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The local paper for the Upper per West Side p Sid A 20TH CENTURY GIANT ◄ P.12

WEEK OF MAY

16-22 2019

THE NYPD’S COMPSTAT AT 25 CRIME The groundbreaking crime analysis tool, which changed the way policing works in the city, continues to play a central role in keeping New Yorkers safe BY MICHAEL GAROFALO

CompStat is definitely much smarter now than it’s ever been.”

From nearly the moment CompStat was introduced in 1994, the New York City Police Department’s cutting-edge crime tracking and performance management system became an instrument of unparalleled influence in law enforcement. CompStat’s implementation here coincided with an unprecedented

20th Precinct Commander Timothy Malin

In the 25 years since CompStat’s introduction, the program’s principles have permeated the NYPD’s organizational structure. Photo: Adrian Owen, via Flickr

drop in crime that saw rates fall by half by the end of the decade — a downward trend that continues with the historic low reported crime totals of today. As the NYPD evolved from the broken windows strategy of the 1990s to the modern neighborhood policing model, CompStat remained as an ever-present tool for judging police effectiveness. CompStat (shorthand for “Compare Statistics”) was hailed as one of the key policing innovations of the era and adopted by departments around the country and world, with varying levels of success. But with its success came critiques that the system’s emphasis on numbers had

PARKS A herd from Rhinebeck, NY will help remove invasive plants and make the land usable for trees and native species BY JASON COHEN

Beginning next week, New Yorkers will have a chance to see goats in Riverside Park. On May 21, the Riverside Park Conservancy is welcoming a herd of 24 goats from Rhinebeck, NY, who will be assisting to remove invasive species

Putting the goats to work is like taking them to an all-youcan-eat buffet. It’s good for us and it’s good for the goats.” Dan Garodnick, president and CEO of the Riverside Park Conservancy

CONTINUED ON PAGE 14

COUNCIL TO MOVE ON VISION ZERO CHECKLIST BILL Legislation would require DOT to consider protected bike lanes, pedestrian islands on all major projects. P. 5

BIG TOBACCO’S KIDS MENU A high school student says the industry is trying to hook young people with flavored “starter kits,” P. 2

CONTINUED ON PAGE 9

GOATS COMING TO RIVERSIDE PARK from a two-acre area of Riverside Park’s woodland. This is part of the conservancy’s ongoing woodland restoration — a chemical-free method of controlling the growth of detrimental species and supporting the ecological health of the park. The goats are from Green Goats in Rhinebeck. Dan Garodnick, the president and chief executive officer of the Riverside Park Conservancy, said the goats will benefit the park and be a really cool thing for people to see. He explained that while this will be the first time goats will be in

INSIDE

GLOBE-TROTTING GOLDEN GIRLS Senior world travelers — especially women — are reshaping the tourism business , P. 15

SUMMER IN THE CITY Reese is one of the goats coming to Riverside Park. Photo: Larry Cihanek, courtesy of Green Goats

Thanks to these cool day camps, city kids don’t have to leave town to have fun, P. 6

Westsider WEEK OF APRIL

SPRING ARTS PREVIEW

WestSideSpirit

WESTSIDE SPIRIT.COM @WestSideSpirit

Crime Watch Voices NYC Now City Arts

3 8 10 12

Restaurant Ratings Business Real Estate 15 Minutes

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NEWS residents A vocal group of U.W.S. Transportation isn’t convinced the doing enough is Committee of CB7 BY LISA BROWN

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MANHATTAN'S APARTMENT BOOM, > PROPERTY, P.20

2015

In Brief MORE HELP FOR SMALL BUSINESS

PROTESTING THE COMMUNITY BOARD OVER TRAFFIC DEATHS

Zero, Mayor Bill One year into Visionreducing trafficfor de Blasio’s plan traffic the number of has related deaths, Upper West Side fatalities on the compared to last actually increased, year’s figures. Upper West Siders -That has some needs to be done convinced more of the Transstarting with members of the local comportation Committee munity board. West mother, Upper Lisa Sladkus, a member of TransSide resident and said she’s fed at portation Alternatives a silent protest up, and organized 7’s February board Community Board residents dozens of meeting, where Committee called for Transportation leaders to step down. against incredible “We have run up imto get safe street trying just problems said. “This was provements,” she our point across get another way to dissatisfied.” that we are very involved with Sladkus has been Alternatives since Transportation served as director 2002 and formerly Streets’ RenaisSide of Upper West She says becoming sance Campaign. really got her into a mother is what activism. streets around me “Just noticing the as a pedestrian I felt and how unsafe she said. “I wanted and as a cyclist,”

9-15

The effort to help small seems to businesses in the city be gathering steam. Two city councilmembers, Robert Margaret Chin and Cornegy, have introduced create legislation that wouldSmall a new “Office of the within Business Advocate” of Small the city’s Department Business Services. Chin The new post, which have up told us she’d like to would and running this year, for serve as an ombudsman city small businesses within them clear government, helping to get bureaucracy the through things done. Perhaps even more also importantly, the ombudsman and number will tally the type small business of complaints by taken in owners, the actions policy response, and somefor ways to recommendations If done well, begin to fix things. report would the ombudsman’s give us the first quantitative with taste of what’s wrong the city, an small businesses in towards step rst fi important fixing the problem. of To really make a difference, for developers will have to is a mere formality their projects course, the advocaterising rents, are the work complete precinct, but chances-- thanks to a looking to find a way to tackle business’ legally quickly. is being done which remain many While Chin their own hours,” of after-hours “They pick out boom in the number throughout who lives on most vexing problem. gauge what said Mildred Angelo,of the Ruppert construction permits said it’s too early tocould have Buildings one the 19th floor in The Department of the city. role the advocate number three years, the Houses on 92nd Street between on the She Over the past is handing out a record there, more information work perThird avenues. permits, bad thing. of Second and an ongoing all-hours number of after-hours of after-hours work problem can’t be a the city’s Dept. with the said there’s where mits granted by This step, combinedBorough according to new data project nearby jumped 30 percent, noise in construction Buildings has efforts by Manhattan to mediate data provided constantly make BY DANIEL FITZSIMMONS according to DOB from trucks. President Gale Brewer of Informa- workers offer transferring cement response to a Freedom the rent renewal process, they want. They city classifies knows the signs Act request. The between 6 “They do whateverthey please. They Every New Yorker some early, tangible small clang, the tion work come and go as of progress. For many sound: the metal-on-metal beeps of a any construction weekend, can can’t come piercing a.m., or on the have no respect.” at p.m. and 7 business owners, that hollow boom, the issuance of these reverse. A glance The increased a correspond after-hours. soon enough. truck moving in has generated can hardly as has led to

SLEEPS, THANKS TO THE CITY THAT NEVER UCTION A BOOM IN LATE-NIGHT CONSTR

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WESTSIDE SPIRIT COM

NEWS

and you the alarm clock middle of the night, believe it: it’s the carries on fulland yet construction tilt. or your local police You can call 311

Newscheck Crime Watch Voices Out & About

The surge in permitsfees for the city in millions of dollars consome residents agency, and left application process vinced that the

2 City Arts 3 Top 5 8 Real Estate 10 15 Minutes

12 13 14 18

variances

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STOP BIG TOBACCO’S KIDS MENU VIEWPOINT A high school student argues that the industry is trying to hook young people with flavored “starter kits” BY KYLA BROWNE

The tobacco industry has a kids menu. Death, disease and addiction now come in new imaginative electronic cigarette flavors like sour candy worms, unicorn milk, and smurf cake. It is no surprise that these companies are tapping into the imaginations of youth and luring them into a candy-coated addiction. Flavors help improve the taste and reduce the harshness of these products, making them

more appealing and easier for youth, like me, to try the product and become hooked for life. My friends who use electronic cigarettes are struggling. It’s not easy for them to stop. Their body craves it and they need it just to get through the day. The growing use of electronic-cigarettes among my peers raises serious concerns about nicotine addiction, and increases the chances of them using regular cigarettes. Electronic-cigarette companies are using many of the same strategies that tobacco companies have used for years. The tobacco industry knows that flavors are most effective in reaching kids and

Kyla Browne speaks at a recent press conference about the importance of protecting youth from the dangers of flavored tobacco products and candy-flavored electronic cigarettes. Photo: Lisa Spitzner

the most dangerous flavor they have in their arsenal is menthol. No single flavor contributes more to the death and disease caused by tobacco use than menthol. For decades the tobacco industry has been targeting people that look just like me. Eighty-five percent of African American smokers in NYC use menthol cigarettes. This is not a coincidence. For

Give the Graduation or Wedding Gift that Lasts Books and Vintage Prints make amazing and thoughtful gifts.

years, the tobacco industry has heavily targeted people in my community. They have used advertising images and messages that reflect my culture to make smoking look normal. In my own family, I have seen firsthand the death and destruction that tobacco causes through heart disease, cancer and more. Menthol tobacco products are also key in the tobacco

industry’s ruthless strategy to transform children into addicted tobacco users. The minty cool flavor makes smoking easier and right now 57% of menthol users are youth. It’s time to stop Big Tobacco’s predatory attempts to hook kids with flavored “starter kits.” Addiction is never sweet or cool. Something I have learned in school is that his-

tory repeats itself and we can’t afford to wait in taking action on these issues. I hope that we will be able to put these things into perspective and work towards a healthier environment for our future generations. Kyla Browne is a student at The Urban Assembly School of Green Careers on the Upper West Side.

