during the Bloomberg administration in 2012 with no advanced public notice under an emergency contract, “Freedom House has never shed the reputation of being a problem site,” said Helen Rosenthal, who represents the neighborhood in the City Council. For years, neighbors have complained of Freedom House residents engaging in aggressive panhandling, drug dealing, harassment and other disorderly activity, prompting calls from Rosenthal and members of the local community for the shelter to be closed or placed under new management. Steven Banks, commissioner of the New York City Department of Social Services, which oversees the Department of Homeless services, acknowledged that the shelter had fallen short of the agency’s standards. “This particular location has not been an effec-

Naomi Levin, the Republican conservative who is seeking to topple longtime incumbent Democratic U.S. Rep. Jerrold Nadler, campaigning recently at a West 96th Street subway stop. Photo courtesy of Naomi Levin for Congress Campaign

MILLENNIAL SEEKS TO DETHRONE NADLER

Freedom House, a homeless shelter on West 95th Street, will close later this fall. Photo: Michael Garofalo tive facility for serving our clients, and [Rosenthal] has been extremely helpful in pointing out ways in which there have been challenges for both our clients and the community,” he said. The new shelter, also between West End Avenue and Riverside Drive at 306 West 94th St., will be operated by Praxis Housing Initiatives, a Manhattan-based nonprofit. “We have a high-quality provider that wants to provide services on the Upper West Side, they have a track record of providing excellent services, they have a building in which our clients could get better services, and that was really the catalyst for going in a different direction here,” Banks said. Locals learned of the city’s plans for the site at an Oct. 4 meeting with elected leaders and DHS and Praxis officials at P.S. 75 on West 95th Street. A few dozen neighborhood residents attended the forum, which was billed

in flyers as a “community update” on Freedom House. “I think there would have been more people here if they had said in advance what their intentions were,” said Aaron Biller, president of Neighborhood in the 90s, a local block association. The Praxis proposal aims to address key deficiencies that Rosenthal and local groups identified as contributing factors to many of the problems plaguing Freedom House. Freedom House lacks an indoor common space, prompting residents to gather on the sidewalk and in Riverside Park. Additionally, Rosenthal said, security at Freedom House is provided by a third-party firm contracted by Aguila, Inc., the nonprofit provider that runs Freedom House, and not well-integrated into the shelter’s operations.

POLITICS Naomi Levin, a Republican software engineer and defender of Trump, vies to oust a liberal lion of the House BY DOUGLAS FEIDEN

An Upper West Side woman who learned about totalitarianism from her Soviet-Jewish refugee parents is trying to topple a powerful Congressional incumbent who could make life hellish for President Donald Trump if Democrats flip the House in the midterm elections. Naomi Levin identifies herself as a pro-Israel, pro-school choice, 30-something Republican who

CONTINUED ON PAGE 15

I don’t carry a big sign that says, ‘I’m a Republican.’” Naomi Levin, GOP candidate in New York’s 10th Congressional District

speaks Russian, Hebrew and French, sees Iran as a global menace — and strongly believes that many of Trump’s actions and polices are “very positive and very beneficial” to America.

CONTINUED ON PAGE 14

Westsider WEEK OF APRIL

SPRING ARTS PREVIEW

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WESTSIDE SPIRIT.COM @WestSideSpirit

Crime Watch Voices NYC Now City Arts

3 8 10 12

Restaurant Ratings Business Real Estate 15 Minutes

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NEWS residents A vocal group of U.W.S. Transportation isn’t convinced the doing enough is Committee of CB7 BY LISA BROWN

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MANHATTAN'S APARTMENT BOOM, > PROPERTY, P.20

2015

In Brief MORE HELP FOR SMALL BUSINESS

PROTESTING THE COMMUNITY BOARD OVER TRAFFIC DEATHS

Zero, Mayor Bill One year into Visionreducing trafficfor de Blasio’s plan traffic the number of has related deaths, Upper West Side fatalities on the compared to last actually increased, year’s figures. Upper West Siders -That has some needs to be done convinced more of the Transstarting with members of the local comportation Committee munity board. West mother, Upper Lisa Sladkus, a member of TransSide resident and said she’s fed at portation Alternatives a silent protest up, and organized 7’s February board Community Board residents dozens of meeting, where Committee called for Transportation leaders to step down. against incredible “We have run up imto get safe street trying just problems said. “This was provements,” she our point across get another way to dissatisfied.” that we are very involved with Sladkus has been Alternatives since Transportation served as director 2002 and formerly Streets’ RenaisSide of Upper West She says becoming sance Campaign. really got her into a mother is what activism. streets around me “Just noticing the as a pedestrian I felt and how unsafe she said. “I wanted and as a cyclist,”

9-15

The effort to help small seems to businesses in the city be gathering steam. Two city councilmembers, Robert Margaret Chin and Cornegy, have introduced create legislation that wouldSmall a new “Office of the within Business Advocate” of Small the city’s Department Business Services. Chin The new post, which have up told us she’d like to would and running this year, for serve as an ombudsman city small businesses within them clear government, helping to get bureaucracy the through things done. Perhaps even more also importantly, the ombudsman and number will tally the type small business of complaints by taken in owners, the actions policy response, and somefor ways to recommendations If done well, begin to fix things. report would the ombudsman’s give us the first quantitative with taste of what’s wrong the city, an small businesses in towards step rst fi important fixing the problem. of To really make a difference, for developers will have to is a mere formality their projects course, the advocaterising rents, are the work complete precinct, but chances-- thanks to a looking to find a way to tackle business’ legally quickly. is being done which remain many While Chin their own hours,” of after-hours “They pick out boom in the number throughout who lives on most vexing problem. gauge what said Mildred Angelo,of the Ruppert construction permits said it’s too early tocould have Buildings one the 19th floor in The Department of the city. role the advocate number three years, the Houses on 92nd Street between on the She Over the past is handing out a record there, more information work perThird avenues. permits, bad thing. of Second and an ongoing all-hours number of after-hours of after-hours work problem can’t be a the city’s Dept. with the said there’s where mits granted by This step, combinedBorough according to new data project nearby jumped 30 percent, noise in construction Buildings has efforts by Manhattan to mediate data provided constantly make BY DANIEL FITZSIMMONS according to DOB from trucks. President Gale Brewer of Informa- workers offer transferring cement response to a Freedom the rent renewal process, they want. They city classifies knows the signs Act request. The between 6 “They do whateverthey please. They Every New Yorker some early, tangible small clang, the tion work come and go as of progress. For many sound: the metal-on-metal beeps of a any construction weekend, can can’t come piercing a.m., or on the have no respect.” at p.m. and 7 business owners, that hollow boom, the issuance of these reverse. A glance The increased a correspond after-hours. soon enough. truck moving in has generated can hardly as has led to

SLEEPS, THANKS TO THE CITY THAT NEVER UCTION A BOOM IN LATE-NIGHT CONSTR

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and you the alarm clock middle of the night, believe it: it’s the carries on fulland yet construction tilt. or your local police You can call 311

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The surge in permitsfees for the city in millions of dollars consome residents agency, and left application process vinced that the

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OCTOBER 11-17,2018

RIVERSIDE PARK ART INSTALLATION CHANNELS HUDSON HISTORY MULTIMEDIA Exhibition at 69th Street Transfer Bridge by NYC artist Tony Oursler runs through October BY MICHAEL GAROFALO

The actress Pearl White, who starred in early silent ďŹ lms created along the Palisades, is one of many historical references featured in Tony Ourslerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Tear of the Cloudsâ&#x20AC;? exhibition, on view this month in Riverside Park. Image: Tony Oursler Studio.

Upper West Siders will have one more reason to look forward to evenings on the Hudson this month. Starting this week, Riverside Park will host a large-scale multimedia installation by the New York City artist Tony Oursler. The project, named â&#x20AC;&#x153;Tear of the Cloud,â&#x20AC;? after the Adirondack lake that is the Hudson Riverâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s highest source, utilizes the 69th Street Transfer Bridge as a canvas onto which ethereal images alluding to the riverâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s past will be digitally projected.

Videos cast onto the former rail transfer bridge, itself a reminder of the riverâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s industrial legacy, draw on the length and breadth of the Hudson Valley and its history, from the painters of the Hudson River School to the birth of hip-hop culture in the Bronx to the technological advances of Samuel Morse and IBM â&#x20AC;&#x201D; all with an eye toward tomorrow. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Headless Horseman and his horse are important references in Tear of the Cloud, as they gallop towards artificial intelligence, the chess-playing computer Deep Blueâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s famous knight sacriďŹ ce, facial recognition technologies, and bots which have provoked signiďŹ cant questions about our future,â&#x20AC;? Oursler said in a statement. The exhibition, commissioned by the Public Art Fund, will be accompanied

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by an audio component and creates what Daniel S. Palmer, associate curator with the nonproďŹ t, described as a â&#x20AC;&#x153;powerful, expansive, and transformative experience.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;With this new work, Oursler rethinks how we learn, explore, and share our complex narratives by interweaving the past and the present,â&#x20AC;? Palmer said in a statement. â&#x20AC;&#x153;In this way, the artistâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s multivalent allusions to the regionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s stories flow together and offer their vitality like the many tributaries that feed into the Hudson River, coalescing into a source of creativity and inspiration.â&#x20AC;? The installation will be on view in Riverside Park, near 69th Street, Oct. 10 through Oct. 31 from 7 p.m. to 10 p.m., except Mondays.


