Page 1

The local paper for the Upper per West Side p Sid ONCE UPON A TIME IN NEW YORK ◄ P.18

WEEK OF JUNE-JULY

27-3 2019

INSIDE

THE MONEY CHASE IN MANHATTAN POLITICS

CHEWING THEIR WAY THROUGH RIVERSIDE PARK

As the Democratic presidential candidates court wealthy donors, an early look at who’s ahead in NYC’s dollar derby

The visiting goats have exceeded expectations, P. 2

BY STUART MARQUES

The Democratic Dash for Cash is in high gear as presidential candidates — from frontrunners to likely also-rans — are courting mega-rich Manhattan donors as the race for the nomination heats up after the first round of debates. Former Vice President Joe Biden swung through Manhattan on June 17 and June 18 for big-bucks fundraisers, one of which was held at the Upper East Side home Jim Chanos, the founder of Kynikos Associates, a prominent short-selling investment firm. According to pool press reports, guests mingled in the dining room of the art-filled penthouse, sipping wine and chatting. Other prominent candidates have also waded in the Manhattan money pool, including U.S. Sen. Kamala Harris, who pumped the flesh at the home of Marc Lasry, a co-owner of the Milwaukee Bucks basketball team and South Bend, Ind., Mayor Pete Buttigieg, who attended an early June fundraiser at the home of Hamilton James of the Blackstone Group.

CONTINUED ON PAGE 7

Father Henry J. Browne (at left) with Mayor Robert F. Wagner (center) in an undated photo from the early 1960s. Photo courtesy of Flavia Alaya

Father Henry J. Browne, in 1969 or 1970, on the steps of the garden apartment in New Jersey he shared with the mother of his three children. Photo courtesy of Flavia Alaya

HONORING FATHER BROWNE HISTORY On the 100th anniversary of the activist priest’s birth, UWS community members gather to recall his life and work BY EMILY HIGGINBOTHAM

If it hadn’t been for one of his first principled stands as a young seminarian in 1948, Father Henry Browne might never had ended up on the West Side – where his activism and advocacy for peace, civil rights and tenants’ rights still live on today. During that time, according to Father John Duffell, who was a student and friend of Browne, there was cemetery strike

Instead, the church sent Browne to 82nd Street and West End Avenue to teach freshman civics at Cathedral College. “It’s how he got to the West Side,” Duffell said. And it’s how Browne got to St. Gregory’s the Great Church, where he served as priest. And St. Gregory’s was the site where Duffell told Browne’s activist origin story to a crowd gathered for the event “An Appreciation of Activism on the Upper West Side” on June 19, meant to celebrate the 100th anniversary of Browne’s birth. He died of leukemia in 1980 at the age of 61. It was a night for community members — both past and pres-

You wanted to be with [Browne] because he was alive. He challenged you to think.” Father John Duffell

in New York. The Catholic Church ordered seminarians to fill in and dig graves. But Browne wouldn’t cross the picket line. “At the time, he had completed his studies at Catholic University and was ardent that this position was wrong,” Duffell said. “He and eight others denounced these actions.”

CONTINUED ON PAGE 14

SPILLING OVER The Whitney’s colorful 1960s paintings, P. 12

CREATING A CULTURE OF LIBERATION Author and filmmaker David France reflects on Stonewall, AIDS and more, P. 6

HEALTHY KIDNEYS, ALL SUMMER LONG Hot weather and dehydration can pose a real threat, P. 9

Westsider WEEK OF APRIL

SPRING ARTS PREVIEW

WestSideSpirit

WESTSIDE SPIRIT.COM @WestSideSpirit

Crime Watch Voices NYC Now City Arts

3 8 10 12

Restaurant Ratings 14 Business 16 Real Estate 17 15 Minutes 20

< CITYARTS, P.12

NEWS residents A vocal group of U.W.S. Transportation isn’t convinced the doing enough is Committee of CB7 BY LISA BROWN

CONTINUED ON PAGE

MANHATTAN'S APARTMENT BOOM, > PROPERTY, P.20

2015

In Brief MORE HELP FOR SMALL BUSINESS

PROTESTING THE COMMUNITY BOARD OVER TRAFFIC DEATHS

Zero, Mayor Bill One year into Visionreducing trafficfor de Blasio’s plan traffic the number of has related deaths, Upper West Side fatalities on the compared to last actually increased, year’s figures. Upper West Siders -That has some needs to be done convinced more of the Transstarting with members of the local comportation Committee munity board. West mother, Upper Lisa Sladkus, a member of TransSide resident and said she’s fed at portation Alternatives a silent protest up, and organized 7’s February board Community Board residents dozens of meeting, where Committee called for Transportation leaders to step down. against incredible “We have run up imto get safe street trying just problems said. “This was provements,” she our point across get another way to dissatisfied.” that we are very involved with Sladkus has been Alternatives since Transportation served as director 2002 and formerly Streets’ RenaisSide of Upper West She says becoming sance Campaign. really got her into a mother is what activism. streets around me “Just noticing the as a pedestrian I felt and how unsafe she said. “I wanted and as a cyclist,”

9-15

The effort to help small seems to businesses in the city be gathering steam. Two city councilmembers, Robert Margaret Chin and Cornegy, have introduced create legislation that wouldSmall a new “Office of the within Business Advocate” of Small the city’s Department Business Services. Chin The new post, which have up told us she’d like to would and running this year, for serve as an ombudsman city small businesses within them clear government, helping to get bureaucracy the through things done. Perhaps even more also importantly, the ombudsman and number will tally the type small business of complaints by taken in owners, the actions policy response, and somefor ways to recommendations If done well, begin to fix things. report would the ombudsman’s give us the first quantitative with taste of what’s wrong the city, an small businesses in towards step rst fi important fixing the problem. of To really make a difference, for developers will have to is a mere formality their projects course, the advocaterising rents, are the work complete precinct, but chances-- thanks to a looking to find a way to tackle business’ legally quickly. is being done which remain many While Chin their own hours,” of after-hours “They pick out boom in the number throughout who lives on most vexing problem. gauge what said Mildred Angelo,of the Ruppert construction permits said it’s too early tocould have Buildings one the 19th floor in The Department of the city. role the advocate number three years, the Houses on 92nd Street between on the She Over the past is handing out a record there, more information work perThird avenues. permits, bad thing. of Second and an ongoing all-hours number of after-hours of after-hours work problem can’t be a the city’s Dept. with the said there’s where mits granted by This step, combinedBorough according to new data project nearby jumped 30 percent, noise in construction Buildings has efforts by Manhattan to mediate data provided constantly make BY DANIEL FITZSIMMONS according to DOB from trucks. President Gale Brewer of Informa- workers offer transferring cement response to a Freedom the rent renewal process, they want. They city classifies knows the signs Act request. The between 6 “They do whateverthey please. They Every New Yorker some early, tangible small clang, the tion work come and go as of progress. For many sound: the metal-on-metal beeps of a any construction weekend, can can’t come piercing a.m., or on the have no respect.” at p.m. and 7 business owners, that hollow boom, the issuance of these reverse. A glance The increased a correspond after-hours. soon enough. truck moving in has generated can hardly as has led to

SLEEPS, THANKS TO THE CITY THAT NEVER UCTION A BOOM IN LATE-NIGHT CONSTR

29

WestSideSpirit

WESTSIDE SPIRIT COM

NEWS

and you the alarm clock middle of the night, believe it: it’s the carries on fulland yet construction tilt. or your local police You can call 311

Newscheck Crime Watch Voices Out & About

The surge in permitsfees for the city in millions of dollars consome residents agency, and left application process vinced that the

2 City Arts 3 Top 5 8 Real Estate 10 15 Minutes

12 13 14 18

variances

CONTINUED ON PAGE

29

We deliver! Get The Spirit Westsider sent directly to your mailbox for $49 per year. Go to WestSideSpirit.com $ or call 212-868-0190


2

JUNE 27-JULY 3,2019

The Spirit|Westsider westsidespirit.com

CHEWING THEIR WAY THROUGH RIVERSIDE PARK NATURE

â&#x20AC;&#x153;The goat project has been a tremendous success,â&#x20AC;? Garodnick told the West Side Spirit. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We are so encouraged by the progress that theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve made in clearing invasive plants. You can now stand at the top and see all the way down the site to the tennis courts. Something you could not have done three weeks ago.â&#x20AC;? Garodnick stressed that the goats have not only impacted the park environmentally, but have also created quite a stir in the community. More than 1,000 people came to the park when they arrived, including children and elected officials. Since then, numerous people have visited the goats, ranging from kids to adults. According to Garodnick, the plan is to have the goats in the park for a

As the visiting goats exceed expectations, residents can vote on which ones should stay through the summer BY JASON COHEN

Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s been a little more than a month since the goats arrived in Riverside Park. But boy, have they been hungry. Dan Garodnick, the president and chief executive officer of the Riverside Park Conservancy, said the goats have done what was expected and more. On May 21, the Riverside Park Conservancy welcomed a herd of 24 goats from Rhinebeck, who are assisting to remove invasive species from a two-acre area of Riverside Parkâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s woodland. This is part of the conservancyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ongoing woodland restoration â&#x20AC;&#x201D; a chemical-free method of controlling the growth of detrimental species and supporting the ecological health of the park. The goats are from Green Goats in Rhinebeck.

month and then four to six of them will stay for the remainder of the summer. He noted that the goats will be fenced in and people are welcome to look at, but not touch them. He explained with the end of June around the corner, residents will decide which goats stay and go home by voting on the conservancyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s website. â&#x20AC;&#x153;New Yorkers have really taken to them,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It has exceeded expectations because not only have the goats done an incredible job, but we have used it as a tool to educate people about the

Skittles. Photo courtesy of Riverside Park Conservancy

German is for Everyone!

work of the Conservancy and a nontoxic way to control invasive plants.â&#x20AC;? Garodnick said the goats will beneďŹ t the park and be a really cool thing for people to see. He explained that while this will be the ďŹ rst time goats will be in a Manhattan park, it has been done before in New York. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Goats being invited to help with horticultural care is not novel,â&#x20AC;? Garodnick said. About a year ago the conservancyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s horticultural team was ďŹ guring out the best way to attack the woodland area and it was concluded that goats were the best option. Garodnick noted that goats can consume 25 percent of their body weight in vegetation in a day and their fecal matter provides nutrients for the soil. Garodnick explained that the woodland area, which spans from 119th Street to 123rd Street (nicknamed â&#x20AC;&#x153;GOaTHAMâ&#x20AC;? by the Conservancy), is ďŹ lled with mugwort, poison ivy and many other hazardous specimens. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Our gardeners canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t access the area in the way we want to because it has steep slopes and the invasives themselves like poison ivy are not

friendly to humans,â&#x20AC;? Garodnick said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Putting the goats to work in GOaTHAM is like taking them to an all-you-can-eat buffet. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s good for us and itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s good for the goats.â&#x20AC;? Once the goats make the land usable, Garodnick said the goal is to put more canopy trees there and replace the invasive specimens with more native ones. Garodnick told the West Side Spirit that this is also an educational opportunity. The conservancy will provide free public programming about the goats and it has formed a partnership with the engineering and earth science department at Columbia University, where they will use sensors to study the nutrients and health of the soil while the goats are in the park. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The public education is an important part of all of this,â&#x20AC;? he stressed. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We want to educate kids and park users about forest management and about how goats are chemicalfree and a sustainable way of killing weeds. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the ultimate farm to table and we want to celebrate this moment.â&#x20AC;?