NORTHERN MANHATTAN STUDY OF METABOLISM AND MIND

NOMEM The purpose of NOMEM is to learn more about how blood sugar and other factors relate to the brain and mental abilities of persons living in Northern Manhattan. We are seeking your help to conduct this study. You are eligible to participate if you: x Live in Manhattan or the Bronx x Are between 60 and 69 years of age x Are able to do an MRI and a PET scan of the brain

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MAY 16-22,2019

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CRIME WATCH BY JERRY DANZIG ARREST IN ATTACK ON TEEN

STATS FOR THE WEEK Reported crimes from the 24th precinct for the week ending May 5

Police arrested an 18-year-old man who allegedly forced his way into an ex-girlfriendâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s apartment and choked her. On Monday afternoon, April 29, police said, the suspect arrived uninvited at the apartment of a 17-year-old woman living at 965 Columbus Ave. According to the police report, the teen told the man she didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t want him to enter, but when she opened the door to hand him a bag he entered and took her phone out of her hand. She told police that when she told him to leave, he choked her and ripped her sweater, though she never lost consciousness.

Week to Date

VIOLENT PURSE SNATCHING On Thursday afternoon, May 2, a 73-year-old woman was walking down the stairs into the subway station at Central Park West and West 96th St. when a man pushed her against the wall, punched her in the mouth and stole her bag, police said. Chased by two good Samaritans, the supect ďŹ&#x201A;ed to the street, tossing the bag to the ground. The victim was taken to Lenox Hill Hospital, where she was treated for a small cut to her lip and released. Her bag was recovered with all contents intact, except for $50 cash.

Police searched the neighborhood but did not ďŹ nd the perpetrator.

FELONY ASSAULT ARREST At 6:05 p.m. on Wednesday, May 1, two officers from the 24th precinct

2019 2018

% Change

2019

2018

% Change

Murder

0

0

n/a

1

0

n/a

Rape

0

0

n/a

1

6

-83.3

Robbery

4

1

300.0

46

48

-4.2

Felony Assault

3

2

50.0

49

54

-9.3

Burglary

1

0

n/a

23

47

-51.1

Grand Larceny

12

9

33.3

150

212

-29.2

Grand Larceny Auto

2

2

0.0

8

11

-27.3

and pain. The officers subdued the supect, 36-year-old DeShawn Sterlin. A supected crack pipe was recovered from his jacket pocket, police said. Sterlin was arrested and charged with felony assault, criminal trespass and additional offenses.

Photo by Tony Webster, via Flickr

responded to a report of a disorderly man in front of 2549 Broadway. A witness pointed out the man, who was allegedly smoking crack. According to the officers, when they confronted the man he struck both of them in the face with a closed ďŹ st, causing injury

   

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Year to Date

STABBING AFTER BASKETBALL GAME A man was stabbed while trying to break up an argument after a basketball game, police said. The game had ended at West Side High

School at 140 West 102nd St. on Thursday evening, May 2, when several players got into a verbal dispute. According to police, as one man tried to mediate, another man he recognized walked up to him and allegedly stabbed him in the upper left arm with an unknown sharp object, causing a laceration and bleeding. The victim told police the suspect ďŹ&#x201A;ed on foot, heading west on West 102nd St. towards Amsterdam Ave. The victim was taken to St. Lukeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Hospital. Police searched the area but did ďŹ nd the assailant.


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MAY 16-22,2019

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Drawing Board

Useful Contacts POLICE NYPD 20th Precinct

120 W. 82nd St.

212-580-6411

NYPD 24th Precinct

151 W. 100th St.

212-678-1811

NYPD Midtown North Precinct

306 W. 54th St.

212-767-8400

FDNY Engine 76/Ladder 22

145 W. 100th St.

311

FDNY Engine 40/Ladder 35

W.66th &Amsterdam

311

FDNY Engine 74

120 W. 83rd St.

311

Ladder 25 Fire House

205 W. 77th St.

311

FIRE

CITY COUNCIL Councilmember Helen Rosenthal

563 Columbus Ave.

212-873-0282

Councilmember Mark Levine

500 West 141st St.

212-928-6814

STATE LEGISLATORS State Senator Brad Hoylman

322 Eighth Ave. #1700 212-633-8052

State Sen. Jose M. Serrano

1916 Park Ave. #202

Assemblymember Linda Rosenthal

230 W. 72nd St. #2F

212-873-6368

Assemblymember Daniel O’Donnell

245 W. 104th St.

212-866-3970

COMMUNITY BOARD 7 250 W. 87th St. #2 LIBRARIES

212-828-5829

212-362-4008

St. Agnes

444 Amsterdam Ave.

212-621-0619

Bloomingdale

150 W. 100th St.

212-222-8030

Performing Arts

40 Lincoln Center

917-275-6975

Mt. Sinai – Roosevelt

1000 10th Ave.

212-523-4000

Mt. Sinai - St. Luke’s

1090 Amsterdam Ave.

212-523-5898

CON ED TIME WARNER CABLE POST OFFICES

4 Irving Place

212-460-4600

2554 Broadway

212-358-0900

US Post Office

215 W. 104th St.

212-662-0355

US Post Office

700 Columbus Ave.

212-866-1981

US Post Office

127 W. 83rd St.

212-873-3991

Ansonia Post Office

178 Columbus Ave.

212-362-1697

HOSPITALS

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ABOUT US The West Side Spirit is published weekly by Straus Media-Manhattan, LLC.Please send inquiries to 20 West Ave., Chester, NY 10918.

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MAY 16-22,2019

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COUNCIL TO MOVE ON VISION ZERO CHECKLIST BILL SAFETY Legislation would require DOT to consider installing protected bike lanes, pedestrian islands on all major projects BY MICHAEL GAROFALO

Amid an uptick in fatalities on New York City roadways, the City Council is poised to pass legislation that would place new requirements on safety features the Department of Transportation must consider as it redesigns streets. Council Speaker Corey Johnson announced last week that he will hold a vote later this month on Intro. 322, which would mandate that the DOT publish a checklist of 10 street safety elements included in each major street design project undertaken by the agency. Features the DOT would be required to consider include ADAaccessibility, protected bike lanes, bus lanes, pedestrian islands, wide sidewalks and traffic signals with exclusive intervals for pedestrian crossing.

CONTINUED ON PAGE 7

Ydanis Rodriguez, chair of the City Councilâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s transportation committee, speaks at a rally for street safety legislation on the steps of City Hall on May 8. Photo: John McCarten/NYC Council

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SUMMER IN THE CITY CAMPING Thanks to these cool day camps, city kids don’t have to leave town to have fun BY MICHELLE NAIM

Summer can be a difficult time for parents as they search for something for their kids to do besides play Fortnite for 11 hours straight. But New York City has lots of choices, including actual outdoor activities that don’t involve any electronics at all. Here are a few to consider.

(on request and for an extra fee) early drop-off or late pickup. Sign-ups are done on a week-by-week basis. “The excitement really is contagious — they’re outside and having a blast all day, learning new skills, making friends, and exploring different sports,” said camp director Ahmed Cohen.

Ages 4-16 are welcome. Dates: June 3- August 23 Cost: $500 per week. riversideparknyc.org

Riverside Park Conservancy

Central Park Zoo

Put on your hats and sneakers because Riverside Park is bringing a sports camp to your Upper West Side neighborhood. The camp offers single sport options — soccer, baseball, basketball, tennis, and flag-football — and multisport options that combine two sports per day. The camp also offers scholarship opportunities so that everyone can participate. Perks include an on-site medical trainer and

Educational and fun, what better place to spend summer than alongside the (caged) animals at the Central Park Zoo. The toddler camp, KinderZoo (entering Pre-K4K), Week of Wildlife (entering 1st and 2nd grades), Zoo explorers (3rd-5th grades), Junior Keepers (entering 6th8th grades, and Conservation in Action (entering 9th-12th grades) make this the perfect way to get your child to fall in

The Central Park Zoo has day camp programs designed for kids from Pre-K to 12th grade. Photo: Courtesy Wildlife Conservation Society

love with the (caged) wildlife in New York City. Participants get their own camp T-shirt and small, healthy snacks every day. Spots have been filling up fast, but you can get on the wait-list if you hurry! It’s also never too early to think about next summer.

