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The local paper for the Upper per West Side p Sid BRAVE NEW FASHIONS ◄ P. 12

WEEK OF MAY

18-24 2017

INVESTIGATION

DINING FOR DOLLARS Where Manhattan politicians court donors and raise campaign cash BY DOUGLAS FEIDEN

The path to grasping and retaining political power in New York City has long plowed through such sumptuous and moneyed Manhattan haunts as the Regency and the Harvard Club, the 21 Club and the Union League Club, Jean Georges and Il Mulino. It still does, of course. Pols will always court the uber-rich and venture into their lairs for donations. No sea change has taken place. Probably, it never will. For all his down-with-the plutocrats posturing, even Mayor Bill de Blasio is not immune from their blandishments. In fact, his reelection campaign held a private fundraising event at the Robert De Niro-owned Greenwich Hotel in Tribeca in March 2016, spending $1,895 at the restaurant, according to its filings with the city’s Campaign Finance Board. Then last November, it paid $266 for an unspecified political meeting at Keens Steakhouse, the eatery at 72 West 36th Street, founded in 1885, that still boasts of the old-line conservatives like J.P. Morgan and General Douglas MacArthur who were members of its “Pipe Club.” But even as Manhattan’s signature clubs, hotels and restaurants retain their monopoly as venues to host high-end fundraisers and attract big-bucks donors, there has also been a slow if steady democratization of the political watering hole in the postBloomberg era.

14 13 1122 10 1111 9

WEST SIDE ESTABLISHMENTS USED FOR POLITICAL PURPOSES

1. Incognito Bistro 2. Keens Steakhouse 3. Harvard Club 4. Carmine’s - Times Square 5. Lindy’s 6. Jean Georges 7. Joanne Trattoria 8. Utopia Restaurant 9. Sarabeth’s 10. Mitchell’s Wine & Liquor Store 11. Barney Greengrass 12. Carmine’s - UWS 13. City Diner 14. Telio Restaurant

8 7 6 5 4

The intersection of Whitehall Street with State Street and Water Street in the Financial District includes an “exclusive pedestrian phase” signal that stops traffic for pedestrians in all directions. Photo: Michael Garofalo

3 2

DANCING IN THE STREETS? SAFETY

1

To see the interactive map, read this article on westsidespirit.com.

DOT to study “pedestrian scramble” crossing model at dangerous intersections

GRAPHICS: CHRISTINA SCOTTI; MAP DATA: GOOGLE MAPS

BY MICHAEL GAROFALO

roughly a dozen other kosher restaurants, a dozen-plus Greek diners and coffee shops and 10-plus pizzerias have been used to solicit funds, stage campaign events or hold political meetings, CFB filings show. “You can raise money just as easily at a humble diner as you can at a four-star restaurant,” said Maureen Eng, a software engineer who lives on the West Side, works near City Hall and says she often crosses paths with Comptroller Scott Stringer in diners and coffee shops both uptown and downtown.

You can raise money just as easily at a humble diner as you can at a four-star restaurant.” Maureen Eng Consider that in Manhattan alone, at least five Le Pain Quotidiens, four Sarabeth’s, four bagel shops, two Carmine’s, two Lebanese restaurants, two Mendy’s,

Pedestrian safety advocates are hoping that a new law will bring an old way of crossing the street back into vogue. If the legislation’s supporters get their wish, pedestrians walking diagonally from corner to corner while vehicles are stopped in all directions could soon become a common sight at some of Manhattan’s busiest intersections.

Legislation passed unanimously by the City Council last week requires the Department of Transportation to explore the implementation of Barnes Dance crossings at high-crash intersections. Under the Barnes Dance crossing model, also commonly referred to as a pedestrian scramble, traffic signals include a phase that halts vehicles in all directions, allowing walkers to cross intersections as they please. “One in four of the crashes that kill or seriously injure people happens in the crosswalk when the pedestrian or

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CONTINUED ON PAGE 15 Westsider WEEK OF APRIL

SPRING ARTS PREVIEW

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Crime Watch Voices NYC Now City Arts

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MANHATTAN'S APARTMENT BOOM, > PROPERTY, P.20

2015

In Brief MORE HELP FOR SMALL BUSINESS

PROTESTING THE COMMUNITY BOARD OVER TRAFFIC DEATHS

Zero, Mayor Bill One year into Visionreducing trafficfor de Blasio’s plan traffic the number of has related deaths, Upper West Side fatalities on the compared to last actually increased, year’s figures. Upper West Siders -That has some needs to be done convinced more of the Transstarting with members of the local comportation Committee munity board. West mother, Upper Lisa Sladkus, a member of TransSide resident and said she’s fed at portation Alternatives a silent protest up, and organized 7’s February board Community Board residents dozens of meeting, where Committee called for Transportation leaders to step down. against incredible “We have run up imto get safe street trying just problems said. “This was provements,” she our point across get another way to dissatisfied.” that we are very involved with Sladkus has been Alternatives since Transportation served as director 2002 and formerly Streets’ RenaisSide of Upper West She says becoming sance Campaign. really got her into a mother is what activism. streets around me “Just noticing the as a pedestrian I felt and how unsafe she said. “I wanted and as a cyclist,”

9-15

The effort to help small seems to businesses in the city be gathering steam. Two city councilmembers, Robert Margaret Chin and Cornegy, have introduced create legislation that wouldSmall a new “Office of the within Business Advocate” of Small the city’s Department Business Services. Chin The new post, which have up told us she’d like to would and running this year, for serve as an ombudsman city small businesses within them clear government, helping to get bureaucracy the through things done. Perhaps even more also importantly, the ombudsman and number will tally the type small business of complaints by taken in owners, the actions policy response, and somefor ways to recommendations If done well, begin to fix things. report would the ombudsman’s give us the first quantitative with taste of what’s wrong the city, an small businesses in towards step rst fi important fixing the problem. of To really make a difference, for developers will have to is a mere formality their projects course, the advocaterising rents, are the work complete precinct, but chances-- thanks to a looking to find a way to tackle business’ legally quickly. is being done which remain many While Chin their own hours,” of after-hours “They pick out boom in the number throughout who lives on most vexing problem. gauge what said Mildred Angelo,of the Ruppert construction permits said it’s too early tocould have Buildings one the 19th floor in The Department of the city. role the advocate number three years, the Houses on 92nd Street between on the She Over the past is handing out a record there, more information work perThird avenues. permits, bad thing. of Second and an ongoing all-hours number of after-hours of after-hours work problem can’t be a the city’s Dept. with the said there’s where mits granted by This step, combinedBorough according to new data project nearby jumped 30 percent, noise in construction Buildings has efforts by Manhattan to mediate data provided constantly make BY DANIEL FITZSIMMONS according to DOB from trucks. President Gale Brewer of Informa- workers offer transferring cement response to a Freedom the rent renewal process, they want. They city classifies knows the signs Act request. The between 6 “They do whateverthey please. They Every New Yorker some early, tangible small clang, the tion work come and go as of progress. For many sound: the metal-on-metal beeps of a any construction weekend, can can’t come piercing a.m., or on the have no respect.” at p.m. and 7 business owners, that hollow boom, the issuance of these reverse. A glance The increased a correspond after-hours. soon enough. truck moving in has generated can hardly as has led to

SLEEPS, THANKS TO THE CITY THAT NEVER UCTION A BOOM IN LATE-NIGHT CONSTR

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WESTSIDE SPIRIT COM

NEWS

and you the alarm clock middle of the night, believe it: it’s the carries on fulland yet construction tilt. or your local police You can call 311

Newscheck Crime Watch Voices Out & About

The surge in permitsfees for the city in millions of dollars consome residents agency, and left application process vinced that the

2 City Arts 3 Top 5 8 Real Estate 10 15 Minutes

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MAY 18-24,2017

CROWDFUNDING PSYCHEDELICS HEALTH NYU researchers are studying psilocybin’s use in treating depression and alcoholism BY MICHAEL GAROFALO

Researchers at NYU Langone Medical Center are turning to the public to support clinical research on the use of psychedelic drugs for treating anxiety, depression and addiction. Fundamental, a crowdsourcing campaign based in New York, recently began efforts to fund ongoing studies at the forefront of psychedelic medicine, including two at NYU Langone. The campaign has raised over $18,000 of its $500,000 goal since it launched on May 9. One of the NYU studies, led by Dr. Michael Bogenschutz, aims to explore the use of psilocybin — the psychedelic compound found in so-called “magic” mushrooms — in treating alcoholism. Bogenschutz hopes to build on an earlier study he conducted, which found that alcoholic patients consumed alcohol less frequently and in lesser quantities after a 12-week course of therapy accompanied by

two psilocybin sessions. The followup study is underway at NYU and partially funded; Fundamental aims to deliver the remaining funding required to complete the study. Though the research is promising, funding studies through conventional avenues has proven difficult. Most medication development research is funded by the pharmaceutical industry or the federal government, primarily through the National Institutes of Health. Pharmaceutical companies have shied away from funding studies exploring drugs like psilocybin and LSD because securing exclusive marketing rights for the drugs would likely prove elusive. Additionally, research suggests that patients treated with psychedelics may experience longterm benefits after only a handful of treatments. “It’s hard to see how you would make money off of a drug that people only have to take a couple of times,” Bogenschutz said. The NIH often plays a role in funding research of potential value that, for lack of profit motive or other reasons, is not pursued by the private market — an umbrella that studies like those at NYU would seem to fit comfortably under, were it not for most psyche-

delic drugs’ Schedule I status under federal law. By definition, Schedule I drugs have a high potential for abuse, no currently accepted medical use, and lack evidence of safety when used under medical supervision. NIH has been reluctant to commit public funds to researching substances that are scheduled and, in some circles, remain controversial due to lingering cultural stigma dating to the Wild West days of psychedelic use in the 1960s. “The fact of the matter is that classic hallucinogens like psilocybin are not addictive,” Bogenschutz said. He added that psychedelics are not without dangers and can be abused, but that such risks are mitigated in the controlled settings in which clinical studies are performed. Due to these roadblocks, researchers exploring potential clinical applications for psychedelic drugs have had to turn to alternative sources like nonprofits and private donors to support their work. These barriers to traditional funding sources prompted Rodrigo Niño to launch Fundamental. As the CEO of the Prodigy Network, a real estate development firm based in the Financial District, Niño raises money from the public to fund commercial real estate

