Page 1

The local paper for the Upper per West Side p Sid

WEEK OF FEBRUARY OLD MASTERS IN A NEW LIGHT ◄ P.12

14-20 2019

Inside

NYPD TO BOLSTER SEX CRIMES UNIT LAW ENFORCEMENT As reported rapes increase, the department to add investigators in Special Victims Division

REQUIEM FOR A PET STORE Petland Discounts to shutter its shops by April

BY MICHAEL GAROFALO

The New York City Police Department will increase staffing in its unit tasked with handling sex crimes amid a citywide trend of rising reports of rape. The department will add 35 investigators to the Special Victims Division, police officials announced at a Feb. 5 press briefing. The NYPD came under fire last year after a report by the city’s Department of Investigation cited “chronic understaffing and inexperience” within the SVD, which “jeopardized prosecutions, re-traumatized victims, and negatively impacted the reporting of sex crimes.” The NYPD recorded 150 rapes in January of this year, a 27 percent increase over the 118 reported over the same period last year. Three of those rapes were reported in the Upper East Side’s 19th Precinct, which recorded zero in January of last year. January’s totals represent the continuation of a spike in reported rapes that began in 2018, when police recorded 1,794 rapes citywide, as compared with 1,449 the previous year. Mayor Bill de Blasio and NYPD Commissioner James O’Neill have said that the increased totals are not due to an increase in the actual number of rapes taking place; rather, they believe rapes have long been underreported to police and that survivors have felt more comfortable coming forward in

CONTINUED ON PAGE 18

Manhattan Borough President Gale Brewer at the New York City Women’s March in Columbus Circle on Jan. 19. She is widely expected to run in 2021 for the City Council seat on the Upper West Side where she served for 12 years until her election as beep in 2013. Photo: Brewer’s Instagram page.

DÉJÀ VU ON THE WEST SIDE seat on the Upper West Side where she served from 2002 through 2013, according to at least seven people in her political orbit. No final decision has been made, and no announcement is anticipated anytime soon, for a general election race that is still two years and nine months away, say friends, supporters, district leaders, political consultants and officers of Democratic political clubhouses. Term limits, which Brewer has long opposed, is the catalyst. It will force her out of office on Dec. 31, 2021, when she completes the second of her two consecutive four-year terms as borough president.

POLITICS Gale Brewer was first elected to the City Council in 2001 and moved up to borough president 12 years later. As the term limits clock ticks, friends and supporters say, she is now contemplating a reprise. BY DOUGLAS FEIDEN

It is extraordinarily rare for an elected official serving in an executive capacity to trade down to a legislative branch and seek a position with fewer constituents, lower pay and lesser influence. But Manhattan Borough President

I am ecstatic!” Keith Wright, Manhattan County Democratic leader Gale Brewer has never been your typical politician. Ever since she was reelected to a second term by a lopsided 83 percent margin in 2017, the question of her political future has emerged as one of the hottest guessing games in town. Now, the answer is starting to come into focus: Brewer has been eyeing a possible return in 2021 to the City Council

YOU WROTE A BOOK? SO PUBLISH IT! Shakespeare & Co.’s printing machine

BLOOD, SNAKES AND SQUARE KNOTS Recalling Boy Scout camp in the 1960s

CONTINUED ON PAGE 9 Westsider WEEK OF APRIL

SPRING ARTS PREVIEW

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NEWS residents A vocal group of U.W.S. Transportation isn’t convinced the doing enough is Committee of CB7 BY LISA BROWN

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MANHATTAN'S APARTMENT BOOM, > PROPERTY, P.20

2015

In Brief MORE HELP FOR SMALL BUSINESS

PROTESTING THE COMMUNITY BOARD OVER TRAFFIC DEATHS

Zero, Mayor Bill One year into Visionreducing trafficfor de Blasio’s plan traffic the number of has related deaths, Upper West Side fatalities on the compared to last actually increased, year’s figures. Upper West Siders -That has some needs to be done convinced more of the Transstarting with members of the local comportation Committee munity board. West mother, Upper Lisa Sladkus, a member of TransSide resident and said she’s fed at portation Alternatives a silent protest up, and organized 7’s February board Community Board residents dozens of meeting, where Committee called for Transportation leaders to step down. against incredible “We have run up imto get safe street trying just problems said. “This was provements,” she our point across get another way to dissatisfied.” that we are very involved with Sladkus has been Alternatives since Transportation served as director 2002 and formerly Streets’ RenaisSide of Upper West She says becoming sance Campaign. really got her into a mother is what activism. streets around me “Just noticing the as a pedestrian I felt and how unsafe she said. “I wanted and as a cyclist,”