OCTOBER 11-17,2018

3

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CRIME WATCH BY JERRY DANZIG CABBIE ROBBED

STATS FOR THE WEEK

A cabdriver reported to police that he was robbed by one of five men who had approached his taxi asking for a ride. The driver, from Queens, told police he had dropped off a passenger in front of 5 West 63rd St. shortly before 11 p.m. on Sept. 24 when the five, all wearing black hoodies, approached. When he declined the fare, one of the men opened one of the cab’s doors and grabbed the driver’s bag, with the five then running toward Central Park. The driver told officers the bag, worth $100, contained an iPhone X valued at $1,000, a $300 wallet, a bag priced at $150 and other items. Police searched neighborhood but couldn’t find the men.

Reported crimes from the 20th precinct for the week ending Sep 30 Week to Date

PURSE TAKEN AT MOVIE THEATER A New Jersey woman told police several items were missing from her purse and presumed taken as she `watched a movie inside the AMC Loews theater at 1998 Broadway on the evening of Sept. 23. The 22-year-old told officers she first realized her iPhone X valued at $1,000 as well as a credit card were missing from her purse. She noticed other credit cards not belonging to her were scattered on the theater floor nearby. She cancelled her credit card after unauthorized usage turned up.

2018 2017

% Change

2018

2017

% Change

Murder

0

0

n/a

0

1

-100.0

Rape

1

0

n/a

10

3

233.3

Robbery

1

1

0.0

49

53

-7.5

Felony Assault

0

0

n/a

58

48

20.8

Burglary

1

1

0.0

58

57

1.8

Grand Larceny

15

16

-6.3

503 518 -2.9

Grand Larceny Auto

0

0

n/a

25

BLOOMINGDALE’S THEFT Photo by Tony Webster, via Flickr

SKIN CARE DESPAIR

LOCKER LOOTED

Duane Reade makes a return to the column this week. At 10:50 p.m. on Sept. 26, a man said to be in his late 20s entered the drug chain’s 1889 Broadway location, took multiple skincare products off a shelf and left the store without paying. The merchandise was valued at $1,419.

A gym-goer reported to police that a thief busted into his locker at NYSC gym at 61 West 62nd St. and taken the Queens man’s $400 iPhone 6s, a wallet worth $50, a gym bag selling for $40, keys and credit and debit cards between 7:30 and 8:30 p.m. on Oct. 1.

Year to Date

At 5:10 p.m. on Wednesday, September 19, a woman in her late 20s entered the Bloomingdale’s store at 2085 Broadway, selected two coats, one fur, one leather, and four pairs of sunglasses and placed the sunglasses in the pockets of one of the coats,

10

150.0

according to store representatives’ account to police. She next placed the coats on a rack. An accomplice, a man said to be about 30, then picked those items up and left the store, using the employee exit, without paying. The value of the stolen items was put at $1,450.

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Useful Contacts

Drawing Board BY MARC BILGREY

POLICE NYPD 20th Precinct

120 W. 82nd St.

NYPD 24th Precinct

151 W. 100th St.

212-580-6411 212-678-1811

NYPD Midtown North Precinct

306 W. 54th St.

212-767-8400

FDNY Engine 76/Ladder 22

145 W. 100th St.

311

FDNY Engine 40/Ladder 35

W. 66th St. & Amsterdam Ave.

311

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120 W. 83rd St.

311

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205 W. 77th St.

311

FIRE

CITY COUNCIL Councilmember Helen Rosenthal

563 Columbus Ave.

212-873-0282

Councilmember Mark Levine

500 West 141st St.

212-928-6814

State Senator Brad Hoylman

322 Eighth Ave. #1700

212-633-8052

State Sen. Jose M. Serrano

1916 Park Ave. #202

212-828-5829

STATE LEGISLATORS

Assemblymember Linda Rosenthal 230 W. 72nd St. #2F

212-873-6368

Assemblymember Daniel O’Donnell 245 W. 104th St.

212-866-3970

COMMUNITY BOARD 7 LIBRARIES

250 W. 87th St. #2

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212-621-0619

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Performing Arts

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HOSPITALS Mt. Sinai – Roosevelt

1000 10th Ave.

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CON ED TIME WARNER CABLE POST OFFICES

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US Post Office

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OCTOBER 11-17,2018


OCTOBER 11-17,2018

PESTICIDE APPLICATION RAVAGES GARDEN GREEN SPACES Jenny’s Garden, in West Harlem, loses harvest after Amtrak contractor uses herbicide on right of way

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BY RICHARD KHAVKINE

A pesticide application on the Amtrak right of way through West Harlem has ravaged a community garden off 138th Street just as its caretakers were readying a fall harvest destined for an Upper West Side soup kitchen. Roughly half of the plantings at Jenny’s Garden, which abuts the railway at the westernmost end of 138th Street, were killed or severely damaged by the application on Sept. 15. Fig, peach, apple and pear trees were also damaged. Jenny Benitez, who lives on Riverside Drive and started the garden nearly 50 years ago, was inspecting the coming harvest on Sept. 22 when she noticed that a 15-year-old fig tree’s leaves were browning and looking poor, said her daughter, Victoria Benitez. She then saw that plantings nearest the wire and mesh fence abutting the right of way were also ailing. “It dawned on her that was happening was not natural,” Victoria Benitez said. “She called me in near hysterics because she didn’t know what had happened.” Recalling that a similar but more minor incident happened about 10 years ago, also attributable to a pesticide application, Benitez called Amtrak. A company official initially told Benitez the company had no record of a recent spray. The Amtrak official later called to say that a pesticide application, by a contractor, had in fact taken place on Sept. 15. In a statement, Amtrak said the company had investigated the incident through a site visit and would continue to assess the damage to the garden and to work toward a resolution. “Amtrak assured Jenny’s Garden and the Parks and Recreation Department that Amtrak will work with its contractor to take care of the garden and leaf damage to some of the plants,” the statement said. The state-

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Upper School Day & Boarding Programs (5 and 7-day) Middle School Day Program

A volunteer at Jenny’s Garden trimming roots from canna plants on Sunday following a pesticide application on the nearby Amtrak right of way that severely damaged about half the West Harlem community garden. Photo: Richard Khavkine ment said the contractor had provided documents related to the incident to the city Parks Department. Citing the company’s continuing investigation, the spokesman said Amtrak officials would not answer detailed questions about the incident, including about the types of chemicals used, any necessary permits and the extent of the pesticide application. Benitez, though, said she was told that the application was of Bayer Viewpoint Herbicide, a so-called “broad brush” product used to curtail brush and invasive and noxious weeds, according the to the manufacturer’s webpage. The herbicide consists of the chemicals imazapyr, Aminocyclopyrachlor and Metsulfuron-methyl. The herbicide does not appear to be highly toxic to humans. Garden volunteers had been preparing a harvest of eggplant, tomatoes, beans, cucumbers, squashes, grapes, and several varieties of greens designated for the soup kitchen at Broadway Presbyterian Church on West 114th Street, Victoria Benitez said. “That entire harvest was destroyed,” she said. Borough President Gale Brewer and Mark Levine, who represents that portion of West Harlem on the City Council, sent a letter to Amtrak CEO Richard Anderson denouncing the pesticide application. The letter expressed concern for the health of people living

in the neighborhood. The closest residences are on Riverside Drive, above the garden, and on the other side of an underpass on 138th Street, about 200 feet from the garden. “This is not a responsible or acceptable practice in one of the nation’s densest urban environments,” the letter continued, adding that the garden had losses in the thousands of dollars. The Riverside Park Conservancy’s president and CEO, Dan Garodnick, said he would pressure Amtrak to compensate for the loss. “So many hours and the heart and soul of Jenny Benitez and her team go into caring for that space, which was simply destroyed in an instant by Amtrak,” he said. “That is not acceptable.” Garodnick said Conservancy staff would assist garden volunteers starting Wednesday to dig up, dispose of and replace 3 to 4 inches of soil, as Health Department officials suggested. He said the Conservancy would pay for the soil and ask Amtrak for reimbursement. On Sunday morning, Jenny Benitez, 86, was already looking forward to spring. She sat on a bench near the garden’s entrance, speaking to wellwishers and directing neighborhood volunteers taking care of the plantings. “The garden is here still,” she said. “We’ll see you in April and May. We’ll have it ready.”