NORTHERN MANHATTAN STUDY OF METABOLISM AND MIND

NOMEM The purpose of NOMEM is to learn more about how blood sugar and other factors relate to the brain and mental abilities of persons living in Northern Manhattan. We are seeking your help to conduct this study. You are eligible to participate if you: x Live in Manhattan or the Bronx x Are between 60 and 69 years of age x Are able to do an MRI and a PET scan of the brain

After-School Program NY State Accredited Language Program t-PXUVJUJPO t/PQSFWJPVT(FSNBOOFDFTTBSZ t.JOJNVNBHFZFBST

t.BOIBUUBOMPDBUJPO6QQFS&BTU4JEF t-PDBUJPOTBMTPJO'SBOLMJO4RVBSFBOE (BSEFO$JUZ -POH*TMBOE

New: Mommy and Me, Minimum Age 4 Classes start second week in September For more information see: www.German-American-School.org German Lessons Since 1897 for more information email: kidslearngerman@aol.com or go to german-american-school.org

Participation will include these activities: 1. Questionnaires 2. Blood tests 3. A brain MRI 4. A brain PET scan with contrast We will compensate your time for participating in these 4 activities with $350. We will also give you the results of important blood tests.

PLEASE CONTACT US @ 212-305-4126, 646-737-4370, LS960@CUMC.COLUMBIA.EDU


JUNE 27-JULY 3,2019

3

The Spirit|Westsider westsidespirit.com

CRIME WATCH BY JERRY DANZIG STATS FOR THE WEEK Reported crimes from the 20th precinct for the week ending June 16 Week to Date

Year to Date

2019 2018

% Change

2019

2018

% Change

Murder

0

1

-100.0

1

2

-50.0

Rape

2

1

100.0

5

8

-37.5

Robbery

2

2

0.0

66

61

8.2

Felony Assault

2

1

100.0

71

61

16.4

Burglary

1

7

-85.7

28

68

-58.8

Grand Larceny

11

9

22.2

207 282 -26.6

Grand Larceny Auto

2

1

100.0

12

16

-25.0

WOMAN MUGGED ON BROADWAY

BOX CUTTER ASSAULT

According to police, at 3:50 a.m. on Sunday, June 16, a 54-year-old woman was walking north on Broadway at West 88th St. when an unknown individual came up from behind her, placed what she believed to be a ďŹ rearm against her back, and told her to â&#x20AC;&#x153;Drop the bag!â&#x20AC;? The suspect then ďŹ&#x201A;ed in an unknown direction. Among the items stolen were a book bag valued at $20 and college text books valued at $425. The victim was not injured.

A man was injured in an apparent random act of violence. According to police, at 9:00 p.m. on Thursday, June 13, a 32-year-old man was walking in front of 120 West 91st St. when he was attacked from behind by an unknown woman who slashed his face with a box cutter. Police said the attack caused a three-inch laceration to the manâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s left cheek. The victim told police he neither knew nor had a relationship with the woman, but refused to give further information.

LYSOL ATTACK At 10:15 a.m. on Wednesday, June 12, a 24-year-old woman living at 825 Columbus Ave. at 101st St. had Lysol sprayed in her face by her childâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s father during a dispute, police said. The man then reportedly threatened to kill the woman and himself. Police continue to search for the assailant.

POINTS ILL TAKEN An ID thief stole a manâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s frequent ďŹ&#x201A;ier points, police said. During the period between 9:00 a.m., Thursday, Apr. 11 and 4:25 a.m., Friday, Apr. 12, someone used information about a man living at 111 West 90th St. to purchase two American Airlines tickets

Photo by Toni Webster via Flickr

More neighborhood news? neighborhood milestones? neighborhood events? neighborhood celebrations? neighborhood opinions? neighborhood ideas? neighborhood feedback? neighborhood concerns?

An area resident made a most unpleasant discovery upon returning from a trip abroad. From Tuesday, Apr. 30 to Sunday, June

Met Council is accepting applications for the waiting list of affordable housing rental apartments in our building located at 141 East 23rd Street, NY. For one person households, applicants must be 62 years old at the time of application; for two person households, both applicants must be 62 at the time of application. Current Rent Range studio: $826.85 - $1437 Income Range: $35,354 - $59,760 (1 person household) Current Range 1 bedroom: $1055.51 - $1542 Income Range: $44,580.40 - $59,760 (1 person household) $44,580.40 - $68,320 (2 person household) Monthly rent includes heat, hot water and gas for cooking. Seniors will be required to meet income guidelines and additional selection criteria to qualify. Income guidelines are subject to change. One application per household. Applications may be downloaded from: www.metcouncil.org/housing or requested by mail from Met Council: East 23rd Street Residence 77 Water Street, 7th floor New York, NY 10005.

$UH\RXIHHOLQJGHSUHVVHG"





,V\RXUDQWLGHSUHVVDQW WUHDWPHQWQRW ZRUNLQJDVZHOODV\RXKRSHGLWZRXOG"



,I \RXDUH\HDUVRUROGHU\RXFRXOGEH HOLJLEOHIRUDIHGHUDOO\IXQGHGUHVHDUFKVWXG\ DWWKH&ROXPELD8QLYHUVLW\0HGLFDO&HQWHU WKDWSURYLGHV 



Â&#x2122; $IUHHHYDOXDWLRQ

 

Â&#x2122; 7UHDWPHQWZLWK)'$DSSURYHGPHGLFDWLRQ

 

Â&#x2122; &RPSHQVDWLRQRI XSWR

 

Â&#x2122; $PRUHDFWLYHDQGIXOILOOLQJOLIH





&DOOWKH&OLQLFIRU$JLQJ$Q[LHW\DQG0RRG'LVRUGHUVDWQRZWRVHHLI \RXDUHHOLJLEOH 3DUDVHUYLFLyHQHVSDxROOODPHDO

75 Years of

A

P E T

T O D AY !

A COOPERATIVE ADOPTION EVENT:

MUDDY PAWS RESCUE, LINDAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S CATS & NORTH SHORE ANIMAL LEAGUE AMERICA

BORIS & HORTON 195 Avenue A @ E. 12th & E. 13th Sts. 1 New York, NY SATURDAY 1 JUNE 29 112 PM - 5 PM

UNLEASHED BY PETCO 159 Columbus Avenue @ W. 67th & W. 68th Sts1 New York, NY SUNDAY 1 JUNE 30 112 PM - 5 PM

&CXKU#XG2QTV9CUJKPIVQP0;ranimalleague.orgrr44

Current Rent Range studio: $1049.56 - $1437 Income Range: $44,262.40 - $59,760 (1 person household)

Monthly rent includes heat, hot water and gas for cooking. Seniors will be required to meet income guidelines and additional selection criteria to qualify. Income guidelines are subject to change. One application per household.

No-Kill Action and Compassion A D O P T

Met Council is accepting applications for the waiting list of affordable housing rental apartments in our building located at 231 East 77th Street, NY. For one person households, applicants must be 62 years old at the time of application; for two person households, the applicant must be 62 and the co-applicant 55 at the time of application.

Current Range 1 bedroom: $1076.77 - $1542 Income Range: $45,430.80 - $59,760 (1 person household) $45,430.80 - $68,320 (2 person household)

Join the Celebration

Email us at news@strausnews.com

UNAUTHORIZED CHARGES

2, a 77-year-old woman living at 711 Amsterdam Ave. at 95th St. was out of the country. When she returned, she checked her mail and discovered that multiple transactions had been made to her credit card account without permission or authority. She told police she had no idea who stole her credit card number. She also ďŹ led a report with her bank. The total of the unauthorized charges came to $6,140.

Please include a self-addressed envelope. No broker or application fee.





from London to JFK for a total of 210,000 frequentďŹ&#x201A;ier points, a value of $6,195. The names appearing on the tickets were Philip Klinogo and Nelisha Hughes.

FOLLOW US ON:

Applications may be downloaded from: www.metcouncil.org/housing or requested by mail from Met Council: East 77th Street Residence 77 Water Street, 7th floor New York, NY 10005 Please include a self-addressed envelope. No broker or application fee.


4

JUNE 27-JULY 3,2019

The Spirit|Westsider westsidespirit.com

Drawing Board

Useful Contacts POLICE

BY PETER PEREIRA

NYPD 20th Precinct

120 W. 82nd St.

212-580-6411

NYPD 24th Precinct

151 W. 100th St.

212-678-1811

NYPD Midtown North Precinct

306 W. 54th St.

212-767-8400

FDNY Engine 76/Ladder 22

145 W. 100th St.

311

FDNY Engine 40/Ladder 35

W.66th &Amsterdam

311

FDNY Engine 74

120 W. 83rd St.

311

Ladder 25 Fire House

205 W. 77th St.

311

FIRE

CITY COUNCIL Councilmember Helen Rosenthal

563 Columbus Ave.

212-873-0282

Councilmember Mark Levine

500 West 141st St.

212-928-6814

STATE LEGISLATORS State Senator Brad Hoylman

322 Eighth Ave. #1700 212-633-8052

State Sen. Jose M. Serrano

1916 Park Ave. #202

Assemblymember Linda Rosenthal

230 W. 72nd St. #2F

212-873-6368

Assemblymember Daniel O’Donnell

245 W. 104th St.

212-866-3970

COMMUNITY BOARD 7 250 W. 87th St. #2 LIBRARIES

212-828-5829

212-362-4008

St. Agnes

444 Amsterdam Ave.

212-621-0619

Bloomingdale

150 W. 100th St.

212-222-8030

Performing Arts

40 Lincoln Center

917-275-6975

Mt. Sinai – Roosevelt

1000 10th Ave.

212-523-4000

Mt. Sinai - St. Luke’s

1090 Amsterdam Ave.

212-523-5898

CON ED TIME WARNER CABLE POST OFFICES

4 Irving Place

212-460-4600

2554 Broadway

212-358-0900

US Post Office

215 W. 104th St.

212-662-0355

US Post Office

700 Columbus Ave.

212-866-1981

US Post Office

127 W. 83rd St.

212-873-3991

Ansonia Post Office

178 Columbus Ave.

212-362-1697

HOSPITALS

HOW TO REACH US: 212-868-0190 nyoffice@strausnews.com westsidespirit.com

TO SUBSCRIBE: The West Side Spirit is available for free on the west side in select buildings, retail locations and news boxes. To get a copy of west side neighborhood news mailed to you weekly, you may subscribe to The Westsider for just $49 per year. Call 212-868-0190 or go online to StrausNews.com and click on the photo of the paper or mail a check to Straus Media, 20 West Ave., Chester, NY 10918

NEWS ITEMS: To report a news story, call 212868-0190. News releases of general interest must be emailed to our offices by noon the Thursday prior to publication to be considered for the following week. Send releases to news@strausnews.com.

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR: Include your full name, address and day and evening telephone numbers for verification. Letters that cannot be verified will not be published. We reserve the right to edit or condense letters for libel, good taste, grammar and punctuation. Submit your letter

at westsidespirit.com and click submit at the bottom of the page or email it to nyoffice@strausnews.com.

CALENDAR ITEMS: Information for inclusion in our calendar should be posted to nycnow. com no later than two weeks before the event.

BLOG COMMENTS: We invite your comments on stories and issues at westsidespirit.com. We do not edit those comments. We urge people to keep the discussion civil and the tone reflective of the best we each have to offer.

PLACE A CLASSIFIED AD: Call 212-868-0190. Classified ads must be in our office by 12pm the Friday before publication, except on holidays. All classified ads are payable in advance.

PREVIOUS OWNERS: Tom Allon, Isis Ventures, Ed Kayatt, Russ Smith, Bob Trentlyon, Jerry Finkelstein

ABOUT US The West Side Spirit is published weekly by Straus Media-Manhattan, LLC.Please send inquiries to 20 West Ave., Chester, NY 10918.


JUNE 27-JULY 3,2019

5

The Spirit|Westsider westsidespirit.com

SPEED CAMERAS ARE

WORKING LONGER HOURS! To save lives, New York City is expanding its use of speed cameras.

On July 11th, the City will start issuing speed camera violations from 6 AM – 10 PM, Monday through Friday, year round. The City will operate speed cameras in 750 school speed zones. Expanding the speed camera law is one aspect of the City’s comprehensive plan to eliminate traffic deaths and serious injuries. Learn more at nyc.gov/visionzero.

