Page 1

The local paper for the Upper per West Side p Sid

WEEK OF MARCH A CULT FAVORITE ◄ P.12

7-13 2019

EVEN MORE CONGESTION QUESTIONS

Also inside:

TRAFFIC State lawmakers could pass congestion pricing by the end of the month. What would it mean for Manhattanites?

LOOKING FOR A KOSHER, GLUTEN-FREE BABKA? ▲ P.16

BY MICHAEL GAROFALO

More than half a century after policymakers first proposed congestion pricing as a tool to ease Manhattan’s traffic woes, and after numerous failed attempts to enact a plan in the ensuing decades, 2019 could well be the year congestion pricing finally crosses New York’s legislative goal line. A plan put forth by Governor Andrew Cuomo would impose a toll on vehicles entering a central business district encompassing all of Manhattan south of 61st Street, with the exception of the FDR Drive. The toll, in combination with the recently introduced

DEPRESSION IN SENIORS: IT’S SUBTLE ▲ P.6 Proponents of congestion pricing say the policy would increase vehicle travel times in Manhattan and raise billions in revenue for the MTA. Photo: Steven Strasser

CONTINUED ON PAGE 5

THE GRAYING OF MANHATTAN TRENDS Surging senior populations are reshaping the Upper West and Upper East Sides — but the under-65 tally is waning on both sides of the park, new data shows BY DOUGLAS FEIDEN

The census of Upper West Side seniors has skyrocketed over the past decade: There are now 41,194 adults north of age 65, a stunning climb of 44 percent. In the same period, between 2007

and 2017, the older population in Chelsea and Hell’s Kitchen shot up 38 percent and the number of Upper East Siders in that age bracket rose 31 percent. Contrast those tallies with the citywide and statewide figures, where the growth in the over-65 set, while still robust, was a much smaller 24 and 26 percent respectively. Another yardstick to gauge the explosive increase in the elderly census is the number of the very old, age 85 and over, which rose 20 percent in the city and 26 percent in the state over 10 years, according to a new report from the Center for an Urban Future, a research institute.

But those figures are dwarfed among Upper West Siders: As of 2017, there were 4,898 residents aged 85 and above, up from 3,197 in 2007, a leap of 53 percent, a CUF data analysis of Manhattan neighborhoods prepared at the request of Straus News found. “There are more residents aged 65 and above in Manhattan than there are people under the age of 19 — that is the largest spread of any county in the state, by far,” according to the think tank’s report, “New York’s Older Adult Population is Booming Statewide.” On the other side of the spectrum, the number of residents below age 65 is stagnating or shrinking. Over the past decade, the city’s non-senior population managed only a two percent increase, while the tally in Manhattan actually declined by 2 percent,

the CUF report found. Decreases on both sides of the park were even more dramatic: The under-65 population of the UWS dropped to 165,836 in 2017 from 185,747 in 2007, a steep falloff of 11 percent. During the same period on the UES, it fell to 172,042 from 186,015, a decline of eight percent, the data shows. “New York’s population is rapidly graying,” said Jonathan Bowles, the Center’s executive director. “In every corner of the state, older adults are driving most if not all of the growth.” Added Beth Finkel, the state director of AARP, which helped fund the report, “These eye-popping numbers are a wake-up call to address the needs of our fast-aging population.” invreporter@strausnews.com

‘POTVIN SUCKS!’ RANGERS FANS SAY – FOR 40 YEARS ▲ P.8

SOMETHING NEW AT THE HIGH LINE ▲ P.2

Westsider WEEK OF APRIL

SPRING ARTS PREVIEW

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Crime Watch Voices NYC Now City Arts

3 8 10 12

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NEWS residents A vocal group of U.W.S. Transportation isn’t convinced the doing enough is Committee of CB7 BY LISA BROWN

CONTINUED ON PAGE

MANHATTAN'S APARTMENT BOOM, > PROPERTY, P.20

2015

In Brief MORE HELP FOR SMALL BUSINESS

PROTESTING THE COMMUNITY BOARD OVER TRAFFIC DEATHS

Zero, Mayor Bill One year into Visionreducing trafficfor de Blasio’s plan traffic the number of has related deaths, Upper West Side fatalities on the compared to last actually increased, year’s figures. Upper West Siders -That has some needs to be done convinced more of the Transstarting with members of the local comportation Committee munity board. West mother, Upper Lisa Sladkus, a member of TransSide resident and said she’s fed at portation Alternatives a silent protest up, and organized 7’s February board Community Board residents dozens of meeting, where Committee called for Transportation leaders to step down. against incredible “We have run up imto get safe street trying just problems said. “This was provements,” she our point across get another way to dissatisfied.” that we are very involved with Sladkus has been Alternatives since Transportation served as director 2002 and formerly Streets’ RenaisSide of Upper West She says becoming sance Campaign. really got her into a mother is what activism. streets around me “Just noticing the as a pedestrian I felt and how unsafe she said. “I wanted and as a cyclist,”

9-15

The effort to help small seems to businesses in the city be gathering steam. Two city councilmembers, Robert Margaret Chin and Cornegy, have introduced create legislation that wouldSmall a new “Office of the within Business Advocate” of Small the city’s Department Business Services. Chin The new post, which have up told us she’d like to would and running this year, for serve as an ombudsman city small businesses within them clear government, helping to get bureaucracy the through things done. Perhaps even more also importantly, the ombudsman and number will tally the type small business of complaints by taken in owners, the actions policy response, and somefor ways to recommendations If done well, begin to fix things. report would the ombudsman’s give us the first quantitative with taste of what’s wrong the city, an small businesses in towards step rst fi important fixing the problem. of To really make a difference, for developers will have to is a mere formality their projects course, the advocaterising rents, are the work complete precinct, but chances-- thanks to a looking to find a way to tackle business’ legally quickly. is being done which remain many While Chin their own hours,” of after-hours “They pick out boom in the number throughout who lives on most vexing problem. gauge what said Mildred Angelo,of the Ruppert construction permits said it’s too early tocould have Buildings one the 19th floor in The Department of the city. role the advocate number three years, the Houses on 92nd Street between on the She Over the past is handing out a record there, more information work perThird avenues. permits, bad thing. of Second and an ongoing all-hours number of after-hours of after-hours work problem can’t be a the city’s Dept. with the said there’s where mits granted by This step, combinedBorough according to new data project nearby jumped 30 percent, noise in construction Buildings has efforts by Manhattan to mediate data provided constantly make BY DANIEL FITZSIMMONS according to DOB from trucks. President Gale Brewer of Informa- workers offer transferring cement response to a Freedom the rent renewal process, they want. They city classifies knows the signs Act request. The between 6 “They do whateverthey please. They Every New Yorker some early, tangible small clang, the tion work come and go as of progress. For many sound: the metal-on-metal beeps of a any construction weekend, can can’t come piercing a.m., or on the have no respect.” at p.m. and 7 business owners, that hollow boom, the issuance of these reverse. A glance The increased a correspond after-hours. soon enough. truck moving in has generated can hardly as has led to

SLEEPS, THANKS TO THE CITY THAT NEVER UCTION A BOOM IN LATE-NIGHT CONSTR

29

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and you the alarm clock middle of the night, believe it: it’s the carries on fulland yet construction tilt. or your local police You can call 311

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The surge in permitsfees for the city in millions of dollars consome residents agency, and left application process vinced that the

2 City Arts 3 Top 5 8 Real Estate 10 15 Minutes

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MARCH 7-13,2019

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SOMETHING NEW AT THE HIGH LINE CITY SPACES New Yorkâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s favorite repurposed railway is bigger and better than ever BY EMILY MASON

The High Line is opening the last stretch of its original expanse this spring with a new space, called The Spur. It marks the complete restoration of the original stretch of High Line from the 1930s, a project which the cofounders of the High Line, Joshua David and Robert Hammond, began back in 2003. The entrance to the Spur, at Tenth Ave and West 28th St., sits amid the epicenter of the Hudson Yards development, The Friends of the High Line organization had some trouble securing this ďŹ nal section. The land the High Line is on was originally owned by the MTA and was used to park trains. The bid for the land included an option to either keep or destroy this section of High Line. But following a rigorous campaign to â&#x20AC;&#x153;Save the Spur,â&#x20AC;? the developer who purchased the land agreed that is could become the next focal point of the now-famous High Line park.