Dates: Each age division has its own dates Cost: Starts at $175 per week centralparkzoo.com

Chelsea Piers For the past 23 summers, Chelsea Piers has been holding its very own sports camp, and every year they add on more options for campers to enjoy. Kids can dabble in a diff erent sport every week with the camp’s flexible enrollment option, or stick to one and become a star. This year, they have 16 different sports to choose from, including gymnastics, ice skating, and even ninja/parkour, to name a few. Many of the camps have “short week options” so you can sign up for as little as two days a week. The camp coaches work at Chelsea Piers yearround, so they are leaders with an abundance of knowledge.

Age: 3-17 Dates: June 17- August 30 Cost: Starts at $385 a week before May 17 www.chelseapiers.com It’s a summer of sports in Riverside Park, where kids from 4 to 16 can improve their skills in basketball, soccer, baseball and more. Photo: Courtesy Riverside Park Conservancy.

iD Tech Camps at NYU: A Silicon Valley family started this camp in 1999 and it now has 150 different locations around the U.S. It’s a great place for kids to kickstart their tech skills. Based in the NYU neighborhood, the camp offerings include coding, game development, robotics, and design. “Our mission is to create life-changing tech experiences that embolden students to shape the future,” says the company’s website. The camp also provides scholarships to children from underserved schools and communities.

brarians have put together for each age group. There’s also a “Read for the Stars Game,” a game board that children can get from their NYPL librarian to track how many minutes (or hours!) they’ve read this summer. Library branches have a Summer Reading kickoff and closing celebration to celebrate the kids’ reading achievements. They’re also holding an essay contest about “How a book you’ve read has expanded your universe.” The winner gets a free trip to a New York Yankees game.

www.nypl.org Ages: 7-17 Dates: June 24- August 9 Price: Starts at $779 per week. There are a couple spots left, but they’re filling fast! www.idtech.com

NYPL Summer Reading: Best part about this program? It’s free and can be done in the comfort of your home if the summer heat is just too much. Start checking off books from the NYPL reading list that li-

Email us at news@strausnews.com


MAY 16-22,2019

VISION ZERO CONTINUED FROM PAGE 5 The legislation stops short of requiring the city to install any measures, but would require DOT to put forth an explanation whenever a design element is not included on a given street. “The bill is fairly modest in what it directs the city to do, but the thinking is that it’s an opportunity for the public to get insight into the street design decisions that are made and what priorities go into them in a much easier way than through the typical community board process,” said Marco Conner, interim director of the safe streets advocacy group Transportation Alternatives. “We’re very hopeful that public scrutiny will pressure the city to prioritize what it should.” NYPD statistics show that 67 people have been killed in traffic collisions so far this year, a nearly 20 percent increase over the same period in 2018.

“It Shouldn’t Be a Heavy Lift” As drafted, the checklist bill

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NYPD statistics show that 67 people have been killed in traffic collisions so far this year, a nearly 20 percent increase over the same period in 2018. would only apply to redesign projects on major arterial streets — which would likely include most avenues and two-way crosstown streets in Manhattan but not most one-way crosstown streets. Transportation Alternatives is advocating for lawmakers to expand the legislation’s scope by forcing DOT to apply the checklist any time it repaves a given length of any street. “We also want to see stronger language around the explanation that the DOT is required to make so that they can’t just make a generic explanation every time that says a given solution is not feasible and leaves it at that,” Conner said. The DOT submitted testimony to the Council last year

in opposition to the bill. Margaret Forgione, the agency’s chief operations officer, said that the DOT’s existing design process already accomplishes the goals of the legislation and that the bill’s increased reporting requirements “would add costs and delay to the delivery of Vision Zero projects and other mobility projects by consuming project staff time at their completion.” “If that’s the case, then it shouldn’t be a heavy lift for them,” Conner said. “All we ask for is public insight into their process, which shouldn’t be too much to ask for.” The administration of Mayor Bill de Blasio has now taken a slightly more conciliatory approach in the face of what is likely to be a veto-proof legislative majority (43 of the Council’s 51 members have signed on as co-sponsors of the bill). In an interview last week on WNYC, de Blasio said he and the Council have “a lot of agreement on the basics,” but his administration has “concerns about some of the specifics of the bill.” The mayor declined to discuss the specific elements of the bill that he objects to.

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Voices

Write to us: To share your thoughts and comments go to westsidespirit.com and click on submit a letter to the editor.

UES DEMOLITION DERBY EAST SIDE OBSERVER BY ARLENE KAYATT

Tall story — There goes another Upper East Side block. The southeast corner of East 83rd Street and Third Avenue is losing the six 3- and 4-story buildings that line the avenue to the demolition crews that have become a part of the UES landscape in the East 70s and 80s since the completion and opening of the Second Avenue subway two years ago. While it may have taken over a hundred years (yes, construction of the UES section of the Second Avenue subway got underway sometime in the 1920s), for the subway to open, real estate developers will have their luxury condominiums

up and running in a New York minute. Demolition plans for the 83rd Street site have been filed, the Real Deal and Patch report. The buildings coming to First Avenue (between 79th-80th, northeast, and between 85th86th, southwest) were scheduled for discussion at the Community Board 8 meeting on May 14th, where representatives of Extell Development were expected to attend. If the past is any prologue, the neighborhood can look forward to the commercial class that’s replacing small businesses — from the Equinoxes to the TD Banks to the Morton Williams’s et cetera, et cetera, et cetera. And maybe a barber shop (they’ve made a comeback) and a gourmet

coffee shop/patisserie. Definitely not a Glaser’s kind of bakery. That’s so yesteryear. Reader readback — In a recent column I noted that Duane Reade on East 87th Street and Third Avenue was adding sales tax to the price of newspapers. A reader posted on my Facebook page asking,”Why WOULDN’T a newspaper get taxed? Books, magazines ... they all get taxed. Why would a newspaper be different?” They further inferred, in a separate post, about the pettiness of caring about paying maybe “17 cents” in tax. To which I say: First, newsprint is tax exempt in New York. Second, so vendors should not be charging tax. Third, some might say that ‘17 cents is 17 cents,’ but if you buy more than one newspaper on a daily basis — like the NY Times for $3, the Wall Street Journal for $3, the Daily News at $1.50, the New

MOTHERS AND MARTYRS BY LORRAINE DUFFY MERKL

When it comes to NYC mothers, people like to talk about Tiger Moms, Helicopters, and now thanks to the college admissions scandal, Snowplows. Perhaps it’s time to address the mothers who don’t have an official catchphrase, but can be described with two words: martyrdom and self-neglect. I just read “The Overdue Life Of Amy Byler,” by Kelly Harms, and it reminded me of my early days of competitive parenthood when I believed that the only way I could hold my own on the UES was by overlooking myself and thinking of my son and daughter 24/7. “Amy” is a single mother from Pennsylvania whose estranged husband resurfaces after four years and wants to reconnect with his children by taking them for the entire summer. Baffled as to what to do with her newfound freedom, Amy happens upon a conference for professional

librarians in Manhattan, with the added bonus of free room and board thanks to her former college roommate Talia, a glossy magazine editor in chief. In exchange for her hospitality, Talia turns Amy’s temporary vacay from her life into a magazine article, giving her friend a hair/makeup/ wardrobe makeover that also includes a diet and exercise regimen. She coins the hashtag Momspringa, (a variation on Rumspringa, when Amish youth live in the city free of their church’s rules), and online teasers citing Amy’s transformation begin to trend. The upshot: Amy confesses that after having time for friends and herself, getting positive attention from men, as well as new, better fitting bras, “Parts of me that were asleep for far too long are starting to wake up.” Amy never wants to go back to her old life. That’s not to say she doesn’t want to go back to caring for her family in Pennsylvania; she just

Photo via amazon.com

doesn’t want to return to living a self-forgetting life. Not only was I one of those “them first, me last” mothers, but I was sanctimonious about it, thinking that the ones who remained “divalicious” were selfish because, after all, if you took time for yourself, you took time away from your kids. I was the mom at the park in the