®


6

The Spirit|Westsider westsidespirit.com

JUNE 27-JULY 3,2019

CREATING A CULTURE OF LIBERATION PRIDE 2019 Author and filmmaker David France reflects on Stonewall, the AIDS epidemic, building walls and tearing them down BY DAVID NOONAN

David France was 10 years old in 1969, when the Stonewall Uprising changed the course of gay life in America. He didn’t hear about the historic event until 1979, when he was a student at Kalamazoo College in Michigan. “I had just come out,” he recalled in an interview, “so I must have been 20. We started a queer student group on campus, there had not been one, and someone came back from New York and gave a talk about Stonewall and its significance. It was oral history, it wasn’t written. There were no queer history books then. There was no way to find out about this except from passing along stories from mouth to ear.” Forty years later, France is doing as much as anyone is to make sure that queer history is preserved and readily accessible for future generations. His 2012 Oscar-nominated and Peabody-award winning documentary, “How to Survive a Plague,” and his book of the same name, capture the tragedy of the AIDS epidemic and the fury of the war that gay activists waged on the bigotry and complacency that made the epidemic that much worse. “The Death and Life of Marsha P. Johnson,” his 2017 documentary, is about the transgender leader and Greenwich Village legend who played a central role in the gay liberation movement before and after Stonewall.

In the Wake of the Uprising France moved to New York in June 1981, after graduating from college. “Immediately,” he said, “like the next day, to come and find a gay community.” He got involved with the Pride march committee and landed a job at the Oscar Wilde Bookshop, which was founded in 1967 by Craig Rodwell. “I got a job working for Craig at the bookstore, which every gay activist dreamed of doing because that was the nerve center for so much of the political activity that happened in the movement.” As France sees it, there were two major developments in the years

“How to Survive a Plague,” France’s 2012 documentary about the AIDS epidemic, won a Peabody Award and was nominated for an Oscar. Photo: © Ken Schles

after Stonewall (aka the 1970s). One was the creation of the “structural foundation” for the movement — the building of the Gay Liberation Front, the Gay Activists Alliance and the diversification of the political movement. “And the second thing,” he said, “was building a kind of culture of liberation, which isn’t the same thing as liberation, but it is a kind of a modeling of it ... What was happening was this experimentation with liberty. And that looked like parties, it looked like gatherings, it looked like dance clubs, it looked like a lot of sexual expression.” For all that, France notes, the 70s were hardly the glory days of LGBTQ life that some people might imagine. “There certainly were no laws protecting LGBTQ people in New York,” he said. “It was more likely than not that you would get fired from your job if anybody found out you were gay. And there was the rise of a reactionary anti-gay violence, which took hold immediately after 1969.”

Imagining Freedom France has spent years researching Marsha Johnson’s life and studying her impact on LGBTQ life. While she was one of the principals in building post-Stonewall political organizations, he said, “the role that she played, more than anything, was to imagine what freedom was like. Freedom from all constraint, freedom from prejudice and expectation. She found a kind of revolutionary joy in queer life, and exercised that in a very strategic and political way. ‘This is what it’s going to be

David France, center, in the 1983 Pride march. Photo: Nelson Sullivan

like. We will not have to conform in any way whatsoever.’” The Stonewall Uprising kicked off what France describes as the largest migration of LGBTQ people the world has ever known. “Huge numbers of people, everybody who had a queer consciousness of any sort, got up and soon as they could and moved.” They created queer ghettoes in New York, San Francisco and cities around the world, France explained, and joined the great, gay experiment that was taking place.

AIDS Arrives “That’s why it was such a perfect environment for the arrival of a new retrovirus,” he said. “Very closed communities, all within certain geographical boundaries, all right on top of one another, all involved in the same exercise, which was radical sexual display. And boom.” It was almost exactly 12 years between Stonewall in June 1969 and the first public reports of AIDS cases, in early July 1981. The disease changed everything. “It just became so urgent that there was no room anymore for infighting,” said France. “And it drew people with more strategic thinking about politics into the movement. It expanded the size of the community tremendously, because it rendered the closets transparent, so people were no longer coming out, they were just out and there was nothing they could do about it. There were a lot people joining the anti-AIDS movement who had real organizing talent. And that’s when we started getting traction.”

In France’s analysis, the crisis was driven by the more common disease of inhumanity. “The reason that AIDS went from a small cluster of infected individuals to a raging global pandemic was because nobody considered the people who were suffering from AIDS as having basic human rights,” he said. “So what the movement really did initially was to argue for and to establish the humanity of gay people. And it sounds so stark to say it like that, and almost unbelievable, but that’s exactly where we were.” Among the offenses he listed — hospitals were turning away sick people, doctors were saying in surveys that they would not touch an AIDS patient and the ant-gay violence of the 70s surged to new levels in the 80s.

A New Era, Born of Necessity Ultimately, the AIDS epidemic forced post-Stonewall gay communities to abandon the strategy of isolation that had helped them thrive in the 70s. “[Those years were] about building these ghettoes that were facsimiles of freedom and acceptance, and making them very rich and culturally outré and very productive for arts and thinking and writing. But it was all really about creating a separate space… a parallel universe. We just started doing everything for ourselves.” When AIDS hit, France said, they tried to do the same thing. They set up their own parallel pharmacists and buyers clubs, peer-review medical journals and drug-trial networks. “And it just became really obvious after a while that there was

no way we could do this ourselves. And these walls around our ghetto that we had built so meticulously over the years, we had to start dismantling. And we had to go back to America and say ‘Look, we need those institutions that are supposed to be responding to these things to actually respond to these things.’”

Clues and Messages With the 50th anniversary of Stonewall just days away, France shared one final memory from his college days, when, he said, “I felt like I was the only gay person alive.” One day in the winter of 1979 he noticed that all the parking meters had little stickers on them, on the bottom of the post. “And I got down on my knees to read the writing, and each one was handwritten. They were notices about the national gay march, which had already taken place. And I point this out because that’s the way secrets were passed back then. People left little messages, they dropped clues. That’s the way you found life, and that’s the way you found your community. You really had to keep your eyes open for little symbols that would suggest that larger things were happening. “That was such a key moment for me, to try to picture somebody writing all those things and putting them there for me to find them. It kind of launched my journey to try to find the community and find the center of things, and that’s what brought me to New York.”


JUNE 27-JULY 3,2019

Former Vice President Joe Biden. Photo: Marc Nozell, via flickr

The Spirit|Westsider westsidespirit.com

Sen. Kamala Harris. Photo: Gage Skidmore, via flickr

POLITICS CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 “They all come through Manhattan because this is where the candidates get their money,” longtime political consultant George Arzt said. “They think New York City streets are paved with gold and they want to get as much as they can.” The latest numbers in New York’s dollar derby surprisingly show New Jersey Sen. Cory Booker with a healthy edge over Kirsten Gillibrand, New York’s junior senator, with Booker pulling $1.7 million statewide, compared to Gillibrand’s $1.28 million. The numbers, from the April 15 filings, are itemized contributions of more than $200 in the election cycle and with be updated in about three weeks — and for the first time will include numbers from Biden and Mayor Bill de Blasio. “I’m not completely surprised that Gillibrand wasn’t first, but I would have thought Harris, [Sen. Bernie] Sanders or [Sen. Elizabeth] Warren would have been more likely to be Number 1,” said political consultant Jerry Skurnik. “I think if contributions under $200 are included, Sanders and Warren might be ahead.”

‘Upper East Side Donors are Holding Back’ Despite the absence of Biden and de Blasio, the early numbers provide a look at where the money’s coming from, and who’s getting it. Harris is a solid third in the statewide money chase at $914,841, with the rest of the major candidates fighting it out in the second tier: Sen. Amy Klobuchar collected $486,657; Pete Butti-

They all come through Manhattan because this is where the candidates get their money. They think New York City streets are paved with gold and they want to get as much as they can.” Political consultant George Arzt gieg $392,596; Beto O’Rourke $317,815; Bernie Sanders $292,656; and Sen. Elizabeth Warren took in $225,179. The largest chunks of the Manhattan money came from zip codes 10023 and 10024 on the Upper West Side, 10021 and 10028 on the Upper East Side, 10011 and 10019 in Chelsea and Clinton and 10013 in Greenwich Village/Soho. “The Upper West Side and the Upper East Side traditionally are the top areas,” Skurnik said. “It appears from this data that Upper East Side donors are holding back. I suspect future filings will show them getting involved and giving to Biden and Gillibrand.” “I’ve noticed ... that New Yorkers who usually get involved in Presidential campaigns early have been holding back,” Skurnik added. “At this point in past campaigns, many more rich New Yorkers were on finance committees and many more elected officials had endorsed candidates.” There haven’t been many early endorsements, but Sanders reportedly has won the support of State Sens. Ju-

South Bend Mayor Pete Buttigieg. Photo: Gage Skidmore, via flickr

lia Salazar and James Sanders, Assemblymember Ron Kim and City Council member Rafael Espinal. Gov. Andrew Cuomo and Rep. Tom Suozzi have endorsed Biden; former New York City Council member Ronnie Eldridge is supporting Buttigieg; Rep. Carolyn Maloney is baking Gillibrand; and Assemblymember Rodneyse Bichotte is for de Blasio.

July Filings Will Shake Up the Race But let’s get back to those early money totals and break them down a little further. Booker’s leading donations were $82,729 from 10023; $77,848 from zip code 10024 and $63,917 from zip code 10011. Gillibrand took in $80,607 from zip code 10024; $74,958 from zip code 10021 and $67,100 from zip code 10011. Harris also did well in 10023, raking in $62,129; she brought in $56,446 from zip code 10011 and $53,275 from 10019. Klobuchar raised $$48,300 from 10024, $33,500 from 10023 and $32,400 from 10003. O’Rourke garnered $24,207 in 10013, $21,495 in 10024 and $19,100 in 10011. Sanders pulled in $9414 from 10025, $9,285 from 10010 and $8,171 from 10012. Warren collected $21,623 from 10011, $11,616 from 10023 and $11,325 from the 10013 zip code. Arzt said the second quarter filings, to be released July 15, will shake up the Manhattan money race. He predicts that Biden will “pick up a lot of money.” Arzt said some of the likely also-rans won’t do as well: “People are reluctant to give money to candidates who haven’t gained any traction.”

7


8

JUNE 27-JULY 3,2019

The Spirit|Westsider westsidespirit.com

Voices

Write to us: To share your thoughts and comments go to westsidespirit.com and click on submit a letter to the editor.