Photo: Shinya Suzuki, via ďŹ&#x201A;ickr

A lot of people [originally] thought it was industrial and covered in weeds, an eyesore that needed to go. Joshua David and I fell in love with the weeds.â&#x20AC;? High Line co-founder Robert Hammond â&#x20AC;&#x153;A lot of people [originally] thought it was industrial and covered in weeds, an eyesore that needed to go,â&#x20AC;? Hammond said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Joshua David and I fell in love with the weeds.â&#x20AC;? In homage to the shrubbery that initially made David and Hammond dedicate themselves to the abandoned railway, green space is a key component of every section of the High Line, and the Spur will be no exception. The space will contain the most dense greenery of the High Line, in stark contrast to its commercial surroundings. Preceding the archway that leads

into the Spur space is a narrow walkway enclosed on one side by a screen of advertisements for the soon-to-be shopping mall towering over this section. Feet away is the site of the Shed, the arts center project, and ahead one can spot the cranes working the massive development that is Hudson Yards. Communications Director for the High Line, Melissa Parsoff, works on occasion with the surrounding projects. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We call this the crossroads because itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s where all of these different organizations meet,â&#x20AC;? Parsoff said. The Spur is where visitors will find the High Lineâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s other newest attraction, the Plinth, where sculptures and art will be on display, changing every 18 months. The ďŹ rst piece to be featured is a sculpture called â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Brick Houseâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; by Simone Leigh. The High Line aims to include artwork from around the world, in part to ensure that everybody can find something to connect with on the High Line. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Just because itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a public space doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t mean everybody feels welcome,â&#x20AC;? Hammond said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We want to bring the best contemporary art and make it reďŹ&#x201A;ect [different] cultures and demographics.â&#x20AC;?

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CRIME WATCH BY JERRY DANZIG VIOLENT BIKE THEFT A bike rider survived a violent encounter with a self-proclaimed gang member. According to police, around midnight on Sunday, Feb. 24, a 29-year-old man was pushed off his bike in front of 207 West 98th St. by an unknown man. The attacker dragged the victim to the sidewalk and said, “Give me your money, or I’ll take your bike,” the victim told police. The

suspect took the victim’s bike and told him to “Stay back. If you do anything, I’ll cut you,” police said. He also told the victim in Spanish that he was a member of the Traviesos Mexican gang. The suspect was last seen fleeing southbound on Amsterdam Avenue. The victim suffered no injuries and refused medical attention at the scene. The stolen bicycle was a Mongoose valued at $300.

MULTIPLE CHARGES IN DUANE READE ROBBERY At 7 p.m. on Thursday, Feb. 21, a man rode a bicycle into the Duane Reade store at 2681 Broadway and took facial skincare products worth $50, police said. As he was leaving, an employee told police, the man said he had a gun and to call the police. Police combed the neighborhood and located the suspect. They arrested Hector Fernandez, 40, charging him with robbery, assault, criminal trespass, dangerous weapons and more.

Reported crimes from the 24th precinct for the week ending Feb 24 Week to Date

Year to Date

2019 2018

% Change

2019

2018

% Change

Murder

0

0

n/a

1

0

n/a

Rape

0

0

n/a

1

2

-50.0

Robbery

3

2

50.0

17

18

-5.6

Felony Assault

2

5

-60.0

21

30

-30.0

Burglary

1

6

-83.3

14

21

-33.3

NURSE REPORTS ASSAULT

Grand Larceny

6

11

-45.5

64

86

-25.6

A nurse at the New Jewish Home, 120 Ellington Pkwy., reported that she was assaulted by a patient, police said. The 68-year-old assistant nurse said the patient struck her on her left arm with a cane on Thursday night, Feb. 7. The nurse filed a complaint with the home’s supervisor.

Grand Larceny Auto

0

0

n/a

1

3

-66.7

GIRLFRIEND, 64, CHARGED WITH FELONY ASSAULT At 6:45 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 23, a 64-year-old woman called police about a dispute she was having with her 58-year-old boyfriend inside 107 West 109th St. When the police arrived, the boyfriend reported that his girlfriend

Photo by Tony Webster, via Flickr

STATS FOR THE WEEK

had slashed him on his right arm with a kitchen knife. He also said that she had hit him several times on the head with a cooking pot. There was a visible injury on his arm, but no injuries could be seen on his head, police said. The man also police that when he tried to leave the location, his girlfriend threw a glass bottle out of the window, trying to hit him. The victim refused medical attention on the scene. His girlfriend, Dorothy Gray, was arrested and charged with felony assault, criminal mischief and more.

GRAB BAG Police said a man grabbed a bag belonging to a 46-year-old man sitting inside the McDonald’s at 2549 Broadway at 2:25 a.m. on Wednesday, Feb. 20, and tried to leave with it. The victim grabbed the bag, but the robber said, “This is my bag!” and punched him in the face. The victim suffered a small laceration but refused medical attention at the scene. Police searched the neighborhood but did not find the suspect.

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POLICE NYPD 20th Precinct

120 W. 82nd St.

NYPD 24th Precinct

151 W. 100th St.

212-580-6411 212-678-1811

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306 W. 54th St.

212-767-8400

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145 W. 100th St.

311

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W. 66th St. & Amsterdam Ave.

311

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120 W. 83rd St.

311

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205 W. 77th St.

311

FIRE

CITY COUNCIL Councilmember Helen Rosenthal

563 Columbus Ave.

212-873-0282

Councilmember Mark Levine

500 West 141st St.

212-928-6814

State Senator Brad Hoylman

322 Eighth Ave. #1700

212-633-8052

State Sen. Jose M. Serrano

1916 Park Ave. #202

212-828-5829

STATE LEGISLATORS

Assemblymember Linda Rosenthal 230 W. 72nd St. #2F

212-873-6368

Assemblymember Daniel O’Donnell 245 W. 104th St.

212-866-3970

COMMUNITY BOARD 7 LIBRARIES

250 W. 87th St. #2

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The Spirit|Westsider westsidespirit.com and are subject to ongoing negotiations. But if the legislature approves a plan as robust as the governorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s stated aims, the results will be immediately tangible, according to Charles Komanoff, a transportation and energy policy analyst who has studied congestion pricing extensively. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The lionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s share of the beneďŹ ts are going to accrue to residents of Manhattan,â&#x20AC;? Komanoff said, adding, â&#x20AC;&#x153;The number one benefit is driversâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; time savings.â&#x20AC;? Komanoffâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s traffic model projects a 12 to 15 percent increase in vehicle travel speeds within the central business district once congestion pricing is implemented, which under Cuomoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s plan would take place in 2021. Further benefits, he said, will manifest over time as congestion revenue investments translate into improved transit service and more New Yorkers opt to ride the subway. Within ďŹ ve to 10 years, said Komanoff, average travel speeds could rise 20 to 23 percent from current levels.

CONGESTION CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 surcharge on trips below 96th Street in taxis and other for-hire vehicles, would create a new stream of dedicated revenue for the cash-strapped Metropolitan Transportation Authority. Cuomo â&#x20AC;&#x201D; whose plan now has the support of Mayor Bill de Blasio, a longtime congestion pricing skeptic â&#x20AC;&#x201D; is pressing Albany lawmakers to approve congestion pricing by the April 1 state budget deadline. In addition to funding sorely needed transit improvements, advocates say a congestion toll would serve as a disincentive against unnecessary car trips, turning away drivers who would otherwise clog Manhattanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s most crowded streets, resulting in smoother bus service and reduced travel times. But questions abound.