Psilocybe semilanceata, aka magic mushrooms and liberty caps. Researchers at New York University would like to explore the ability of psilocybin to treat alcoholism. Photo: Patrick Ullrich, via Wikimedia Commons ventures. Niño was inspired to apply the crowdfunding model to funding psychedelic research after a cancer scare, during which he discovered the benefits of ayahuasca, a hallucinogenic brew that is a traditional medicine used by indigenous peoples of the Amazon, in easing his anxiety. “This crowdfunding campaign is not only about raising funds, but it’s also in many ways about raising awareness, and I think that’s the big difference between this funding campaign and others,” said Ismail Ali, a policy fellow with the Multidisciplinary Association for Psychedelic Studies, a

nonprofit organization that is sponsoring one of the studies Fundamental will support. “The Fundamental project is really geared toward the public, which is really cool because it not only involves the public in supporting this amazing, innovative research, but it also gets a lot of information out which otherwise might have been contained within our networks.” “I think it’s brilliant to see a way to go outside of those usual structures and go directly to people who have an interest in this work and have some means to contribute,” Bogenschutz said.

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CRIME WATCH BY JERRY DANZIG BROADWAY BANK ROBBED TWICE IN 10 DAYS Things were anything but capital at the Capital One branch at 2379 Broadway, where bank employees contended with two robberies within 10 days. In the ďŹ rst incident, at 10:17 a.m. on Monday, May 1, a man approached a teller and passed her a note which read, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Give me all the ďŹ fties and hundreds.â&#x20AC;? According to the police account the man also said, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t try to do anything stupid, or else you will regret it. Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be funny and give me the dye pack.â&#x20AC;? He then took back his note and put it in his pocket and the teller handed over various denominations totaling $2,550, which the man placed in a black duffel bag before ďŹ&#x201A;eeing north on Broadway on foot, police said. Officers searched the neighborhood but couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t ďŹ nd the thief. In the second incident, a man entered the branch at about 2:30 p.m. on May 11, approached a teller and demanded money. The man was able to get away with $4,910, police said. Police described him as black, in his 30s, about 5 feet, ďŹ ve inches tall, with no facial hair. He was wearing a baseball cap and dark sunglasses. Police did not say if that individual is a suspect in the May 1 robbery. Anyone with information in regards to this incident is asked to call the NYPDâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Crime Stoppers Hotline at 1-800-577TIPS (8477).

Police are seeking this man in connection with the robbery of Capital Bank branch on Broadway on the afternoon of May 11.

98 TEARS

STATS FOR THE WEEK

One home health aide apparently made herself a little too much at home with her clientâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s bank account. A Central Park West resident looking at her checking account determined that, by her count, her balance was off by more than $200,000. Going over printouts of her bank statements she saw that nearly 100 checks had been cashed without knowledge during a 13-month period ending in April. The names appearing on the cashed checks belonged to a home health aide who came twice weekly to the victimâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s apartment. The total value of the unauthorized checks came to an $215,829.

Reported crimes from the 20th precinct Week to Date

Year to Date

2017 2016

% Change

2017

2016

% Change

Murder

0

0

n/a

1

0

n/a

Rape

0

0

n/a

1

1

0.0

Robbery

0

0

n/a

15

21

-28.6

Felony Assault

1

0

n/a

24

21

14.3

Burglary

0

0

n/a

29

22

31.8

Grand Larceny

12

14

-14.3

243 217

12.0

Grand Larceny Auto

1

0

n/a

4

100.0

2

SAY WHAT? KNIFE ATTACK At 8:50 a.m. on Wednesday, May 3, a 51-year-old man was slashed in front of his residence at 2508 Broadway by an acquaintance. The victim suffered a severe open wound on the left side of his face. He was taken to St. Lukeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s hospital for treatment, while his assailant was last seen ďŹ&#x201A;eeing southbound on Broadway. The assailant was not publicly identiďŹ ed and there was no word on the victimâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s condition.

Another senior had a problem with a different kind of aid. At 3 p.m. on Sunday, April 30, an 80-year-old woman parked her car next to a vendor on Broadway and West 110th Street, leaving the vehicle unattended while she paid for some food. She had placed her Audiology hearing aid, valued at $3,400, on the ďŹ&#x201A;oor on the passengerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s side of the car. An unknown witness told her that a 20-year-old male bicyclist had been seen opening the passenger door and removing the hearing aid. The victim didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t ďŹ le a police report until May 7 because she lives out of state.

SCOOTER ACCOUTER Now that itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s spring, here come the scooter looters again. At 10 p.m. on Thursday, May 4, a 54-year-old man parked his 2015 Yamaha scooter on the street outside 983 Amsterdam Ave. When he returned the following day at 9 p.m., his scooter had scooted. A search of the neighborhood turned up nothing. He told police heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d secured the scooter wheels with a chain lock, and he alone had keys to the lock. The scooter is valued at $2,900.

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Useful Contacts POLICE NYPD 20th Precinct

120 W. 82nd St.

212-580-6411

NYPD 24th Precinct

151 W. 100th St.

212-678-1811

NYPD Midtown North Precinct

306 W. 54th St.

212-760-8300

FDNY Engine 76/Ladder 22

145 W. 100th St.

311

FDNY Engine 40/Ladder 35

W. 66th St. & Amsterdam Ave.

311

FDNY Engine 74

120 W. 83rd St.

311

Ladder 25 Fire House

205 W. 77th St.

311

FIRE

CITY COUNCIL Councilmember Helen Rosenthal

563 Columbus Ave.

212-873-0282

Councilmember Inez Dickens

163 W. 125th St.

212-678-4505

State Senator Brad Hoylman

322 Eighth Ave. #1700

212-633-8052

State Sen. Jose M. Serrano

1916 Park Ave. #202

212-828-5829

STATE LEGISLATORS

Assemblymember Linda Rosenthal 230 W. 72nd St. #2F

212-873-6368

Assemblymember Daniel O’Donnell 245 W. 104th St.

212-866-3970

COMMUNITY BOARD 7 LIBRARIES

250 W. 87th St. #2

212-362-4008

St. Agnes

444 Amsterdam Ave.

212-621-0619

Bloomingdale

150 W. 100th St.

212-222-8030

Performing Arts

40 Lincoln Center

917-275-6975

HOSPITALS Mt. Sinai – Roosevelt

1000 10th Ave.

Mt. Sinai - St. Luke’s

1090 Amsterdam Ave.

212-523-4000 212-523-5898

CON ED TIME WARNER CABLE POST OFFICES

4 Irving Place

212-460-4600

2554 Broadway

212-358-0900

US Post Office

215 W. 104th St.

212-662-0355

US Post Office

700 Columbus Ave.

212-866-1981

US Post Office

127 W. 83rd St.

212-873-3991

Ansonia Post Office

178 Columbus Ave.

212-362-1697

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MAY 18-24,2017

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MAY 18-24,2017

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Sunset at the Lawrence Hall of Science, in Berkeley, California, where kids can attend summer camp programs. Photo: David Abercrombie, via flickr

COLLEGES OPEN DOORS FOR SUMMER PROGRAMS Kids can attend camp at Berklee School of Music, a DNA lab upstate or a science facility in the San Francisco Bay Area BY KATHERINE ROTH

After most college students have packed up and moved out of their dorms for the summer, many campuses and research centers across the country stay open, making their dorms and other facilities available to kids eager for academic summer adventure. Campuses are home to a wide range of summer camp programs, some run by private groups that lease the college facilities, and others run by the colleges or research centers themselves. “Summer is a great time for kids to learn about what we do, and spend 20 to 30 hours a week getting hands-on lab experience and doing experiments,” says Amanda McBrien, assistant director of DNA Learning Center in Cold Spring Harbor, New York. It’s a branch of Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, famous for groundbreaking genetics research. “We now offer a suite of weeklong day camps,

starting the summer after fifth grade and running through senior year in high school,” she says. “If a student is interested, they could come here for a week every summer starting in middle school and do something new and exciting each time, and by the end of high school they would have done more hands-on biology labs than they’ll probably do as undergraduates, if they’re even in a molecular biology program. It’s cool.” She said many of the kids who sign up for Cold Spring Harbor’s program do a variety of short, focused camps for the summer. “They’ll spend a week here getting deep into science, then they’ll leave here and do something completely different, like a week of robotics or space camp at NASA,” she says. For the musically inclined, the Berklee College of Music, in Boston, opens its doors in summer for intensive camps for kids as young as 12 who have a minimum of six months of musical training. Campers can spend their days doing a mix of small group lessons, music theory and ear training. Finding oneself part of a small group with a specific and shared passion can be transforma-


MAY 18-24,2017 tive for children and teenagers, parents say. “Our son thrived at the Berklee summer program, which helps students find their musical and creative voice by enabling them to play with musicians from all over the world and varying degrees of experience and training,” said Carol Rose of Boston. “The investment paid off: He’s a successful professional bassist.” The Johns Hopkins Center for Talented Youth, meanwhile, offers day camps and residential programs at campuses across the country in a range of subjects for kids in grades two through 12. Students can explore everything from anatomy to zoology. Stephanie Stiker of Greenwich, Connecticut, said her 11-year-old enjoyed the CTY camp on the campus of Washington College, in Chestertown, Maryland, and the experience of staying in the dorms. “CTY gave our son the chance to do a deep dive into robotics, where they programmed actual robots to make decisions and try to outwit each other. He also did his own laundry and managed his free time, all while making friends with

The Spirit|Westsider westsidespirit.com

7

whom he shared the same interests,” she said. This summer, her son is returning to the camp, this time to study forensics. For students 14 and up who are interested in English as a second language, Concordia College in Minnesota offers a chance to get a feel for American life; summer campers stay in the dorms, study English on campus and, off campus, visit farms, attend barbecues and baseball games, and more. On the West Coast, The Lawrence Hall of Science, part of the University of California, Berkeley campus, offers summer camps for kids age 4 through high school. For those who want to emphasize sports instead of academics, the campus of the State University of New York at Purchase might be just the thing. A private group called Future Stars runs day camps at Purchase and three college campuses on Long Island, focusing on everything from tennis and soccer to circus arts and even magic 101 for kids ranging from preschool to 12th grade.