WHY THIS UES LADY DOTH PROTEST JUST ENOUGH BY LORRAINE DUFFY MERKL

Upper East Side women are superficial snobs who live Instagrammable lives, can’t order a coffee without an uptalking whine and worship at the altar of their black cards. Are we not tired of this trope? I am four episodes deep into Lifetime’s “American Princess” and my viewing pleasure has been disrupted by a love/hate relationship; I love the quirkiness of the very inventive backdrop — a Royal Renaissance Festival — but hate that once again a representative of our nabe gets thrown under the bus. Amanda (played by Australian actress Georgia Flood) is a UES socialite, by way of Vassar and summers on The Cape, who pedicabs away from her storybook, country inn nuptials (alluding to Gwyneth being in attendance, natch) after finding her doctor fiancé with another woman. As per the Bard: The course of true love never did run smooth. Depressed, distraught, confused and on the verge, she takes refuge at a local Faire, where, when on the clock, none of the “Rennies” break

Georgia Flood as Amanda in “American Princess.” Photo courtesy of Lifetime

character, because All the world’s a stage and all the men and women merely players. After news of her runaway bride exploits hits the tabloids and her former fiancé goes on their honeymoon solo to “prioritize self-care,” Amanda realizes her new friends, “are nicer to me than the people who were supposed to be in my wedding.” Misery acquaints a man with strange bedfellows. Amanda renounces her life of shopping, cocktails, and brunch to take

a job as a pub wench for which she adopts the festival moniker: Ophelia Feelsgood. (What’s in a name?) Even though the onetime English major is a natural at Elizabethan patter and recites witticisms such as, “My kingdom for some WiFi,” Amanda is still who she is: a Seven Sisters-educated, competitive NYC jetsetter who can’t help but show off by besting “William Shakespeare” apropos of historical accuracy, taking on festival OG “Queen Elizabeth,” and schooling gratuitously

just about everyone, even those who are trying to help her, including a potential love interest, on how things would be so much better if done her way. I do enjoy a good fish out of water story, especially when the non-comfort zone environ promotes growth and change, and having one of our own as the person going from elegant to earthy is as good as any. Did she though, have to be so unlikable? The Upper East Side adult brat, whose claim to fame is how many likes her posts get, who shows up constantly on television, in books and movies has become just lazy storytelling. What fools these mortals be. My adult son has lived a number of places around the country during his academic and working careers. Because the stereotype of where we live always proceeds him, after the question Where in Manhattan did you grow up? is posed, he often mumbles the location hoping to fend off the invariable next comment: “Oh, so like on Gossip Girl?” There’s really no reason that Amanda had to be a Blair without

the ubiquitous headband. She could have come from affluence, but easily also been a talented entrepreneur as well as philanthropic. Perhaps then, when the groom is revealed to be a cheater, the reaction towards the bride-to-be would be sympathetic rather than “Who could blame him?” She’s also an arrogant blackout drunk, and a self-confessed person who “picks myself and everyone else apart, I find what’s wrong in most every situation, I thrive on negativity,” yet still believes she brings the joy and everybody likes her. I will continue to watch (there are only ten episodes) because I need to witness the personal renaissance of my little UES compatriot. Something tells me though, when the time comes for her to save the Faire’s day, it will be using the skills that she was running from in the first place. All’s well that ends well? Me thinks not. Lorraine Duffy Merkl is the author of the novels “Fat Chick” and “Back To Work She Goes.”

East Side Observer

MANHATTAN HAZARDS: E-BIKES AND STEEL PLATES BY ARLENE KAYATT

Dodging bikes — So far, Manhattan is exempt from legalizing electric bicycles in NYC’s bike lanes. The new legislation gives localities the ability to regulate the top speed of e-bikes. Hence our Mayor will be taking time out from his cross-country travel to figure out how to keep the traffic on the streets and sidewalks safe for pedestrians and bikers alike as DoorDash, Grubhub, Uber Eats, and restaurants deliver take-out to the hungry minions in Manhattan who want their hot food hot when it arrives. In a WNYC interview with Brian Lehrer, the Mayor acknowledged that there has to be “order and security for everyone, particularly for our

seniors, and pedestrians have to be protected first,” as reported in Patch. A tall order. One of the questions posed to the Mayor by Mr. Lehrer, was “Whether people on e-bikes should be forced to ride in the streets instead of bike lanes because the vehicles can reach the city’s speed limit for cars.” The Mayor said that they are going to have to figure out how to make it work “legally” and “appropriately” so that pedestrians and people using bikes for their work are protected. A good thing for sure. Out of line at the Times — Some may have been taken by surprise by the NY Times’s endorsement of Tiffany Caban as Queens DA. What was surprising to me was that the headline in the print edition on June 18th endorsing the candidate read “Ms. Caban for Queens District Attorney” and never mentioning her first name until halfway through the editorial. The “Ms. Caban” headline appeared in the print edition. If it was online, it was removed. The online edition uses her full name, Tiffany Caban. No “Ms.” This time, the print version was ahead of the digital Times. Would love to know the backstory.

Meddling plates — The city never stops repairing its streets. Would be helpful if they could come up with a way to fix them so that they were not a litany of hazards when crossing from curb to curb. The latest impediment is the metal plating that’s being used before/ during/after the street is paved. The plates do away with pebbles and small holes, but they bring their own set of challenges, like separations between the plates, slipperiness, and having to step up to the plate. Will our streets ever be camera-ready? Toasting the French — Waiting for Hot & Crusty to re-open on Lexington Ave between 85th and 86th Streets was futile. It closed, the sign said, for renovations. But they never returned and the location remains empty. However, several stores down a Paris Baguette opened. Too much competition no doubt. Hot & Crusty was a combination NY style bakery-cafe. You stopped at the counter, ordered a sandwich or soup or salad, maybe a coffee, sat down, devoured it and made your way to the bus or train on the same street. Definitely an eat-and-run event. Paris Baguette has a different concept. An

international bakery, it invites sitting and staying awhile to drink your coffee, have some freshly baked breads, pastries, cakes, snacks, and work your laptop. Most sandwiches and salads are pre-made. At one time, Hot & Crusty shops had several locations. Not sure that there are any left. Not so with Paris Baguette and other French bakerycafe-bistros which are taking over Manhattan. Most are large-scale French establishments like Maison Kayser, Le Pain Quotidian, Paris Baguette. The French are also making their mark on a more intimate scale: There’s French bistro-cafe Bonjour Crepes and Wine, with locations on Lexington and 94th, Second and 82nd, and another in Astoria. Some of these establishments are self-serve. Others have wait staff and self-serve. All are very NY, with some French flair. Funnies — Mailman/postal worker wheeling an empty mail cart to a street mailbox to mail a bunch of letters ... Sign in a newly opened coffee/wine bistro promoting its “chilly bean soup” — which turned out to be a hot, not cold, bean soup with chili peppers.


JUNE 27-JULY 3,2019

may occur if symptoms are not recognized and dehydration is not treated promptly.

HEALTHY KIDNEYS, ALL SUMMER LONG HEALTH Hot weather and dehydration can pose a real threat to these vital organs

workers subjected to longer hours and days of heat and dehydration. Here’s what you need to know to give your kidneys the extra care as summer arrives.

BY JOSHUA REIN, DO

The Dangers of Dehydration Sunburn and sunstroke are often what people fear when a heat wave is coming. But when the temperatures soar, so does the risk for your kidneys. Recurrent heat exposure and inadequate hydration strain kidneys, especially if there’s a pre-existing kidney condition. And frequent dehydration, even if mild, may lead to kidney damage. Research published in the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology suggests that the increase in heat waves due to climate change may be associated with the rise in kidney diseases detected in outdoor

9

The Spirit|Westsider westsidespirit.com

The kidneys cleanse our blood and maintain the normal balance of salt and water. Kidneys conserve water during dehydration, and excrete excess water when sufficiently hydrated. During dehydration, blood flow declines and is only restored when the body has consumed plentiful amounts of water. However, kidney damage, sometimes permanent, may result from prolonged dehydration. Heat stress nephropathy is now recognized as a cause of the chronic kidney disease that is seen globally among manual workers in sweltering climates associated with repeated episodes of dehy-

Facts About Chronic Kidney Disease

Prolonged dehydration can cause kidney damage, so thirst should never be ignored. Photo: Emilian Robert Vicol via Flickr

dration. Summer weather is associated with an increased risk of developing kidney stones, which can cause severe pain and urinary obstruction. Adequate hydration prevents kidney stones.

Recognizing the Symptoms The first symptom of dehydration is thirst, which should never be ignored. The brain activates the sensation of thirst and signals the kidneys to retain water upon the slightest detection of dehydration. Urine becomes concentrated and appears dark yellow or amber in color. Decreased urination throughout the day is also a

sign of dehydration. Proper hydration quenches thirst and triggers the kidney to remove excess water, making urine appear clear to pale yellow. Sugar-sweetened beverages for hydration should be avoided, as they may increase the risk for developing kidney damage. Regular consumption of these drinks is a risk factor for developing chronic kidney disease. Tea colored urine may be indicative of kidney damage from profound dehydration. Other symptoms of dehydration include increased heart rate or light-headedness upon standing from a seated position. Loss of consciousness

Chronic kidney disease, a long-term complication of recurrent dehydration, is usually diagnosed with a blood and/or urine test. Among those at greatest risk are people who work outside and have limited access to water for extended periods of time. Those living with diabetes are at even higher risk. Alcohol must be avoided to quench thirst, as it blocks the kidneys from retaining water. Over-the-counter NSAIDs such as ibuprofen and naproxen are also prohibited during dehydration, as they can cause further kidney injury. Certain blood pressure medications, such as diuretics, angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACE inhibitors) and angiotensin II receptor blockers increase the risk of kidney injury in the setting of dehydration. In some cases, use of these medications may need to be adjusted during the summer, as directed by a nephrologist

(kidney specialist). Treatment of chronic kidney disease includes dietary and lifestyle modification, vitamins, minerals, and medications, which may stabilize kidney function or slow down the progressive decline in kidney function over time.

Keeping Kidneys Healthy Thirst indicates dehydration, so prolonged thirst should be avoided. Water is the best choice for hydration. It is vital to consume enough until thirst is quenched. Most dehydration can be treated with increased oral fluid intake, but severe cases, especially those associated with strenuous exercise, raise the risk of kidney failure and require intravenous fluids in an emergency room. So this summer, while you slather on the sunscreen, also try to keep your kidney health in mind. If you think you may have a problem, nephrologists, trained to diagnose and treat kidney disease, blood pressure, and electrolyte disorders, are here to help you. Joshua Rein, DO, is an instructor of medicine (nephrology) at The Mount Sinai Hospital.

I can’t get health insurance through my job, but I can with GetCoveredNYC’s help. Free help signing up for low- or no-cost health insurance, regardless of immigration status • Call 311 • Text CoveredNYC to 877877 • Visit nyc.gov/health and search health insurance Message and data rates may apply. Text STOP to quit, HELP for more information. For Terms of Use and Privacy Policy, visit nyc.gov/health

Health

Bill de Blasio Mayor Oxiris Barbot, MD Commissioner


10

JUNE 27-JULY 3,2019

The Spirit|Westsider westsidespirit.com

NEIGHBORHOODâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S BEST To place an ad in this directory, Call Douglas at 212-868-0190 ext. 352.

ART

Calendar NYCNOW

HEBREW SCHOOL

Discover the world around the corner. Find community events, gallery openings, book launches and much more: Go to nycnow.com MON-SAT 10:30AM-6PM | SUN 12PM-6PM

www.the-maac.com Come visit the nationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s largest art & antiques center featuring 100 galleries and over 40 categories. Enjoy time on our 3 ďŹ&#x201A;oors of antiques, ďŹ ne art, and every category in-between Buy or sell, we welcome your visit 7 days a week.

7UDGLWLRQDOÂ&#x2021;(JDOLWDULDQ

A warm community for sacred, social and educational events & experiences.

Scott N. Bolton, Rabbi

Hebrew School registration is open! Director of Youth Education and Programming VKLUVFK#RU]DUXDRUJ 212-452-2310 x15

1050 2nd Ave. bt. 55th & 56th Sts.

212.355.4400

LOCKSMITH

HOME CARE

SKY LOCKSMITH & HARDWARE NOW OFFERING FULL SERVICE PAINT COLOR MATCHING & MIXING

$5 OFF $5 OFF COUPON COUPON

34 Years Experience

1-GALLON 1-GALLON VALSPAR VALSPAR PAINT PAINT ANY ANYCOLOR COLOR

Call 24/7 for a free consultation!

(877) 212-4222

toll-free

CUSTOMIZED CARE DEMENTIA TRAINING FOR THE AIDES SOCIAL WORK SERVICES INCLUDED Visit cohme.org or email referrals@cohme.org

The Frick 1 E 70th St 10:00 a.m. Free frick.org 212-288-0700 This exhibition highlights a selection of paintings, drawings, prints, and photographs related to Giambattista Tiepoloâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ďŹ rst signiďŹ cant project outside of Venice, a series of ceiling frescoes for Palazzo Archinto in Milan.