York Post at $1, the Washington Post for $3 — that comes to $11.50 a day. Tax is over 8 percent, so it’s a considerable multiple of “17 cents” to pay for tax-exempt newsprint five days a week. And that doesn’t include weekend editions, which cost considerably more. While reading online is always an option, some people like reading both print and digital versions, and shouldn’t be punished because there’s newsprint’s in their DNA. Oh, I followed up with Duane Reade to find out why they sometimes taxed newspapers and sometimes didn’t. Response was that there were several registers for payment at Duane Reade and one of them was a Walgreen’s register which was programmed to include tax for newspapers. Cheaper to stick to the DR registers. Looks familiar — Several restaurants, when their leases run out or

overalls looking like a farmer about to harvest the season’s crop, shaking my head at the glamorous mom, wondering, “Who comes to m the t playground in luxury resortworthy shorts and a top? Is that w woman actually wearing Aaron w Basha jewelry by the sandbox?” B As my children got older and their sschedules got heavier, my wardrobe actually devolved from jeans ro to sweatpants, which were more comfortable for running all over the co place. (I spent over a decade out of pl breath — another sign of my dedicabr tion.) What difference did it make? I ti wasn’t going to a ball, only drop off w and pick up, the supermarket, the an basketball game — one of many afba ter-school activities. Oh, and a basete ball cap completed my ensemble. ba Unlike Amy, I did not need a threemonth respite to see the error of my self-disregarding ways. When my son was in seventh grade, my husband and I were invited to a black tie event. It had been a long while since I’d gone anywhere fancy, so I made a hair appointment for a much-needed trim and blowout. Right from there I headed to school for pick up.

the rent’s just too damn high, find themselves relocating. So Effy’s, a Mediterranean restaurant which was located on Third Avenue in the 90s, moved several years ago (the old location is still empty) to 100th Street and Lexington Avenue. They now have another restaurant on the northeast side of Second Avenue and East 72nd Street. Then there’s Pig Heaven, a forever neighborhood favorite which was on Second Avenue in the 80s and has now relocated to Third Avenue in the 80s. And Subway Inn, with its iconic sign, which was opposite Bloomingdale’s on East 60th Street, west of Lexington Avenue, now stands proudly — sign and all — at the entrance to the Ed Koch Bridge on East 60th Street. Good to have old places in new spaces. And Koch must be kvelling with all the attention “his” congestion pricing neighborhood is getting these days. Keeps him out there.

Other moms, teachers and even the principal did a double take. One person actually remarked, “I had no idea what your hair looked like let alone that it was so beautiful.” Someone else cut right to the chase and asked why, given how pretty I was, did I purposely make myself look so frumpy. After seeing myself in the salon’s mirror, I had wondered that myself. What had I gained by ignoring myself? Would the homework really have not gotten done or dinner not gotten made or would the kids have ever missed an after school sport or doctor visit, if I had taken a few minutes to pick out a more fashionable outfit, put on makeup, and style my hair? That day was a game-changer for me and, yes, I do wish I would have had the revelation sooner. Like Amy, my #momspringa moment elevated my self-esteem and made me more pleasant, which turned me from a good mother into a better one to be around. Lorraine Duffy Merkl is the author of the NYC mom-empowerment novel, “Back to Work She Goes.”

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MAY 16-22,2019

COMPSTAT CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 helped produce unreliable crime data and unfair enforcement tactics. So what is CompStat, and how has it shaped policing in New York City over the last quarter century? At its core, CompStat is a management tool used by the NYPD to identify problems and measure the efficacy of its crime fighting strategies. Central to the approach is the computerized real-time collection and mapping of crime and enforcement data across the city. But contrary to a common misconception, CompStat is more than statistical analysis software. Regular CompStat meetings at police headquarters bring together precinct commanders, bureau chiefs and other top executives to evaluate crime reduction strategies and results.

No More Silos The objective is to leverage the vast quantities of information gathered under the CompStat umbrella to effectively target police resources and ensure smooth information flow within the massive bureaucracy of the NYPD. “The NYPD is a behemoth organization, and we have these specialized units that have different levers they can pull to address different crimes,” said Deputy Inspector Timothy Malin, the commanding officer of the 20th Precinct on the Upper West Side. “CompStat is the mechanism that ensures everybody with a stake in the game, who has the potential to affect violence, is doing what they need to be doing and communicating with each other.” John Eterno, a professor at Molloy College and former NYPD captain who has studied CompStat extensively, said the system’s role as a conduit for information is one of its main positive features. “It helps defeat what we call the silo effect, where each of the bureaus in the department were operating separately and distinctly,” Eterno said. “CompStat meetings helped bring together all of the various bureaus and even other agencies which were totally working in the blind from one another before CompStat began.”

The Spirit|Westsider westsidespirit.com Priorities and Best Practices Among CompStat’s calling cards is an aggressive focus on reducing seven major index crimes — murder, rape, robbery, felony assault, burglary, grand larceny and grand larceny auto. Commanding officers are held strictly accountable for results within their precincts at famously intense CompStat meetings, where they must answer to their superiors. “You’re speaking in front of a room in front of all your peers and you’re being questioned directly by the highest-ranking people in the shop,” Malin said. “It’s upper management talking to middle management in front of a room loaded with peers assessing the quality of investigations and noting deficiencies and telling you to improve.” Though the experience can at times be unpleasant for commanders with unsatisfactory results or responses, CompStat meetings engender a clear sense throughout the department of priorities and best practices. “The reason we’re all in the room is so everyone knows what the top brass expects, and then you take that back to your command and apply it to your own issues,” Malin said.

A Crime Prevention Tool Though some of its innovations may now seem like common sense, when it was introduced 25 years ago CompStat represented a paradigm shift within the context of a broader effort to reorient policing toward crime prevention. “The idea of calling the precinct commander and saying, ‘This is your precinct, these are the crimes that are happening, what are you doing about it?’ — it sounds obvious today, but it really hadn’t been done for at least 30 years and perhaps even longer,” said Peter Moskos, an associate professor at John Jay College of Criminal Justice, whose current research is focused on the New York City crime drop of the 1990s. Before CompStat, crime reports were compiled on a quarterly basis and statistics were already months out-ofdate by the time they reached commanders’ desks. In contrast, he information gathered under CompStat could be put to use immediately.

Crucially, CompStat was not itself intrinsically linked to any particular policing philosophy or tactic, and gave commanders latitude to address problems and shoulder responsibility for the results. “CompStat did not provide solutions,” Moskos said. “It just said, ‘You’re smart people. You’re executives here. Figure it out.’ And those that did rose in the ranks and survived and those that didn’t got pushed back.”

Negative Pressures But according to some observers, CompStat’s relentless focus on producing ever lower crime figures has also produced unintended side-effects. “There’s so much pressure on commanders to show up at CompStat meetings and say crime is going down,” Eterno said. “The unsaid message is that otherwise your career is going to be stunted.” Eterno’s research with Professor Eli Silverman of John Jay College has focused on crime data manipulation within the NYPD — “juking the stats,” in police parlance — which he says became commonplace as the directive to post consistent crime drops became a political imperative. “When CompStat started in 1994, a lot of the pressures were absolutely necessary because the department needed a culture shift,” Eterno said. “There was a lack of accountability and a true need to really clamp down on things. But as time went on, the pressure of CompStat continued to get ratcheted up. It never eased.” “We’re finding that the pressures are too much and that the officers are gaming the system to make themselves look better,” Eterno continued, noting that the phenomenon is present not just in New York but in other CompStat departments throughout the U. S. and the world. “What’s happening is that the words on the reports are being changed to downgrade what actually is occurring so that it’s not classified as an index crime,” Eterno said. “Instead of taking a report as a burglary, in many precincts they’re taking them as criminal trespass and larceny. In this way, the crime is broken down into its constituent parts and it’s no longer an index crime.”

CONTINUED ON PAGE 14

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MAY 16-22,2019

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Calendar NYCNOW

Discover the world around the corner. Find community events, gallery openings, book launches and much more: Go to nycnow.com

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May 16 - Sep 22 NEW YORK PHILHARMONIC & WARNER BROS. PRESENT BUGS BUNNY AT THE SYMPHONY II The New York Philharmonic 10 Lincoln Center Plaza 8:00 p.m. $60 nyphil.org 212-875-5656 Classical music gets a fun twist with the Wascally Wabbit and friends. Enjoy classic Looney Tunes projected on the big screen, with their original scores performed live by the Philharmonic. Created by George Daugherty & David Ka Lik Wong. Family-friendly. Open to everyone ages 4 and up.