Weill Music Institute

NEIGHBORHOOD CONCERT

Ensemble Connect Sunday, May 21 at 5 PM Ensemble Connect’s trademark virtuosity and versatility is showcased in a program that features two masterworks of the Classical era by Mozart and Beethoven.

Music at Our Saviour’s Atonement (MOSA) | Our Saviour’s Atonement Lutheran Church 178 Bennett Avenue (at 189th Street) | Manhattan mosaconcerts.org | 212-923-5757

1 A | Bus: Bx7, M100 A program of Carnegie Hall, The Juilliard School, and the Weill Music Institute in partnership with the New York City Department of Education

Free concerts in all five boroughs! The Berklee College of Music, in Boston, opens its doors in summer for intensive camps for kids as young as 12. Photo: By Daderot, via Wikimedia Commons

carnegiehall.org/NeighborhoodConcerts Artists, programs, and dates subject to change. © 2017 CHC.

Fadi Kheir

! e e Fr


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MAY 18-24,2017

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Voices

Write to us: To share your thoughts and comments go to westsidespirit.com and click on submit a letter to the editor.

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR THE BIKE DEBATE Douglas Feiden opens his article with an interesting, but unsupported statement: “Bicycles ... are swiftly multiplying on the streets of Manhattan” (“The Age of the Bike Controversy,” May 11-17). How “swiftly?” And are they in fact multiplying at all? Even if we assume some level of increase, it is certainly not to the degree that the bike lobby has claimed for years that it would be. When the first stretch of bike lane on Columbus Avenue was installed, and there was precious little increase in bicycle usage, the bike lob-

by claimed that it was because the bike lane was not complete. When the bike lane was completed, and the expected huge increase did not occur, the excuse was that it was finished during the fall/winter season. When the warm season came — and the expected increase still did not come — the bike lobby was suspiciously silent. Any increase that it has seen is not nearly what the bike lobby claimed would occur. I am not against bikes: I ride mine every day. But doing so has only proved to me that whatever “multiplying” has occurred has been

anything but “swift,” and is actually comparably negligible. Ian Alterman Upper West Side Beginning in 2007 I have been an advocate, writing published letters all to do with the bike situation. Since that time I have been a believer in licensing bikes and very vocal about it. When it hits you in the pocket perhaps there will be some of these selfish, arrogant bikers who will change their mindset; plus think of the extra funds for the city. I am not young and had many near hits, but the most frightening was walking out of my building one day and a man wearing a suit and a helmet rode directly in front of me — what a heart-stopper. He should have

known better. Our former DOT Commissioner Janette Sadik-Khan and former Mayor Bloomberg were in love with bikes and bike lanes. How often did they attempt to step in a bike lane or cross a street to find that bikers feel they own the road, going through red lights, against traffic and on the sidewalk? I notice that the Citi Bike riders are quick learners. They, too, are doing the same. Is there no one to help pedestrians of all ages? Bunny Abraham Upper West Side

TOWN HALL CROWD How can the direction of an important article (“UWS Residents Decry

Proposed Supertall Building,” May 11-17) be subverted in the first three words [“Around 80 people ... “] of the article? This happened to be a very important neighborhood meeting with regard to the proposed skyscraper [at 200 Amsterdam Avenue]. The location was moved to accommodate the increased interest/attendance for the town hall meeting. Put another way, 80 does not do any kind of justice to the actual number of attendees, and seems to minimize neighborhood and civic interest. The larger venue held far more than the 80, and chairs were being added for most of the several presentations to accommodate arriving individuals. Manfred Fuchs Upper West Side

TRANSITIONING EAST SIDE OBSERVER BY ARLENE KAYATT

Where the bus doesn’t stop — Riders who take the uptown M101, M102, M103 on 14th Street and Third Ave may think they’ve hit pay dirt with a bus stop on the northeast AND the southeast corners. Odd for sure but maybe to accommodate the busy location. Not so fast. Yes, there are two stops, but buses stop only at the southeast corner. Good old MTA has a huge yellow sign pasted on the kiosk of the original bus stop on the northeast corner announcing that THIS IS THE STOP. Believe it at your peril — you’ll never get to where you’re going if you do. The bus stops ONLY at the southeast corner. So why the misinformation? You won’t find out from the driver (when you get on the bus at the southeast corner). When asked why the two stops and why the sign, his profound and helpful retort: “You’re on the bus now, right?” Wrong. It’s really simple to get this one right. Streets alive again — New businesses are back on the block and opening where once there was emptiness.

The block between 88th and 89th on the west side of Third Ave is coming alive again with the opening of Siena, an Italian restaurant wine bar where the Starlight Diner once was. And mid-block, where Vanilla beauty salon once was, Roma Pizza is opening a second location several stores down from its corner sit-down/takeout pizzeria. Between the old and new locations is an empty store and Wok 88. Don’t know if the corner store will close or if there will be two Roma pizzerias on the same block. My guess is that the new one will be a full service restaurant, and the other will remain a sit-down/take-out. Another Italian restaurant opening on Lexington Ave between 90th and 91st — Marinara — is in the space previously occupied by a kosher pizzeria. In Gramercy, hadn’t noticed that Sal Anthony’s had opened on the northwest corner of Third between 19th and 20th. There was this big splash of white that wasn’t there before — and then it was. It turned out to be the return of an old local favorite. The original Irving Place location lost its lease in a rent dispute years ago. Sal Anthony has other businesses in the Gramercy area — not only a restaurant. And it’s good to have the old

back as new. New game in town — At Third Ave, between 54th 55th Streets, the storefront once occupied by Sam Flax art store — which closed several years ago — will soon be home to Title Boxing Club. The fitness center, replete with punching bags and all things boxing, is opening its second location in Manhattan on the ground floor of the office building at 900 Third, opposite the FDR Post Office and boxed in by Chipotle on one corner and Bank of America on the other. The first location is in the far West 30’s. Interesting commercial enterprises evolving in our town. No doubt that Equinox, with gyms all over Manhattan, will get into the ring and go for the title. Judge time — Upper East Siders who made the cut and came out of the New York Democratic Committee Screening Panel and who are hoping to be on the ballot in November (unless there’s a Primary) are Suzanne Adams, Ariel Chesler and James Clynes. They and the other candidates will learn later this month who gets the party’s nomination. Then the public judging begins.

There are stops for the uptown-bound M101, M102 and M103 buses on both the northeast and southeast corners of Third Avenue and 14th Street. Wait to board on the northeast one and you’ll miss your ride. Photo: Mtattrain, via Wikimedia Commons

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MAY 18-24,2017

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Floodwaters surged into the Manhattan entrance to the Hugh L. Carey Tunnel during Hurricane Sandy in 2012. Future storm events were frequent topics at the Waterfront Alliance’s Waterfront Conference last week. Photo: Jay Fine, via Wikimedia Commons.

KEEPING THE WATERS AT BAY PLANNING City’s waterfront being compromised by Trump administration’s environmental policies, conference attendees say BY MADELEINE THOMPSON