How would the plan impact traffic? Many key details that will determine the ultimate impact of Cuomoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s plan â&#x20AC;&#x201D; including the tollâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s cost, the number and types of drivers who will qualify for medical and other hardship exemptions (such carve-outs are a key pillar of de Blasioâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s support), and the share of revenue directed to subways and bus service as opposed to regional rail (to say nothing of how effectively the MTA spends it) â&#x20AC;&#x201D; remain unclear

How much will the toll cost? Cuomoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s plan does not specify rates for the congestion toll, which would be variable to provide discounts for drivers entering the zone during offpeak hours. Instead, the congestion toll amounts would be set next year by a new six-member panel. Key details

of the panel â&#x20AC;&#x201D; including who would hold responsibility for appointing its members â&#x20AC;&#x201D; are under negotiation. City Council Speaker Corey Johnson, an advocate of congestion pricing, cited an â&#x20AC;&#x153;unaccountable, unnamed panel that will eventually set the pricesâ&#x20AC;? as one reason he opposes the plan supported by the governor and mayor. Johnson also criticized the proposal for its lack of details on the types of MTA capital projects congestion revenue could fund. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m surprised the mayor would sign on to the plan without having a greater level of commitment on how the money was going to be spent,â&#x20AC;? Johnson said. The governor has said that his congestion pricing plan would raise $15 billion for the MTAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s next capital plan, but he has not specified how much he thinks drivers should be charged. Last year, a commission formed by the governor recommended a peak-hour charge of $11.52, which would correspond to the two-way E-ZPass toll rate for the Queens-Midtown and Hugh L. Carey Tunnels. As of March 31, those toll rates will rise to $12.24. The plan would not â&#x20AC;&#x153;double tollâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; drivers who already pay a toll to enter the congestion zone from the East River tunnels, the Holland and Lincoln Tunnels or the Henry Hudson Bridge at the northern tip of Manhattan. Drivers paying a toll to enter Manhattan from the Hugh L. Carey Tunnel, for ex-

ample, would have the cost of that toll offset from the full congestion charge, so that they would pay the same effective toll rate as a driver using the Brooklyn Bridge. On the East River, this would have the effect of reducing congestion caused by the â&#x20AC;&#x153;bridge shoppingâ&#x20AC;? incentivized under the current system of tolled tunnels and untolled bridges. â&#x20AC;&#x153;You want to harmonize the tolls so it doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t matter which crossing you choose,â&#x20AC;? said Alex Matthiessen, the founder of the inďŹ&#x201A;uential congestion pricing advocacy campaign Move NY. But on the West Side, the peak-hour E-ZPass toll rate for the Lincoln and Holland Tunnels is $12.50 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; meaning that if the congestion toll isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t greater than $12.50, New Jersey drivers using these crossings to enter the congestion zone would see no change in the cost of their daily commute. Komanoff said it might be worth exploring an added congestion toll on the Hudson River tunnels â&#x20AC;&#x153;to grab additional revenue and deal with the traffic disaster that is the West Side of Manhattan.â&#x20AC;?

What about Manhattan residents? The lack of a further disincentive for out-of-state commuters would not sit well with some Manhattan drivers. who argue that they should receive relief or exemptions from the congestion toll, akin to existing toll discount

WE SALUTE THE 2019 â&#x20AC;&#x153;OTTYâ&#x20AC;? HONOREES

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DEPRESSION IN SENIORS: IT’S SUBTLE AGING Identifying older adults with the disorder can be challenging BY ARDESHEER TALATI

“He says he’s depressed—but he’s just getting old,” a friend recently said to me about her father-in-law, who had just turned 80. The perils of disagreeing with a parent-in-law aside, my friend did inadvertently hit on something important: the difficulties we face in differentiating depression in later life from everything else happening to our bodies and minds as we age. Major depression is a chronic,

debilitating disorder projected to be the biggest contributor to global disease burden by 2030 in Western countries. It usually first appears in early adulthood, though adolescent depression (particularly among females) is not uncommon. But that does not mean that depression doesn’t occur in later life. Indeed, up to five percent of seniors are estimated to suffer from clinical depression at any given time. For some, it may be recurrences of a depression that started earlier in life; for others, it may be new. In either case, treating these depressions is important because studies show that untreated depression can worsen outcomes for cardiovascular disease, stroke, pain, and certain dementias. It

can also shorten lifespan. Not surprisingly, the National Institute of Health has classified depression in adults 65 and over as a major public health problem.

What to Watch For Unfortunately, several subtleties can complicate the diagnosis of depression as we get older. Here are some worth thinking about. 1. Even though the criteria for the disorder are the same across ages, depression at older ages doesn’t always follow the textbook. For example, while depression at younger ages is more common among females, the gender imbalance is much less in later life. Also, while

CONTINUED ON PAGE 9

HEALTHY HEROIN ABUSERS (Men and women, ages 21-59) who drink alcohol regularly are needed for an 8-week inpatient study investigating medication effects at the NY State Psychiatric Institute. Earn approximately $6550-$7350.

Call the Substance Use Research Center at (646) 774-6243


MARCH 7-13,2019

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LESSONS LEARNED AROUND THE CAMPFIRE CAMPING A summer camp director started a podcast to share insights on building lives of meaning for kids. Four key themes that keep coming up: BY COLE KELLY

I’ve been lucky to be a summer camp director for the past seventeen years. It’s a gift to see our campers (and staff) laugh and learn over time. Most arrive not knowing a soul and leave with friends for life. I see it over and over ... and it’s a joy every time. In hopes of continuing our learning and spreading the idea of camp, our team has started a podcast. It’s not about our camp. The Campfire Conversation podcast is all about the insights camp professionals have on raising kids and building lives full of meaning. I’ve spoken with dozens of camp directors and thought leaders from around the country. While the conversations have covered lots of topics, four themes consistently come up in our conversations: the importance of “near peers,” connecting without technology, the change in parents and something interesting about our kids.

The Power of Near Peers As camp directors, we believe you

can have a great camp in a parking lot if you’ve got the right people. In most cases, 19 to 22-year-old staff have an enormously positive impact on the campers’ lives. How is that possible? Camp counselors are saying pretty much the same thing as parents back home: “Make your bed.” “Be kind and respectful.” Campers just seem to listen more to these near peers than their parents. Jeff Leikin, a teen psychologist and counselor from California, explains the difference between camp staff and parents as “right message, wrong messenger.” Having someone who is older but within the same realm of development makes the message more impactful than even Mom or Dad.

Connection Minus Tech We’re all concerned about the rise in anxiety among our young people. One in four children under 18 years old has been diagnosed with some type of anxiety disorder. Bob Ditter, a family therapist and “camp whisperer” from Boston, has spent time researching this and found the rise of “curated lives” on social media to be a leading cause of increased anxiety. Our campers’ young brains don’t have the resources yet to differentiate between what is real and the airbrushed, filtered “reality” displayed

online. Running through the comparison trap of social media is truly challenging for our young people. Because most summer camps remove or restrict the use of technology, young people connect and live face-toface and more fully in the present. By disconnecting from tech, campers build greater empathy, independence and happiness. And, relative to their still connected friends, they also develop a superpower: being able to put their phones away.

Parents are Changing Several longtime camp directors mentioned increased anxiety among their camp parents. Parents are having a harder time at the bus pickup spots than their campers. They make anxious calls to the camp office when they haven’t seen photos of their children. Bunk placements are fraught decisions. Wendy Mogel, author of “Blessings of a Skinned Kneed” — the book most mentioned on the podcast — tells of parents once dropping their child off at the bus and heading off for a celebratory drink. Now, one of the biggest fears she hears from parents in her clinical practice is allowing their children to go to camp at all. The 24/7 news cycle and attentiongrabbing headlines have our collective lizard-brain going at too a high a rate.

A Ƶő΀Ɨőɸ˝ő̈Ɨʡɸ˝ɐnj̯ǩő̈̈ɐnjnj˝Ȯőͺő΀

“Neer peer” counselors have a positive impact on camper’s lives. Photo courtesy of Camp Weequahic Rather than seeing the good in the world, we hold our children back from threats we perceive to be imminent rather than what they are: unlikely. I feel it, too. I had a hard time sending our oldest off to his own camp, and I’ve been a camp director for 17 years.

Kids are Still Kids Here’s the really good news: experienced camp directors say kids haven’t changed much at all over the years. They want to play, connect, explore, goof off and create. They want to cook s’mores, tell stories, laugh and learn. They are going to try and wear the same shirt three days in a row, flail at telling a joke in the bunk, learn from mistakes and come out of the experience shining in all the right ways.

Parents who say their child “really doesn’t connect well with others” or “won’t try anything new” or “will only look at his phone” are often shocked to see their camper build true friendships and expand their horizons at camp, all without tech. The kids will look back at those weeks without their phone fondly. I’m excited to keep learning through the Campfire Conversation podcast and putting the knowledge into play. The positive outcome of the right camp for a child is important. Let’s help them keep the learning going back home. Cole Kelly is the camp director at Camp Weequahic in Lakewood, PA and host of the Campfire Conversation podcast.


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MARCH 7-13,2019

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Voices

Write to us: To share your thoughts and comments go to westsidespirit.com and click on submit a letter to the editor.