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Thu 16

Fri 17

Sat 18

112TH: BOOKSTORE POETS VOL. 1

GUTS AND MARROW

â&#x2013;˛ HOMECOMING: A HIP-HOP CARDIO EXPERIENCE

Book Culture 536 West 112th St 7:00 p.m. Free Join and celebrate the launch of bookstore poets vol. 1, a new reading series here at Book Culture, along with the launch of the new chapbook of the same name. The event will feature readings from Allison Albino, Ariel Francisco and Kwame Opoku-Duku. nypl.org 212-595-1962

92Y 1395 Lexington Ave Noon $15 Choreographer Anna Sperber presents new work and is joined by dance makers Jessica Cook, Angie Pittman and Molly Poerstel, working in experimental forms, who situate mystery, animality and aggression within the feminine, and who wrestle with somatic experience and the ďŹ&#x201A;eshy reality of embodiment. 92y.org 212-415-5500

The Joan Weill Center for Dance 405 West 55th St 7:30 p.m. $25 Matthew Johnson Harris, of Ailey Extension, hosts an epic 90-minute HOMECOMING: A Hip-Hop Cardio Experience workshop in celebration of BeyoncĂŠâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s latest album. Students of all dance and ďŹ tness levels will get their heart rate up and tone the body by switching from dynamic to slow controlled movements, all infused with hip-hop swag. aileyextension.com 212-405-9000


MAY 16-22,2019

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SPIRITUAL HEALING       

   

        !!"#$ Patty will explore how a spiritual perspective of God reveals goodness, wellness & freedom. She will share concrete examples of how God's love has brought freedom to people's lives, including her own, from all sorts of challenges.   ! %&&'()  *      (Enter on Central Park West at 68th street)              +*&   Ph:(212)8776100 fccsnyc@aol.com  !! ,       

      Address: 10 West 68th Street

Photo: Evonne via Flickr

Sun 19

Mon 20

Tue 21

LOOPHOLE OF RETREAT FILM PROGRAM

ABT GALA

â&#x2013;˛ LATE NIGHT SESSION: SAM CHESS

The Guggenheim 1071 Fifth Ave 3:00 p.m. Free with Museum Admission This ďŹ lm program features the premieres of a new iteration of Simone Leighâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s video work Untitled (M*A*S*H) (2018â&#x20AC;&#x201C;19) and two shorts directed by Madeleine Hunt-Ehrlich. guggenheim.org 212-423-3500

The Metropolitan Opera 30 Lincoln Center Plaza 6:30 p.m. $25 Join the star-studded red carpet to celebrate Alexei Ratmanskyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 10 years as Artist in Residence with a world premiere and classic pieces from the repertoire. The Spring Gala at the Metropolitan Opera House is the shining jewel of ABTâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s season: an annual special event raising money for the company and its education and outreach programming. metopera.org 212-362-6000

Dizzyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Club 10 Columbus Circle 7:30 p.m. $45 Sit back and relax to trombonist Sam Chess in this late night series thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s sure to get you grooving in your seat. jazz.org 212-258-9595

ACTIVITIES FOR THE FERTILE MIND

thoughtgallery.org NEW YORK CITY

America 2019: Where Are We Now? (And Where Are We Going?)

SATURDAY, MAY 18TH, 2PM NY Institute of Technology | 1855 Broadway | 212-261-1500 | onedayu.com Do democracy and the rule of law still hold the same sacrosanct place they held during the nationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s founding? Hear from professor Sam Potolicchio of Georgetown University as he questions whether weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re experiencing â&#x20AC;&#x153;an erosion of public faithâ&#x20AC;? ($95).

Wed 22

Code Name: Liseâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;The True Story of the Woman Who Became WWIIâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Most Highly Decorated Spy

â&#x2014;&#x201E; ETHICAL DEATH CAFĂ&#x2030;

WEDNESDAY, MAY 22ND, 7PM

New York Society for Ethical Culture 2 West 64th St 2:30 p.m. $5 suggested donation Gather in a relaxed and safe setting to discuss death, drink tea and eat delicious cake. The objective is to increase awareness of death and help people make the most of their (ďŹ nite) lives. Topics include health-care proxy, ethical wills, and green burial. nysec.org 212-874-5210

SPYSCAPE | 928 Eighth Ave. | 212-549-1941 | spyscape.com Bestselling author Larry Loftis will present his new book on Odette Sansom, who served with the Special Operations Executive and survived Gestapo torture and a concentration camp (free).

Just Announced | Neil Gaiman Talks Good Omens with Special Guest Nick Offerman

WEDNESDAY, MAY 22ND, 7PM The Town Hall | 123 W. 43rd St. | 212-997-1003 | thetownhall.org Prep for a new Amazon Prime series based on the novel Good Omens by Neil Gaiman and Terry Pratchett; Nick Offerman, a star of the show, hosts (prices vary; include signed paperback copy).

For more information about lectures, readings and other intellectually stimulating events throughout NYC,

sign up for the weekly Thought Gallery newsletter at thoughtgallery.org.


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MAY 16-22,2019

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IF YOU GO WHAT: “Lincoln Kirstein’s Modern” WHERE: The Museum of Modern Art, 11 West 53rd St. WHEN: Through June 15. www.moma.org

Walker Evans (American, 1903–1975). “Lincoln Kirstein.” c. 1931. Gelatin silver print. The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Gift of the artist. © 2018 Walker Evans Archive, The Metropolitan Museum of Art

A 20TH CENTURY GIANT Lincoln Kirstein, cultural arbiter and co-founder of the New York City Ballet, is the subject of a sprawling show at MoMA, an institution he helped build BY VAL CASTRONOVO

Like Abraham Lincoln, after whom he was named, Lincoln Kirstein (1907-1996) was a tall, imposing figure, “a giant sequoia,” as dance critic Arlene Croce wrote in his obituary. Photographer Walker Evans, a friend, captured the force of his personality and intellect when he commented, “He invaded you; you either had to throw him out or listen to him ... [he had] a really penetrating intelligence about an articulation of all esthetic matters and their contemporary applications.” Indeed, Kirstein considered all the arts his domain, with dance, painting, sculpture, drawing, writing/ editing, poetry and film his pets.

Paul Cadmus (American, 1904–1999). Set design for the ballet “Filling Station.” 1937. Cut-and-pasted paper, gouache, and pencil on paper. The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Gift of Lincoln Kirstein, 1941. © 2018 Estate of Paul Cadmus

He leveraged his wealthy pedigree (his father was a partner in Filene’s Department Store), his Harvard education (class of 1930) and his elite social and professional circle (he was part of an influential network of queer artists, writers and dancers) to support and promote a dizzying array of cultural ventures in the last century.

output and aspirations in the 1930s and 1940s. He may be best known for collaborating with Russian-born choreographer George Balanchine to establish the School of American Ballet in 1934 and the New York City Ballet in 1948. But he was also an ardent champion of literature, the fine arts, photography and cinema, from a young age.

An Ardent Champion of the Arts

A Man and a Museum

His multi-disciplinary approach resonates especially today, now that MoMA is expanding and re-thinking the organization of its galleries, which will include a performance space. Says senior curator Jodi Hauptman: “Sometimes the best way to look forward is to look back, and to dig into moments of our history when we were doing interesting work around the connections between the visual and the performing arts. Lincoln Kirstein offers a kind of lens through which we could look at this earlier period at the Museum and understand his ambition for dance to play a key role.” The exhibit, comprised of some 300 works from MoMA’s collection, focuses on Kirstein’s creative

Upon graduation from Harvard, where he co-founded a literary journal and a contemporary arts society, Kirstein turned his considerable energies to the development of the collection at the newly opened MoMA. He served on the Museum’s junior advisory committee and other subcommittees, indefatigably pitching ideas for exhibits, writing catalog text, donating and acquiring new works for the collection and jumpstarting the “Bulletin of the Museum of Modern Art” (1933-1963) and “Dance Index” (1942-1948). He also established the now-gone Dance Archives and Dance and Theatre Design department, all the while tending to performance ventures such as Ballet Caravan, a touring group he

formed in 1936 to promote the work of American choreographers and set designers. Colorful drawings of costumes and sets for such quintessentially American works as “Filling Station” (1937), “Pocahontas” (c. 1936) and “Billy the Kid” (1938) are on view, with snippets of dances projected on big screens. Associate curator Samantha Friedman notes the importance of American painter Paul Cadmus’s designs for “Filling Station”: “In those designs you see realized Lincoln’s desire to create a uniquely American ballet based on American themes. You have the setting of the gas station as a place where people of all types and social classes come together, but then you get the eroticized male body in a kind of transparent jumpsuit that Mac, the gas station attendant, is wearing. They’re beautiful drawings that embody a lot of what Lincoln was after.”