New York City has more than 500 miles of coastline, leading some to refer to the expansive network of waterways as the city’s sixth borough. Protecting and taking full advantage of this resource was the focus at the Waterfront Alliance’s annual Waterfront Conference Wednesday, May 10. The daylong gathering, aboard the Hornblower Infinity on the Hudson River, convened experts and stakeholders on panels that explored maritime job opportunities, climate change and the harvesting of offshore energy sources. While there was plenty of talk about specific steps that could be taken to mitigate the effects of rising sea level and to improve the city’s resilience, a broader tone of anxiety reigned, attributable, the panelists said, to the Trump administration’s approach to environmental policy. Marcia Bystryn, the president of the New York League of Conservation Voters, called President Donald Trump’s view about climate change “a real problem” but suggested that Congress could help thwart some of the administration’s more radical environmental policy changes. “You might not agree with [U.S. Rep. Lee Zeldin of Long Island] on many things, but he is passionate about cleaning up Long Island Sound ... because his constituents care

about cleaning up Long Island Sound,” she said, alluding to the second-term Suffolk County Republican. In her keynote address, U.S. Rep. Nydia Velazquez, whose district includes Lower Manhattan and Brooklyn neighborhoods inundated during Hurricane Sandy, was more circumspect. She said any accomplishments that have been made to preserve and protect the city’s waterways are being undone by the Trump administration. “I am profoundly troubled that many of [Trump’s] environmental policies will turn back the clock on the progress we have made,” she said. “This president has proposed cutting the EPA budget by 30 percent, something that could impair projects like Superfund, which is helping clean up the Gowanus Canal.” Velazquez will soon reintroduce her Waterfront of Tomorrow Act, which would fund studies by the Army Corps of Engineers on protection the metropolitan region’s coast. Newark, N.J., Mayor Ras Baraka said there was a contradiction with regard to Trump’s promises to invest in infrastructure while at the same time he is asking for cuts to the budgets of two federal agencies that support infrastructure: the Department of Transportation and the Environmental Protection Agency. Mayor Bill de Blasio, who also addressed the conference, touted the recently launched citywide ferry service, reinforcing the water-focused message, but said more care and investment was needed. The city, he said, “became great because we were given this beautiful resource to cherish and then somehow it fell out of vogue.” The mayor’s recently pro-

posed budget includes $100 million to finish the greenway encircling Manhattan. “Each successive generation has to do more,” de Blasio said. “We have to get it right. We have to return to our roots.” Catherine Hughes, a former chair of downtown’s Community Board 1, who is deeply involved in resiliency efforts in Lower Manhattan, attended the conference for the first time. She was especially struck by an update on C40 — a coalition of 90 cities worldwide, including New York, whose leaderships have committed to addressing climate change — and wind power. “Right now there is a huge need to fill that gap as you’re replacing fossil fuels, as we’re going off of the carbon-intensive diet, with windmills,” she said following the conference. “It’s very exciting to hear about this offshore wind project moving ahead.” As a resident of downtown who weathered and helped clean up after Hurricane Sandy, Hughes is concerned for her neighborhood. She pointed out that it was featured in the upcoming documentary “An Inconvenient Sequel: Truth to Power,” which she took as a sign that New York City is at the forefront of the issue. “People said the 9/11 Memorial could never flood due to sealevel rise,” she said, recounting part of the documentary. “Fast forward. Then you see all of Lower Manhattan and the Battery Tunnel flooding.” Unless there is significant progress, several of the panelists suggested, it almost certainly won’t be the last time. Madeleine Thompson can be reached at newsreporter@ strausnews.com

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More Events. Add Your Own: Go to chelseanewsny.com

Original Photography by Stephane Munnier

Thu 18 Fri 19 MODERN DANCE FESTIVAL The West Side YMCA, 5 West 63rd St. 7 p.m. $17 “Footprints 2017” — This year’s annual dance festival celebrates innovative works of contemporary creations from diverse new and established voices in N.Y.C. dance. 212-912-2635. ymcamyc.org

TOM GREEN LIVE Carolines on Broadway, 1626 Broadway 7:30 p.m. $35 Tom Green, known for his “anything-goes run as the funniest, most unpredictable personality on MTV,” headlines five shows. 212-757-4100. carolines.com

Sat20

STAGE STRUCK! RECLAIMING HISTORY

MEDITATION STREET RETREAT

New Perspective Studios, 458 West 37th St. 7:30 p.m. $15-$20 Five actors portray Minnie Maddern Fiske, Katharine Hepburn, Bertha Kalich, Eartha Kitt and Clara Morris — women who helped shape the modern theater and made a difference in civic and artistic life of N.Y.C. and the country. 212-630-9945. newperspectivestheatre.org

Damrosch Park, 60 Lincoln Center Plaza 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Free. RSVP. Daylong retreat with Bhante Suddhaso around N.Y.C. The best place to meditate? Right where you are. Monk Bhante Suddhaso, takes group on peaceful meditation tour of the city. buddhistinsights.com

▲RED BULL MUSIC PRESENTS ELZA SOARES The Town Hall, 123 West 43rd St. 7:30 p.m. $45 The Brazilian samba singer brings her undeniable charisma and unforgettable voice to Town Hall. 212-997-1003. thetownhall.org

ART MUSEUM DAY | TOUR American Folk Art Museum, 2 Lincoln Square 1 p.m. Free Celebrate Art Museum Day with special guided tour of “Eugen Gabritschevsky: Theater of the Imperceptible” and “Carlo Zinelli (1916-1974).” Meet in the atrium. 212-595-9533. aamd.org


MAY 18-24,2017

Sun21 LOVE YOUR STREET TREE DAY Garden at Urban Assembly School for Green Careers, 145 West 84th St. Noon-2 p.m. Community tree care, neighborhood cleanup, and general beautification. Demos by NYC Parks Dept., Trees NY and Goddard Greenkeepers. 212-787-1189. west80s.org

▼ISRAEL FILM CENTER FESTIVAL JCC Manhattan, 334 Amsterdam Ave. Festival kicks off with screening of “The Women’s Balcony.” When the women’s balcony in an Orthodox synagogue collapses, leaving the rabbi’s wife in a coma and the rabbi in shock, the congregation falls into crisis. 646-505-5700. jccmanhattan.org

Mon 22 APOLLO 8 | TALK Intrepid Sea, Air & Space Museum, Pier 86, 12th Avenue, at 46th Street 6:30 p.m. Free. RSVP TIME science editor and author Jeffrey Kluger and former NASA astronaut Mike Massimino engage in conversation and Q&A about the space mission that brought the dream of walking the moon within reach.

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212-245-0072. intrepidmuseum.org

NOTHING FORGOTTEN | CONCERT Christ & Saint Stephen’s Church, 120 West 69th St. 8-9:30 p.m. Free The North/South Consonance Ensemble, an American chamber ensemble dedicated to the performance of contemporary classical music from the Americas, perform several works, including Hilary Tann’s “Nothing Forgotten.” 212-787-2755. northsouthmusic.org

Tue 23 CHICKEN & CHAMPAGNE The Fat Monk, 949 Columbus Ave. 7-10 p.m. $75 Chef Rob McCue, famous for his pickle-brined fried chicken is serving a family style dinner with his fried chicken and host of side accoutrements, all paired with some of the finest Champagnes and sparkling wines. 212-837-2334. thefatmonknyc.com

WRITERS ON BEATLES SONGS | BOOK SIGNING Barnes & Noble UWS, 2289 Broadway

7-10 p.m. From Beatlemaniacs who grew up listening to the iconic albums on vinyl to new fans who download the songs on iTunes, each contributor explores a poignant intersection between Beatles history and personal history. 212-362-8835. barnesandnoble.com

Wed 24 OLD CROW MEDICINE SHOW ‘BLONDE ON BLONDE’ The Town Hall, 123 West 43rd St. 8 p.m. $35-$45 High-energy old-time string band pays homage to Bob Dylan’s classic recording. 212-997-1003. thetownhall. org

FROM VENICE TO VIENNA Holy Trinity Lutheran Church, 3 West 65th St. 8-10 p.m. Name Your Own Price $0-$50 Program explores “the cross-fertilization of musical styles between the Venetian Hofkapellmeisters to the Holy Roman Emperor in Vienna, and the German and Austrian composers who spread this Italian Compositional idiom.” 212-877-6815. holytrinitynyc. org

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BRAVE NEW FASHIONS Rei Kawakubo’s avant-garde outfits at The Costume Institute challenge our notions of style and beauty BY VAL CASTRONOVO

She doesn’t consider herself a fashion designer. She says she’s “just an artisan” who produces clothing. She likes the term “worker.” “For [the] more than forty years that I have been making clothes, I have never thought about fashion. In other words, I have almost no interest in it,” Rei Kawakubo, 74, said in 2014. “What I’ve only ever been interested in is clothes that one has never seen before, that are completely new, and how and in what way they can be expressed. Is that called fashion? I don’t know the answer.” Her garments for Comme des Garçons (“Like the Boys”), the label she founded in 1969, are not fashionable, either, in the traditional sense. More like sculptural objects than clothing, especially in recent years, they are bursting with imperfection — tears, frayed edges, exposed seams, wild asymmetries — and outlandish embellishments such as baby dresses and teddy bears.

The works are concrete manifestations of Zen “koans” or riddles, meant to defy description. The show’s subtitle, “Art of the In-Between,” refers to the esoteric concept of “in-betweenness,” where the koan “mu” (emptiness) and its kin, “ma” (space), coexist. Kawakubo’s designs live in the spaces between the show’s nine opposing themes: Absence/Presence; Design/ Not Design; Fashion/Antifashion; Model/Multiple; Clothes/Not Clothes; and so forth. These spaces “[offer] endless possibilities for creation, re-creation, and hybridity,” Andrew Bolton, curatorin-charge of The Met’s Costume Institute, said at a preview of the spring exhibit of some 140 garments by the avant-garde designer, dating from her Paris debut in 1981 to the present. Born and based in Tokyo, this disrupter doesn’t care about femininity or traditional notions of beauty. What she cares about is projecting strength and power in her designs — and going where no clothes-maker has ever gone before. She’s an innovator with a punk sensibility. A bomb-thrower. “Rei doesn’t like to explain her work. She prefers her clothes to speak for themselves,” Bolton said. She dis-