Thu 27 â&#x2013;ş

STORE ONLY VALIDVALID IN IN STORE ONLY USE BY 06/19 USE BY 06/19 1-GALLON PER COUPON 1-GALLON PER COUPON

Store Locations: 1574 1st Ave / 2212 Broadway 24/7 EMERGENCY LOCKSMITH SERVICE 212-288-7773

MEDICAL

June 27 - July 14 TIEPOLO IN MILAN: THE LOST FRESCOES OF PALAZZO ARCHINTO

($671'675((7Â&#x2021;1<&Â&#x2021;WWW.ORZARUA.ORG

PERSONALIZED HOME CARE

EDITORâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S PICK

Contact Sigal Hirsch

PSYCHOTHERAPY

Voted #1 Vein Doctors In New York

FILM - THREE COMRADES (1938) 96th St Library 112 East 96th St 2:00 p.m. Free In this ďŹ lm, co-written by F. Scott Fitzgerald, three German veterans of World War 1 suffer through, with a little levity provided by the sole object of their attention, a local tubercular girl, played by Margaret Sullavan. nypl.org 212-289-0908

Give your legs new life Quick and minimally invasive treatments

REAL ESTATE KARPOFF AFFILIATES

Senior Move Manager Real Estate Broker

KARPOFF AFFILIATES is your single stop for senior life transitions and real estate brokerage needs. Compassionate Senior Move Manager & Expert Real Estate Broker

Marilyn Karpoff www.KarpoffAfďŹ liates.com mkarpoff@karpoffafďŹ liates.com 212.358.8044 290 Third Avenue, Ste 26C, NYC 10010

Most treatments covered by major insurances and Medicare

SPIRITUAL

WINDOW TREATMENTS

Upper West Manhattan Church of Christ 80 YEARS!

Meeting at 891 Amsterdam Ave. @ 103rd St. In Hosteling International For more information: Call 212-729-8356 www.uwmchurchofchrist.com

Draperies Shades Shutters Blinds Motorization Window Film Upholstery Fabric & Trim Flooring Paint

SEMI-ANNUAL CUSTOM DECORATING SALE GOING ON NOW! UPPER WEST SIDE 469 AMSTERDAM AVE. 212.501.8282 WINDOWFASHIONS.COM

Fri 28

Sat 29

â&#x20AC;&#x153;WHO DO YOU SAY YOU ARE? APPROACHES TO PORTRAITURE THEN AND NOWâ&#x20AC;?

SEAN JONES: DIZZY SPELLZ

Mount Vernon Hotel Museum & Garden 421 East 61st St 11:00 a.m. Free with admission Take a look at context for a look at portraiture from the 19th century to the present time, from America and abroad. How has portraiture been shaped by time, place, identity, movement and migration? How do artistsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; experiences as immigrants shape their depictions? This museum-wide exhibit examines artistic production with an eye to the connections and conditions which helped to shape it. mvhm.org 212-838-6878

Dizzyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Club 10 Columbus Circle 7:30 p.m. $45 Tonight we welcome modern trumpet icon and former Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra member Sean Jones back to Dizzyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Club. In the unique program called Dizzy Spellz, the music and life story of Dizzy Gillespie are used as a lens to explore the intersection of cultural and spiritual dilemmas within the African Diaspora. jazz.org (212) 258-9595


Sun 30

LIVING POSITIVELY: HOW ETHICAL HUMANISM HELPS NAVIGATE TROUBLED WATERS

THE SLEEPING BEAUTY - ABT

New York Society for Ethical Culture 2 West 64th St 11:00 a.m. Free When people are divided and in conflict it can be difficult to maintain a positive stance in living. Bart Worden, Executive Director for the American Ethical Union, will talk about how Ethical Humanism can help us address the challenges we face as we strive to live ethically and work to build a caring and just society for all. nysec.org 212-874-5210

11

The Spirit|Westsider westsidespirit.com

JUNE 27-JULY 3,2019

Mon 1

The Metropolitan Opera 30 Lincoln Center Plaza 7:30 p.m. $25 Alexei Ratmansky’s inspired reconstruction of this classic ballet awakens the timeless tale of love against evil. Featuring 400 lavish costumes, 210 intricate wigs and magnificent storybook sets, the beloved story of the beautiful Princess Aurora, the evil sorceress Carabosse, and the magical kiss of a handsome prince is certain to cast a spell on your heart and imagination. metopera.org 212-362-6000

Going to the Airport? 1-212-666-6666 Sedan Rates: To LaGuardia ........... $34 $4 OFF To Newark ............... $51 Any Trip Over $20

Car & Limousine Service

To JFK ...................... $52 Tolls & gratuities not included. Prices subject to change without notice.

Must get Code# Upon Reserving Not Valid 3-7pm One Coupon per Trip. Expires Expires 12/31/19 6/30/19

TLC Lic#B00256

Download the free appget car cash, earn airline miles!

5 OFF

$

Any Airport Pick-Up

Must get Code# Upon Reserving One Coupon per Trip. Expires 12/31/19 6/30/19 Expires

www.CarmelLimo.com

Summer of

Tue 2 ► LAW OF THE LAND: THE SUPREME COURT’S YEAR IN REVIEW 92Y 1395 Lexington Ave 7:30 $35 Thane Rosenbaum brings a diverse panel of highly qualified experts — Trevor Morrison, Dean of NYU Law School, Slate’s Mark Stern, CNN’s Ariane de Vogue and Reuters Andrew Chung — to delve into the cases decided this past term, the Kavanaugh confirmation hearings, providing edifying context and exploring the political, social and civil implications. 92y.org 212-415-5500

Wed 3 ARTIST STUDIOS AT MAD Museum of Art and Design 2 Columbus Circle 10:00 a.m. Free with museum admission Anthony Iacono’s painted collages depict anonymous queer bodies with quotidian objects recontextualized into perverse and fetishistic scenarios. madmuseum.org 212-299-7777

Film at Lincoln Center Join us for free movies, talks, signature series, and more! View the lineup at filmlinc.org

filmlinc.org

-

#filmlinc

Elinor Bunin Munroe Film Center 144 West 65th Street Walter Reade Theater 165 West 65th Street Film at Lincoln Center receives generous support from Official

53

Contributing

This project is supported in part by an award from the National Endowment for the Arts, and the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew M. Cuomo and the New York State Legislature. Image: Mahershala Ali and Alex R. Hibbert in Moonlight, photo by David Bornfriend/Kobal/Shutterstock.

51


12

The Spirit|Westsider westsidespirit.com

LIVING COLOR A gathering of artists, each with a distinct style, adds up to a radiant exploration of beauty BY MARY GREGORY

Sometimes, it’s more than enough for an exhibition to offer an extraordinarily beautiful moment. “Spilling Over: Painting Color in the 1960s” at the Whitney does just that as it radiates with color, line, and exuberance. There are plenty of “isms,” history, context, and voices to connect with, but the overall experience is one of exhilarating, ebullient beauty. Culled from the museum’s permanent collections and spaciously arranged, 18 works by 18 artists fill the top floor’s sunny galleries. Some have been at the museum for decades; some are new acquisitions. Some are by well known artists; some are by artists who deserve to be better known.

Frankenthaler the Pioneer Perhaps the best way to see the show is to stand in the center of each gallery and just turn in place. The spilling-overness of the colors permeates the spaces and touches the spirit. Then, there’s plenty of time to step up to each work, look carefully, read the label, and let it speak to you. Helen Frankenthaler’s 1966 “Orange Mood” has a magnetic charge that draws you from across the room. Frankenthaler, like Jackson Pollock, liberated paintings from the easel, laying canvas on the floor, and then pouring, pulling, puddling and painting with thinned, vibrant acrylics. Rich oceans of lapis create a channel for a rising swell of warm golden oranges. The “mood” was hers when it was made. Now it’s yours for reflection. Frankenthaler pioneered the use of poured stains and the genre of Color Field Painting, which resisted a central object, seeking instead to create

IF YOU GO WHAT: “Spilling Over: Painting Color in the 1960s” WHERE: Whitney Museum of American Art 99 Gansevoort Street WHEN: Through August 31st Whitney.org (212) 570-3600 works that transcended the limits of the canvas. She influenced Morris Louis and Kenneth Noland, both on view here. Noland’s 1967 “New Day” opens the show, and Louis’s rainbow ribboned “Gamma Delta,” from a few years later, faces “Orange Mood.”

An Early Feminist, and Debuts Miriam Shapiro’s lively geometric abstraction, “Jigsaw,” fits pieces of pure color into an almost-square format. An early feminist artist, her later pieces utilized fabrics, referencing quilts and other fiber arts generally thought of as women’s work. She described the colors in “Jigsaw” as “blinding and highkeyed, enough so as to optically distort the form.” Still, it’s not hard to see an abstract figure, a quilt block, and one of the colored wooden puzzles popular in those days in her bright star-shaped pattern. Stepping away from abstraction, Kay Walking Stick’s “April Contem-

plating May” is from 1972 (just a bit beyond the ‘60s) and it’s making its debut appearance at the museum. “It’s a picture of two women in a space defined by color. And they are in color ... I was trying to create space primarily through color,” she says in a video that accompanies the exhibition online. Another figurative work appearing for the first time at the Whitney is “Baby” a 1966 painting by Emma Amos. Supercharged hues in the background blend with dark blue glasses, a cornflower speckled dress and the brown skin of the central figure, turning the portrait to a kaleidoscopic image. The wall text notes that Amos once said, “Every time I think about color it’s a political statement.”

These works express some of the zeitgeist of the 1960s, with countercultural, political, social and technological undercurrents. While distinct voices sing, there’s a harmony with plenty of grace notes coming through. Optical illusion, psychedelic visions, civil rights, feminism, protest, challenge, abstraction,

JUNE 27-JULY 3,2019

pushing boundaries, and seeking new visual vocabularies are part of the dynamic energy in the exhibition. “It’s kind of a gathering of different artists,” says curator David Breslin, adding “Color is really the animating factor.”

Undercurrents and Harmony Also making a political statement through color is Frank Bowling’s painting, “Dan Johnson’s Surprise.” Territories, mapping, whitewashing, borders and color are expressed through three floating outlines of South America on a fluid background edged with red, yellow and blue. The title refers to Daniel LaRue Johnson, a mid-century African American artist who studied in Paris, while the shifting, unfocused shapes hint at continents, borders and nations eradicated or altered by colonialism and the slave trade.

Emma Amos’ “Baby” from 1966 is a recent acquisition making its debut appearance in the Whitney’s “Spilling Over: Painting Color in the 1960s.” Photo: Adel Gorgy


JUNE 27-JULY 3,2019

13

The Spirit|Westsider westsidespirit.com

Your Neighborhood News Source

BEYOND BROADWAY - WEST SIDE The #1 online community for NYC theater:

www.show-score.com

NOW PLAYING IN YOUR NEIGHBORHOOD FROM $62

PUFFS 608 REVIEWS AUG 18 ž

FROM $20

FROM $89

THE PLAY THAT GOES WRONG

TONI STONE 73 REVIEWS ENDS AUG 11 ž

2,043 REVIEWS OPEN RUN ž

84

77 84

A Potter-inspired comedy for anyone who has ever felt like a secondary character in someone else’s story.

After a 2-year run on Broadway, the hit comedy about a disastrous opening night performance moves Off-Broadway.

In Roundabout’s world premiere, Obie Award winner April Matthis stars as the first female baseball player to go pro in the Negro Leagues.

NEW WORLD STAGES - 340 W 50TH ST

NEW WORLD STAGES - 340 W 50TH ST

THE HAROLD AND MIRIAM STEINBERG CENTER - 111 W 46TH ST

WHAT’S TRENDING ACROSS NYC

COMING SOON

FROM $61

FROM $60

LIFE SUCKS. 219 REVIEWS ENDS SEP 01

MOJADA PREVIEWS START JUL 02

ž

Luis Alfaro returns to The Public with this stirring drama about love, immigration, and sacrifice, inspired by the Ancient Greek story of Medea.