Devotion to American Themes Kirstein’s intense commitment to creative pursuits outside the performing arts, however — like photography and painting — is one

of this show’s many revelations. In 1931, he persuaded Walker Evans to join him and a poet friend on a road trip through New England and New York to photograph Victorian houses for a (never-realized) book. Kirstein donated the images to MoMA, where they became grist for the Museum’s first presentation of the work of a single photographer in 1933, “Walker Evans: Photographs of Nineteenth-Century Houses.” As the catalog’s meticulous time line records, Kirstein wrote in his diary: “At least a part of my life consists in filling up the ledger of the indigenous past ...” Kirstein’s devotion to American themes extended to his taste in painting, drawing and sculpture. He promoted realist and magic realist works, favoring figuration and painterly precision over abstraction. Hauptman elaborates: “In his version of the modern, it’s an art scaled to the human. And one of the reasons may be because he is really interested in dance and what the body can do.” When he was named consultant on Latin American Art for MoMA in 1942, he traveled to South America to purchase works for the collection. Argentine artist Antonio Berni’s “New Chicago Athletic Club” (1937) epitomizes Kirstein’s preference for hyper-real art with social relevance. Says Hauptman: “The painting gets to a question that the exhibition raises around what it means to be ‘American,’ and proposes links across the hemisphere, a pan-Americanism. The painting shows a team of multi-ethnic kids joining together to play their favorite sport. It is a ragtag group — some are dressed better than others, some have their soccer boots and others are barefoot — so Berni shows us connections across social class as well.” Kirstein’s idea of the “modern,” which prizes representation, social content and continuity with tradition, allows another way to think about modern art.


MAY 16-22,2019

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BEYOND BROADWAY - WEST SIDE The #1 online community for NYC theater:

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Broadway’s 2004 Tony Award winner for Best Musical continues its hilarious, puppet-filled run Off-Broadway.

In the long-running “Drunk Shakespeare,” an actor drinks heavily and then tries to corral others into enacting a story by the Bard.

This rarely-produced drama from Pulitzer Prize winner Sam Shepard offers a portrait of a struggling family in rural California.

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In Roundabout’s world premiere, Obie Award winner April Matthis stars as the first female baseball player to go pro in the Negro Leagues.

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Sean O’Casey’s 1924 drama offers a devastating portrait of wasted potential in a Dublin torn apart by the chaos of the Irish Civil War.

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Sean O’Casey’s 1926 drama centers on a young woman fighting to keep her family afloat, as Ireland stands on the brink of revolution.

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MAY 16-22,2019

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RESTAURANT INSPECTION RATINGS MAY 1 - 7, 2018 The following listings were collected from the Department of Health and Mental Hygiene’s website and include the most recent inspection and grade reports listed. We have included every restaurant listed during this time within the zip codes of our neighborhoods. Some reports list numbers with their explanations; these are the number of violation points a restaurant has received. To see more information on restaurant grades, visit www.nyc.gov/html/doh/html/services/restaurant-inspection.shtml. Perfect Picnic

405 Central Park W

Grade Pending (35) Evidence of mice or live mice present in facility’s food and/or non-food areas.

Joe & The Juice

2460 Broadway

A

Dunkin’

730 Columbus Ave

Not Yet Graded (14) Cold food item held above 41º F (smoked fish and reduced oxygen packaged foods above 38 ºF) except during necessary preparation.

Calle Ocho

45 West 81 Street

Grade Pending (26) Hot food item not held at or above 140º F. Food not cooled by an approved method whereby the internal product temperature is reduced from 140º F to 70º F or less within 2 hours, and from 70º F to 41º F or less within 4 additional hours. Evidence of mice or live mice present in facility’s food and/or non-food areas.

Burke & Wills / Manhattan Cricket Club

226 W 79th St

A

Oath Pizza

2169 Broadway

A

Modern Bread and Bagel

472 Columbus Ave

A

Marinara

483 Amsterdam Ave

A

Amsterdam Ale House

340 Amsterdam Ave

Grade Pending (23) Hot food item not held at or above 140º F. Filth flies or food/refuse/ sewage-associated (FRSA) flies present in facility’s food and/or nonfood areas. Filth flies include house flies, little house flies, blow flies, bottle flies and flesh flies. Food/refuse/sewage-associated flies include fruit flies, drain flies and Phorid flies.

Redfarm

2170 Broadway

Grade Pending (27) Hot food item not held at or above 140º F. Filth flies or food/refuse/ sewage-associated (FRSA) flies present in facility’s food and/or nonfood areas. Filth flies include house flies, little house flies, blow flies, bottle flies and flesh flies. Food/refuse/sewage-associated flies include fruit flies, drain flies and Phorid flies. Food not protected from potential source of contamination during storage, preparation, transportation, display or service.

Tap NYC

267 Columbus Ave

A

Pinkberry

2041 Broadway

A

Pomodoro Ristorante

229 Columbus Avenue A

Old John’s Luncheonette

148 West 67 Street

A

Nanoosh

2012 Broadway

A

Crossfit Spot

55 Amsterdam Ave

Not Yet Graded (39) No facilities available to wash, rinse and sanitize utensils and/or equipment. Food not protected from potential source of contamination during storage, preparation, transportation, display or service.

Cafe Bee

239 W 72nd St

A

Freshly Bagel

2067 Broadway

A

Walter Reade Theater

70 Lincoln Center Plaza

A

VISIT OUR WEBSITE! at WESTSIDESPIRIT.COM

oversee reform efforts.

COMPSTAT CONTINUED FROM PAGE 9

A Case Study Approach

CompStat also contributed to the rise of stop-and-frisk in the 2000s. “If crime was up in your precinct they would ask ‘What are you doing about it?’ And for a good five to ten years the answer was ‘stops are up,’” Moskos said. The very fact that stops were being counted led to their being utilized as an indicator of productivity — a case of the tail wagging the dog that led to excessive use of the tactic and blowback from the public that culminated in a class action civil rights lawsuit and the appointment of an independent monitor in 2013 to

In recent years, Malin said, CompStat has moved away from its former focus on arrest and stop totals and toward a more case-driven approach. “It’s different now,” he said. “They really focus on the quality of investigations, as opposed to the amount of enforcement being done.” CompStat meetings now roughly resemble the casestudy learning method used in top business schools. NYPD executives identify important individual cases to highlight — usually (but not always) related to violent crime — then call on precinct commanders to review their actions and

thought process to ensure all relevant actors are sharing information and working together toward solutions. “CompStat is definitely much smarter now than it’s ever been,” Malin said. The program’s longevity is a testament to its adaptability in the face of evolving departmental philosophies and strategies. “It all comes down to good leadership,” Moskos said. “If you have good leadership it works, and if you don’t it kind of goes haywire. Other cities have tried to do this and CompStat alone isn’t enough, just to say that we’re going to have a weekly meeting and keep track of crime statistics. If you don’t have leadership, it all fails.”

GOATS CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 a New York park, it has been done before throughout the country. “Goats being invited to help with horticultural care is not novel,” Garodnick said. “It has been tried elsewhere, but this is the first time that we will see it in a Manhattan park.” About a year ago the conservancy’s horticultural team was figuring out the best way to attack the woodland area and it was concluded that goats were the best option. Garodnick noted that goats can consume 25 percent of their body weight in vegetation in a day and their fecal matter provides nutrients for the soil. Garodnick explained that the woodland area, which spans from 119th Street to 123rd Street (nicknamed “GOaTHAM” by the conservancy), is filled with mugwort, poison ivy and many other hazardous specimens. “Our gardeners can’t access the area in the way we want to because it has steep slopes and the invasives themselves like poison ivy are not friendly to humans,” Garodnick said. “Putting the goats to work in GOaTHAM is like taking them to an all-you-can-eat buffet. It’s good for us and it’s good for the goats.” According to Gardonick, the plan is to have the goats in the park for a month and then four to six of them will stay for the remainder of the sum-

Female goats Brooklyn and Charlie will be coming to Riverside Park. Photo: Larry Cihanek, courtesy of Green Goats

mer. He noted that the goats will be fenced in and people are welcome to come look at, but not touch, them. Once the goats make the land usable, Garodnick said the goal is to put more canopy trees there and replace the invasive specimens with more native ones. Garodnick told the West Side Spirit that this is also an educational opportunity. The conservancy will provide free public programming about the goats and it has formed a partnership with the en-

gineering and earth science department at Columbia University, where they will use sensors to study the nutrients and health of the soil while the goats are in the park. “The public education is an important part of all of this,” he stressed. “We want to educate kids and park users about forest management and about how goats are chemical-free and a sustainable way of killing weeds. It’s the ultimate farm to table and we want to celebrate this moment.”