SIGNATURES & MAD AVE MADNESS EAST SIDE OBSERVER BY ARLENE KAYATT

Petition prize — Collecting petition signatures to get on the ballot is a daunting task. Rain or shine — well not rain — the mighty signature-getters stand (usually on street corners) and ask registered voters of a political party to sign to get a candidate or candidates on the ballot. Sometimes it gets to be a heady experience. And so it was for a Democrat district leader candidate on the UWS when uber-West Sider and New York’s favorite son, Congressman Jerrold Nadler, was the first to sign his petition. I’m guessing that candidate, Joshua Benjamin Kin-

berg, would want to save and savor the precious petition with Nadler’s signature. But if Kinberg’s in a contested primary and another candidate is seeking the same seat, he’ll need every signature. It’s always possible, of course, that a follow-up Nadler endorsement could scare off a contender. Stay tuned. Reader readback — Some columns ago, I noted the closing of Infirmary, an UES restaurant (and bar) and the incongruity of its name for a NYC bar. Like who knew that “Infirmary” was intended to celebrate New Orleans. I took exception to the restaurant’s not celebrating, or at least making known, its New Orleans origins. Washington Heights reader Judy Hamudy pointed out that

the Infirmary name probably came from the old New Orleans blues/jazz ballad, “St. James Infirmary,” made famous by Louis Armstrong. With all due respect, how many Gothamites would make that connection at a restaurant with no obvious hint of its New Orleans origin? Another reader, Stuy-Towner Hazel Feldman, loved the Billie Ward Grace cat photo that accompanied the column about the missing cat in the Chinese zodiac. Perhaps in these proactive times a campaign may be in order to bring the cat to the calendar. Any takers? Mad(ison) Ave madness — A 13-story building is coming to Madison Ave. between 65th and 66th Streets. Look for 19 apartments

units and commercial space. And keep an eye on the northwest corner of 92nd and Madison where the halfblock building at 1288-1290 stands emptied of residential apartments and commercial space. The once elegant apartment building is an eyesore. One of the businesses, a restaurant, moved around the corner and is now known as Gina’s Italian. It’s been out of the old space for at least four years. However, the name “Gina Mexicana” remains on the door at the old location. Wonder what the landlord/building owner is up to? And when it will happen. MTA skips — News for M15 Select bus riders — you heard it here — the Select no longer stops at 72nd Street and Second Ave.. The stop after 74th

or 75th St. is now 68th St. That nice lady’s voice that announces stops over the bus speaker goes silent every now and then. So unless you’re tuned in to what’s going on in MTA la la land, you would never know that the stop has been taken off the route. No more secrets. Old time mail — Now that the blue box mailboxes that stand on the city streets are set to be redesigned, it was interesting to pass a letterbox mounted on the outside of the residential building at 333 East 68th St.. The shiny gold relic, which once probably accepted letters, is now just a reminder of time gone by. No more mail drop.

‘POTVIN SUCKS!’ RANGERS FANS SAY — FOR 40 YEARS PUBLIC EYE BY JON FRIEDMAN

On Feb. 25, New York Rangers diehards marked a cherished anniversary: the birth of the most notorious rallying cry in New York sports history. It has united Rangers fans of all ages, ethnicities and tax brackets for 40 years: “POTVIN SUCKS!” I know all about it. I was at Madison Square Garden that night, on Feb. 25, 1979, when the chant was first heard. It started in the blue-collar upper reaches of the blue seats and cascaded down to the seats closer to the ice. In a neat bit of symmetry, I was at the Rangers-New Jersey Devils game at MSG as recently as Feb. 23. Sure enough, I heard it once again (several times, in fact). The hubbub all began during a typically intense Rangers-New York Islanders game on that long ago Sunday night, so far back in 1979 that the Iranian “students” hadn’t yet kidnapped Americans at the embassy in Tehran. Bob Dylan hadn’t yet been declared

born again. And it would be about half a year til Yankees catcher Thurman Munson died in a plane crash. The war cry was born at an exciting time. Back on Feb. 25, 1979, the ice hockey stakes were high. The Islanders were on their way to compiling the best record in the National Hockey League and hoping to win the first Stanley Cup in the franchise’s seven-year history. And the Rangers? My Rangers! We figured to be a stone in the Islanders’ shoe on their march to destiny. When it comes to local sports rivalries, this one has no match. Forget Yankees-Red Sox. Compared with Rangers-Islanders circa 1979, Yanks-Sox has all the intensity of a debate about which town serves up the best clam chowder. During the Feb. 25, 1979 game, Islanders captain Denis Potvin smashed Ulf Nilsson, the Rangers’ best player, into the end boards so hard that Nilsson suffered a broken ankle. The Rangers’ home crowd was understandably furious as Ulfie Nilsson limped to the bench and didn’t return to the ice that evening. That the Rangers scored a goal a few feet away at that exact moment — and ultimately won the game

— was little consolation, for Nilsson was never the same speedy skater when he came back from his injury. Since that fateful night, the chant heard ‘round Madison Square Garden became a staple at every Rangers home game. It continued after the Islanders stopped winning championships and became a mediocre team, and even after Potvin himself retired from the NHL (and was eventually inducted into the sport’s hall of fame). You don’t have to be a sociologist to conclude that the rallying cry reflects poorly on Rangers fans. Until the Rangers won their first Stanley Cup in 54 years, in 1994, “Potvin Sucks” was really all the fan base had to hang on to, to feel good about itself. Yelling that nonsense is akin to a poor person ringing Warren Buffett’s doorbell and running away. Big deal. But that won’t stop Rangers fans. They liked their role as New York hockey’s lovable Brooklyn “Dem Bums” Dodgers to the perennial 1980s champion Islanders. They imagined that they had the moral high ground. They embraced their second-class status on the ice. And they always had the chant. And they still do. Just listen.

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DEPRESSION CONTINUED FROM PAGE 6 depression in adolescence and early adulthood tends to run in families, late-life depression doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t. So the â&#x20AC;&#x153;my mother had depression, will I get it too?â&#x20AC;? sleuthing doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t work. And whereas earlier-life depression typically comes and goes in episodes, later-life depression tends to be more chronic. What this all means is that population-level patterns are less reliable guideposts when it comes to diagnosing depression among older individuals. 2. As reďŹ&#x201A;ected by my friendâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s comment, symptoms can be difficult to disentangle from the ups-and-downs of daily living. As we age, we invariably develop more chronic diseases, use more medications, and have reduced memory and mobility. To be sure, these can sometimes themselves lead to depression. But they also add a layer of fog that clouds the ability to pick up on true depressive symptoms. Is she sleeping less because of depression or because of that new thyroid medication? Is he irritable because he is depressed or because they wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t renew his driverâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s license? The answer can vary by person and by situation, and it takes time and an experienced clinician to differentiate between these scenarios. 3. Even though low mood is a hallmark symptom, many older patients may experience other symptoms first. These can include insomnia, agitation, gastrointestinal problems, and loss of sexual interest. Mood changes may not emerge until later. This can make screening for depression challenging, for if our spotlights are so focused

The advantages of recognizing and treating depression early are myriad.â&#x20AC;? Ardesheer Talati on mood disturbances, we may miss some of the other early warning signs. 4. Older adults may underreport mood symptoms even when they do occur. Some may believe that their symptoms are part of the natural course of aging. But there is also stigma about mental illness, which studies show to be greater in older populations. Sharing may be quite the norm for millennials, who grew up on social media, but those who came of age before conversations about mental illness became common may still be unable to channel the right language to express their symptoms. And this is truer still for some minority populations, where having a mental illness may be viewed as a dishonor.

How to Help What can we do to help? As we live longer, medical schools are devoting increasing training on the speciďŹ cities and subtleties of disease management at older ages. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a good thing. But meanwhile, what might my friend have done differently? Perhaps the next time her father-in-law says heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s been feeling down, she shouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t assume heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s just getting old. Moods come in many flavors, and yes, sometimes an older family member may just be having a bad day. But the take-

home message is to not jump to that conclusion reflexively. Instead, ask them about what is going on, why they might be feeling that way, or if anything has changed recently. Keep a track of their daily activities â&#x20AC;&#x201D; eating, sleeping, walking, talking, even complaining â&#x20AC;&#x201D; so that changes from their normal baseline become easier to identify. And try not to dismiss symptoms that seem esoteric or donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t ďŹ t neatly together (e.g., too much sleep one day, too little the next). When possible, invite them to consult a professional with experience in later-life mental health. This could be their general practitioner, or a psychiatrist or psychologist. The good news is that there are effective medications for depression â&#x20AC;&#x201D; and although side-effects need to be managed more carefully in older populations, they still work. The advantages of recognizing and treating depression early are myriad. As mentioned, leaving depression untreated can increase the risk for other adverse medical outcomes and death. But there is broader advantage, too. Improving mood increases hope. And hope increases motivation to seek treatment. Thus, successfully treating depression can have a spillover effect, with the potential to improve treatment outcomes and quality of life for just about every other medical problem. Ardesheer Talati, Ph.D. is an assistant professor of clinical neurobiology (in psychiatry) at Columbia University Vagelos College of Physicians & Surgeons, and a research scientist at New York State Psychiatric Institute. For more information, contact adi.talati@ nyspi.columbia.edu

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HEALTHY HEROIN ABUSERS (Men and women, ages 21-59) who drink alcohol regularly are needed for an 8-week inpatient study investigating medication effects at the NY State Psychiatric Institute. Earn approximately $5700.