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OCTOBER 11-17,2018

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s ar ce ye ien 34 per ex

PERSONALIZED HOME CARE

WHAT THE BUZZ IS ABOUT NATURE Andrew Cote, with help from family and friends, keeps bees in the city, and gathers a sweet harvest

CUSTOMIZED CARE DEMENTIA TRAINING FOR THE AIDES SOCIAL WORK SERVICES INCLUDED

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(877) 212-4222 toll-free nsultation! Call 24/7 for a free co

BY DEBORAH FENKER

It’s a busy time of year for honey. The New York Botanical Gardens hosted an exhibit on a recent weekend called Honey & Harvest, and The High Line matched donation dollars earlier this month, inspired by a generous donor passionate about protecting the productive pollinators who provide the stuff. And a huge contingent of New Yorkers just celebrated what might be honey’s signature holiday: Rosh Hashanah, where the custom of dipping apple slices in honey inspires hope for the Jewish New Year. A recent trip to the Union Square Greenmarket mirrored this apian frenzy. At one of the most popular stands at the market, Andrew’s

All abuzz on a city rooftop. Photo courtesy of AndrewsHoney.com Honey, it was difficult to discern whether there were more bees or customers thronging the golden jars on display. Andrew Cote, a Connecticut native, comes from a family that has been keeping bees since the 1800s, at Silvermine Apiary. His family is still an integral part of the business: his father, Norm, makes regular appearances at the market; his mother, Polly, still helps keep the books; and his brother and nephew help with the hives. And those hives are myriad:

Sunday, 10/28/2018  11 am-2 pm  285 Jay Street, Brooklyn NY 11201

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he still has colonies in Connecticut, but the main draw at the Greenmarket are his signature New York City honeys, harvested from rooftops, community gardens, select balconies, and even from cemeteries, where the sprawling grounds give bees a little more elbow room. Not that they need much: bees are locavores, usually not flying more than a a few miles from their hives. And for this, city bees have avoided much of the havoc wreaked on rural hives. Cote is

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OCTOBER 11-17,2018 frequently asked how bee populations are faring, what with the all the attention recently given bees and their mysterious demise. Lucky for him, and for those of us who love honey, while it might seem counterintuitive that bees living in the city would suffer less imminence than their bucolic counterparts, evidences show they are. City bees are not exposed to the pesticide use and nefarious mono-cropping practices of big commercial agriculture, which are two of the most pernicious causes of colony collapse. Mono-cropping, which focuses on cultivating a single commodity on a farm’s acreage, offers a stingy variety of pollens for bees, and pesticides can be as harmful to bees as they are to the insects they are targeting. Two other factors, climate change and mite infestations, do affect hives in the city, but responsible beekeeping can counter some of the latter. The former, of course, is a mammoth issue, and the direction that current action and legislation are taking isn’t helping. In fact, among the many curious practices in which bees partake (like the Waggle Dance, a sort of mating mambo), climate change may be having a deleterious effect. Not ones to soil their own stomping grounds,

7

The Spirit|Westsider westsidespirit.com bees they basically “hold it” all winter, until the weather warms and they reenergize out of their quasi-dormant, cold-weather mode for a long awaited “potty break” often referred to as an elimination flight. This occurs as soon as the weather warms, sometimes false-starting the bees into action only for them to be struck back by a sudden cold snap. Thus, erratic temperatures further jeopardize already challenged bee populations. And the overturning of legislation enacted by the Obama administration — by permitting increased use of pesticides and eliminating measures designed to curb global warming — could cause multi-faceted damage on hive health. Fortunately, Cote may be the city’s preeminent beekeeper, by being passionate about responsible beekeeping and by doing his part to encourage healthy bee populations. It is he, along with two NYPD officer beekeepers, who the city calls to capture rogue swarms. There were quite a few of these this summer, with swarms ranging from equal to the size of a grapefruit to a backpacksized behemoth composed of half a hive’s worth of bees — upwards of 30,000 little buzzers. Cote has a special vacuum

that gently and safely sucks up the swarm, which he then transports to one of his less populous hives, where the bees continue to produce their delectable honey. Andrew sells a variety of honeys at his stand, and online at www.andrewshoney.com. His best-sellers are a thick, centrifuge-whipped honey that is creamy and spreadable — amazing on toasty rusks. Other favorites include an incendiary ghost-pepper-infused honey (terrific with roast chicken or drizzled on goat cheese), and an array of signature rooftop honeys, with hives spanning four of the five boroughs, and well into Westchester and Connecticut. As fall ushers in its new strains of flora and subsequent allergens, Cote’s stand gets even busier with hordes of the afflicted seeking relief through his hyper-local honey. What’s produced closest to where you suffer the most is said to be the more effective, since the honeys are derived from the same pollens causing you anguish. So whether you’re augmenting your holiday feast, seeking an alternative to Claritin or just sweetening your tea, Andrew’s Honey offers a premium product, and allows you to support a local business, and a guy who really cares about bees.

The Board of Elections in the City of New York is hiring Poll Workers to serve at poll sites across New York City. Become an Election Day Worker and you can earn up to $500 for completing the training course, passing the exam and working two Election Days.

ELECTION INSPECTOR

INTERPRETER

REQUIREMENTS @ Registered voter residing in the City of New York

REQUIREMENTS @ A permanent U.S. resident over 18 years of age and a resident of New York City

@ Enrolled in the Democratic or Republican party @ Able to read and write English DUTIES @ Prepare the poll site for voters

@ Assist voters during the voting process @ Close the poll site @ Canvass and report election results @ Assist other poll workers as needed TRAINING @ All Inspectors must attend a training class and pass the exam SALARY @ Earn $200 per day

@ Earn $100 for training (Note: You will only be paid for Training if you pass the exam and work on Election Day.)

You can earn up to $500 for completing the training course, passing the exam and working two Election Days.

@ Fluent in English and the interpreter’s language @ Spanish interpreters needed in all boroughs @ Chinese interpreters needed in Manhattan, Brooklyn & Queens @ Korean, Hindi and Bengali interpreters needed in Queens. For Hindi Interpreters: Please note on your application if you can also speak Punjabi.

@ Does not have to be a registered voter DUTIES @ Assist non-English speaking voters by translating voting information into covered languages during the voting process TRAINING @ All Interpreters must attend a training class and pass the exam SALARY @ Earn $200 per day

@ Earn $25 for training (Note: You will only be paid for Training if you pass the exam and work on Election Day.)

You can earn up to $425 for completing the training course, passing the exam and working two Election Days.

HOURS/LOCATION @ 5:00 a.m. until the polls are closed and results reported, which will be after 9:00 p.m. @ Must be willing to travel within the borough for assignment to a poll site

HOW TO APPLY Visit pollworker.nyc/2018 to apply. If you have any questions, call 866-VOTE-NYC (866-868-3692).

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8

OCTOBER 11-17,2018

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Voices

Write to us: To share your thoughts and comments go to westsidespirit.com and click on submit a letter to the editor.

REMEMBER HENRY STERN NOW BY BETTE DEWING

Should John Jay Park pool be renamed for former city Parks commissioner Henry Stern while he can still enjoy the honor or be renamed, as is usual, only after the honoree has departed this life? Community Board 8’s Park’s Committee voted a unanimous “yes” to renaming forthwith. But New Yorkers nevertheless need to hear about this longtime parks commissioner and his dedicated and visionary work for parks and the city at large. And, yes, Henry was a bit of an eccentric, which sparked more media coverage of places and concerns too often overlooked. And sometimes caused some misunderstandings. And, remember as well, prior to being parks commissioner, Stern was a City Council member-at-large for Manhattan, and with Council Member Bobbie Wagner Jr. tried

in vain to have subway station rails installed, Stern was a man for safe travel, in general, and his remark about city biking was a truth-in-anutshell, a Sternism. He said: “A bicycle can be more scary than a car, because it’s small, swift and silent and can come at you from any direction.” But among the few city officials who agreed was Police Commissioner Ben Ward who warned: “Scofflaw biking is scaring the public to death.” Stern did post “No bicycling” signs on pedestrian park paths, and pushed for greater park patrol enforcement but there’s still a long way to go. Stern is being honored, of course, for his enormous contribution to parks citywide, including, the extraordinarily loving care he gave to park trees – city trees in general. And, he closely monitored the many recreational places, especially the safety of playgrounds, not to men-

tion public swimming pools. But also endearing were the more personal things Stern initiated like giving park names to park-goers, his staff and others. Stern, though, was a central figure in lawsuits alleging discrimination at Parks during his tenure, which the city eventually settled for tens of millions of dollars. But, of course, there also was Stern’s strong commitment to public swimming pools, exemplified by his involvement with John Jay Park pool. The city’s public pools were lifesavers, he reportedly said, for those unable to travel to beaches. Yes, even in this affluent Upper East Side location there are such people, and they especially want the pool to bear Henry Stern’s name while he still can appreciate the honor. Stern is reportedly in ill-health, due to Parkinson’s disease. And don’t we need to hear about that in

Henry Stern. Photo: swedennewyork, via flickr a time when so many afflicted elders especially drop out of sight,of public view, even those who once so magnificently served the public like Henry Stern? Surely now it’s their care that needs close monitoring – their diseases and disorders which need more research to find better treatments and also cures - even if the population were not aging.