9-15

The effort to help small seems to businesses in the city be gathering steam. Two city councilmembers, Robert Margaret Chin and Cornegy, have introduced create legislation that wouldSmall a new “Office of the within Business Advocate” of Small the city’s Department Business Services. Chin The new post, which have up told us she’d like to would and running this year, for serve as an ombudsman city small businesses within them clear government, helping to get bureaucracy the through things done. Perhaps even more also importantly, the ombudsman and number will tally the type small business of complaints by taken in owners, the actions policy response, and somefor ways to recommendations If done well, begin to fix things. report would the ombudsman’s give us the first quantitative with taste of what’s wrong the city, an small businesses in towards step rst fi important fixing the problem. of To really make a difference, for developers will have to is a mere formality their projects course, the advocaterising rents, are the work complete precinct, but chances-- thanks to a looking to find a way to tackle business’ legally quickly. is being done which remain many While Chin their own hours,” of after-hours “They pick out boom in the number throughout who lives on most vexing problem. gauge what said Mildred Angelo,of the Ruppert construction permits said it’s too early tocould have Buildings one the 19th floor in The Department of the city. role the advocate number three years, the Houses on 92nd Street between on the She Over the past is handing out a record there, more information work perThird avenues. permits, bad thing. of Second and an ongoing all-hours number of after-hours of after-hours work problem can’t be a the city’s Dept. with the said there’s where mits granted by This step, combinedBorough according to new data project nearby jumped 30 percent, noise in construction Buildings has efforts by Manhattan to mediate data provided constantly make BY DANIEL FITZSIMMONS according to DOB from trucks. President Gale Brewer of Informa- workers offer transferring cement response to a Freedom the rent renewal process, they want. They city classifies knows the signs Act request. The between 6 “They do whateverthey please. They Every New Yorker some early, tangible small clang, the tion work come and go as of progress. For many sound: the metal-on-metal beeps of a any construction weekend, can can’t come piercing a.m., or on the have no respect.” at p.m. and 7 business owners, that hollow boom, the issuance of these reverse. A glance The increased a correspond after-hours. soon enough. truck moving in has generated can hardly as has led to

SLEEPS, THANKS TO THE CITY THAT NEVER UCTION A BOOM IN LATE-NIGHT CONSTR

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and you the alarm clock middle of the night, believe it: it’s the carries on fulland yet construction tilt. or your local police You can call 311

Newscheck Crime Watch Voices Out & About

The surge in permitsfees for the city in millions of dollars consome residents agency, and left application process vinced that the

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FEBRUARY 14-20,2019

IS IT REALLY JUST â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;NERVOUS STOMACH?â&#x20AC;&#x2122; son the Mediterranean Diet is repeatedly voted as the best diet on countless lists year after year. Its focus on whole, unprocessed foods, with an emphasis on plant-based items, healthy fats and lean proteins, makes it beneďŹ cial not only for digestive health, but overall health too. â&#x20AC;˘ Cut back on caffeine. Caffeine may act as a stimulant on the bowels, by promoting the release of a hormone which increases motor activity and emptying time in the colon. This can lead to diarrhea and abdominal discomfort. Products containing caffeine include coffee, tea, soda, energy drinks and chocolate. â&#x20AC;˘ Avoid known triggers. This seems obvious enough, but some people ďŹ nd it hard to resist certain foods they know to bother their stomach. If you absolutely must indulge, try to limit yourself to having a small amount alongside foods you tolerate, and consume it at home, if possible. â&#x20AC;˘ Limit alcohol. Alcohol can irritate the lining of the GI tract and exacerbate your symptoms. Stick to a maximum of one drink per day for women or two drinks per day for men as tolerated, and stay well-hydrated with water. If you are taking antibiotics or other medications, check for potential interactions with alcohol before drinking, even in moderation. â&#x20AC;˘ Slow down! We live in a fast-paced world and our mealtimes are often secondary to the many other things we have to do. Practice mindful eating by taking the time to sit down for a meal without distractions, chew slowly and enjoy your food. Your digestion will thank you for it. For additional tips related to nutrition and more, follow us on Instagram at @mountsinai_ibdcenter.