Call the Substance Use Research Center at (646) 774-6243


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Discover the world around the corner. Find community events, gallery openings, book launches and much more: Go to nycnow.com

EDITOR’S PICK

Tue 12 MARILYN NONKEN Miller Theatre 2960 Broadway 6:00 p.m. Free millertheatre.com 212-854-7799

Inspired Music of Women Composers and Poets

Thursday, March 14 at 7:30pm The Marble Choir in Concert directed by Kenneth Dake

Admission: $20 at door | $15, seniors Save $5 by ordering in advance online at MarbleChurch.org

Event listings brought to you by Marble Collegiate Church. 1 West 29th Street / New York, New York 10001 212 686 2770 / MarbleChurch.org Download the Marble Church App on iPhone or Android

Marilyn Nonken is known as “one of the greatest interpreters of new music” (American Record Guide), especially in her mastery and knowledge of the music of Tristan Murail, with whom she has closely collaborated. Here, she explores the relationship between teacher and student with works by Murail and his teacher Olivier Messiaen. Photograph by Ventiko, via www.marilynnonken.com

Thu 7

Fri 8

Sat 9

RENEE ROSNES QUARTET

EXHIBITION TOUR — ART OF NATIVE AMERICA: THE CHARLES AND VALERIE DIKER COLLECTION

DOUGLAS FAIRBANKS IS ... THE THIEF OF BAGDAD

Dizzy’s Club 10 Columbus Circle 7:30 p.m. $40 With pianist Renee Rosnes, bassist Peter Washington, drummer Lewis Nash, and vibraphonist Steve Nelson. One of the premier pianists and composers of her generation, Rosnes has toured and recorded with legendary musicians, including James Moody, Joe Henderson, Wayne Shorter and her husband, pianist Bill Charlap. Listen to her lead one of the most consistently excellent groups in town. jazz.org 212-258-9595

The Met 1000 Fifth Ave 10:30 a.m. Free with museum admission Tour this landmark exhibition that showcases 116 masterworks representing the achievements of artists from more than fifty cultures across North America. Space is limited; first come, first served. Stickers distributed at all admissions, information, and Membership desks. metmuseum.org 212-535-7710

Library for the Performing Arts 40 Lincoln Center Plaza 2:00 p.m. Free This movie, starring Douglas Fairbanks, is a visual extravaganza and perhaps his greatest adventure — complete with a magic chest, flying carpet, fire-breathing dragon, and a princess in distress. nypl.org 917-275-6975


MARCH 7-13,2019

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The Spirit p |Westsider westsidespirit.com

A N N UA L S P R I N G M C G I N L E Y L E C T U R E

Sun 10

Sexuality, Spirituality, and the Love of God: Jewish, Christian, and Muslim Insights

SUNDAY PLATFORM â&#x20AC;&#x201D; JOE CHUMAN: EINSTEINâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S RELIGION

The Reverend Patrick J. Ryan, S.J. Laurence J. McGinley Professor of Religion and Society

NY Society for Ethical Culture 2 West 64th St 11:00 a.m. Free Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s worth $2.9 million, and it has created quite a buzz in intellectual circles. The center of attention is a brief missive written by Albert Einstein, nicknamed â&#x20AC;&#x153;the God Letter,â&#x20AC;? that was recently auctioned by Christieâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s and purchased for that amount. Written in 1954, a year before his death, it summarizes Einsteinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s thoughts about God as well as his Jewish identity. ethical.nyc 212-874-5210

RESPONDENTS

Sarit Kattan Gribetz, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Theology at Fordham University Amir Hussain, Ph.D., Professor of Theological Studies at Loyola Marymount University in Los Angeles This lecture will be delivered first on

Tuesday, April 9 | 6 p.m. McNally Ampitheatre | 140 W. 62nd St. | Lincoln Center Campus | New York City (Please use 62nd Street entrance)

and repeated on

Wednesday, April 10 | 6 p.m. Flom Auditorium | Walsh Family Library | Rose Hill Campus | Bronx, N.Y. FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC

For more information, please call 718-817-4745 or email mcgchair@fordham.edu.

Mon 11 Tue 12 â&#x2013;ź WAGNER, THE WOMENâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S SUFFRAGE MOVEMENT

â&#x2013;˛ COLUMBUS: SUZANNAH LESSARD ON THE ABSENT HAND

The New York Society Library 53 East 79th St 6:30 p.m. $15 In connection with the Libraryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s exhibition â&#x20AC;&#x153;Women Get the Vote,â&#x20AC;? Dr. Sally Roesch Wagner tells the stories of those who made womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s suffrage happen, based on her new book, â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Suffrage Movement,â&#x20AC;? which unfolds a new intersectional look at the 19th-century womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s rights movement. nysoclib.org 212-288-6900

Book Culture 536 W 112th St 7:00 p.m. Free Join Author Suzannah Lessard as she discusses her new book, â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Absent Hand: Reimagining Our American Landscape.â&#x20AC;? bookculture.com 212-595-1962

Wed 13

fordham.edu/mcginleychair

SELECTED SHORTS: COMEDY TONIGHT! Symphony Space 2537 Broadway at West 95th St 7:30 p.m $32 To paraphrase Stephen Sondheim, sometimes itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s best to laugh now and leave the tragedy for tomorrow. This evening, a crack cast of comedic performers, including Jane Curtin and Dick Cavett and led by host John Fugelsang, perform lighthearted tales that explore the childishly profound and the profoundly childish. Step away from the news, the phone, the bills, the kids and/ or the parents, the pets and the dreary end of winter for a night of laughter and escape. symphonyspace.org 212-864-5400

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Women suffragists picketing in front of the White house, 1917. Library of Congress reproduction #LC-USZ62-31799, via Wikimedia Commons.


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MARCH 7-13,2019

A CULT FAVORITE Moroni, a little known Italian Renaissance painter, is having a big moment at The Frick Collection BY VAL CASTRONOVO

There’s a Lady in Red and a Man in Pink in the Oval Room at the Frick, part of an opulent new show of 23 portraits by Albino-born Giovanni Battista Moroni (1520/24-1579/80), the first major exhibit of this regional artist’s oeuvre in North America. Moroni is better known in his native Italy and in England, which possesses the largest number of Moronis outside the painter’s homeland and hosted a comprehensive show at the Royal Academy of Arts, London, in 2014. As Ian Wardropper, director of the Frick, noted at a recent preview: “He’s

IF YOU GO WHAT: “Moroni: The Riches of Renaissance Portraiture” WHERE: The Frick Collection, 1 East 70th Street WHEN: Through June 2, 2019 a little bit of a cult favorite. I think people who love Old Master pictures have known about Moroni.” A contemporary of Titian and Bronzino, this painter worked mainly outside the major artistic hubs — Venice, Florence and Rome — confining himself for the most part to Albino and nearby Bergamo, in the Lombardy region of northern Italy. He kept it local. That may be why Giorgio Vasari didn’t include Moroni in his famous compendium of artist biographies,

“The Tailor” (ca. 1570), seen here in the East Gallery with a pair of 16th century shears, is Moroni’s most famous painting. Photo: Michael Bodycomb

“Portrait of a Young Woman” (ca. 1575) shows Moroni’s genius for “capturing that person exactly as she was,” said the Frick’s associate curator Aimee Ng. Private collection. Photo: Michael Bodycomb

“Lives of the Most Eminent Painters, Sculptors, and Architects” (1550; 1568). Renaissance art historian Bernard Berenson (1865-1959) also slighted him, writing him off as a “mere portrait painter,” who “gives us sitters no doubt as they looked.” There was not enough “art” in his art, apparently. But a reputation rehab has been underway for decades, with one scholar lauding the painter’s diligent likenesses, claiming they anticipated the realism of Caravaggio. Still, as the press release for the show states, “Moroni’s characterization as an artist who faithfully recorded the world around him — whether understood as a positive quality or a weakness — has obscured his creativity and innovation as a portraitist.” At the Frick, Moroni is presented as an artist more artful and interesting than he’s been given credit for. Take the full-length picture of “Isotta Brembati” (ca. 1555-1556) in the Oval Room. A poet from an aristocratic family, Brembati wears a gown patterned with a motif that grows larger and larger as it travels down the length of the garment, most likely an embellishment rather than something real. “It seems as if he had a dress, and he’s fictionalized part of it to create a more impressive visual effect,” co-curator Aimee Ng said. “We don’t really notice it, because it’s painted so naturalistically.” More than anything else, Isotta was a woman who knew how to accessorize