So these conditions must be seen, not hidden, for this to occur especially in a society which so inordinately values the young and fast movers and talkers. Again, we need to hear more about Henry Stern’s life now, ideally, to see him at those civic meetings he once so faithfully attended. And how we need to hear Stern speak, however, haltingly, about the hard truths about Parkinson‘s and other disabling conditions which keep those afflicted away from these community meetings, at which decisions affecting entire communities are made. Time for a much needed change and with no one more qualified to lead it than an unparalleled public servant like Henry Stern at age 81. It’s not an impossible dream, not if enough of us share it — and with the able-bodied enabling those who are not, to be seen and heard on a public level. And in general — to never let them be out of sight and mind — or forgotten. dewingbetter@aol.com

FOUL VS. FAIR: WHO WILL TURN OUT? BY MEREDITH KURZ

A light rain fell when the #CancelKavanaugh rally started last Thursday near Trump Tower, but it quickly became a downpour as the crowd of protesters swelled. Anti-Trump protesters have always been cordoned off across the street from Trump Tower, with the meager number of pro-Trump supporters slightly south, on the same side of the street of Trump’s building. Taking the NYPD by surprise, it seemed, activists were directly marching on the sidewalk in front of Trump Tower. Officers finally moved the protesters farther south of Trump’s building, but the march was soon over. The rain stopped, people faded away, most leaving soggy signs. There were no arrests. The foul weather voters could determine next month’s midterm outcomes. According to a 2007 study in The Journal of Politics, statistics favor Republicans in inclement elections.

As at this rally, many pro-Trump supporters are quiet about their preference. The trick for pollsters is to uncover his secret voters. There was only one counter-protester willing to show his stripes at the #CancelKavanaugh rally. He held an oversized “Trump 2020” banner, marching along with the protesters, yelling, “Losers!” He said he’s been at every protest since April 2017. He felt Christine Blasey Ford should be heard, but that Kavanaugh should get in. There was a scuffle when he and another man exchanged words. A nearby officer quickly quelled the dispute. A woman in a torn dress and fake blood all over her was handing out red-splotched flyers quoting the Old Testament — “‘They had sex with her and abused her all night long until morning,’ Judges 19:25.” A wide group of organizations sponsored the rally, from the Women’s March which gathered more than three million people nationwide in

2017, to a group called the Socialist Rifle Association, with the National Lawyers Guild, Black Women’s Blueprint and many others. The only escape from the rain was the Trump Tower overhang: reporters and photographers hovered there, with the doormen and the NYPD. One young man there looked like a businessman who just left work; tie and jacket off, but in a white collared shirt and suit pants. He did not want to give his name, but said he was a conservative Republican. He calmly explained why he wasn’t coming forward to express himself as a counter-protester: he’d been aggressively harassed in the past over his atypical Manhattan opinions. “I don’t think Republicans are conservative enough,” he said with a quiet smile. He supported Trump and approved of Kavanaugh, citing his twelve years on the D.C. courts, and the many times the Supreme Court endorsed his opinions. He noted that

four of Ford’s friends denied that the alleged assault happened as Ford explained it, and that he’d never seen a group of people try to ruin someone else’s life. He admitted he’d like to see Trump behave more formally and that the president had a big ego. However, he likes that Trump “sells” America, claiming we have the best products, the best employees. He’s very happy with the new trade agreement with Mexico and Canada. “Trump cares about, and is doing a good job with, our economy,” he said. “He gets work done. The voters knew what they were getting, and they voted him in.” The protesters had many varied opinions, yet all agreed Kavanaugh didn’t belong on the Supreme Court and that Trump should be voted out. Most felt the president should not be impeached because it would continue this ongoing political feud. As a generalization, the women

An open Trump supporter at the protest. Photo: Meredith Kurz protesters seemed focused on the disparity between being their being in the majority numerically while being grossly underrepresented politically. The men on both political sides seemed more focused of the power struggle between the two political parties. One woman I spoke to said Kavanaugh had “expressed a disdain for a political slant of some Americans.” This Saturday there is a rally in Washington, DC sponsored by the Women’s March. There is no estimate on the size of the rally. Weather forecast? Fair.

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FURY IS ALL THE RAGE BOOKS Journalist Rebecca Traister’s “Good and Mad” analyzes the power of women’s anger, and why it is essential to cultural transformation

She loved theater. So she gave.

Rebecca Traister is furious, and she feels “fucking great” about it. Traister, award-winning author, journalist and New York magazine writer at large, and Aminatou Sow, co-host of the “Call Your Girlfriend” podcast, spoke to a packed house at the New York Public Library’s main branch on Oct. 2 to mark the launch of Traister’s new book, “Good and Mad: The Revolutionary Power of Woman’s Anger.” Obviously, cracked Sow, Traister engineered the book’s release with the current new cycle. Yes, the joke landed. But looking around — at an audience ranging from young professionals to older activists on the feminist scale, at the middleaged woman Instagramming her “suff RAGEtte” shirt, at the teetering stacks of books that would sell out by the end of the evening, at the audience giving a standing ovation before the talk even began — it was clear that women’s anger isn’t just a blip in the news cycle or a trend piece. Female rage is both a catalyst for and consequence of American history. If the room stuffed to the gills was any indication, there are still pages and pages yet to be written. It was with this in mind that Sow and Traister launched into a passionate conversation about just how women’s anger functions as a political propellent, particularly at a moment when almost daily, a new incident fans the flames. (It’s worth noting that at approximately the same time as the book talk, President Trump was imitating Christine Blasey Ford’s testimony before the Senate Judiciary Committee at a campaign rally in Mississippi.) Traister did not pull any punches. Yes, she said, it’s risky to show anger. Angry women are often characterized as “hysterical, performative, unhinged.” These shrill harpies and furious freaks are the very opposite of the cool girl trope, noted Traister, the pop culture ideal rewarded by the patriar-

Photo:Stephen Paley

BY ALIZAH SALARIO

Rebecca Traister and Aminatou Sow at the New York Public Library. Photo courtesy of the NYPL chy for keeping her cool. For women of color, the stakes of showing anger are even higher. Anger can get you fired. Anger can get you killed. Which, of course, is why women’s anger is sanitized and tamped down. Perhaps it’s also why neither Traister nor others thought of women’s anger as a worthy lens to view politics until the 2016 election. Traister called her book idea a moment of clarity, and a narrative through-line became immediately obvious. Women’s anger is “consequential ... only women never had their fury hailed as fundamentally transformative and patriotic,” she said. The audience nodded in recognition. Traister envisioned working on a book about female anger over a period of years. But that was before the Women’s March, before young women were some of the most vocal activists on gun control, before #MeToo, before the Kavanaugh hearings. The fast and furious pace of political upheaval and outrage turned a marathon into a four-month sprint. Yes, “Good and Mad” comes at a time when women’s anger has reached a boiling point. But Traister is quick to point out that as a country, we’ve been here before, many times. It was women who led labor and civil rights efforts that transformed our nation. For instance, Clara Lemlich called for a general strike that became the shirtwaist workers uprising, resulting in new labor agreements with all but a few factories — one of which was the Triangle Shirtwaist Factory. For the record, Rosa Parks wasn’t just tired. She was intentional in the act of refusing to stand. And yes, she was angry.

Traister certainly isn’t the first to recognize that women’s anger can be a propulsive force. But by looking at “the specific nexus of women’s anger and American politics,” and how many of the movements for social change and progress are woven within it, Traister presents an illuminating reframing. Women’s anger isn’t threatening because a shrieking banshee may spontaneously combust. It’s threatening because angry women run for office. They expose corruption and wrongdoing. Most recently, the unapologetic rage of Ana Maria Archila and Maria Gallagher, the activists who confronted Senator Jeff Flake in an elevator, used anger as a vehicle for disruption and change. Anger makes it impossible to look away. Women’s anger has proven not only productive, but patriotic, even revolutionary. So why is it that the righteous anger of our forefathers — our “national lullaby,” Traister calls it — is the song we have on repeat? This reporter couldn’t help but think about what was missing from the audience: men. Too bad more of them weren’t there to witness what Traister and Sow tapped into: anger allows women to be be seen — and that’s what feels so damn good. “It’s not the anger that’s bad, it’s the swallowing and holding it in,” Traister noted. “Good and Mad” hasn’t been on shelves long. But the very fact of its existence reframes women’s anger for what it so often is: a catalyst for change. The Traister-Sow talk will be rebroadcast on the NYPL’s “Library Talks” podcast, which comes out on Sunday, Oct. 7.