Gallery View, Clothes/Not Clothes: War/Peace. © The Metropolitan Museum of Art

Rei Kawakubo (Japanese, born 1942) for Comme des Garçons (Japanese, founded 1969), 18th-Century Punk, autumn/winter 2016–17; Courtesy of Comme des Garçons. Photograph by © Paolo Roversi; Courtesy of The Metropolitan Museum of Art trusts words. So much so that there is virtually no text in the show, aside from some titles and numbers on the floor — and a booklet you can grab at the entrance for guidance. “We wanted people to engage with Rei’s fashions on a more personal and intimate level,” the curator said. Caroline Kennedy, a former U.S. ambassador to Japan, paid eloquent tribute to the designer, her friend, at the preview: “Rei’s work is beautiful. It transcends age and gender, it reconnects us with silence, it makes us look more carefully at the things we take for granted.” The design of the exhibition is as unconventional as the clothes. The walls are pure white, and the mannequins appear in geometric structures that, in an aerial view, look like a collection of stadium bowls, silos and boxy spaces — the architecture of a small community in a galaxy far, far away. “There is no prescribed route through the exhibition,” Bolton said, noting that the collections are not presented in chronological order. A walkthrough feels very free and liberating, if somewhat disorienting — like the outfits themselves. Kawakubo is only the second living designer to be given a solo show at the costume museum; Yves Saint Laurent was the first in 1983. Bolton praised her ability to think abstractly. She

Rei Kawakubo (Japanese, born 1942) for Comme des Garçons, (Japanese, founded 1969), Blue Witch, spring/summer 2016; Courtesy of Comme des Garçons. Photograph by © Paolo Roversi; Courtesy of The Metropolitan Museum of Art

comes up with the idea for a piece, and the patternmakers on her staff have the job of translating the concept into an actual garment. As one patternmaker said in 1990, per the show’s catalog: “Once [Kawakubo] gave us a piece of crumpled paper and said she wanted a pattern for a garment that would have something of that quality.” The inspiration comes from within — not from other designers and typically not from history or a particular culture or place, she claims. “The concept could be anger, energy or an aspiration to make something strangely shaped,” she has said. Self-taught, she’s guided by intuition and instinct; her designs are distinctly non-political and convey no social messages. The fashions conceal rather than reveal the female form and, by implication, take issue with male designers who create sexy, flesh-baring looks. The clothes are over-the-top strange and weird, which is how Kawakubo likes it because she is constantly in search of “newness.” Fabric is wrapped around bodies — draped, knotted, bunched and padded. Her seminal 1997 collection, “Body Meets Dress — Dress Meets Body,” boasts down-filled bustles and other protrusions in gingham. A harbinger of future disruption, it was dubbed “lumps and bumps” by the critics.

In 2014, Kawakubo abandoned making clothes altogether, opting instead to create “objects for the body” that take on a life of their own. The results, labeled Clothes/Not Clothes, mark the fulfillment of her mission to create “forms that have never before existed in fashion.” Akin to sculpture and performance art, the pieces “exist as purely aesthetic and abstract expressions,” the booklet states. The collections “Blood and Roses” (2015), “Blue Witch” (2016) and “18th-Century Punk” (2016-17) typify the new direction. “Kawabuko confronts expectations of fashion and subverts them,” Bolton said. “She is one of the bravest designers out there.”

IF YOU GO WHAT: “Rei Kawakubo/Comme des Garçons: Art of the In-Between” WHERE: The Costume Institute at The Met Fifth Avenue WHEN: Through Sept 4 www.metmuseum.org/


MAY 18-24,2017

INTERSECTIONS CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 the bicyclist has the right of way,” Council Member Helen Rosenthal, one of the bill’s sponsors, said in a telephone interview after the legislation was passed. “As I learned about the different street engineering ideas, the Barnes Dance stood out as something that could make a real difference addressing exactly this problem.” The Barnes Dance takes its name from Henry Barnes, who served as New York City’s traffic commissioner in the 1960s and implemented the signal pattern at a number of prominent crossings during his tenure. The Dance fell out of favor with transportation planners in the decades after Barnes’ death in 1968, but in recent years the scramble has been reintroduced in several cities, including Los Angeles and Washington, D.C. Rosenthal and other supporters feel that Barnes Dance crossings could mitigate the risk posed to pedestrians by turning vehicles — particularly those turning left — at dangerous intersections. According to the DOT, vehicles making left turns account for more than twice as many pedestrian and cyclist fatalities as those turning right. Advocates say that the Barnes Dance ensures better outcomes by eliminating this conflict between vehicles and pedestrians, so that neither share the right of way concurrently. DOT has focused on several strategies to make dangerous intersections safer, including the installation of left turn signals, physical cues like rubber curbs intended to slow vehicle turning speeds, and “leading pedestrian interval” signals, which give pedestrians a head start crossing intersections before vehicles proceed. But the department has not moved towards reintroducing the Barnes Dance on a wide scale at hightraffic crossings. “We tend to shy away from it more now than we used to,” Sean Quinn, senior director of the DOT’s Office of Bicycle and Pedestrian Programs, said at a November 2016 hearing on the legislation. As of November, the Barnes Dance was employed at 89 intersections in the city, often in the outer boroughs at intersections with lower pedestrian and vehicle volumes, Quinn said. At high-traffic intersections of the type that the DOT will study in response to the new law, the DOT has instead usually opted to implement alternative measures, due in part to certain draw-

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backs associated with the Barnes Dance. In areas with high pedestrian volume, Quinn noted, the Barnes Dance’s additional signal phase can cause increased sidewalk congestion at corners because pedestrians must wait longer to cross. Additionally, he said, the Barnes Dance requires increased signal time during the pedestrian phase to accommodate walkers covering longer distances by crossing diagonally. Combined, these signal timing factors can have broader implications for the movement of vehicle traffic on the surrounding grid. “It’s not out of our toolkit,” Quinn said. “It’s just not one of our newer tools that we’re really applying to these more congested locations.” The recently passed legislation does not specify the crossings to be studied by DOT (the department will be responsible for identifying locations that might benefit from the Barnes Dance), but Rosenthal believes one intersection in her Upper West Side district — where West End Avenue meets 96th Street — is an ideal candidate. “Coming south on West End and then turning on 96th seems to be one of the places that’s jammed up, and it’s a place where pedestrians and cars are really fighting,” she said. “The cars want to turn and the pedestrians are crossing. And that’s exactly where you would want something like a Barnes Dance so traffic would be stopped in every direction.” “We approach intersection design with an open mind and design to the context,” a DOT spokesperson said after the legislation was passed last week. “We implement several types of exclusive pedestrian phasing and protected pedestrian movements on a regular basis. For new changes and enhancements at our priority locations, we think that tools such as ‘split’ leading pedestrian interval phases [which give crossing pedestrians a head start while allowing non-turning vehicles to proceed through intersections] may often be the best choice for protecting pedestrians with conflict-free crossing time.” The law directs the DOT to submit a feasibility report to the mayor and City Council by August 1. It requires the DOT to study the potential use of the Barnes Dance at high-crash intersections, but does not bind the department to ultimately implement the crossing method. Michael Garofalo can be reached at reporter@ strausnews.com

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BOSTON BROTHERS BRING BURGERS RESTAURANTS Wahlbergs land in Yorkville BY LORRAINE DUFFY MERKL

You would’ve thought that Marky Mark was flipping patties, Donnie was waiting tables, and Jennie McCarthy was the hostess. There was an hour-long wait last Friday night to get into the new Wahlburgers restaurant on Second Avenue near 85th Street, which celebrated a soft opening on May 11. They don’t accept reservations, so it’s first-come, first-served. My 19-year-old daughter, Meg, whose idea it was to dine there, and I put our name on the list at 7:30 p.m. and were told they would text us when the table was ready. My husband, Neil, was meeting us in front. As he is not big on “waiting” in general, and less so for a seat at a burger joint, I hoped for major train delays — the later he arrived the better. When Neil caught up with us at 8, he retained his sense of humor to get us through what turned out to be the remaining 40 minutes of our anticipated seating. During that time,

I observed UES behavior at its finest. There were the people who walked by wanting to know what everyone was standing around for, looking a bit perturbed that they were out of the loop about the invasion of the Bostonian brothers (Mark, Donnie and Paul, the chef, are the owners). Others would approach the young host to be added to his iPad seating list. Upon being told the length of the wait, each and every one would shake their heads and declare, “That’s ridiculous,” stomp away, confer with the rest of their party, then return to give the young man their names. And what would a “velvet rope” (albeit an invisible one) situation be without the cajolers, pleaders and combatants. To his credit, the sentinel with the iPad was poised and polite, while he remained firm that no one would be cutting the line. Last but not least, there was the take-out contingency, who thought they would show up we “list people” by heading around the corner to 85th to put in their order. That stay was no less daunting. When I tired of people-watching, I was entertained by the four, large monitors behind the bar (yes, they serve booze) that can easily be viewed

from the street. One was tuned to the Mets game, with the other three running the same behind-the-sceneswith-the-Wahlbergs footage on a loop. I would be remiss not to stress that Wahlburgers is indeed a familyfriendly establishment. In fact, its ethos is on the wall at the entrance: Growing up in Dorchester, MA with 9 kids in a triple decker house, we didn’t have much, but we had each other, & that’s what mattered most. In the toughest of times we always made the best of times. And for us, no time was better than sitting at the table together, sharing good food, a few laughs, and lots of love! At Wahlburgers we hope to share a little bit of those times with you. When my family finally got the text, and got seated, it was a generally positive experience. The décor is sleek and streamlined, with Kelly green as its signature pop-of-color. The newly trained staff is still finding its footing,

RESTAURANT INSPECTION RATINGS APR 28- MAY 05, 2017 The following listings were collected from the Department of Health and Mental Hygiene’s website and include the most recent inspection and grade reports listed. We have included every restaurant listed during this time within the zip codes of our neighborhoods. Some reports list numbers with their explanations; these are the number of violation points a restaurant has received. To see more information on restaurant grades, visit www.nyc.gov/html/doh/html/ services/restaurant-inspection.shtml.