82

PUBLIC THEATER - 425 LAFAYETTE ST

Aaron Posner’s reimagining of Chekhov’s timeless classic “Uncle Vanya” returns in an encore staging from Wheelhouse Theater Company. FROM $23

THEATRE ROW - 410 W 42ND ST

THE WAY SHE SPOKE PREVIEWS START JUL 08

FROM $87

THE SECRET LIFE OF BEES 115 REVIEWS ENDS JUL 21

Audible’s new one-woman play demonstrates the power of speaking truth, even as it considers the implications of doing so.

ž

MINETTA LANE THEATRE - 18 MINETTA LN

82 FROM $45

LITTLE GEM PREVIEWS START JUL 17

Based on the hit novel, Atlantic’s new musical comes from the creative team behind “Sweat,” “Spring Awakening,” and “Fun Home.” ATLANTIC THEATER COMPANY - 336 W 20TH ST

Equal parts comic and poignant, Irish playwright Elaine Murphy’s debut play centers around three generations of North Dublin women.

FROM $50

IRISH REPERTORY THEATRE - 132 W 22ND ST

YES! REFLECTIONS OF MOLLY BLOOM 36 REVIEWS ENDS JUL 07 ž

FROM $45

LOVE, NOËL PREVIEWS START JUL 26

80

Content provided by

Irish Rep’s solo show offers a theatrical journey into the mind and heart of James Joyce’s most sensual hero, the indomitable Molly Bloom.

Get to know the life and times of one of the 20th century’s most dynamic creative icons – Noël Coward – through this intimate performance.

IRISH REPERTORY THEATRE - 132 W 22ND ST

IRISH REPERTORY THEATRE - 132 W 22ND ST KEY:


14

JUNE 27-JULY 3,2019

The Spirit|Westsider westsidespirit.com

RESTAURANT INSPECTION RATINGS JUNE 5 - 11, 2019 The following listings were collected from the Department of Health and Mental Hygiene’s website and include the most recent inspection and grade reports listed. We have included every restaurant listed during this time within the zip codes of our neighborhoods. Some reports list numbers with their explanations; these are the number of violation points a restaurant has received. To see more information on restaurant grades, visit www.nyc.gov/html/doh/html/services/restaurant-inspection.shtml. Szechuan Garden

239 West 105th St

Grade Pending (43) Raw, cooked or prepared food is adulterated, contaminated, crosscontaminated, or not discarded in accordance with HACCP plan. Filth flies or food/refuse/sewage-associated (FRSA) flies present in facility’s food and/or non-food areas. Filth flies include house flies, little house flies, blow flies, bottle flies and flesh flies. Food/refuse/ sewage-associated flies include fruit flies, drain flies and Phorid flies. Hand washing facility not provided in or near food preparation area and toilet room. Hot and cold running water at adequate pressure to enable cleanliness of employees not provided at facility. Soap and an acceptable hand-drying device not provided. Food not protected from potential source of contamination during storage, preparation, transportation, display or service. Food contact surface not properly washed, rinsed and sanitized after each use and following any activity when contamination may have occurred.

Broadway Dive

2662 Broadway

A

Ayurveda Cafe

706 Amsterdam Ave

A

The Halal Guys

720 Amsterdam Ave

A

Bob’s Your Uncle

929 Columbus Ave

A

Junzi Kitchen

2896 Broadway

A

Flor De Mayo

484 Amsterdam Avenue

A

King Food

489 Amsterdam Avenue

Grade Pending (24) Hot food item not held at or above 140º F. Filth flies or food/refuse/sewage-associated (FRSA) flies present in facility’s food and/or non-food areas. Filth flies include house flies, little house flies, blow flies, bottle flies and flesh flies. Food/refuse/sewage-associated flies include fruit flies, drain flies and Phorid flies. Wiping cloths soiled or not stored in sanitizing solution.

The Cottage

360 Amsterdam Avenue

A

Pizzeria Sirenetta

568 Amsterdam Ave

A

Nylo Nyc

2178 Broadway

A

Jg Melon

480 Amsterdam Ave

A

La Sirene Uws

416 Amsterdam Ave

A

Dunkin’

353 Amsterdam Ave

A

GARI Columbus

370 Columbus Ave

A

Vanguard Wine Bar

189 Amsterdam Ave

A

Lincoln Center Theater (Claire Tow Theater)

150 West 65th St

A

‘Cesca

166 West 75th St

A

Sushi Kaito

244 West 72nd St

A

Le Pain Quotidien

60 West 65th Street

A

Boulud Sud

1900 Broadway

A

Bistro Cassis

225 Columbus Ave

A

Mandarin Oriental HotelBanquet

80 Columbus Circle At A 60th Street

Harry Browne talks about the lessons his father, Henry Browne, taught him about opposing violence and caring for others. Photo: Emily Higginbotham

ST. GREGORY’S CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 ent, made up of those who knew Browne when he was alive and those who knew him only as the protagonist of tales told of the crusades for fairness in the neighborhood — to join together in remembering the complex man Browne was known to be. He was a man of faith and a man who carried on a secret relationship with Flavia Alaya, for whom he would later leave his post at the parish to be with and so they could raise their three children together. They also knew him to be a pacifist, a preacher and a co-founder of the Stricker’s Bay Neighborhood Council, a tenants’ rights group that still pushes for affordable housing in the area. Through his time on the West Side, attendees recalled, Browne helped men escaping the draft flee to Canada during the Vietnam War; he secured 2,500 lowincome housing units and fought against the federal urban renewal program of the 1950s; and he inspired and touched the lives of many on the West Side. “You wanted to be with Harry because he was alive,” Duffell said. “He challenged you to think, to recognize that you had ability.” Manhattan Borough President Gail Brewer, who grew up in the neighborhood and was a parishioner at St. Gregory’s, developed a relationship with Browne in the church basement practicing hymns with the other

Flavia Alaya, a feminist writer, speaks about her late husband, Henry Browne, and his legacy as her son, Chris Browne, looks on. Photo: Emily Higginbotham

guitarists. She noted that Browne inspired her activism and public service. Browne’s eldest son, Harry, who lives in Ireland working as a journalist, spoke about his father making sure he and his siblings, all in attendance at St. Gregory’s, knew how important it was to be a global citizen and to care for others of all races and nationalities. “My dad died in 1980 and there were a couple of hard facts that happened in the world before he died. Ronald Reagan became president and John Paul II became the pope. He wasn’t very happy with either of those gentlemen,” he said. “But in 1979 the Nicaraguan revolution succeeded. A dictator was out of power and that was a celebration in our home. Because the world was our home, and when dictators were toppled and people rose up and they made democracy in action.” He said he learned from his father that it was important to stand against violence, especially when it’s by the hand of the U.S. government. “Insofar as people are occupied or whether it’s in Belfast, in Gaza or anywhere else in the world, we stand with those people,” he said. “We stand in rage, in defiance and in solidarity. In our shared home, we are all human created equally in the eyes of God.” As Browne’s admirers reflected on his past, they talked about sharing Browne’s legacy with the next generation of activists.

“Let’s all make a commitment now, again, what is left of us and those of you who are young now, to carry that tradition into the future please,” Alaya, Browne’s widow, asked of those gathered. Tom Angotti, a professor emeritus of urban policy and planning at Hunter College, reminded the crowd that the work Browne started was not over — on the West Side and the rest of the city. Displacement of people of color and low-income people is a fundamental part of the country’s history, Angotti said. “We had the federal urban renewal program because property investments were strong enough to go to congress and get legislation passed that gave local governance the money and freedom to take the land from low income people, people of color, which is the history of the United States,” said Angotti. Today, Angotti said, displacement is taking place at the hands of the real estate industry, through zoning, development and gentrification. “In the last six years of the de Blasio administration, the mayor has proposed five mayor rezonings in communities of color. Every one of them was heavily contested, and every one of them passed,” he said. “We have let the officials who rely on the real estate industry as their primary source of funding. So we have to get it together again. We have to unite in protest.”


JUNE 27-JULY 3,2019

15

The Spirit|Westsider westsidespirit.com

WHAT WILL REPLACE LINCOLN CORRECTIONAL? NEIGHBORHOOD The prison on West 110th Street is slated to close this fall BY JASON COHEN

With the impending closure of Lincoln Correctional Facility, the question is what will replace the building that overlooks Central Park. The prison, located at 31–33 West 110th, has been primarily used as a work-release program for nonviolent drug offenders since 1991 and currently has 275 inmates. On May 17, Governor Andrew Cuomo announced that Lincoln Correctional and Livingston Correctional Facility in Livingston County would shutter their doors Sept. 1. This will make a total of 13 prisons the governor has closed since he took office in 2011. According to Department of Corrections and Community Supervision Spokesman Thomas Mailey, the prison population has declined by

Lincoln Correctional Facility. Photo: Jason Cohen

more than 10,500 since Cuomo took office. In fact, the current population is at its lowest level in 30 years and leads the nation with the lowest imprisonment rate of any large state. From its peak of 72,773 20 years ago, the population has decreased by over 26,000 people — a 35.8 percent reduction. While realtors are speculating the prison could be prime real estate for luxury housing, Jack Sterne, press

secretary for the government-run Empire State Development, who is handling the sale of the property, said that is not true. “ESD is in the early stages of our due diligence, and there are no plans for the site at this time,” Sterne said. “Before any steps are taken toward redevelopment, we will solicit input from local stakeholders and neighborhood leaders. We are at a very preliminary step in the process, and

ACTIVITIES FOR THE FERTILE MIND

thoughtgallery.org

we look forward to working with the Harlem community to help shape the future of this project.” Borough President Gale Brewer does not want the prison flipped into condos, said her Press Secretary Courtney McGee. McGee explained the BP is hopeful the building can be landmarked or converted to affordable housing. “Gail is really adamant about the community having input,” McGee

said. “She doesn’t want this to be sold off and built into a high rise.” Mailey explained that the selection of facilities was based on a thorough review of the operations at the 54 correctional facilities in the state. This involved a variety of factors, including, physical infrastructure, program offerings, facility security level, specialized medical and mental care, potential reuse and the proximity of other correctional facilities to minimize the impact to the workforce. “These closures are a result of the governor’s successful progressive criminal justice reforms that have led to a historic decrease in crime, including both violent and property offenses, as well as individuals incarcerated in New York State prisons,” Mailey said. “In 2017, reported crime reached an all-time low since statewide reporting began in 1975. Preliminary data for 2018 shows that crime continued to decline for the sixth consecutive year and will mark yet another historic low. This has cemented New York’s position as the safest large state in the nation.”

Are you experiencing stress or anxiety?

NEW YORK CITY

The 34th: The Story of Marriage Equality in Ireland

SATURDAY, JUNE 29TH, 6PM Irish Arts Center | 553 W. 51st St. | 212-757-3318 | irishartscenter.org Catch a screening documenting the events that led up to the the 34th amendment to the Irish constitution, which extended civil marriage to same-sex couples. Stay for a Q&A with Minister for Children and Youth Affairs Katherine Zappone, moderated by author Yvonne Cassidy ($10).

Kokdu: A Story of Guardian Angels

SATURDAY, JUNE 29TH, 7PM Alice Tully Hall, Lincoln Center | 1941 Broadway | 212-721-6500 | filmlinc.org As part of the New York Asian Film Festival 2019, catch a rare screening and concert experience. Live traditional accompaniment will be performed by a 20-member ensemble from the National Gugak Center, who will play the score to the most recent film by Tae-yong Kim ($50).

Just Announced | Cameron and Tyler Winklevoss in Conversation with Ben Mezrich: Cryptocurrency and the Future of Money

TUESDAY, JULY 9TH, 7:30PM 92nd Street Y | 1395 Lexington Ave. | 212-415-5500 | 92y.org

Our Behavioral Health program supports people dealing with the effects of vision loss* and their emotional health. Our team is also here to help people of all ages cope with: ï Depression ï Trauma ï $GGLFWLRQ ï Post-traumatic stress GLVRUGHU 376'

sign up for the weekly Thought Gallery newsletter at thoughtgallery.org.