HEALTH Intestinal health issues may not be fun to talk about, but they can have a major impact on quality of life BY JESSICA GELMAN, MS, RDN, CDN

Letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s face it, running to the bathroom because of your â&#x20AC;&#x153;nervous stomachâ&#x20AC;? can be very embarrassing, not to mention inconvenient. Whether you are giving a presentation at the office, or trying to navigate the crowded New York subway system, daily stress levels may unfortunately play a role in dictating your bathroom needs. While it may be an uncomfortable topic to discuss, the staff at the Susan and Leonard Feinstein IBD Clinical Center has heard it all. We treat thousands of patients a year and know that a so-called â&#x20AC;&#x153;nervous stomach,â&#x20AC;? with symptoms such as bloating, gas, abdominal pain, nausea, diarrhea and/ or constipation, can be a sign of a more serious, but treatable, gastrointestinal disorder. Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) is the most commonly diagnosed gastrointestinal condition and affects more than 35 million Americans. It is a chronic disorder of gut-brain interaction, deďŹ ned by recurrent abdominal pain and altered bowel habits. Other gastrointestinal disorders include Crohnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s disease, ulcerative colitis, celiac disease, gastroenteritis and more. Diagnostic tests, including blood tests, radiological imaging or an endoscopy with biopsy, can help identify whether your digestive disorder may be structural, motility-related or gut-brain in nature. Once the cause of your distress has been diagnosed, an integrated approach to your treatment plan â&#x20AC;&#x201D; not simply a prescription â&#x20AC;&#x201D; can help to empower you and get you back to being the high-functioning New Yorker that you want to be. Comprehensive

Irritable Bowel Syndrome is the most commonly diagnosed gastrointestinal condition. care should include nutrition, mental health services and social/care coordination. If you are suffering with gastrointestinal issues, you should seek an

accurate diagnosis and treatment plan. In the meantime, here are some nutrition-focused strategies that may help. Please note that every person is different, and these items may not ap-

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CRIME WATCH BY JERRY DANZIG TOOTH OR CONSEQUENCES

TOOL THEFT

It seems that a dental employee has been busy extracting something other than teeth. According to police. during the period between Thursday, Nov. 1, 2018 and Wednesday, Jan. 16 of this year, an employee of CPW Dentistry, located at 25 West 68th St., used a company credit card to purchase gift cards valued at $95,900 without permission or authority. Anthony Pinales was arrested Monday, Jan. 28, and charged with grand larceny.

At 7:10 a.m. on Sunday, Jan. 27, a 38-year-old woman was notiďŹ ed by OnStar that the alarm on her elativeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 2017 Cadillac sedan parked on West 62nd St near Freedom Place had been activated. She and the relative went to the car and discovered that a rear passenger window had been broken and property was missing. Surveillance video later showed the perpetrator ďŹ&#x201A;eeing south on Freedom Place on a bike.The items stolen included a Festool drill valued $500, a Fluke multimeter worth $500, a thermal imager selling for $450, a DeWalt router priced at $350, a jigsaw tagged at $200, various tools totaling $100 and a DeWalt toolbox worth $50, making a total stolen of $2,150.

CLEANED OUT On Sunday, Jan. 27, a 31-year-old woman living at 137 West 71st St. had a cleaning lady from Handy in to clean her apartment. When she returned at 4 p.m., the cleaning lady was gone, her apartment was in disarray, and some items of property were missing. The stolen belongings included a winter coat valued at $1,200, a custom whiskey glass worth $750, another winter coat tagged at $600, facial lotion cream selling for $300, a sweatshirt worth $150, sweatpants priced at $150 and a bottle of Kilchoman whisky selling for $75, making a total stolen of $3,225.