Some Some say say Helen Helen Merrill was was the the theater. theater. During her life, life, she she fostered fostered the careers of of dozens dozens of of playwrights. playwrights. Today, Today, 21 21 years years after her death, death, the the fund fund she she started in The The New New York York Community Community Trust supports supports emerging emerging and distinguished distinguished playwrights.

What do you love? We We can can help help you you create create aa charitable charitable legacy. legacy.

Contact Jane Wilton: (212) 686-2563 or janewilton@nyct-cfi.org

THE NEW YORK COMMUNITY TRUST nycommunitytrust.org


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OCTOBER 11-17,2018

The Spirit|Westsider westsidespirit.com

Health & Wellness Seminar Series

Discover the world around the corner. Find community events, gallery openings, book launches and much more: Go to nycnow.com

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AMNH FAMILY PARTY American Museum of Natural History, 79th St. Transverse and West 81st St. 5 p.m. $85 for children/$175 adults 212-313-7161. amnh.org

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Time 6:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;8:00 pm Place All seminars held at Uris Auditorium Meyer Research and Education Building Weill Cornell Medicine 1300 York Avenue (at 69th St.)

All seminars are FREEand open to the public. Seating is available for 250 people on a firstcome, first-served basis. For more information on the Health & Wellness Series please visit our website at: www.weill.cornell.edu/seminars/ American Sign Language interpretive services will be provided at all seminars.

If you require a disability-related accommodation please call 212-821-0888 and leave a message.

Curious kids can live out their â&#x20AC;&#x153;Night at the Museumâ&#x20AC;? dreams and get a behind-the-glass peek at some incredible museum exhibits. They can hang with animals, dive into ocean-themed science activities and boogie to live music. Little ones can also take a peak into ongoing research through hands-on activities, then enjoy food, crafts and live performances. For ages 2-12.

Thu 11

Fri 12

Sat 13

â&#x2013;ş DISCUSSION: CLAUDE LĂ&#x2030;VISTRAUSS, OUR CONTEMPORARY

POLISH DOCUMENTARY FILM FESTIVAL

INNA FALIKS: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;POLONAISE FANTAISIEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;

Hunter College, Ida K. Lang Recital Hall 695 Park Ave. 3 p.m. Free with reservation at PDFFestival@yahoo.com The Catholic Association of Journalists, in cooperation with the Polish Ministry of Foreign Affairs, will present 12 ďŹ lms (with English subtitles) that address Polish priests, martial law, patriotic football fans, the 2010 air crash that killed the countryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s president and 95 others, and other topics. 212-772-4227 nycnow.com

Symphony Space / Nimoy Thalia Theater 2537 Broadway 7:30 p.m. $20 Ukranian-born pianist Inna Faliks alternates musical interludes with spoken word at this unique night of narrative storytelling chronicling Faliksâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; lifeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s path: her familyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s emigration to America, her formative inďŹ&#x201A;uences, her evolution as an artist, as well as her love story, as she was reunited in adulthood with a childhood friend who is now her husband. 212-864-5400 symphonyspace.org

Columbia University 116th Street & Broadway 6 p.m. Free Emmanuelle Loyer, whose biography on French anthropologist Claude LĂŠviStrauss has recently been translated into English, will discuss how LĂŠvi-Strauss took a critical perspective on the present, expressed not only in his structural anthropology but also in his critiques of many things we take as certainties in the modern world, including our belief in progress. 212-854-1754 columbia.edu


OCTOBER 11-17,2018

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Sun 14 Mon 15 Tue 16 ▲ STEPPING STONES FAMILY NETWORK Manhattan JCC 334 Amsterdam Ave. 1 p.m. Free Stepping Stones is a network of families embracing their children’s gender nonconformity in a kind and loving manner. These monthly meetings provide a place for parents to connect with each other to share information and experiences. At the same time, children can participate in a playgroup sponsored by the member families. 646-505-4444 steppingstones@pflagnyc.org

OPEN REHEARSAL: AMANDA SELWYN DANCE THEATRE Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater, 405 West 55th St. 6:30 p.m. Free “Crossroads,” a work in development, explores forging into unchartered waters and the tumultuous process of self-discovery through dance. The performance highlights these lingering moments at the crossroads, choosing one path or another, and how these moments steer the course of our lives. amandaselwyndance.org

BROADWAY IN BLOOM BENEFIT Calle Ocho 45 West 81st St. 6 p.m. $60/$45 young professionals Enjoy bold Latin fare at the Broadway Mall Association’s annual benefit works, which works to maintain the Upper West Side’s “front yard.” All proceeds from the event will go towards BMA’s work to beautify and maintain the malls from 70th to 168th Streets through horticulture, winter lighting, public art exhibitions and community programs. 212-491-6470 broadwaymall.org

Wed 17 EXHIBITION: ‘FREE WITHIN OURSELVES’

Claude Lévi-Strauss. Photo by UNESCO/Michel Ravassard, via WikiMedia Commons

North of History 445 Columbus Ave. 6 p.m. Free Artist Jason Wallace’s latest exhibition “Free Within Ourselves” (the name is an excerpt from the book “The Negro Artist and the Racial Mountain” by Langston Hughes) employs various mediums to explore person-toperson and person-to-material relationships, as well as the behaviors of consumption and accumulation within contemporary consciousness. northofhistory.com

WHAT DO YOU WANT TO BE WHEN YOU SHOW UP?

You’re full of potential and eager to get ahead, but one thing’s missing — your college degree. Whether you took a break after high school or you stopped out of college with less than 60 credits, earning your Associates Degree now through the NYU School of Professional Studies Division of Applied Undergraduate Studies can change your life! From the first day you step into our classrooms, you’ll develop applicable work-related skills in a highly supportive environment, while building your confidence and benefiting from a wealth of university and career development resources. New affordable tuition makes a world-class NYU education attainable. VIRTUAL INFO. SESSION - Tuesday, October 16, 7 p.m. WALK-IN WEDNESDAYS - October 17, 24, 31; November 7 anytime 9 a.m. - 6 p.m. Register - sps.nyu.edu/appliedUG/events39

For information: visit sps.nyu.edu/appliedUG/associates39 or call 212-998-7100 * Bachelors degree programs available for those who have earned 60 transferable college credits or more.

You can do this! We can help you every step of the way! CHOOSE FROM PROGRAMS IN: Business, Health Administration, Information Systems Management, Liberal Arts New York University is an affirmative action/equal opportunity institution. ©2018 NYU School of Professional Studies.


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OCTOBER 11-17,2018

Open Call’s inaugural class. Photo: Scott Rudd

FRESH VOICES RESPOND TO THE SHED’S OPEN CALL The up-and-coming cultural institution aims to present arts and pop culture under one roof for all audiences. Can a generous commission program for emerging artists help? BY ALIZAH SALARIO

To butcher a Virginia Woolf quote, artists must have money and a large cultural institution of their own if they are to create. Now, 52 New York Citybased artists and arts collectives have just that, thanks to The Shed’s inaugural Open Call program, announced by CEO and artistic director Alex Poots on Oct. 9. The luxuries of time and space have long eluded even established and mid-career artists, particularly in a city where the rent is too damn high. The Shed, the gargantuan new cultural center located where the High Line meets Hudson Yards, is trying to

Stage managing director change that. The institution James King and filmmaker is already positioning itself and CEO of the fashion colas New York City’s next hub lective Hood By Air Leilah of artistic innovation with Weinraub. the inaugural commissions Open Call provides the resources local Though the artists selected well before it officially opens artists need to fully explore their ideas, as for Open Call self-identified in spring 2019. through the proposal pro“A fundamental part of well as the platform for reaching higher cess as either “early-career” our mission is to engage our levels of visibility with new audiences.” or “emerging,” many boast local communities and supTamara McCaw, chief civic program officer, The Shed impressive biographies and port New York City’s divermyriad accomplishments — sity of talent,” said Tamara just not a previous commisMcCaw, chief civic program officer at The Shed, who co-organized Beating out a pool of nearly 1000 appli- sion with a large or major institution. Open Call along with Emma Enderby, cants, the recipients each receive a sti- Recipients include designers, rappers, senior curator. “Open Call provides pend of between $7,000 and $15,000, dancers, activists and makers, all of the resources local artists need to in addition to support and resources whom will have the chance to bring fully explore their ideas, as well as the to develop their work. Applicants went their creative visions to two stages platform for reaching higher levels of through a rigorous vetting process, in The Shed’s innovative space: a 500including a committee of curatorial seat black box theater and a 17,000 visibility with new audiences.” Developed specifically for New York and producing artists that honed in on square-foot open air plaza with The City-based artists who have haven’t inventive and risk-taking proposals. Shed’s movable shell ceiling. Recipients include Prince Harvey, a had the opportunity to create and Final selections were made by a panel present work with large cultural insti- of New York-based movers and shak- Dominica-born artist and musician tutions, Open Call spotlights artists ers, including poet and cofounder of known for recording his first album in from across the creative spectrum. Cave Canem Cornelius Eady, Harlem an Apple Store and for STAY BOLD: 100

DAYS 100 SONGS, where he released a song a day for 100 days as a protest against President Trump; artist Gabriela María Corretjer Contreras, who utilizes textiles and performance as a way of imagining a future for a society with an “identity crisis;” and vocalist and composer Tariq Al-Sabir, who has premiered roles in the Smithsoniancommissioned operetta “Qadar” and in the social justice opera “Stinney,” in addition to jingle writing, film scoring and music production. The inaugural group of artists will launch the Shed’s 2019 season and continue into 2020. All of the performances will be free. Core to The Shed’s mission is commissioning and presenting leading artists and thinkers from all disciplines under one roof. Just like the structure itself, it’s a lofty goal — but one that now has plenty of creative fuel behind it. For more information, visit theshed.org/ commission/open-call


OCTOBER 11-17,2018

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A foot-stompin’, knee-slappin’ new musical set in the Old West based on ‘Measure for Measure.’