Š Š Š Š

vision loss multiple medical issues family crises chronic illness

/LJKWKRXVH*XLOGèV%HKDYLRUDO+HDOWKSURJUDPLVWKHRQO\SURJUDP RILWVNLQGLQWKH86WKDWKDVVSHFLDOL]HGH[SHUWLVHLQYLVLRQORVV We are a Medicare and Medicaid provider and accept many insurance plans. :HDUHOLFHQVHGE\WKH1<62IĆFHRI0HQWDO+HDOWK 20+ 

Located: :HVWWK6WUHHW EHW$PVWHUGDP :HVW(QG$YH

Call us for an appointment 212-769-6263

The Winklevoss twins talk about their foray into the ether, Gemini, and what emoney has to tell us about where capitalism is headed. Ben Mezrich, author of Bitcoin Billionaires, joins ($40).

For more information about lectures, readings and other intellectually stimulating events throughout NYC,

ï $Q[LHW\GXHWR

lighthouseguild.org

@LighthouseGuild @LighthouseGld @LighthouseGuild


16

The Spirit|Westsider westsidespirit.com

JUNE 27-JULY 3,2019

Business

FABSCRAP IS GREEN AND GREAT ENVIRONMENT Recycling has never been more creative, or glamorous BY DIANA DUCROZ

Shoppers at The FABSCRAP Shop, a sleek new storefront at 110 West 26th St., are not just finding bargains, they are helping to save the planet. Bolts of high-quality fabric line the walls above bins filled with fabric scraps arranged by color. Designer fabrics sell here for as little as $5 per yard. “You would never know that all of this was supposed to be on the curb and going to be buried somewhere in a landfill. It’s really beauti-

ful stuff,” Jessica Schreiber, executive director of FABSCRAP, said of the shop’s carefully curated stock. The nonprofit Schreiber founded three years ago collects, sorts, and redistributes leftover fabric from local fashion houses, interior design businesses and theater costume departments.

Don’t Waste It, Wear It Following a pilot series of pop-up shops around the city last year, FABSCRAP opened its first permanent retail outlet on June 1 on West 26th Street, close to the fashion students who make up such a large part of its customer base. In her previous job at NYC’s Department of Sanitation, Schreiber often heard from commercial de-

The rainbow dress was created by a member of the FABSCRAP staff. Photo: Diana Ducroz

signers asking for alternatives to leaving their excess fabric out for trash pickup. Although a reuse stream had developed for used clothing, no such infrastructure existed for the raw material, especially in such large quantities. For a year, Schreiber thought about possible solutions, telling only a couple of people about her idea for a textile pickup service. But then one of them nominated her in 2016 for “Project Runway Fashion Startup,” a one-season spinoff of the hit reality show, and everything changed. “The most terrifying leap was when I pitched the idea, and then past that, nothing else has seemed as scary,” Schreiber said. Her pitch to the show’s panel was successful, earning her the seed money to start FABSCRAP in September 2016.

Jessica Schreiber, right, and Camille Tagle at the FABSCRAP ribbon cuttting. Photo: Courtesy of FABSCRAP

Tons of Good Deeds Since then, the organization has salvaged over 350 thousand pounds of raw fabric otherwise destined for the landfill or incinerator, at a rate of 5,000 pounds each week. The material is housed and sorted in FABSCRAP’s warehouse at the Brooklyn Army Terminal. Roughly sixty percent of the stock is then made available to the public for purchase at a bargain price or donated to other organizations. The remainder is shredded and recycled as insulation, carpet padding, moving blankets and mattress stuffing. Only a tiny fraction cannot be recycled and will end up in the landfill. Perhaps the most creative repurposing of the scraps is to fill punching bags at local boxing gyms, Schreiber said. FABSCRAP has grown faster than Schreiber anticipated, and now employs five full-time and two parttime staff. The organization is selfsustaining through service fees paid by the donor businesses, along with the proceeds from fabric resale. The organization also relies heavily on volunteer help to sort the loads of incoming fabric. In exchange for a three-hour shift, volunteers may choose five pounds of free fabric from the warehouse inventory or five yards from the more select retail stock. Fashion students in particular have been attracted to FABSCRAP, both as volunteers and customers. The fabric stock is “pretty high-quality stuff, but it’s low quantities. It’s affordable,” Schreiber said.

FABSCRAP’s customers also include a diverse demographic of “emerging designers, home sewers, quilters, crafters, artists, a lot of people who just really care about the sustainable sourcing in their work or in their creations,” Schreiber said.

A Business Built On Scraps Designer Daniel Silverstein is not part of the FABSCRAP staff, but jokes that he’s “FAB-adjacent.” Over the last decade, Silverstein has established a clothing design business built on scraps. “I started literally with my own scraps,” Silverstein said. “One day I made myself a shirt out of scraps and my business took off from there.” It’s fitting then that his company, Zero Waste Daniel, is the first featured designer pop-up shop in FABSCRAP’s new location. “Daniel is a great example of utilizing the small pieces to make something that’s totally wearable and usable,” Schreiber said. “What ‘reusable’ is is really just dependent on the person’s creativity.” “As a designer, sourcing materials is a huge job,” Silverstein said. The abundant, affordable and consistent supply, as well as diverse textures and colors, now available through FABSCRAP “eliminated a huge amount of headache and stress for me,” and has allowed Silverstein to expand his production.

The ‘zero waste’ aspect of his designs is a great selling point. To stand out as a designer in a crowded field, “you have to have something original to say,” Silverstein said. “About 100 percent of the growth of my business and my brand has been organic because people are really genuinely interested and fascinated by this issue, and I think the same is really true of FABSCRAP.”

The Future is Bright FABSCRAP is evolving into more than just a textile recycling business. In coming months, the store plans to hold educational and social events at their new location where the public can learn about topics such as sustainability or hear local designers speak about their work. Down the road, Schreiber hopes to expand FABSCRAP’s business model to other cities that have a similar nexus of manufacturing, designers, makers, and shredding capacity. FABSCRAP’s active social media presence is further nurturing a budding community of makers who share ideas and information. It’s a place where people “can share what they’re doing and what their skill or their technique is,” Silverstein said. “As much as it is a place where I’m getting news about the business, I’m also getting linked to other people who are inspiring me.”


JUNE 27-JULY 3,2019

The Spirit|Westsider westsidespirit.com

Real Estate Sales

17


18

The Spirit|Westsider westsidespirit.com

JUNE 27-JULY 3,2019

Gay Love. Photo: Mark Ivins

Lesbian Herstory, 1980. Photo: Mark Ivins

ONCE UPON A TIME IN NEW YORK A local photographer captured a microcosm of Greenwich Village gay life in the late ‘70s and early ‘80s BY MARK IVINS

I was a “Village kid” growing up, it was my neighborhood. I started photographing there when I was 12. I was 13 when the Stonewall riots happened. After college I worked a summer at a downtown newspaper. Fred W. McDarrah, the legendary Village Voice photo editor and photographer, called me one day. “Mark, it’s Fred, from the Voice, quit screwing around downtown and come

Morton Street Pioer, 1978. Photo: Mark Ivins

work for me here.” Most of these photographs were taken on assignment for him, and The Village Voice These photos were taken between 1977 and 1982. That was an evolutionary time in New York City. People were finding their way with the new freedom. The Village was a sanctuary for everybody during the day — gay, straight, whatever. It didn’t matter. It was relaxed. At night, a different scene dominated, looking for anonymous sex was the game. I always shoot “straight-up, no chaser.” This is what it was like

when I was there, it was weird, beautiful, disturbing, funny. Draw your own conclusions. It was also dangerous, I always felt that I was in peril, but then I had a camera. Once, while photographing in the abandoned, derelict piers where cruising took place, I was advised by a large body-builder type guy in leather that I might end up in the river if I took a certain picture. I did not take that picture.

TO SEE MORE PHOTOS, GO TO WESTSIDESPIRIT.COM

Tears. Gay Pride March, Christopher Street & Seventh Avenue, 1977. Photo: Mark Ivins


JUNE 27-JULY 3,2019

19

The Spirit|Westsider westsidespirit.com

YOUR 15 MINUTES

To read about other people who have had their “15 Minutes” go to westsidespirit.com/15 minutes

‘THIS IS MY NEIGHBORHOOD’ The owner of Paola’s Restaurant talks about her history on the Upper East Side — and her plans to open a new family-friendly restaurant BY EMA SCHUMER

Paola Bottero, 73, is the eponymous owner of Paola’s Restaurant, the family-run, Italian restaurant located on 92nd Street and Madison Avenue. A native of Rome, Italy, Bottero immigrated to New York with her father in 1961. She has been serving authentic Italian food to Upper East Siders since 1983. Bottero runs the restaurant with her son, Stefano Marricino, who has been working at Paola’s since he was 16 years old. In July, Bottero and Marricino will open their second restaurant in Carnegie Hill at 1246 Madison Avenue, between 89th and 90th Streets. Bottero told Our Town about her first foray into the restaurant business, her experience serving Carnegie Hill patrons and her vision for Paola’s Osteria — the new restaurant that is slated to make its debut later this summer.

Where are you from and when did you come to the United States? I am from Rome, Italy. I came to the United States when I was 16 years old in 1961. My father was a violinist for the Metropolitan Opera and at that time I was the oldest of three

Paola’s in Carnegie Hill. Photo: Ema Schumer

children. We lived on the Upper West Side. I went to school at Long Island University and Hunter College. I wanted to be a teacher at that point.

Do you have a family? I married when I was 22 years old and I had two boys two years apart. One of them is in the business with me right now. The other is a cinematographer; he makes documentaries and movies.

How did you get into the restaurant business? My twin brothers came over to the United States when they were 18 and one of my two brothers opened a restaurant when he was 20 years old. It was very successful. It got two stars from The New York Times. I [decided] I want to be just like my brother. I wanted to have my own place some day.

When did you open your own restaurant? I opened Paola’s in 1983 on 85th between First and Second. I was there for 10 years and then I moved over to 84th between Second and Third for eight or nine years. The original Paola was a long and narrow storefront. I had no more than eight or ten tables. I had three round tables and then a bunch of little tables on the side. The entrance was nine feet wide and the kitchen was seven feet

wide. I would go to the fish market in the morning, I would get my fish; I would get my meat from local suppliers and then start butchering it; [I would] go home, take a nap, and then come back. My mother would look after my children. You know, they say when there’s a will there’s a way. Paul Newman lived in the neighborhood and he would come to my restaurant. People were so impressed.

What brought you to Carnegie Hill and what has your experience been like in the neighborhood? In 2009, the landlord [would] not renew my lease because he was making [the space] into offices. One of my customers, who used to come over with his son all of the time, told me he had a space on 92nd and Madison and would I be interested in taking it over. I got very very lucky. God was helping me I guess, if you believe in God. The best thing about having Paola’s in this neighborhood in the beginning was that my granddaughter was going to school at Nightingale-Bamford so I could meet her on a daily basis and have lunch with her or a cookie across the street. That was phenomenal. I bought an apartment on the Upper East Side on 91st between Park and Lex. Then the fact that I made friends with people in the neighborhood makes it even more friendly. Everyone is so very warm and love-

Paola Bottero (right) with her son, Stefano Marricino. Photo courtesy of Richard Cacciato/Blue Iceberg

ly and it makes my heart tingle because it’s like being in Europe. The friendship and comradeship that I have over here I didn’t have at any other place and I love it.