MAY 16-22,2019

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Siberia was not what 90-year-old Irma Cohen had expected. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It was quite settled,â&#x20AC;? she recalled. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t a cold, barren wasteland.â&#x20AC;? During her journey of more than 5,500 miles from Moscow to Vladivostok on the Trans-Siberian Railroad, the Upper East Side resident even spotted a familiar-looking sign. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I can read Cyrillic letters, and I thought â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;that says I-KE-Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;? she said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The next sign was in English, and it said IKEA! In Siberia! I was hysterical.â&#x20AC;? For Cohen, whoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s spent her golden years touring destinations like Japan, Italy, Crete and Israel, the little similarities between places are often just as exciting as the differences. Cohen has plenty

of notes to compare â&#x20AC;&#x201D; sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s spent three decades traveling on group tours with companies like Road Scholar, which she relied on to organize her Siberia trip and a whopping 49 others. Fellow New Yorker Gloria Aponte, 76, hasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t had quite as many years on the road, but sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s still managed to ďŹ t in nearly 100 international and domestic trips with the company. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I do a lot of back-to-backs, like I did Vietnam, added an extension to North Vietnam and combined it with Tokyo,â&#x20AC;? said Aponte. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s how it becomes this crazy number. I could be away for a month â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s more efficient that way.â&#x20AC;? Clearly, neither woman is afraid of the road less traveled by â&#x20AC;&#x201D; in fact, like many modern seniors, they prefer it. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t want to go halfway around the world to a city mimicking New York,â&#x20AC;? Gloria said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;In Mongolia, you felt that you were back 100 years, like it was caught in a time warp. There were huge ex-

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Business

Ask a Broker

Photo: Stann Lee

OUR FRIEND WANTS TO BE OUR BROKER BY ANDREW KRAMER

One of our friends, who also lives in our building, is a broker and would very much like to list our place when we put it on the market. We like her, but she works for a small firm and we question if she’s the right choice. We’ve interviewed a few other brokers and there’s one who made a great impression on us. We’re concerned if we go with him it will not fare well with our friend. What’s the best way to handle this? Politics don’t only exist at 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue. When it comes to real estate, it can hit home regardless of your address. Everyone knows a broker or two, and you don’t want to spoil a friendship based on who you hire. For example, if things aren’t going well with your sale, it’s hard to yell or fire a friend. However you don’t want to put an end to a friendship by going with someone else. If this is causing you sleepless nights, the best advice I can offer is hire both agents (a.k.a. a ‘co-exclusive’) and let them share in listing your home. This will be a winwin for everyone. You’ll keep your friendship on good footing while getting the best exposure for your property. Both brokers will also share the commission that comes their way and half of something is certainly better than the alternative! Once it’s sold you can all go out to dinner to celebrate.

Photo: Steven Strasser

THE PSYCHOLOGY OF BUYERS AND SELLERS REAL ESTATE Though they represent opposite sides in a negotiation, they want the same thing — but for very different reasons BY FREDERICK W. PETERS

Buyers feel excited. Sellers feel nostalgic. Buyers look ahead. Sellers look back. These differences help to explain the profoundly different psychologies with which buyers and sellers approach both a marketplace and a negotiation. Buyers and sellers not only represent opposite sides in the negotiation equation, but also experience the tugs of the give and take in very different ways. Agents spend their professional lives in the middle of this equation, trying to get the two sides to balance out so the problem can be solved. In order to succeed with this delicate task, agents must first manage the profoundly different motivations which animate their principals.

Buyers feel excited. It’s a truism of real estate markets that in a rising market, buyers adjust quickly, while in a declining market, sellers adjust slowly. Why? Part of it is as simple as the laws of supply and demand. In a rising market, demand tends to exceed supply; under these circumstances auction fever sets in. Most people instinctively value something more if someone else want it too. But other factors also impact buyer behavior. A home purchase signals an investment in the future, a commitment to looking ahead. Most buyers experience this as energizing and exciting. In that frame of mind, caught up by the scarcity of supply, the possible interest of other bidders, and their own excitement as they visualize themselves in the property during the months and years ahead, buyers may well stretch to secure the home. Sellers feel nostalgic. Unless the property under consideration has served only as an investment, chances are the seller or his/her family have lived there. This cre-

ates an entirely different dynamic for the seller than that experienced by a buyer. The seller is likely to imbue the property with excessive value precisely BECAUSE it belongs to him. He will detail to his broker the things which make it better than other similar properties available for sale and feel offended if the agent disagrees. His view of the property, often unrealistically, revolves around his memories of the role the home has played in family life and the events which he has experienced there over the years. Just as the buyer’s excitement centers around the future, the seller’s attachment tends to revolve around the past. Sellers’ reluctance to reduce prices in a descending market reflects the words of the famous tune from “Cabaret,” — “If You Could See Her Through My Eyes.” If you understood how much this place means to me, you would never devalue it this way! Understanding these two perspectives and their ramifications marks one of the areas where

agents become indispensable to facilitating a transaction. In an up market, we try to apply some brakes to buyer enthusiasm to make sure they think through all sides a decision before impulsively leaping ahead. At the same time, we remind sellers that the mauve bedroom which Mom loved so much may not translate for a stranger entering the property and looking to imagine their own life in it. And in a down market, we remind the buyers that a home purchase is like a marriage: you don’t go into it with a two year window and you have to envision the life your family will enjoy there. At the same time we remind sellers that lowering the price to reflect changed market conditions doesn’t devalue them or their history in the home. When both parties can be brought to the present moment, blending the past experiences of one side with the future hopes of the other, that is the locus of consummated transactions. Frederick W. Peters is Chief Executive Officer of Warburg Realty Partnership.


MAY 16-22,2019

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Jeremy Palmer, Senior Vice President at Tauck Land Journeys, a tour company serving older travelers

Looking for Authentic Experiences Today, more seniors than ever are embracing the unfamiliar. In fact, many travel professionals note that older travelers are the least likely to be deterred by newsworthy events abroad. “Seniors tend to be the hardiest travelers — if there’s a terrorist event, or Mother Nature strikes, they’re the likeliest to stick to their plans and the quickest to come back,” said Palmer of Tauck. “They’re very determined to travel and it takes an awful lot to put them off.” They also note that seniors today are looking for more authentic experiences than the bus tours and shopping trips of decades past. “People really want to meet local people and know what’s going on in a destination,” said JoAnne Bell, Senior Vice President at Road Scholar. “There’s less interest in seeing a thousand churches. We visit local restaurants, do home-hosted meals, sometimes we visit schools. We want to bring the fabric of that country to life with our participants.”

something

Some of Cohen’s favorite memories are the conversations she’s had with locals. While lunching with a Russian family in Yekaterinburg, one of the stops on the train tour, she noticed they all sported American sneakers. She found out that the teenage daughter was an exchange student at a high school in Virginia who had developed an ingenious way to find the just right fit for each. “They all send her an outline of their foot with their name on it so she can take it to the store,” Irma said. “They’re all living together in this dacha the size of my living room but everyone had American sneakers. These are things you don’t find out unless you’re out there somewhere!” Aponte says the joy of travel lasts long after she unpacks her bags. Walking down a familiar city block after a recent trip to the “stans” of Central Asia, a small sign caught her eye. “I was walking on Ninth Avenue by Port Authority, like I must’ve done hundreds of times, and I saw a small restaurant serving Uzbek food right in my own neighborhood,” she said. “Traveling has made me more aware of things. I would’ve never noticed that, and now I plan to visit.” It won’t be long before she hits the road again; for her next trip, Aponte is headed to South Africa. Meanwhile, Cohen is looking forward to following the footsteps of her favorite classical composers through the concert halls of Europe. Her biggest problem these days is finding places she’s never been before, but that hasn’t stopped her from looking. “My granddaughter works at NASA,” she said. “So I asked her if she could get me a trip to the moon!”