A Dorchester, Massachusetts, family has got a foothold on the Upper East Side. Photo: Lorraine Duffy Merkl but all were convivial and solicitous. The food is good, but not that much better than the other establishments in our area; in other words, I don’t think Shake Shack will shutter any time soon. Because of its cachet of celebrity, and open, inviting atmosphere, as well as prime location, Meg already has a date to return with her friends. Neil, (“When all is said and done, it’s still just a hamburger,”) and I are satisfied with our lone visit. If I am going to stand around hoping to be a guest, I’ll do my lingering on

Fifth Avenue between 89th and 90th for a table under the limestone aches of Heavenly Rest Stop, the chapelcum-café next to The Church of the Heavenly Rest. The sidewalk seating reminds me of why I love living in NYC and the food is, dare I say, divine. Plus, if I drop dead from waiting an hour for my table, they can hustle me right next door for my funeral. Lorraine Duffy Merkl is the author of the novels “Back to Work She Goes” and “Fat Chick,” from which a movie version is in the works.

Tasti D-Lite

523 Amsterdam Ave

Not Yet Graded (13)

Bella Luna

574 Columbus Ave

Not Yet Graded (24)

Celeste

502 Amsterdam Avenue

Not Yet Graded (25)

Bagel Talk

368 Amsterdam Avenue

Not Yet Graded (15)

Rosa Mexicana

61 Columbus Avenue

A

Pain D’epices

104 West 70 Street

A

Indie Food And Wine

144 West 65 Street

Not Yet Graded (22)

V & T Restaurant

1024 Amsterdam Avenue

Not Yet Graded (15)

Turkuaz Turkish Cuisine

2637 Broadway

A

New York Institute Of Technology

1849 Broadway

Not Yet Graded (40)

Sookk Thai Restaurant

2686 Broadway

C

Sweetgreen

311 Amsterdam Ave

Not Yet Graded (16)

Hunan Park

721 Columbus Ave

Not Yet Graded (17)

Shun Lee

37 West 65 Street

Not Yet Graded (10)

Mokja

852 Amsterdam Ave

Not Yet Graded (18)

The Muffins Shop

222 Columbus Avenue

B

Mcdonald’s

2549 Broadway

Not Yet Graded (14)

Kouzan

685 Amsterdam Avenue

Not Yet Graded (7)

West Side Cafe And Pizza

218 W 72Nd St

A

Pinkberry

2873 Broadway

B

Birdbath Neighborhood Green Bakery

274 Columbus Ave

Not Yet Graded (16)

Manhattan Valley

2636 Broadway

Not Yet Graded (24)

Tenzan Cuisine

285 Columbus Avenue

A

Hamilton Deli

1129 Amsterdam Avenue

Not Yet Graded (7)

La Boite En Bois

75 West 68 Street

Not Yet Graded (12)

Little Italy Pizza

214 W 92Nd St

B

Andanada

141 West 69 Street

A

Cafe86

2350 Broadway

A

My Most Favorite Food

247 West 72 Street

A

Ashoka

489 Columbus Ave

C

Parm

235 Columbus Ave

A

Pizza Pete’s

528 Columbus Avenue

Not Yet Graded (31)

Cafe Bee

239 W 72Nd St

Not Yet Graded (10)

Tessa

349 Amsterdam Ave

Not Yet Graded (27)

Ella Nyc

249 Columbus Ave

A

Nice Matin

201 West 79 Street

Not Yet Graded (15)

Pasha Turkish Restaurant

64 West 71 Street

Not Yet Graded (24)


MAY 18-24,2017

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The Spirit|Westsider westsidespirit.com

POLITICS CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 “It’s cheaper, and it’s probably a lot more fun, too,” she added over a $13.50 Greek omelet with feta and spinach at the Utopia Diner, 267 Amsterdam Avenue near 72nd Street. Indeed, the Stringer campaign, originally focused on a mayoral bid but now gearing up for a re-election race, held nine fundraising meetings and breakfasts at the Utopia over the past two years, tallying a modest $263.95 for meals, an average of just $29.32 per utopian dining. Why the Utopia? Was he keeping campaign costs down? Dining at a place he cherishes? Picking a spot convenient to his West Side home? Those questions, asked repeatedly by this reporter, remained shrouded in mystery because, oddly, the Stringer campaign would not address them. According to CFB filings, Stringer also racked up modest fundraising expenses at the Gee Whiz Diner (motto: “Always Delicious”) at 295 Greenwich Street, and the Good Stuff diner, at 109 West 14th Street. And a political meeting in March at Barney Greengrass, the “Sturgeon King,” 541 Amsterdam Avenue, set him back a mere $17.40. Like most politicians, however, the comptroller can also be susceptible to a sprinkling of stardust: A 2016 fete at Joanne Trattoria — a mecca for Lady Gaga fans at 70 West 68th Street owned by her father, Joe Germanotta — cost the campaign $4,148.41 in “fundraising, catering” costs. Republican Michael Faulkner, the former New York Jetturned-Harlem minister who is vying to unseat Stringer, followed a similar pattern. His campaign reported four payments to the City Diner, a 24hour stalwart at 2441 Broadway at 90th Street that says it “specializes in the crafting of mouth-watering meals.” The average tab: $45. But Faulkner also dropped $10,479 at the Harvard Club, at 35 West 44th Street, a bastion of the Manhattan establishment since its founding in 1865. His campaign wrote six separate checks in 2015 and 2016 to pay for “fundraising meetings, hotel rooms ... events, beverage service,” filings show. That bifurcation of political fundraising venues — the grand and often stuffy on the one hand, the relatively modest or lumpen on the other — is a common thread in campaign finance documents. And surpris-

The exterior of the Harvard Club on West 44th Street, a block known as Clubhouse Row where politicians have been raising funds for more than a century. Photo: Wally Gobetz, via flickr Met Council is accepting applications for the waiting list of affordable housing rental apartments in our building located at 351 East 61st Street, NY. For one person households, applicants must be 62 years old at the time of application; for two person households, both applicants must be 62 at the time of application.

Keens Steakhouse off Herald Square, also known as Keens Chophouse, where Mayor Bill de Blasio spent campaign funds. Photo: Leonard J. DeFrancisci, via Wikimedia Commons ingly, the latter can sometimes cost more than the former. Take the twin campaign launches of Upper East Sider Rebecca Harary, who is running as a Republican for the City Council seat being vacated by Councilman Dan Garodnick, a Democrat first elected in 2005 and barred by term limits from seeking a fourth term. Her formal March 29 kick-off took place at the Metropolitan Republican Club, 122 East 83rd Street, which was founded in 1902 and numbered Mayor Seth Low and President Theodore Roosevelt among its members. The storied club’s venue fee: $300. For a second, less formal event at Saba’s Pizza, 1217 Lexington Avenue at 82nd Street,

Harary shelled out $618 for kosher pizza. As for Garodnick, who has continued to raise money for an undeclared office, his campaign spent $2,009 in December 2014 for a fundraising event at the World Bar in Trump World Tower, 845 United Nations Plaza at 48th Street. Billed as the spot “Where Manhattan Meets the World,” the bar is famed in Turtle Bay for its Remy XO-based “World Cocktail,” which will set you back $50, as well as the comparatively cut-rate “World Peace Cocktail,” which goes for $12. Garodnick also held another fundraiser in 2015 at the Brass Monkey, 55 Little West 12th Street, forking over $2,400 for

the space, which brands itself an “unpretentious Meatpacking District pub with a roof deck.” And then there is Upper East Side City Councilman Ben Kallos and his penchant for Bagel Bob’s on York, where CFB filings show his campaign spent $239 in 2015, $468 in 2016 and $600 so far this year on the singular New York foodstuff. Kallos, who is running for reelection, says he uses his political funds to buy bagels for the scores of residents who show up every year for his State-ofthe-District Speech: “I hope they come to hear me,” he said. “But it is very possible that many of them come for Bagel Bobs.”

Mamapalooza! Sunday, May 28, 12-5pm Pier I @ 70th St Celebrate all families and fierce feminists at our annual festival featuring live music, art, activism, vendors and wellness.

Current Rent Range studio: $940.75 - $1281 Income Range: $39,830 - $53,440 (1 person household) Current Range 1 bedroom: $1052.10 - $1375 Income Range: $44,364 - $53,440 (1 person household) $44,364 - $61,120 (2 person household) Current Range 2 bedroom: $1300.53 - $1409 Income Range: $54,341.20 - $61,120 (2 person household) Monthly rent includes heat, hot water and gas for cooking. Seniors will be required to meet income guidelines and additional selection criteria to qualify. Income guidelines are subject to change. One application per household. Applications may be downloaded from: www.metcouncil.org/housing or requested by mail from Met Council: 351 East 61st Street Residence 120 Broadway, 7th floor New York, NY 10271 Please include a self-addressed envelope. No broker or application fee.

Met Council is accepting applications for the waiting list of affordable housing rental apartments in our building located at 334 East 92nd Street, NY. For one person households, applicants must be 62 years old at the time of application; for two person households, the applicant must be 62 and the co-applicant 55 at the time of application. Current Rent Range studio: $848.47 - $1281 Income Range: $36,138.80 - $53,440 (1 person household) Current Range 1 bedroom: $950.41 - $1375 Income Range: $40,296.40 - $53,440 (1 person household) $40,296.40 - $61,120 (2 person household) Monthly rent includes heat, hot water and gas for cooking. Seniors will be required to meet income guidelines and additional selection criteria to qualify. Income guidelines are subject to change. One application per household. Applications may be downloaded from: www.metcouncil.org/housing or requested by mail from Met Council: East 92nd Street Residence 120 Broadway, 7th floor New York, NY 10271 Please include a self-addressed envelope. No broker or application fee.