Why did you decide to expand Paola’s and what is your vision for Paola’s Osteria at 1246 Madison Avenue? We were given advice that the lease on the location that we’re in right now would probably not be renewed because [the Wales Hotel] has been sold. Since we only had two years left on the lease I figured I want to stay in the neighborhood because this is my neighborhood. We looked it over and [found] a space at 1246 Madison Avenue. Osteria is not a first-class restaurant; it’s more casual. Something we’ve learned is that we have a lot of families; I wanted them to be able to come in with their children and enjoy dinner and not be worried about making problems. We are going to be serving Italian pizza made from a pizza oven. If the kids want meatballs they’ll have meatballs. But there’s also going to be swordfish meatballs, eggplant meatballs and potato meatballs. We’re going to have a little more varied menu but similar in style to what we have at Paola’s Restaurant. It’s going to be more traditional Italian food [with a] very Roman influence because that’s where I’m from and that’s

what I remember. It will have Arancini, which are rice balls stuffed with mozzarella. It will have different types of fish, [including] swordfish done sicilian style and halibut. We’re going to have pork chops and a nice, beautiful steak. We hope to be able to be open definitely in the next month. Do you plan to retire? I’m 73. I’m not sure I will be able to work again like the way I used to work. My grandchildren are growing and they come to visit, so I will retire, but not entirely retire you know. I’m not behind the stove [but the restaurant] gives me something to do on a daily basis.

Do you have a favorite dish on the menu? My favorite dish right now is All’Amatriciana. It’s very simple, [made of only] bacon, tomato, and pecorino cheese. We try to keep things at minimal ingredients so you can actually taste the flavors. It’s very flavorful. This interview has been edited for space and clarity.

Know somebody who deserves their 15 Minutes of fame? Go to westsidespirit.com and click on submit a press release or announcement.


20

Westsider

23

24 30

31

7

6 5

7 8

6

4

5 5

8

3

9

M I J O U V A Z I C A C V I X

B M U V Y O R T W S C R A N V

E S A R R A N G E Q E A A G M

The puzzle contains the following words. They may be diagonal, across, or up and down in the grid in any direction.

R A R G U M E N T A T I V E L

Abbreviate Adding Affluent Aggregate Aims Altosappear Amber Aquamarine Arable Argumentative Arise Arrange Assiduous Awesome Azalea

ANSWERS B

O

44

45

E

S

I

A

K

46

38

S

W A

R

E

R

R

P

S

B

A

36 34 32 27

28

T E 29

Z

A

O W

L

F

T

R

A

A

E

E O

L

18 15 11 1

2

22

T 3

I

S

N E

T

C

V

A

I

E

A 5

B

N

N O 6

U

A

7

T

D

A M

43

E

A Y R

31

A M

25

26

E E

17

I

L

G

D M 13

I

D

I

I 24

S

B 42

N

C

L

20

A M H

I

41

L

30

E

16 4

R

S

N

23

12

A

33

I

A

49

S W

V

19

E

48

40

35

N A

C

47

E

F

Y

T

N

L 37

E 21

A

39

N

P

A W

14 8

A

T

9

B

C

10

U K H R L T I P W S E W O A N

M L X E E D A P P Z L P W D E

A A A T U G B R J E J F J D U

M I J O U V A Z I C A C V I X

B M U V Y O R T W S C R A N V

E S A R R A N G E Q E A A G M

R A R G U M E N T A T I V E L

3 8

2 5

7

6 8 4 9 7 3 1

2 6 1 5 9 4

1 4 9 5 3 7 2 6 8

7 2 8 9 5 6 1 4 3

9 3 4 1 7 2 8 5 6

5 6 1 3 8 4 9 7 2

8 7 3 6 2 5 4 1 9

4 9 2 7 1 3 6 8 5

6 1 5 4 9 8 3 2 7

47. Animation platform (abbr.)

B P G O D A A S P Q B Q B T I

46. Abatement

A A A T U G B R J E J F J D U

Y G L M G S Z I S R G C N I R

45. Call to Bo-peep

M L X E E D A P P Z L P W D E

A W E S O M E A V A W E F A A

44. Frequently, in verse

U K H R L T I P W S E W O A N

D J H T D T L K M E U A E A M

43. Beer ingredient

B P G O D A A S P Q B Q B T I

A U L P E U B Z P L R Z G H A

42. Nile bird

Y G L M G S Z I S R G C N I R

J A C D B P A O F S N B D E U

41. Fall off

A W E S O M E A V A W E F A A

Z H F C B N R F X U Q E B D Q

39. Jessica’s sister

D J H T D T L K M E U A E A M

B J F I V S A O P Q D F A A A

37. Knack

A U L P E U B Z P L R Z G H A

T

35. European city that is a musical and artistic center

J A C D B P A O F S N B D E U

L

33. Hill person: abbr.

Z H F C B N R F X U Q E B D Q

I

31. Rug

B J F I V S A O P Q D F A A A

S

30. Turkish money

WORD SEARCH by Myles Mellor

E

55

48. Conger

7

N

50. Really awesome! 51. Depend 52. Bubkes 53. Bar bill 54. Amtrak track 55. N.Y. minutes? Down 1. Flip pages 2. “My name is ___” 3. “Beetle Bailey” pooch 4. “Got it!” 5. Loud thud 6. Odd 7. Bartender’s supply 8. Burlesque 9. Exclude 10. 100 lbs. 13. Checks for under 21’s 17. Physical checkups 19. Lake sport 22. Screwball 23. My country, ___ of thee 25. Against 26. Fuse 27. Calendar abbr. 28. Concoction 29. Stiff hair

2

52

52 54

4

55

49

51

5

43

L

Across 1. The Lion 4. Adjoin 8. Fox competitor 11. “Dig in!” 12. Vietnam’s capital 14. Clawed foot 15. “___is never finished, only abandoned,” Da Vinci 16. Correction 18. Go smoothly 20. Workbench adjunct 21. Montezuma, for one 24. Water barrier 27. Avoid 30. Baby tiger 32. Primps 33. Catania city locale 34. Have another go at 35. Porch along the outside of a building 36. Constituted 37. Last 38. Long green 40. Be saturated in 44. Homage 49. Atty group

48

42

E

53

47

41

6

I

40

5

G

50

Level: Medium

39

46

4

A

45

6 2

4

37 38

3

1

6

35 36

7

1

33

34

9

N

32

44

26

2

I

29

25

8

R

22

4

54

28

20

Each Sudoku puzzle consists of a 9X9 grid that has been subdivided into nine smaller grids of 3X3 squares. To solve the puzzle each row, column and box must contain each of the numbers 1 to 9. Puzzles come in three grades: easy, medium and difficult.

H

27

14 17

19 21

10

51

18

13

9

B

16

8

B

15

7

A

12

6

A

11

5

F

4

T

3

SUDOKU by Myles Mellor and Susan Flanagan

by Myles Mellor

50

2

CROSSWORD

53

1

JUNE 27-JULY 3,2019

The Spirit|Westsider westsidespirit.com


JUNE 27-JULY 3,2019

The Spirit|Westsider westsidespirit.com

PUBLIC NOTICES

21


22

JUNE 27-JULY 3,2019

The Spirit|Westsider westsidespirit.com

PUBLIC NOTICES

NEED TO RUN A LEGAL NOTICE? Quick | Easy | Economical

Call Barry Lewis Today: 212-868-0190

IT’S NEVER TOO EARLY

TO INVEST IN A GOOD THING. Introducing Better Futures —a whole new kind of investment with a greater return than money. When you invest, it helps kids go to college. Because a mind is a terrible thing to waste but a wonderful thing to invest in. TM

TM

©2013 UNCF

Invest in Better Futures at UNCF.ORG/INVEST


JUNE 27-JULY 3,2019

POLICY NOTICE: We make every eďŹ&#x20AC;ort to avoid mistakes in your classiďŹ ed ads. Check your ad the ďŹ rst week it runs. The publication w only accept responsibility for the ďŹ rst incorrect insertion. The publication assumes no ďŹ nancial responsibility for errors or omissions. reserve the right to edit, reject, or re-classify any ad. Contact your sales rep directly for any copy changes. All classiďŹ ed ads are pre-pa

ways to re-use

your

Do

something

us to

?

into

TRASH IT. DONâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;T FLUSH IT.

like

MERCHANDISE FOR SALE

Telephone: 212-868-0190 Email: classified2@strausnews.com have

CLASSIFIEDS MASSAGE

23

The Spirit|Westsider westsidespirit.com

you Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d look

Email us at news@strausnews.com

old

newspaper #

Wrap pieces of fruit in newspaper to speed up the ripening process.

H

FATBERGS form when grease, wipes and other stuff get ďŹ&#x201A;ushed, clogging pipes and draining wallets. LEARN MORE: FatbergFree.nyc

Discover the worldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s best walk-in bathtub from

#FatbergFreeNYC

DENTAL Insurance Physicians Mutual Insurance Company

5 Reasons American Standard Walk-In Tubs are Your Best Choice 1 2 3

Includes FREE American StandardRight Height Toilet

Limited Time Offer! Call Today!

888-609-0248 Receive a free American Standard Cadet toilet with full installation of a Liberation Walk-In Bath, Liberation Shower, or Deluxe Shower. Offer valid only while supplies last. Limit one per household. Must be first time purchaser. See www.walkintubs.americanstandard-us.com for other restrictions and for licensing, warranty, and company information. CSLB B982796; Suffolk NY:55431H; NYC:HIC#2022748-DCA. Safety Tubs Co. LLC does not sell in Nassau NY, Westchester NY, Putnam NY, Rockland NY.

4

5

Backed by American Standardâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 140 years of experience $ Ultra low entry for easy entering and exiting Patented Quick DrainÂŽ fast water removal system Lifetime Warranty on the bath AND installation, INCLUDING labor backed by American Standard 44 Hydrotherapy jets for an invigorating massage

1,500

SAVINGS

FREE IN-HOME EVALUATION!

Do you know THESE MEN? Cornelius (Neil) Otero Ronald P. Petroski Adam Prochaski James E. Russo Barry J. Ryan Joseph Schuck Patrick Sexton

Vincent Sforza James G. Sickler James T. Smith George J. Stack John Thompson Joseph J. Weber George F. Zartarga

If you have information regarding alleged abuse

A less expensive way to help get the dental care you deserve! CALL NOW!

D O N AT E YO U R C A R Wheels For Wishes

FREE Information Kit

benefiting

Make-A-Wish ÂŽ Metro New York

1-855-225-1434

* 100% Tax Deductible * Free Vehicle Pickup ANYWHERE * We Accept Most Vehicles Running or Not * We Also Accept Boats, Motorcycles & RVs

Get help paying dental bills and keep more money in your pocket This is real dental insurance â&#x20AC;&#x201D; NOT just a discount plan You can get coverage before your next checkup

Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t wait! Call now and weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll rush you a FREE Information Kit with all the details. Insurance Policy P150NY 6129

1-855-225-1434 Visit us online at

www.dental50plus.com/nypress MB17-NM003Ec

WheelsForWishes.org Call:(917)336-1254 * Car Donation Foundation d/b/a Wheels For Wishes. To learn more about our programs or ÂżQDQFLDOLQIRUPDWLRQFDOO  RUYLVLWZZZZKHHOVIRUZLVKHVRUJ

Saving a Life EVERY 11 MINUTES

alone Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m never

Life AlertÂŽ is always here for me even when away from home. One touch of a button sends help fast, 24/7.

+HOSDW+RPH with

GPS !

or its cover-up involving these men, CONTACT US. ÂŽ

The NY Child Victims Act may be able to help you!

:Yll]ja]kF]n]jF]]\;`Yj_af_&

! FREE

FIRST AID

KIT

WHEN YOU ORDER!

+HOS2QWKH*R

For a FREE brochure call: 646-493-1850

57 West 57th Street, 3rd Floor New York, NY 10019

1-800-404-9776


24

The Spirit|Westsider westsidespirit.com

Cluttered Apartment? Recycle your stuff for free in your own building

Talk to your building manager today! Easily and securely recycle your electronics | nyc.gov/ecycle Clean out your closets for a good cause | nyc.gov/refashion nyc.gov/zerowaste | call 311 NYCsanitation  NYCzerowaste

JUNE 27-JULY 3,2019

Profile for West Side Spirit

West Side Spirit - June 27, 2019  

West Side Spirit - June 27, 2019  

Advertisement