A town’s survival depends on producing a play in a week. One problem: no playhouse. Another problem: no play. Directed by Christian Borle.

A high-energy celebration of American women, and an exploration of their changing role from 1900 to today as illustrated through pop music.

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A return engagement of famed novelist Kurt Vonnegut’s rarely produced satire. A searing and darkly comedic look at American culture.

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An all-new incarnation of the hit revue celebrating the songs of Leiber and Stoller.

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The story of a seemingly perfect gay couple with different views on marriage, this unflinching look at how we choose to tie the knot—or not—returns for an open-ended Off-Broadway run.

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David Rossmer and Steve Rosen both play the title character – one eventful year apart – in their musical romantic comedy about courageously owning the hand life deals you.

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Bertolt Brecht’s skewering of Adolf Hitler and totalitarianism is given a new production directed by John Doyle (“The Color Purple”) for Classic Stage Company.

Daniel Alexander Jones returns to the stage as Jomama Jones, his critically-acclaimed alter-ego, in this revival for turbulent times. GREENWICH HOUSE THEATER - 27 BARROW ST

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LEVIN CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1

Naomi Levin on West End Avenue near her apartment off 85th Street. She is running as a Republican against incumbent Democratic U.S. Rep. Jerrold Nadler. Photo courtesy of Naomi Levin for Congress Campaign

In chunks of the deep-blue district she hopes to represent, it would be a giant understatement to call her defense of Trumpism unfashionable: On the UWS and in Hell’s Kitchen, for instance, Hillary Clinton scored 87 percent of the ballot in 2016, demolishing Trump, who managed a mere 10 percent. Still, Levin makes no apologies for a conservative outlook as she mounts a long shot bid to oust U.S. Rep. Jerrold Nadler, the Democrat who has represented the 10th Congressional District for more than a quarter-century — and who is poised to become chairman of the House Judiciary Committee if his party prevails in the general election on Nov. 6. “Jerry represents the far-left side of the district,” Levin said. “He votes no on each and every single bill the Republican

RESTAURANT INSPECTION RATINGS SEP 26 - OCT 2, 2018 The following listings were collected from the Department of Health and Mental Hygiene’s website and include the most recent inspection and grade reports listed. We have included every restaurant listed during this time within the zip codes of our neighborhoods. Some reports list numbers with their explanations; these are the number of violation points a restaurant has received. To see more information on restaurant grades, visit www.nyc.gov/html/doh/html/services/restaurant-inspection.shtml. Szechuan Garden

239 W 105th St

Grade Pending (24) Cold food item held above 41º F (smoked fish and reduced oxygen packaged foods above 38 ºF) except during necessary preparation. Hand washing facility not provided in or near food preparation area and toilet room. Hot and cold running water at adequate pressure to enable cleanliness of employees not provided at facility. Soap and an acceptable hand-drying device not provided. Food not protected from potential source of contamination during storage, preparation, transportation, display or service.

majority would support. He’s against lowering the tax burden, against increasing federal funding for charter school programs, against school choice — and he represents the extreme polarization that has have taken control in Washington.” In a district where roughly 70 percent-plus of all registered voters are Democratic — and Nadler crushed his most recent GOP opponent, Phil Rosenthal, by a 192,371-to-53,857 vote tally — it is tough to imagine that such views would gain traction. Levin is undeterred: “What we’re seeing right now is large numbers of career politicians getting defeated all over the country by people with a fresh perspective,” she argues. “The majority of voters now are looking for something and someone new. So my candidacy is coming at a good time in a diverse district where the political landscape is changing.”

STAY AWAY FROM THE VILLAGE For more than six years, Levin — a software engineer who graduated from Boston University in 2005 with a degree in biology and computer science — has been living off West End Avenue in the mid-80s. That’s smack dab in the liberal political heart of the 10th CD, which encompasses the Upper West Side, Hell’s Kitchen, Chelsea, Soho, Greenwich Village, Tribeca, Wall Street, Battery Park City and parts of Brooklyn. Isn’t West End Avenue unfriendly political territory? “Believe it or not,” she says, the UWS, despite its historical left-leaning reputation, is one of the most hospitable parts

of the district for a Republican based on her personal experience. Greenwich Village, she observes, is the least friendly precinct. “For the most part, I’ve gotten a lot of positive feedback,” Levin said. “So many Democrats are disappointed in their representatives, upset with them because so many have abandoned their constituents ... And besides, the mission of my campaign isn’t partisan politics — it’s to focus on the needs of our district.” Of course, it isn’t all sweetness and smiles: “Every once in a while, I’ll get people who are pretty rude,” she said. “There are the people who won’t talk to be when they find out that I’m a Republican. People who hand me my palm card back. “But I don’t carry a big sign that says, ‘I’m a Republican,’” Levin added. She even demurs when asked if she cast her own vote for Trump: “I don’t think that my personal voting record has an impact on what my mission and my role in Congress would be,” she said. Levin says that she’s “wary” of the president’s “benevolent approach” to dictators in Russian and North Korea, but adds, “I think that with Trump, we need to look at his actions, and his domestic economic policies and his Iran policy have been very positive and very beneficial to this country.” The Levin insurgency is coming at a time when Nadler, whose campaign didn’t return a call for comment by press time, is poised to become a crucial player in any post-midterm drama involving Trump’s sur-

vival in office. If he wins reelection and helms the Judiciary Committee, both of which are expected, Nadler has already pledged to open an investigation into the accusations of sexual misconduct and perjury against newly confirmed Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh. And he’s repeatedly pushed for a probe into whether Trump’s business interests breach Constitutional anticorruption prohibitions. As for any possible impeachment proceedings, Nadler has signaled a go-slow approach, while also saying, “We have to see more, we need more evidence. We may get there.” Levin counters that the incumbent’s anti-Trumpism is reflexive and comes at the expense of his constituents. “I think Nadler’s mission of obstruction is a reflection of the loss of ability to lose with grace,” she said. Meanwhile, Rosenthal, who was eviscerated by Nadler two years ago, is now out campaigning for Levin: “Naomi is the voice of the next generation,” he said. “Nadler will undoubtedly run against Trump, but Naomi is her own person, and I don’t think anyone who meets her will ever confuse the two of them. “She’s the daughter of Soviet emigres, she’s a regular person, not a politician who spent decades in Washington, and she understands the beauty and the importance of our democracy and the freedoms that we cherish here,” Rosenthal added. invreporter@strausnews.com

LEVIN’S FAVORITE THINGS ON THE UWS Restaurants: “Amsterdam Burger’s pulled beef sandwich was my favorite takeout food.” They moved a few blocks to bigger space. French Roast, 85th and Broadway, a “great place where I spend a lot of time hanging out and often hold impromptu campaign meetings.” Street corner: “I absolutely love Riverside Drive on a summer night, somewhere by 90th Street. It reminds me of Europe.” Shul: “I go to so many now to meet residents, and like each and every one for the unique atmosphere. But I’m a loyal member of Carlebach Shul, 79th and West End.” Bar: Maison Pickle, “a good place for an impromptu cocktail. The Manhattan Cricket Club is very cool. And Shalel Lounge feels the most romantic.” Best subway stop in the district: “I find the 2/3 to be efficient and reliable. 72nd is great

to hop onto the express train when I’m going downtown.” Worst subway stop in the district: “I judge subway stops by how dirty or clean they are. The ones closer to midtown tend to be more grimy.” Most hospitable part of the district to a Republican: “From my personal experience: Borough Park, Battery Park, and believe it or not — UWS!” Least hospitable part of the district to a Republican: “West Village.” Favorite place for entertainment: “The row of restaurants and bars in the 70s and 80s on Amsterdam Avenue.” Favorite place for education and enlightenment: “Lincoln Center theaters.”