— and show her money. She holds a gold-or-gilt-bronze-handled fan with feathers, usually mistaken for a purse, and has a fur wrap, with a jeweled marten’s head, hanging around her neck. We wouldn’t necessarily notice the fur if an actual pelt was not on display in a case nearby, along with other luxe accessories that resemble the items in the painting. The period swag is a window into Moroni’s “material world,” in Ng’s words, what he really saw when he painted. As Wardropper put it, the objects sprinkled throughout the Oval Room and the East Gallery “underscore the theme of the riches of Renaissance portraiture.” The marten’s head (ca. 1550-1559), in gold with rubies and pearls, is one of the most eye-catching items on view. “It’s so great that it has survived from the Renaissance,” Ng said of the loan from the Walters Art Museum in Baltimore, which is shown with a modern pelt. “If you had one, you had a lot of wealth, and people knew it.” Moroni admired beauty, but he did not make his subjects conform to Renaissance ideals of beauty. In “Portrait of a Young Woman” (ca. 1575), he demonstrates his genius for “capturing that person exactly as she was ... There’s nothing generic about that expression. I would not want to get on the bad side of this woman,” said Ng. The artist painted the material world

at the same time that he painted the spiritual world. He is credited with inventing a new genre, “sacred portraits,” a mix of contemporary donor portraits and devotional imagery. Three such paintings survive, all displayed here. In these, the contemporary figures practice a type of meditative prayer popularized by books such as St. Ignatius of Loyola’s “Spiritual Exercises” (1548), a rare copy of which is part of the exhibit. As Ng explained: “Just as you have to work out your body, through running or walking, you work out your prayer as well. It’s a four-week program,” involving imagining the sight, sound, smell, touch and taste of heavenly beings. Amen. Moroni, it seems, could move seamlessly from the sacred to the mundane, from patricians to tradesmen. Be sure to see his most famous painting, “The Tailor” (ca. 1570), in the East Gallery. The curator called it “the gateway drug to Moroni” for its genre-bending depiction of a prosperous tailor on the verge of cutting a piece of cloth — it’s a cross between a portrait and a genre painting. A pair of shears, pictured in the foreground, is the gateway to the tailor’s material world. A vitrine showcases the real thing from the 16th century. Said Ng: “Only by having them here [can you] imagine your hand in there, the weight of that ... I kind of understood why he’s resting them on the table. They are so heavy.”


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RESTAURANT INSPECTION RATINGS FEB 20 - 26, 2018 The following listings were collected from the Department of Health and Mental Hygiene’s website and include the most recent inspection and grade reports listed. We have included every restaurant listed during this time within the zip codes of our neighborhoods. Some reports list numbers with their explanations; these are the number of violation points a restaurant has received. To see more information on restaurant grades, visit www.nyc.gov/html/doh/html/services/restaurant-inspection.shtml.

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V & T Restaurant

1024 Amsterdam Ave

Grade Pending (22) Cold food item held above 41º F (smoked fish and reduced oxygen packaged foods above 38 ºF) except during necessary preparation. Evidence of mice or live mice present in facility’s food and/or non-food areas. Live roaches present in facility’s food and/or non-food areas. Filth flies or food/refuse/sewage-associated (FRSA) flies present in facility’s food and/or non-food areas. Filth flies include house flies, little house flies, blow flies, bottle flies and flesh flies. Food/refuse/sewageassociated flies include fruit flies, drain flies and Phorid flies. Food contact surface not properly washed, rinsed and sanitized after each use and following any activity when contamination may have occurred.

Paris Baguette Cafe

2568 Broadway

A

New Asia

666 Amsterdam Ave

Grade Pending (22) Live roaches present in facility’s food and/or non-food areas. Filth flies or food/refuse/sewage-associated (FRSA) flies present in facility’s food and/or non-food areas. Filth flies include house flies, little house flies, blow flies, bottle flies and flesh flies. Food/refuse/sewage-associated flies include fruit flies, drain flies and Phorid flies. Food contact surface not properly washed, rinsed and sanitized after each use and following any activity when contamination may have occurred.

Demitasse Coffee & Tea

973 Columbus Ave

A

Serafina 105

2735-2737 Broadway A

Ozen Sushi Asian Fusion

760 Amsterdam Ave

Not Yet Graded (25) Cold food item held above 41º F (smoked fish and reduced oxygen packaged foods above 38 ºF) except during necessary preparation. Evidence of mice or live mice present in facility’s food and/or non-food areas. Food contact surface not properly washed, rinsed and sanitized after each use and following any activity when contamination may have occurred.

Arco Cafe

886 Amsterdam Ave

A

Amsterdam Gourmet

403 A Amsterdam Ave Grade Pending (20) Cold food item held above 41º F (smoked fish and reduced oxygen packaged foods above 38 ºF) except during necessary preparation. Evidence of mice or live mice present in facility’s food and/or nonfood areas.

Bardolino Pizza Ii

411 Amsterdam Ave

Grade Pending (3)

Pizza Pete’s

528 Columbus Ave

A

Bluestone Lane

417 Amsterdam Ave

A

Gray’s Papaya

2080 Broadway

A

Le Pain Quotidien

50 West 72 Street

A

Barrys Bootcamp

72 W 69th St

A


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â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;LINKS OF HOPEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; TO KICK CANCER

NEIGHBORHOODâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S BEST To place an ad in this directory, Call Douglas at 212-868-0190 ext. 352.

EDUCATION

DINING

ACTIVISM At NYU, student health activists raise awareness to â&#x20AC;&#x153;tell people that youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re not in this fight aloneâ&#x20AC;? BY TEDDY SON

On February 21, a large group congregated in front of the Washington Square arch. Boxes of coffee and hot chocolate were offered to keep passersby and participants warm while marveling at a large violet paper-link chain lying on the parkâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s cobblestones. This event, held by the Coalition Against Cancer New York University Club (CACNYU), drew quite a crowd. Called â&#x20AC;&#x153;Links of Hope,â&#x20AC;? the gathering has been held every year for the past few years, or at least as long as current co-presidents Josie Iadiccico and Margaret Arabpour have been running the club. The event mainly revolves around writing reasons why people hate cancer, and ways to raise awareness, on strips of paper in NYUâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s color which are then linked together to make the chain, or â&#x20AC;&#x153;cancer ribbon.â&#x20AC;? According to club member Paul Roessling, the students collected a whopping 308 paper strips to make the ribbon. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The mission is to show that everyone is affected by cancer in one way or another,â&#x20AC;? said Iadiccico, and to â&#x20AC;&#x153;tell people that youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re not in this ďŹ ght alone.â&#x20AC;? Some people wrote general messages, such as â&#x20AC;&#x153;we hate cancer because it shortens peopleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s lives, because it hurts people,â&#x20AC;? whereas others shared more personal stories about friends and family. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I lost a friend to cancer last summer,â&#x20AC;? said Roessling, â&#x20AC;&#x153;so I was like, fuck cancer, you know?â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;I have witnessed people that I love go through it, I have lost family members that I will never get to meet from it,â&#x20AC;? added Arabpour. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I have lost family, I have family that has gone through it, I have gone through it [as a caregiver],â&#x20AC;? said Iadiccico. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It changes peopleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s lives, and we have the power to inform people about this.â&#x20AC;? CACNYU has been a promi-