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The Spirit|Westsider westsidespirit.com

MAY 18-24,2017

Business

REIGNING CATS AND DOGS Avanti Press pushes the greetingcard envelope BY GAIL EISENBERG

One company has been in the business of cranky cats and anthropomorphized dogs long before they started breaking the internet. Colleagues dismissed Rick Ruffner when he employed photography as the primary medium for greeting cards to launch Avanti Press in Detroit in 1980. Years later, those same naysayers also balked when he began using dog and cat images. As it turns out, the joke is on them. “Rick takes great pride in not listening to the general consensus and successfully striking out into new frontiers. Avanti is now published in 30 countries and 12 languages, and we all know animals rule,” says Dave Laubach, Avanti’s Director of Design since 1998, based in New York. After nearly two decades at Lever Brothers, a Fortune 100 company that inhabited an entire building, it

was a bit of culture shock for Laubach to transition to the small, privatelyowned business to run the West 18th Street office of nine. But he quickly acclimated, and by all accounts loves his gig. “Having daily discussions about alpacas, chickens, and prairie dogs is so unlike corporate America. It’s a dream job. Just being able to come up with funny ideas every week is gift from the universe,” says Laubach. Ruffner’s passion to support his hometown has been a critical factor in maintaining Avanti headquarters in downtown Detroit for thirty-seven years. However, during the pre-internet days, when all of Avanti’s images were licensed from New York City stock photo agencies, it was advantageous to have a satellite office. Today, the New York location also affords them access to a wide variety of photographers and other creative resources. “I confess; I attended a lot of photo shoots early on,” says Laubach. “We

Avanti Press, 2017 LOUIE Award-nominated cards: Exercise Cat, and The Pug in the Afro Wig. Photo: Ryan Segedi

generally want as many of the litter as we can get. As you can imagine, herding kittens is a lot more challenging than working with a trained dog — but it’s so fun.” Women continue to buy the lion’s share — about 80 percent — of all greetings, though much has changed during Laubach’s tenure in the industry. Price points have increased substantially with consumers paying over $10.00 for some cards, and digital greetings have dipped into market share. “We assume a certain amount of business may have moved to digital, but the industry’s retail sales remain steady at $7 to $8 billion a year,” says Laubach. “It’s more likely to be techsavvy younger consumers purchasing digital greetings. Still, there are certain occasions like wedding, sympathy, and bridal shower, where digital cards don’t cut it.” The internet and its numerous social media outlets have also opened up avenues for the global humor brand to find inspiration. “Nothing is off limits. We scout everywhere — Instagram, Pinterest, Facebook, Flicker, you name it,” says Laubach. “If there’s an image we like, we try to license it. In fact, we have an advertising image from a pharmaceutical company that was licensed before I started working here, and it’s still in our line today.” The Avanti line skews more unisex, with images and captions that also work well for kids. A*Press, the company’s graphics-based card offerings often employ glitter and deliver a sassier and more sophisticated level of humor. The group will unveil their

Dave Laubach, Avanti Press Director of Design, with this year’s LOUIE Award nominations, The Pug in the Afro Wig and Exercise Cat. Photo: Ryan Segedi

new America collection at the National Stationery Show held at the Javits Center on Sunday, May 21. The line contains images and stories from the ‘20s through the ‘60s that capture America’s heart, humor, and history. Later on Sunday, it’s on to the Edison Ballroom for the LOUIE awards ceremony — the Oscars of the greeting card industry — where two Avanti entries will vie for top honors: The Pug in the Afro Wig, a get well card in the under $4.00 category, and Exercise Cat, a lenticular, or 3-D, card in the over $4.00 birthday category. The cat’s leg moves up and down in sync with the woman on the TV set behind her while the effort shows on her face. Inside, the verse reads: “The price we pay for having our cake and eating it too. Happy Birthday.” “It’s our first card ever nominated in the Birthday over $4.00 category, the toughest to compete in,” says Laubach. Team Avanti has garnered over forty of the prestigious awards since the Greeting Card Association launched

ON THE SIDE STREETS OF NEW YORK ‘CESCA — 164 WEST 75TH STREET Since opening in 2003, ‘Cesca has become a fixture in the neighborhood — an integral part of the community. There are people who dine here several times a week, and over the years the staff has welcomed families who are now returning with the next generation of little ones. In the beginning, “’Cesca was celebrity-driven,” according to a manager. Tom

Valenti started as the executive chef with Food Network’s Amanda Freitag as chef de cuisine. Both have since left the restaurant, but the menu continued to evolve. For several years, Chef Kevin Garcia has run the behind-the-scenes kitchen operation, and the Italian menu is outstanding. To read more, visit Manhattan Sideways (sideways. nyc), created by Betsy Bober Polivy.

Photo: Tom Arena, Manhattan Sideways

the annual event in 1988. As for whether more Avanti card buyers are cat people or dog people on the whole, well, the pussies have been outperforming their archenemies in recent years. “Cat people seem to love all cats, while dog people tend to be more breed-specific in their passion,” says Laubach. “We usually have a general idea of how well cards will perform, but it’s really fun when we’re surprised by what appeals to the consumer at retail. Currently, the best-selling cards are two chickens, a prairie dog, and a gorilla. Who knew?” For more information about Avanti Press go to www.avantipress.com Follow Avanti on social media: Instagram @ avantipress and Facebook @avantihumor The National Stationery Show takes place May 21 — May 24 at The Javits Convention Center. www.nationalstationeryshow.com


MAY 18-24,2017

The Spirit|Westsider westsidespirit.com

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MAY 18-24,2017

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MAY 18-24,2017

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YOUR 15 MINUTES

To read about other people who have had their “15 Minutes” go to westsidespirit.com/15 minutes

TONY ROBERTS’ NEW YORK We sat down with the iconic actor and discussed his bromance with Woody Allen, growing up in the city and his new movie role BY ANGELA BARBUTI

When Tony Roberts walks around Manhattan, he often gets stopped with questions like, “Where do I know you from?” or “What have I seen you in?” This proves difficult to answer since the actor has enjoyed a five-decade career on stage and screen and is still working. Those encounters were the inspiration behind the title of his memoir “Do You Know Me?” which chronicles his lifelong acting journey with varied roles ranging from leads on Broadway to soap opera stardom to six Woody Allen films. It quickly becomes apparent that he could not tell his story without New York City being a significant backdrop. Not only at the start of his career-attending PS 6 on the Upper East Side and taking an acting class at the 92nd Street Young Men’s Hebrew Association – but later on for moments such as when Allen introduced himself backstage during Roberts’ run in “Barefoot in the Park,” or having a recent conversation about fame with a woman while sitting in Central Park. And at 77, he is still sought after in the industry. He added audiobooks to his prolific resume, lending his voice to the novels of Stuart Woods. And he was offered a role in the “Dirty Dancing” remake, which will air on ABC on May 24.

How did being raised in Manhattan shape your career? I had a tremendous advantage growing up here, not just because it’s New York, which is such a great place compared to any place else, in my opinion. But my father was in the broadcasting business, so I was able to see actors rehearse and perform when I was young. And that was an amazing revelation to see them pretending to be other people in an imaginary story. They played cowboys, gangsters, politicians, anything you can think of. They used different accents. And yet, they were these people who said hello and gave me a hug when I came in and then turned themselves into these other things. For kids with imagination, this was like an open door to pretend. So I was blessed to be exposed to all that at an early age.

Your father started as an actor and then became a successful radio announcer. He gave you a lot of advice when you were starting out, including encouraging you to hit the streets to give out your resume. Explain how actors looked for jobs in those days. Well, there was actually a little publication that came out every month called “Ross Reports,” which listed all the casting agencies in the city. There were no computers or iPhones, so you had the advantage of going yourself and opening a door and having somebody say, “Get out, we’re not taking any resumes today.” But that secretary who told you to get out would be the agent a year from then. She would have moved up inside that company. Well, they need their own clients; they don’t want somebody else’s clients. So the door is open for you to become the new client. But to do it, you have to prove that you’re ambitious and responsible, and that doesn’t mean showing up once or 20 times either, because then you become a stalker. But it becomes knowing when you have something to offer. So if you’re in a play or get a job, then you go back to all of them … . People who think you walk in and it happens, it doesn’t. But if you put your foot in 10 doors, there’s a chance one or two will open.

You explained that people liked your rapport with Woody Allen on camera, which is also your relationship in real life. Why do you think that is? There was a nice article in the New Yorker by Richard Brody about the relationship between Woody and the movies and he referred to it as a “bromance.” And he tried to explain what it was. Nobody knows what it is. It resonates. Most people want to

Shane Harper, Colt Prattes and Tony Roberts in “Dirty Dancing,” airing May 24 on ABC. Photo: © 2016 American Broadcasting Companies. know why we call each other Max and there’s a story behind that, which is in the book. But it was his genius to know that everybody who’s really friendly talks to each other with nicknames that are true only to those two people. And that gave it an authenticity right away. It was also because we are the same, but different. We’re both from New York City, but he’s from Brooklyn. He grew up in a crazy household of relatives and noise and not a lot of money. And I grew up in Manhattan with a very sophisticated, enlightened crowd of performers and actors. But there was something that connected us about being maybe Jews. Maybe neither one of us was particularly athletically gifted. He would hate for me to say that because he’s more athletically gifted than I am, but he doesn’t look like it. But mostly it was the way he wrote us. He was as surprised by it as anybody. Because when “Annie Hall” came out, he said, “You know, I hear a lot from people who say they like our schmoozing.”