Aangan Indian Restaurant

2701 Broadway

Not Yet Graded (31) Live roaches present in facility’s food and/or non-food areas. Filth flies or food/refuse/sewage-associated (FRSA) flies present in facility’s food and/or non-food areas. Filth flies include house flies, little house flies, blow flies, bottle flies and flesh flies. Food/refuse/sewageassociated flies include fruit flies, drain flies and Phorid flies. Food contact surface not properly washed, rinsed and sanitized after each use and following any activity when contamination may have occurred. Sanitized equipment or utensil, including in-use food dispensing utensil, improperly used or stored. Wiping cloths soiled or not stored in sanitizing solution.

Pearls

794 Amsterdam Ave

A

Broadway Bagel

2658 Broadway

A

Hunan Park

721 Columbus Ave

Grade Pending (18) Evidence of mice or live mice present in facility’s food and/or non-food areas. Sanitized equipment or utensil, including in-use food dispensing utensil, improperly used or stored.

The Parlour

250 West 86 Street

A

French Roast

2340 Broadway

A

Francesco Pizzeria

186 Columbus Avenue A

DO YOU HAVE SOMETHING YOU’D LIKE US TO LOOK INTO?

Amy’s Bread Cafe

40 Lincoln Center Plz

EMAIL US AT NEWS@STRAUSNEWS.COM

A

— Douglas Feiden


OCTOBER 11-17,2018

SHELTER CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 Praxis will hire its own security guards and the new shelter facility will feature indoor common space and a courtyard area for residents. Praxis CEO Svein Jorgensen told residents at the Oct. 4 meeting that he and his colleagues would regularly attend community advisory board meetings, employ staff to patrol the area, engage with neighbors to address concerns and address loitering and public nuisance issues. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We will be part of the community,â&#x20AC;? Jorgensen said. Rosenthal said she was reassured by her City Council colleague Andy Cohenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s assessment of a Praxis-operated shelter in Cohenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Bronx district. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Praxis has a good reputation, which never could be said about the [provider at Freedom House],â&#x20AC;? she said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;If the provider is meeting the needs of the residents, then you donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t see the types of problems that the neighbors have had with Freedom House,â&#x20AC;? Rosenthal said. DHS intends to terminate its contract with Aguila and close Freedom House in the weeks to come. Including Freedom House, the city has four contracts with Aguila, for which the nonproďŹ t receives $34 million annually in public funds. The nonproďŹ tâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s other contracts will remain in effect after Freedom House closes. DHS officials declined to address DHSâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s assessment of the quality of services at the other Aguila facilities or whether DHS plans to phase out its contracts with Aguila entirely, as the agency has done with other underperforming providers. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re always looking at their portfolio,â&#x20AC;? Banks said, adding, â&#x20AC;&#x153;weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re raising the bar and so weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re reviewing all of our providers constantly.â&#x20AC;? Banks said he is hopeful that

the Freedom House building will become permanent affordable housing after the shelter closes. DHS officials declined to share details regarding how such a transition might play out. Several residents expressed concern over the siteâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s future at the Oct. 4 meeting, fearing that Freedom House could eventually be replaced with another shelter or supportive housing. DHS Deputy General Counsel Aaron Goodman said that the agency has no plans or proposals at this time for another shelter at the location. Rosenthal shared some attendeesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; skepticism toward DHSâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s response. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I hear it the same way you hear it,â&#x20AC;? she said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not a guarantee.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;I will flip out if they put a shelter where Freedom House is now,â&#x20AC;? Rosenthal said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;That is unacceptable to me.â&#x20AC;? The site of the West 94th Street shelter is the Alexander Hotel, an SRO-style building. Praxis identified the building and submitted a proposal for the site through DHSâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s openended bidding process for new shelters. Six permanent residents living in the building will not be evicted as a result of the transition. The new shelter will serve as a temporary residence for adult families â&#x20AC;&#x201D; for example, a couple experiencing homelessness or a grown child caring for a parent â&#x20AC;&#x201D; the same population served by Freedom House. â&#x20AC;&#x153;To the extent that residents of Freedom House arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t connected to permanent housing yet, theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll be able to move into the new site,â&#x20AC;? Banks said. The new shelter will have capacity for roughly 200 residents, about the same as Freedom House. Some attendees questioned the fairness of siting the new shelter on the block, which is in the vicinity of several supportive housing facilities. Another topic of concern brought up repeatedly by neighbors, dissatisďŹ ed with what they char-

acterized as the ineffectiveness of the community advisory board model in fixing issues during Freedom Houseâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s sixyear history, was the perceived lack of avenues for meaningful recourse to spur response to recurring problems. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We will continue to work with the community as much as we can, in any way possible, to answer any and every question that comes our way as the community has concerns,â&#x20AC;? said Lori Boozer, a special adviser at DSS. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m interested in getting in that building and seeing for myself that itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s in good shape,â&#x20AC;? Rosenthal said, adding, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s really important to me that the community hear this and that we hear their concerns. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m going to continue to hold DHSâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s feet to the ďŹ re to make sure that what weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re talking about actually plays out.â&#x20AC;? A public hearing on the proposal is scheduled for Oct. 18. Closing down and replacing problem shelters such as Freedom House is one aspect of the de Blasio administrationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Turning the Tide on Homelessnessâ&#x20AC;? plan to overhaul the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s approach to homelessness, which DHS officials explain evolved in a haphazard manner over the previous decades to include shelters operated by not-for-proďŹ t providers contracted by the city, commercial hotels and so-called â&#x20AC;&#x153;clusterâ&#x20AC;? sites consisting of private apartments largely in the Bronx and Brooklyn. The city is working to end the use of cluster sites and hotels, as well as to reduce the overall footprint of the system while opening 90 new shelters. DHS has ended the practice of opening new shelters without advanced notiďŹ cation and now provides public notice of plans for new facilities at least 30 days in advance. Last year, the shelter system census remained flat roughly from the previous year for the ďŹ rst time in over a decade.

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OCTOBER 11-17,2018

Business

THE QUICK AND THE LATE Testing same-day delivery offered by a range of services — from traditional retailers to online-only merchants BY ANNE D’INNOCENZIO

It was a Friday and I was eagerly awaiting my vegetable spiralizer, red wine and Roku stick. They all arrived as promised. But where was that book and makeup I ordered? And my pizza? Same-day delivery offers the tantalizing convenience of online ordering with nearly the same immediacy of store buying. But how well are stores pulling it off? I settled in on my couch and spent a Friday trying several different services, from traditional retailers to online-only merchants. Some stores did better than others. Amazon Prime Now, Instacart and FoodKick all delivered my items within a certain time frame. At the other end of the spectrum were some doozies. One delivery — Bobbi Brown eye shadow from online luxury purveyor Net-a-Porter — didn’t arrive at all. Ordering from Barnes & Noble included glitches both on the website and on the app, and a book that didn’t come until nearly 9 p.m. The pizza? That came later than I was told as well, and I was hungry. Here’s my take on what went well — and what didn’t. EASE OF ORDERING: Using the Amazon Prime app on my phone was probably the quickest experience of those I tried. I ordered four items — socks, a vegetable spiralizer, calcium pills and a case of bottled water — and it took just two minutes. The most cumbersome experience was with Barnes & Noble. I started on the app at 10 a.m. to order Kristin Hannah’s novel “Winter Garden,” but kept encountering a glitch when I tried to insert my address. After three tries, I switched to my computer, but I had a similar problem there too. I called customer service a little after 11 a.m., and 24 minutes later I placed the order. I could have walked to the local Barnes & Noble store and bought the book quicker than that! DELIVERY: Only four of the seven retailers including the pizza parlor

Where was my pizza? Photo: Lou Stejskal, via flickr offered a specific time frame for delivery. Knowing when something will arrive really helps. I didn’t think I’d be waiting around in my apartment for 11 hours. Amazon Prime, Instacart and FoodKick, owned by FreshDirect, all promised to deliver between 2 p.m. and 4 p.m. All three came in that period. I had a nice experience at Best Buy, too, receiving the Roku stick a little after 2 p.m. when I was told it would arrive by 9 p.m. Net-a-Porter said my eyeshadow would come by 7 p.m. At 6:52 p.m., I called for an update and was told there was a problem with the order, and I would get it tomorrow. I was told that the computer system was confused by the apostrophe in my last name, and so my order was put on hold, without my getting any updates. No thanks! I canceled the order. It would have been nice for them to alert me earlier that there was an issue. As for Barnes & Noble, the customer service representative on the phone couldn’t give me a delivery time. At 7:05 p.m., I got a text saying the book was on a truck in New Jersey and heading toward me. It arrived around

9 p.m. — still the same day, after all. The margherita pizza and the salad? Ordered at 12:10 p.m., they were supposed to arrive at around 12:45 p.m. but didn’t arrive until about half an hour after that. FEES: The highest was at Net-a-Porter, which charged $27.22 including the flat delivery charge of $25 and other fees. I guess if I were ordering a $500 dress, it wouldn’t matter. But I was ordering eyeshadow that cost about $76. Instacart’s delivery fee — $11.99 — was also high, bringing the total cost of my chips and guacamole to $26.16. The delivery charge is based on customer demand for the delivery window you request. Barnes & Noble’s delivery fee was just $3.99, while Best Buy’s was $5.99. Amazon Prime waived the delivery fee because my order came to more than $35. FoodKick also didn’t charge a fee because my red wine and pesto totaled $22.13, above the $20 minimum for free delivery. So by 9 p.m., I had most of what I ordered, including a book, wine and pizza. Would I try these services again? Yes, but I definitely know which retailers come through.