Â&#x203A;Â&#x2019;Â&#x2014;Â?ČąÂ&#x2019;Â&#x2014;ČąÂ&#x2DC;Â&#x203A;Čą Â&#x2013;Â&#x17D;Â&#x2014;Â?Â&#x2019;Â&#x2DC;Â&#x2014;ČąÂ?Â&#x2018;Â&#x2019;Â&#x153;ČąÂ&#x160;Â? Â?Â&#x2DC;Â&#x203A;ČąÂ&#x160;ȹȹÂ&#x17D;Â&#x153;Â&#x153;Â&#x17D;Â&#x203A;Â?ǡ Â&#x203A;Â&#x2019;Â&#x;Â&#x160;Â?Â&#x17D;ČąÂ&#x160;Â&#x203A;Â?¢ȹÂ&#x2DC;Â&#x2DC;Â&#x2013;Â&#x153;ČąČ&#x160;ČąÂ&#x17D;Â&#x2022;Â&#x2022;¢ȹÂ&#x160;Â&#x2014;Â&#x152;Â&#x2019;Â&#x2014;Â?ČąČ&#x160;ČąÂ&#x160;Â?Â&#x17D;Â&#x203A;Â&#x2019;Â&#x2014;Â? Ĺ&#x2122;Ĺ&#x2014;Ĺ&#x2013;ČąÂ&#x17D;Â&#x153;Â?ČąĹ&#x203A;Ĺ&#x2122;Â&#x203A;Â?ČąÂ?Â&#x203A;Â&#x17D;Â&#x17D;Â?ČąČ&#x160;ČąĹ&#x2DC;Ĺ&#x2014;Ĺ&#x2DC;ČŹĹ&#x2DC;Ĺ&#x153;Ĺ&#x203A;ČŹĹ&#x203A;Ĺ&#x203A;Ĺ&#x2013;Ĺ&#x2013;    ǯÂ?Â&#x17E;Â&#x203A;Â&#x201D;Â&#x17E;Â&#x160;ÂŁÂ&#x203A;Â&#x17D;Â&#x153;Â?Â&#x160;Â&#x17E;Â&#x203A;Â&#x160;Â&#x2014;Â?ÇŻÂ&#x152;Â&#x2DC;Â&#x2013;Čą

Margaret Arabpour and Josie Iadiccico, co-presidents of CACNYU, stand at a kiosk for an on-campus Halloween event. Photo courtesy of CACNYU nent example of college health activism for almost fifteen years. Originally the acronym stood for Colleges Against Cancer, working with the American Cancer Society, but the club branched out in 2017 to become its own independent group. The aims of the club have not changed much, though as Arabpour puts it: â&#x20AC;&#x153;We all want to see an end to cancer and have our part in this ďŹ ght.â&#x20AC;?

A Focus on Caregivers In its early days, CACNYU used to hold one large event (called â&#x20AC;&#x153;Relay For Lifeâ&#x20AC;?) during the semester. Now the group is aiming to do smaller-scale, more frequent events as well as the occasional big event, â&#x20AC;&#x153;to get more involved during the school year,â&#x20AC;? Arabpour explained. Beyond â&#x20AC;&#x153;Links of Hope,â&#x20AC;? CACNYU has participated in multiple fundraisers, including the Making Strides Against Breast Cancer Walk in Central Park, sponsored by the American Cancer Society. CACNYU has conducted events with organizations such as Ronald McDonald Houses and Hope Lodges, while also working with the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We try to get involved on campus as much as possible, raising awareness among our fellow students,â&#x20AC;? said Iadiccico, â&#x20AC;&#x153;and we also do awareness around the city.â&#x20AC;? The aims of the club are clear: to raise cancer awareness in NYU and its surrounding community. According to Roessling, â&#x20AC;&#x153;if every person was able to put his or her hand in the

ďŹ ght against cancer, whether it be awareness, getting money to research cancer, weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d ďŹ nd that itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a much more hopeful outlook.â&#x20AC;? He added that because of the countryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;medical literacy problem,â&#x20AC;? it is important to educate people about cancer and familiarize them with it. Arabpour said that a huge part of cancer awareness is early detection. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s an important step in ďŹ ghting cancer because it can prevent later detection before itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s more detrimental to cure,â&#x20AC;? she said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Awareness is that ďŹ rst step that anyone can take â&#x20AC;&#x201D; you donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t need a medical degree.â&#x20AC;? Iadiccico emphasized the impact of cancer on not just patients, but the patientsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; loved ones as well. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Caregivers are people we also try to care for, and also highlight how hard that can be as well,â&#x20AC;? she said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Not only [can cancer] take the life of the person who is ďŹ ghting, but it can destroy the lives of the people caring for them. If we can get ahead of that, if we can make people aware of that pain, it can just widen peopleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s understanding, and it just comes back to the fact that weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re all in this together.â&#x20AC;? Such motives have united these young college students in the ongoing ďŹ ght against the ultimate disease. CACNYU is now is now prepping for its big endof-semester fundraising event in May, and future aims may entail getting more directly involved with cancer patients. Above all, the students hope to educate at least one more person about a disease that may seem so alien at ďŹ rst, but resides closer than one would expect.

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Neighborhood Scrapbook

Business Photo courtesy of Modern Bread and Bagel

LOOKING FOR A KOSHER, GLUTEN-FREE BABKA? RESTAURANTS Photo courtesy of Canine Retreat by AKC

‘SMOOCH YOUR POOCH’ In honor of National Love Your Pet Day recently, dog owners stopped by to “Smooch Your Pooch” at the East 60th Street location of Canine Retreat by AKC. The doggy kissing booth drew an array of canine friends, accompanied by clients new and old.

Photo courtesy of Canine Retreat by AKC

“There are so many ways to show love for your dog including nutrition, training, grooming, the time spent together and much more,” said James Tysseling, COO of AKC Canine Retreat. “Our ‘Smooch Your Pooch’ event was a fun way to show appreciation to dog lovers’ best friend.”

Modern Bread and Bagel, a new brunch spot, opens on the Upper West Side BY JASON COHEN

A new brunch spot featuring chocolate chip scones, rugalach, babka, cinnamon buns, bagels and pancakes recently opened on the UWS. Oh, it also happens to be kosher and gluten-free. Modern Bread and Bagel, located at 472 Columbus Avenue, between 82nd and 83rd Streets, is the brainchild of baker Orly Gottesman, 32. Gottesman, along with her husband Josh, 33, opened their first restaurant on Feb. 24. “Our whole thing is we wanted to introduce [the restaurant] to not only the Jewish world, but the Upper West Side community,” Gottesman said. “It’s a time when kosher people on the UWS are dying for a place like this.” Her husband’s work as an entrepreneur took them to other countries, which is where Gottesman discovered her interest in food. They lived in Paris from August 2010 to December 2011. During that time, she took an apprenticeship at a pastry shop. She quickly immersed herself in baking, and from 2011 to 2012, when the couple

were in Australia, she studied at the Cordon Bleu Culinary Arts Institute in Sydney. In addition to Gottesman’s passion for baking, her husband has celiac disease, so she was intrigued by gluten-free food. Gottesman decided to pursue an independent study on gluten-free baking and worked closely with the school’s head pastry chef to figure out how different flour blends work for different products. After several years of research, she came up with various glutenfree recipes for baked goods, breads and pastries using ancient grains, rather than traditional flour. Ultimately, this spawned the creation of Blends by Orly in 2014. “Each blend is formulated for a specific purpose,” Gottesman said.

Food and Service After living in Sydney until March 2017, and splitting time between Las Vegas and New Jersey, the couple finally settled down in Gottesman’s hometown of Englewood, N.J. The duo, who keep kosher, realized it was the right time to open their first restaurant. “For us, we saw a real void in good gluten-free,” she said. Gottesman noted that it was important for them to be known for quality food and service, not just being gluten-free. “It [gluten-free] really scares

people away,” she stressed. “It turns them off.” According to Gottesman, not only do many people come to the restaurant not aware that it is gluten-free, but they may not be Jewish, either. She stressed they do not say it is gluten-free unless someone asks. “We’re doing crazy things that gluten-free people can’t find anywhere,” she exclaimed. “People are excited to have an awesome brunch place on the UWS regardless of it being gluten free or kosher. We knew if we only opened as a bagel shop, we wouldn’t make it.” In addition to serving breakfast and lunch Sunday through Friday from 7 a.m. to 4 p.m., the plan is to turn the location into a restaurant at night called Arba. In the evening, the seating will expand from 34 to 50 and the menu will feature Mediterranean food, changing every week and season. However, it will not open until they obtain a beer and liquor license. Gottesman said the plan is to have the biggest selection of kosher wines in the country, with 200 by the bottle and 20 by glass. Looking ahead, she is nervous, but sees great things for the restaurant in the UWS community. “Everything happens for a reason,” Gottesman said. “I think this was my purpose. At the very least, I know people are really excited about us.”