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The senior travel market is absolutely booming. Seniors have this amazing window of 10 or 20 years where they can really do what they want to do ... There’s a tremendous amount of freedom because people are more active and living longer.”

like

dirt

probably 60% to 40%,” he said. “I don’t think it’s always a case of women outliving men — often it’s a case of a husband being left at home because he didn’t have an interest in that destination.” More and more, women are following Cohen and Aponte’s example by setting out as solo travelers. Cohen says her pals in the city think her ambitious itineraries are “totally nuts,” but she finds just the right kind of camaraderie on group tours for older travelers. “There’s always a single woman or two, and everyone is extremely friendly. On Road Scholar, the women are concerned about my welfare — unlike some younger seniors, who think you want to steal their husband!” she said. “On the islands of Scotland, it was so windy, women kept saying to their husbands ‘Hold on to Irma, she’s gonna blow away!’ As soon as you know each other’s names, it’s like one family traveling together.” Aponte agrees that joining a guided tour makes her feel comfortable stepping off the beaten path — a prospect that’s often daunting to the travelers she meets on shorter trips to destinations like Chicago, New Orleans, and San Diego. “I hear them say ‘I can’t wait to go home’ on a seven-day trip and I think, I go away for like six weeks!” she said. “They think I’m Wonder Woman, but what’s there to be brave? The guides are there to take care of you, they almost take you into bed.” The secret to being a successful traveler is all about mindset, agrees Cohen. “I’m adaptable. I can make myself comfortable wherever I am,” she said. “If you want it to be like at home, stay home. You’re traveling, it’s gonna be different!”

have

SIP THE BLACK DIRT

GLOBE CONTINUED FROM PAGE 15

you You’d look

Email us at news@strausnews.com


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YOUR 15 MINUTES

A STAR (PRODUCER) IS BORN She always thought “Hadestown” was destined for greatness, and she was right BY JOSHUA NASSER

April Lavalle is an actor, writer, comedian, and Tony nominated coproducer of “Hadestown.” The production garnered a total of 14 Tony nominations, the most of any show, including the big one — Best Musical. It’s the hottest show in town, in every sense, and it represents Lavalle’s first foray into producing. The Long Island native, who studied theater at Wagner College, spoke with Straus News about what it’s like to be part of a smash Broadway hit, and her plans for a future in theater.

Let’s start with an easy question — When did you start doing theater? I started as a kid, community theater on Long Island. Probably because I wanted attention. My mom was putting together a community production of Annie and asked me to audition for it. I booked it.

destown” is the very first thing I produced, and it’s going shockingly well.

This is the first thing you produced? Seriously? Yeah, and definitely getting into this was just basically because I knew others.

This is wild to me. What brought you into the project? I think I had a different path to producing than most young producers. I didn’t know what producers did until very recently. That being said, I have always really, really loved the show, and I knew I wanted to be part of it in any small way. So I guess that’s a cool way to come to producing, by finding the show you want to produce first, and then producing it. This is the only thing I have worked on and am working on, producingwise. I feel like I’m being very precious with choosing the things I want to do. But it’d be great to produce something else that I’m passionate about first, and then start producing.

Who did you play? I was ensemble orphan.

I was also in Annie! Can I guess who you were?

Sure. Mister Bundles?

No Daddy Warbucks?

No Rooster?

No I give up. Who were you?

I was ensemble also. All thee older kids got the cool roles. Yeah, that’s how it goes.

Kid roles aside, I know you were a co-producer for “Hadestown.” wn.” Do you mostly act? Is producing ing new for you? It is, I’m an actor, but I realize ealize I’m a multi-hyphenate. So I consider myself an actor and a writer, but producing is very new forr me. “Ha-

April Lavalle considers herselff a “multihyphenate.” She’s an actor, writer, riter, comedian and, now, a Broadway ay coproducer and Tony Award nominee. minee. Photo: Sandy Honig

Did you know people involved in “Hadestown?” I’ve been listening to it since it came out at New York Theater Workshop. But I heard the album before that. The show started as a concept album with Anaïs Mitchell, who wrote the music, and the lead singer of Bon Iver was also singing on it. This was nine or 10 years ago. Then it went to a bunch of other theaters until it finally came to Broadway. So I knew about it, and thought the writer was the coolest person ever. The way I got into producing was different, because most producers are very rich and I am not. I came into it through one of the lead producers of the show, Hunter Arnold. He set up an initiative called Uplift,

for young theater producers, because he noticed that most theater producers are old white guys. He wanted younger people to get in on the game, but you normally need a lot of money to produce things. So it’s kind of him offering his mentorship and his help. He helps you learn the ropes of producing, but he also lowers the cap of producing so it’s a doable number for poors to do, like myself.

That’s such a great idea. Yeah, and he started this initiative with “Once on an Island,” when it was on Broadway and he thought ‘Oh, this will be my life’s work and what I do.’

Are there other producers from the Uplift program on “Hadestown?” My producorial unit and one other person are through the program. Everyone else is a co-producer through their own thing.

What’s it like to be nominated for a Tony your first time producing? It’s great, and it’s surprising and surreal in one aspect, but not surprising because I love the show and because I believed in the show so much. I always thought it was destined for greatness. Something very new to me is people congratulating me on my

Lavalle, here doing standup, has been a fan of “Hadestown” since it was a concept album, years ago. Photo: Courtesy April Lavalle

Tony nomination, but me being like, ‘Oh, no no no, I have so little to do with it.’ Because as a co-producer it’s all pre-production ... I’m not really working on it so much, you know, but I’m lucky as a co-producer. Sometimes we’re asked about our opinions on ads and that’s cool, but I did my y work in December and nothing else. And it feels very funny that people congratulate me when I’m like ‘I didn’t do anything.’

You did do something though. I did, but it feels so out of my hands right now, because now I just get to be the show’s cheerleader, which I feel like I would’ve been even if I weren’t a co-producer.

A nice little perk you get. Yeah, it’s cool!

What do you think you want to do next? Well, another big reason I wanted to do this, besides liking and believing in the show, was because we talk about the things we like and don’t like that are coming to Broadway, and I think by becoming a co-producer [I am] taking these small baby steps into this side of the

industry. Another reason is because it’s directed and written by a woman, and there are only three shows on Broadway that are directed by women. So I would love to be the type of person who can make theater happen that I think other people want to see. I think you’re only seeing theater through the eyes of most old white male producers, so to have another perspective would be great. And if I could help people who don’t really have their foot in the door, I would love to help elevate their work. [I’m interested in] things that are riskier in general. Not to shade these kind of shows, cause they are super necessary, when you have adaptations of movies and TV shows, it’s fun. But it feels cooler and riskier to take a show that seems like a bold choice because these shows really take off. And I think the diversity conversation should not only be onstage but backstage. If I can wedge my way in there I’d love to do that.

Very well said. Thanks so much for doing this, April. Thank you for having me! This was fun!

Know somebody who deserves their 15 Minutes of fame? Go to westsidespirit.com and click on submit a press release or announcement.


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Each Sudoku puzzle consists of a 9X9 grid that has been subdivided into nine smaller grids of 3X3 squares. To solve the puzzle each row, column and box must contain each of the numbers 1 to 9. Puzzles come in three grades: easy, medium and difficult.

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Westsider 1

MAY 16-22,2019

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MAY 16-22,2019

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PUBLIC NOTICES

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The Spirit|Westsider westsidespirit.com

MAY 16-22,2019

PUBLIC NOTICES

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MAY 16-22,2019

CLASSIFIEDS MASSAGE

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REAL ESTATE - RENT

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Telephone: 212-868-0190 Email: classified2@strausnews.com

POLICY NOTICE: We make every eďŹ&#x20AC;ort to avoid mistakes in your classiďŹ ed ads. Check your ad the ďŹ rst week it runs. The publication w only accept responsibility for the ďŹ rst incorrect insertion. The publication assumes no ďŹ nancial responsibility for errors or omissions. reserve the right to edit, reject, or re-classify any ad. Contact your sales rep directly for any copy changes. All classiďŹ ed ads are pre-pa

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MAY 16-22,2019

The Spirit|Westsider westsidespirit.com

za o Lan i r a M

usi c Festiv

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SAFE HAVEN WEST

o i t i t e p m o C l a c o in V

19

Sunday o Lanza & Elaine Malb th May 26 11AM - 6PM Broadway 72nd-86th Sts. nual M ari

SIDE BAS

KETBA LL LE AGU E

albin M e n Elai

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OR F N IO T I L COA

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32nd Annual

Mario Lanza & Elaine Malbin

VOCAL COMPETITIONS 1:30 - 5 PM MAIN STAGE Bway & 86th St 20 Tenors & Sopranos Free Seating

2 AWARD

PRESENTATIONS:

1 PM MAIN STAGE: Bway & 86th St

1.

GLADYS BENBASAT AWARD for OUTSTANDING SERVICE to the the UPPER WEST SIDE COMMUNITY to Marc Greenberg

2.

MADELEINE POLAYES MEMORIAL AWARD for CIVIC ACHIEVEMENT

by lia d e t s Ho a Cavig c s e c n a Fr phy togra r Pho a t n a Ch

to Hon. Gale Brewer

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