After “Annie Hall,” people started recognizing you more in Manhattan, which still continues to this day. You talk about some of those encounters in the book. Tell us one of those stories. The first one that comes to mind is Joe Biden. He poked his head out of a

hotel lobby as I went by on Park Avenue and couldn’t wait to shake my hand and thank me for everything I’d done. And I thought, “What did I do that Joe Biden thinks I’m important?” But every time it happens it’s so startling. If you go out of the house in the morning thinking you’re going to be recognized, you’re going to be very disappointed. So you learn, if you live by the sword, you’ll die by the sword. So you don’t expect to be recognized to protect yourself from the ego of thinking, “Why don’t they know who I am?” So instead, you think, “Nobody’s going to know who I am, nor should they.” And then every time it happens, whether it’s an anonymous person from around the corner, or whether it’s Joe Biden, it’s a lovely surprise.

How did your role come about in “Dirty Dancing?” What was that like? They offered me the part. I wish I knew how I got the part because it’s rare you get an offer out of the blue, usually they want you to audition. And I don’t even know to this day where this came from, but I’m very glad it did. It took me about four or five weeks to film in North Carolina. I can’t say much about the new one because I haven’t seen it. It took about seven weeks, I guess, to make the whole thing. And I was there for my scenes

and then I left. And I haven’t seen the rough cut of it and don’t even know what parts are in and out of my own performance. There are more plot lines than there were in the original, if they’re kept in and there’s new music. Some of the music is the same, because some of those were iconic numbers, but there are new ones by new performers. And it’s more ethnically diverse and intentionally. The original one, you can say, is about Jews in the Catskills in 1963. I think that their intention, ABC and Lionsgate, was to make it more universal, with less Jewish identity. My part was originally played by Jack Weston, and we were in a television series together which failed, called “The Four Seasons,” based on the movie of the same name by Alan Alda. Jack and I became pals and he is no longer with us. And Jack played it very Jewish, very broad, almost comical. He was wonderful. It wasn’t written that way for me and I didn’t want to impose a value on it that wasn’t there.

Know somebody who deserves their 15 Minutes of fame? Go to westsidespirit.com and click on submit a press release or announcement.


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The puzzle contains 15 words relating to Thanksgiving. They may be diagonal, across, or up and down in the grid in any direction.

O D Z D H F S U R V I V A L C

Apples Autumn Cheering Corn Drums Football Harvest Leaves Meals Parade Pumpkin Ripe Survival Turkey Yams

ANSWERS L

E

51

52

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53

K

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45

L

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42

G

36

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31 26

27

37

11 1

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2

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39

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40

S A

L A T 4

D O 22

18

F

23

Y O

19

A

G O

15

H O

P

12 5

C

6

B

7

S

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50

E

H O W

30

R

R

34

S

29

I L

49

R

41

33

N O

L A

48

D

O W N

32

A W S 3

44

L

38

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56

P

47

W A

43

S

T

55

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46

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G A 21

14

L

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A

17

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54

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35

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24

25

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20

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16

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10

1 2 5 9 3 6 8

6 1 3 7 9 4 2

3 8 6 4 1 7 5

3 6 4 5 1 8 2 9 7

1 8 5 9 7 2 6 3 4

2 7 9 6 4 3 8 5 1

5 9 7 3 8 1 4 2 6

4 3 8 7 2 6 5 1 9

6 1 2 4 9 5 7 8 3

27 Felt sorry about 28 Thus in Latin 29 Night bird 33 Fresh, in terms of paint 35 __ , the people 37 River in Bavaria 38 Elusive 40 Limit 41 Collect on a surface 43 Country guy 46 Number of Supreme Court judges 48 Cream additive 49 A Simpson 50 Water barrier 51 Evaluating quality 52 Shake a ___! 53 Hang 55 Leaves in a bag

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51 “What ___ can I say?” 54 Outfit 56 Hodgepodge 57 Four quarters 58 Direction 59 Civil Rights heroine, Parks 60 Oval shaped item 61 Shepherd’s locale 62 Lick Down 1 Instants 2 Female servant in India 3 Knowing 4 Prison camp in Russia 5 Dance, when doubled 6 Unidentified aircraft 7 Animal trail 8 Farm noise 9 Governed 10 “Vanilla ___” movie 13 “Party Down” star, Adam 18 Govt. agency 20 Agreement word 22 Kim follower? 24 European coal area 25 Stench 26 Joan __ Arcadia

K V Q B J S A A J D C E P E O

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Across 1 Wood cutters 5 “60 Minutes” network 8 “__ Robinson” Simon song 11 Glow, in a way 12 Quaint dance 13 Saturate 14 Spanish for house 15 Earlier 16 Small rabbit 17 Book keeper 19 Stringed toy 21 Big fuss 23 60’s fashions, for example 26 Mint family member 30 Good looker 31 It’s a wrap 32 BYOB part 34 __ now brown cow! 36 Auspices 39 Spy novelist, John (2 words) 42 Wheeled transporter 44 Roll of dough 45 Rhone river city 47 Sacred song

E U W D D Y V E X G Q F B V V

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P W P N F D R M D Z L X C R I

O D Z D H F S U R V I V A L C

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I P F K S K S N Z S D A M A V

G V X Q Z V R M E P I P L H J

60

R K F M C B V L E A V E S H W

N P A A E N Y Q A E A L X V H

59

I L N Y A U I E D Y A C Y F M

58

5 9

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WORD SEARCH by Myles Mellor

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Level: Medium

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Each Sudoku puzzle consists of a 9X9 grid that has been subdivided into nine smaller grids of 3X3 squares. To solve the puzzle each row, column and box must contain each of the numbers 1 to 9. Puzzles come in three grades: easy, medium and difficult.

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SUDOKU by Myles Mellor and Susan Flanagan

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Westsider 1

MAY 18-24,2017

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MAY 18-24,2017

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PUBLIC NOTICES

NOTICE OF COMPLETION NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING REGARDING THE DRAFT ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT STATEMENT FOR THE PROPOSED AMERICAN MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY RICHARD GILDER CENTER FOR SCIENCE, EDUCATION, AND INNOVATION / CEQR No. 16DPR004M The New York City Department of Parks and Recreation (NYC Parks), as lead agency, has issued a Draft Environmental Impact Statement for the Richard Gilder Center for Science, Education, and Innovation project proposed by the American Museum of Natural History (AMNH or the Museum). A public hearing on the DEIS will be held on June 15, 2017, at 6:00 PM, at the American Museum of Natural History, LeFrak Theater, Enter at Weston Pavilion entrance, Columbus Avenue and West 79th Street, New York, New York 10024. The Gilder Center would be a five-story, approximately 203,000 gross-square-foot (gsf) addition on the west side of the Museum complex, which is located on the superblock bounded by West 81st Street, West 77th Street, Central Park West, and Columbus Avenue, in Theodore Roosevelt Park, City-owned parkland under the jurisdiction of NYC Parks (Block 1130, Lot 1 in the Borough of Manhattan). The proposed project would also include approximately 42,000 gsf of renovations to existing space and alterations to an approximately 75,000 square-foot adjacent area of Theodore Roosevelt Park. The Gilder Center project would integrate the Museum’s scientific research, collections, and exhibitions with its educational programming, provide new innovative exhibition space, improve circulation, and upgrade and revitalize the Museum’s facilities to address critical needs. It would improve the connectivity, spatial logic, and function of the Museum’s interior spaces and service areas. The Gilder Center would largely be set within the area currently occupied by the Museum; three existing buildings within the Museum complex would be removed to minimize the footprint on land that is now open space in Theodore Roosevelt Park, to about 11,600 square feet at grade (approximately a quarter acre). In the adjacent area of Theodore Roosevelt Park, paths, trees and other landscaping would be modified, removed or relocated to accommodate the proposed project. The technical analyses in the DEIS conclude that the proposed project has the potential to result in significant adverse environmental impacts related to transportation, historic and cultural resources, and construction. Proposed measures to avoid, minimize, and mitigate the project’s significant adverse impacts are described in the DEIS; however, the demolition of one of the existing Museum buildings (Building 15) would represent an unavoidable significant impact. A copy of the DEIS can be obtained on-line at http://nyc.gov/parks/amnh-gilder, and is available for public inspection at St. Agnes Library, 444 Amsterdam Avenue, New York, New York 10024, or by contacting: Owen Wells, Director of Environmental Review New York City Department of Parks and Recreation The Arsenal, Central Park, 830 Fifth Avenue, Room 401, New York, New York 10065 Telephone: 212-360-3492 ඵ Fax: 212-360-3453 ඵ Email: owen.wells@parks.nyc.gov Oral and written comments on the DEIS can be submitted at the public hearing. Written comments will also be accepted by NYC Parks at the above address, fax number, or email address until 5:00 PM on June 26, 2017. This Notice has been prepared pursuant to City Environmental Quality Review, Mayoral Executive Order No. 91 of 1977, and the City Environmental Quality Review Rules of Procedure found at Title 62, Chapter 5 of the Rules of the City of New York (CEQR), and the State Environmental Quality Review Act, Article 8 of the New York State Environmental Conservation Law and its implementing regulations found in Part 617 of 6 NYCRR (SEQRA).

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za o Lan i r a M

usi c Festiv

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SAFE HAVEN WEST

o i t i t e p m o C l a c in Vo

17

Sunday o Lanza & Elaine Malb th May 28 11AM - 6PM Broadway 72nd-86th Sts. nual M ari

SIDE BAS

KETBA LL LE AGU E

albin M e n Elai

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OR F N IO T I L COA

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30th Annual

Mario Lanza & Elaine Malbin

VOCAL COMPETITIONS 1:30 - 5 PM MAIN STAGE Bway & 86th St 20 Tenors & Sopranos Free Seating

2 AWARD

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to Mel Wymore Wymors

to Melissa Elstein

Host ale cH i r t a P

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