A order An of “Winter Garden” G from Barnes fr and Noble. an


OCTOBER 11-17,2018

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OCTOBER 11-17,2018

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The Spirit|Westsider westsidespirit.com

YOUR 15 MINUTES

To read about other people who have had their “15 Minutes” go to westsidespirit.com/15 minutes

THE SECRETS OF SECRETIONS Dr. Randi Hutter Epstein discusses her new book about the history of hormones, and why it’s both a story of amazing advancements by brilliant scientists, and crazy claims by hacks and charlatans BY ALIZAH SALARIO

Hormones. Just over a century ago, little was known about these tonguetwisting chemicals. Now oxytocin, estrogen and testosterone roll off the tongue and into daily conversation. Their basic functions — regulating fighting or fleeing, puberty and sex, for instance, are common knowledge, but exactly how hormones work, and the extent of their influence, remains a mystery to many. In “Aroused: The History of Hormones and How They Control Just About Everything,” author Randi Hutter Epstein shares the human stories behind these fascinating secretions. Epstein, a medical writer, lecturer at Yale University, Writer in Residence at Yale Medical School, and an adjunct at the Columbia School of Journalism, spoke to Straus News about why p y hormones are like our internal Wi-Fi, the women who made remarkable discoveries about these chemical messengers, and why no one goes hungry on the Upper West Side.

How did you become interested in the history of hormones in the first place? My first book was called “Get Me Out: A History of Childbirth from the Garden of Eden to the Sperm Bank.” So while I was doing that book I started looking into hormones because our hormones change, and it takes hormones to make a baby. A s I sta r ted look i n g i nto t h e h i s to r y of hormones, wh ich was tangential to the first book, I rea lized that starting at the turn of the twent ie t h ce ntury, when it

Dr. Randi Hutter Epstein. Photo: Nina Subin

comes to hormones, it’s been over a century of amazing advances but also ridiculous claims. And while those outrageous claims make for funny and wacky stories, it also means what can we learn [from those stories]...I can’t believe we were peddling some of this stuff in the 1920s — some of the charlatans — but as we all know, history repeats itself. So a lot of what I found in the 1920s in terms of cures for libido, and people wanting certainty, and people promoting hormone cures to make you feel balanced, it was very similar, different remedies but very similar ideas, to what’s going on today.

You manage to seamlessly weave the nitty-gritty science in with the personal stories of scientists and subjects. Can you tell us a little about your writing process? I usually write on the top of my blank sheet of paper “topic” like whether I’m going to be talking about, I don’t know, pregnancy or growth hormones — topic, story, or what is the point, so I’m always searching for the story that’s going to tell the science. I think the other thing is I have a really short attention space, p , so I think of that as I’m explaining the science. If I’m starting to go on for a page or two, I’ll figure out oh, maybe we can break this up and go back to some conversation ... I do rewrite a lot, and I delete a lot, too.

A lot of women were trailblazers in the study of hormones, like New Yorker Rosalyn Yalow and Georgeanna Jones. Was that intentionally part of your book? You’re the second person to ask k me that. It wasn’t consciously in-tentional, however when I’m do-ing my research I can’t help but love the stories of these women who should get more attention, but they don’t ... Like when it came to Georgeanna Jones, I remember I was talking to this group of friends who are writers, and you know how things go ... We were sitting around drinking and talking about the writing process, and I started to tell them about Howard and Georgeanna Jones, and while they did create America’s first test-tube baby together, and while she made a landmark finding of the pregnancy hormone while she was a female medical student (and there weren’t many female medical students back then), I also happened to throw out that she and her husband shared one desk their entire careers. I can tell you I’m happily married, my husband and I have known each other since we were 17, but if we shared a partner’s desk we would not make it till lunchtime. And the fact they worked for decades together, they shared one car, they stared at each other, they worked in the same office, they were besottedly in love, I was like, America’s first test-tube baby? Well ell that’s okay. Sharing a desk with your husband and having that spark keep going for decades? That’s astonishing. That’s a miracle. So I was telling this story, and someone in my group said, “That’s how you begin your chapter.”

Today when we talk about hormones people tend to ascribe almost magic powers to them. I’m pregnant at the moment, and that certainly seems to be the case? Oh absolutely. We ascribe so many magic powers to them. I mean, they are, in some ways, I wouldn’t say magical, but hormones are astonishing in the sense that I like to consider them our internal Wi-Fi ... It used to be that we thought every message in the body was transmitted by nerves, it just marched along, or it went through the blood and it just sort of washed up like oxygen ... but a hormone is a chemical that’s secreted from one gland and reaches a faraway target, like email. Like your pituitary [gland] will send out a little chemical of something —

the pituitary is in the brain — and that chemical will know to target specific cells, whether it’s the ovary or the pancreas or the testes or the thyroid, so it’s really amazing that it’s like a bow and arrow. It’s really amazing that it knows where to go, but we tend to think of [hormones] as this nebulous thing. Oh, you’ll be “hormonal.” What does that really mean?

You’re a longtime Upper West Side resident. What do you love about the neighborhood? When my kids were little (now they’re 18-25), I remember they watched the movie “Home Alone” and they thought in case you ever forgot about us — I mean, right, like I’m going on a family vacation and I’ll get halfway around the world and think, damn I forgot the kids — in case that ever happened, they wanted to figure out if they could eat three meals a day. And they did! They could go into Zengoni’s on 83rd and Columbus, they

could go into Broadway Farms, they knew the people at both places ... and they figured out the restaurants ... like T & R Pizza. Yes, it’s back, yay, on 78th! That’s a nice thing for kids to grow up knowing. They felt that they were in a community ... not to mention that I feel this strong sense of community, and we’re in each other’s business all the time, but then I can just walk a few blocks and be in Central Park and feel like I’m in the middle of nowhere, which I love. Interested in having Randi Hutter Epstein speak at your book group? You can contact her via her website: randihutterepstein.com

Know somebody who deserves their 15 Minutes of fame? Go to westsidespirit.com and click on submit a press release or announcement.


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WORD SEARCH by Myles Mellor M D A C F R O B B Z R D A D E

F G E A W F D P F O E I T I F

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The puzzle contains the following words. They may be diagonal, across, or up and down in the grid in any direction.

C U E A A I B G Z D R E A M U

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Each Sudoku puzzle consists of a 9X9 grid that has been subdivided into nine smaller grids of 3X3 squares. To solve the puzzle each row, column and box must contain each of the numbers 1 to 9. Puzzles come in three grades: easy, medium and difficult.

52

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SUDOKU by Myles Mellor and Susan Flanagan

by Myles Mellor

R O

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CROSSWORD

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OCTOBER 11-17,2018

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OCTOBER 11-17,2018

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OCTOBER 11-17,2018

CLASSIFIEDS MASSAGE

MERCHANDISE FOR SALE

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Telephone: 212-868-0190 Email: classified2@strausnews.com

POLICY NOTICE: We make every effort to avoid mistakes in your classified ads. Check your ad the first week it runs. The publication will only accept responsibility for the first incorrect insertion. The publication assumes no financial responsibility for errors or omissions. We reserve the right to edit, reject, or re-classify any ad. Contact your sales rep directly for any copy changes. All classified ads are pre-paid.

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OCTOBER 11-17,2018

The Spirit|Westsider westsidespirit.com

N.A.A.C.P. MID-MANHATTAN BRANCH & SYMPHONY SPACE present the 27th Annual

CHILDRENâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S BLOCK: 92-93 Sts.

Broadway FALL Festival Sunday, October 21st 11 AM to 6 PM Broadway 86 to 96 Sts

Japanese Foods, Crafts & Entertainment 91 to 92 & 93 to 94 Sts

Sponsored by

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West Side Spirit

2nd Annual

Shana Farr Cabaret Competition Main Stage at 96 th St 2 PM to 5 PM Info: 212-764-6330 www.mortandray.com

West Side Spirit - October 11, 2018  
West Side Spirit - October 11, 2018  
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