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MARCH 7-13,2019

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Piles of residential trash awaiting collection are a top quality-of-life concern for downtown residents. Photo: Daniel X. O’Neil, via flickr

CUTTING DOWNTOWN’S TRASH LOAD STREETS A new report details strategies for reducing the volume of residential waste on Lower Manhattan streets BY MICHAEL GAROFALO

It’s a ubiquitous, but most unwelcome feature of the downtown streetscape. Alongside Lower Manhattan’s iconic Belgian block pavers, public art and centuries-spanning mix of architectural styles ... is the sidewalk-clogging mountain of garbage. As Lower Manhattan’s population has nearly tripled over the last 20 years, rising from roughly 23,000 pre-9/11 residents to over 62,000 today, piles of trash impeding pedestrians on the city’s oldest, narrowest streets have become an ever more common sight. “More people living here means more garbage out on the streets, and it’s become an increasing quality-of-life concern,” said Jessica Lappin, the president of Downtown Alliance. A new guide prepared by Downtown Alliance seeks to educate residents, building owners and property managers about best practices and free city resources that can reduce the number of trash bags put out on Lower Manhattan sidewalks each night. The guide encourages residential buildings to enroll in the Department of Sanitation’s three voluntary waste diversion programs for compostable organics, electronic waste and

textiles. Because DSNY collects these materials separately from trash and recycling, enrolling in these programs helps reduce the amount of waste put out at the curb and also has environmental benefits. The services are free, but Downtown Alliance found that less than 20 percent of residential buildings are currently participate in one of DSNY’s diversion programs. The report cites mechanical balers as a relatively inexpensive toll that can make a significant impact in reducing curbside clutter. These machines, which have a small footprint and can be purchased for as little as $7,500, quickly pack cardboard, plastic and metal into compact bales of uniform size. A volume of waste that would take up 130 square feet of sidewalk space if bagged or bundled by hand takes up just 16 square feet if processed by a baler.

Real-time collection alerts Downtown Alliance highlighted 50 West Street, a 186unit residential building that opened two years ago, as a model of thoughtful waste planning. Residents use dedicated waste bins for textiles, organics and electronics, and the building is also equipped with a baler. “It’s just a matter of going out of our way to take advantage of every resource the Department of Sanitation provides and work with residents on the education piece so that it’s as effective as possible,” said Seth Coston, the building’s director of condominium operations. The volume of residential

waste produced in Lower Manhattan each day is projected to grow as downtown’s residential building boom continues. Over 1,300 new residential units opened last year, and another 2,900 units in 19 buildings are currently in development. Downtown Alliance has reached out to the developers of new residential projects to encourage them to participate in DSNY’s diversion services and allocate space for balers, compacters and other infrastructure. The residential tower under development at 45 Broad Street, for example, will feature a cardboard baler, an electronic waste bin and a refrigerated trash room to reduce the smell from food scraps and other organics as they await pickup. “It’s easier if you’re building new and thinking about it proactively than to retrofit some of the buildings that are older,” Lappin said. The report recommends policy changes to DSNY, including shortening collection windows to reduce the amount of time trash spends on sidewalks before it is collected. Currently, residential trash can be set at the curb on 4 p.m. the day before pickup. Downtown Alliance also suggests DSNY implement realtime collection alerts to automatically notify building staff when trucks are near. Such a system would allow trash to be set out immediately before pickup, further shortening the window of time during which trash sits on the sidewalk.


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The Spirit|Westsider westsidespirit.com

YOUR 15 MINUTES

To read about other people who have had their “15 Minutes” go to westsidespirit.com/15 minutes

AN ‘ACCIDENTAL ACTIVIST’ The co-founder of Tenants United Fighting for Lower East Side (TUFF-LES) is taking action against the proposal to build four super-tall towers in the Two Bridges neighborhood BY CULLEN MONROE ORMOND

Trever Holland is tired. He has been thrust into the public eye — a position he’s not entirely comfortable with — which forces him to participate in several interviews. So many interviews that it takes him a while to remember which journalist he had an interview with during our specified time. But his popularity is understandable. The 52-year-old former attorney and resident of the Two Bridges neighborhood has been integral to the opposition against the proposal to build four super-tall (over 700 feet) towers on one block. The mitigations proved to be controversial as residents feared gentrification and another lengthy construction period. The Extell building, otherwise known as One Manhattan Square, an 80-story, luxury apartment behemoth already took five years to complete. Holland, co-founder of Tenants United Fighting for Lower East Side (TUFFLES), has been waging a re-zoning war with the City Planning Commission. He was recently rewarded with a small victory when the proposed mitigations were halted because of impending litigation. The next court date is March 28, where the judge could lift, modify or continue the hold on the construction of the towers.

Where do you live? I live at 82 Rutgers Slip, which is in the center of all the Two Bridges development. It’s very close to the water and also right next to the Extell building that’s 80 stories and is currently in its completion phase.

Did you raise a family in Two Bridges? No, but I have family in the area. Including across the street, my wife’s aunt and her cousins. Most of the family live across the street or right across the bridge.

And how did you come to be a founder of TUFF-LES? This was to make sure the people who lived along the waterfront, which we knew was prime real estate and a prospective area, had a voice in what was going to happen. So, we got together all the tenant leaders who lived on the waterfront. I was one of the co-founders, I use that term loosely because it was really a collaborative effort of folks who lived in the area.

Why do you oppose these buildings? When you look out your window, you’ll see that large finger sticking out of the ground, that 80 story thing that is completely out of scale. I don’t know one single community planner or anyone who follows architecture can say that it’s appropriate for the area. It’s an immediate transformation of the neighborhood because it’s mostly luxury apartments. This is primarily a low-income neighborhood and the city has decided to target this particular area, one block, for putting, what they say, is the greatest amount of affordable housing in the city. It’s not appro-

priate, it’s out of scale, it destroys the skyline as we see it.

What was it like when the Extell building was being constructed? The construction nightmare we experienced with the Extell building, those five years out of my life that I will never recover from. It was extremely hell-ish. I can’t imagine them building four buildings essentially on one block and just because we’re in an area that doesn’t have appropriate zoning and the developers knew that.

How does having a family in the neighborhood heighten your opposition to the proposal? I mean it’s not just me who is impacted directly as a resident. We are a family that have different socio-economic conditions, so some may not be able to recover or are not as able to be as mobile or handle changes in the neighborhood as I can. A lot of my family cannot do the same.

I read online too that along with the affordable units that would be coming they said they were going to put $4.5 billion into the neighborhood. Isn’t that a benefit of it? The mitigations were not discussed with the community, it was made by city planning. The recommendations that we gave, none of them were followed. None of the parks that they proposed for re-doing were in the Two Bridges direct impact area.

Do you have an example? To give you an example, we recommend that the Allen Street Mall, which borders Two Bridges into Chinatown, into a particularly poor immigrant neighborhood, that area has been neglected, we recommended improving that. They did nothing for that. If these buildings do not happen, we’re perfectly fine. What we’ve said all along is, “give us the supermarket,” because that’s what we lost, and we’ll be fine. But there isn’t anything that they’re proposing that we’re going to be sad about if it doesn’t happen. Not one single thing.

Have you always been an activist? I’m an accidental activist. I just consider myself a resident to the neighborhood that is concerned in keeping the neighborhood as is. If these towers go up this neighborhood is done. It will never be the same and if we don’t do something right now, history is going to look back and say, “what were you guys doing? How did you let this happen?”

Trever Holland at a Halloween event in his community room. Photo courtesy of Trever Holland

Trever Holland and Mayor Bill de Blasio discuss zoning for Two Bridges and a push for a ULURP in September 2017 at Joseph Sauer Park. Photo courtesy of Trever Holland if you put upwards of 10,000 people on one block in a neighborhood, 80 percent of them affluent, the smaller apartment buildings are going to raise their rents. The same thing is going to happen with the rent of the shops. I’ll go the next the day to the deli and they’ll be selling artisanal mustard. I’m not kidding. Rents of the surrounding areas will go up and anyone that says it won’t doesn’t know anything about economics and city planning. There’ll be a Starbucks on the corner, like it or don’t like it, but the dynamics of the entire neighborhood will change. All the local places that you used to go that you could get something that was affordable will change and people will be forced out. No one heard of Two Bridges until two years ago. Now, it’s becoming the “it” neighborhood.

How will the effects of these buildings trickle into surrounding neighborhoods such as Chinatown?

If the proposed towers are built, will you stay in the neighborhood?

All it takes is common sense to think

I threaten that I’m going to leave but

we all know that it’s tough to find places to live in New York City. I’ve been in this neighborhood for 22 years and saying that I would leave would just be out of frustration, but I as of right now I fully intend to stay in my neighborhood.

What is one thing that you would like people to know? We just need other torchbearers who know what they’re doing to navigate this process because it’s large plan and a big neighborhood with lots of different opinions. I’m waiting for Apple to create a time machine, so I can go take a peek at what’s going to happen.

Know somebody who deserves their 15 Minutes of fame? Go to westsidespirit.com and click on submit a press release or announcement.


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