COUPLE COLLARED WITH INFANT IN TOW A young couple was arrested after a shoplifting incident. According to police, on Monday afternoon, Jan. 28, a 29-year-old man and a 31-year-old woman were seen on surveillance video removing store merchandise from a shelf inside the Century 21 store at 1972 Broadway, concealing it in a backpack and attempting to leave the store without paying. A female loss

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prevention officer reported the pairâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s actions to her male manager, who intercepted the duo and recovered the items. It turned out that a trespass warning had been ďŹ led against both defendants on Nov. 30, 2018. The couple had their six-week-old daughter with them at the time of the latest incident. Demetric Vasquez and Victoria Franklin were arrested and charged with burglary. The items stolen included a Balenciaga jacket valued at $1,500, a St. Laurent t-shirt priced at $230, a Givenchy Intense fragrance selling for $50, a Bulgari fragrance tagged at $40, a Jimmy Choo menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s fragrance priced at $40 plus a Ferragamo fragrance worth $25, for a total of $1,985.

STATS FOR THE WEEK Reported crimes from the 20th precinct for the week ending Feb 3 Week to Date 2019 2018

% Change

2019

2018

% Change

Murder

0

0

n/a

0

0

n/a

Rape

0

0

n/a

0

0

n/a

Robbery

1

1

0.0

5

10

-50.0

Felony Assault

0

1

-100.0

2

5

-60.0

Burglary

1

5

-80.0

8

10

-20.0

Grand Larceny

7

16

-56.3

44

72

-38.9

Grand Larceny Auto

0

0

n/a

0

2

-100.0

CASH AND A SPLASH A burglar who broke into a bar wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t content just to take cash. At 4:36 a.m. on Friday, Jan. 25, an unknown perpetrator broke the front door window at the Caledonia bar located at 424 Amsterdam Ave. He then entered the establishment through the vestibule and went behind the bar, where two cash registers were located. He broke into both and took $500 in cash from one of the registers. He also helped himself to a bottle of whiskey. Photo by Tony Webster, via Flickr

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Useful Contacts

FEBRUARY 14-20,2019

Drawing Board

POLICE NYPD 20th Precinct

120 W. 82nd St.

212-580-6411

NYPD 24th Precinct

151 W. 100th St.

212-678-1811

NYPD Midtown North Precinct

306 W. 54th St.

212-767-8400

FDNY Engine 76/Ladder 22

145 W. 100th St.

311

FDNY Engine 40/Ladder 35

W. 66th St. & Amsterdam Ave.

311

FDNY Engine 74

120 W. 83rd St.

311

Ladder 25 Fire House

205 W. 77th St.

311

FIRE

CITY COUNCIL Councilmember Helen Rosenthal

563 Columbus Ave.

212-873-0282

Councilmember Mark Levine

500 West 141st St.

212-928-6814

State Senator Brad Hoylman

322 Eighth Ave. #1700

212-633-8052

State Sen. Jose M. Serrano

1916 Park Ave. #202

212-828-5829

STATE LEGISLATORS

Assemblymember Linda Rosenthal 230 W. 72nd St. #2F

212-873-6368

Assemblymember Daniel O’Donnell 245 W. 104th St.

212-866-3970

COMMUNITY BOARD 7 LIBRARIES

250 W. 87th St. #2

212-362-4008

St. Agnes

444 Amsterdam Ave.

212-621-0619

Bloomingdale

150 W. 100th St.

212-222-8030

Performing Arts

40 Lincoln Center

917-275-6975

HOSPITALS Mt. Sinai – Roosevelt

1000 10th Ave.

Mt. Sinai - St. Luke’s

1090 Amsterdam Ave.

212-523-4000 212-523-5898

CON ED TIME WARNER CABLE POST OFFICES

4 Irving Place

212-460-4600

2554 Broadway

212-358-0900

US Post Office

215 W. 104th St.

212-662-0355

US Post Office

700 Columbus Ave.

212-866-1981

US Post Office

127 W. 83rd St.

212-873-3991

Ansonia Post Office

178 Columbus Ave.

212-362-1697

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ONCE UPON A COMMUNITY BOARD MEETING COMMUNITY Don’t mess with the District 9 seniors BY MICHELLE NAIM

I did not wear a coat to work on Tuesday. February 5. The temperature was in the 40s that morning, but for someone from Los Angeles, who spent the previous week in her room with the heat on full blast and her feet wrapped in fuzzy socks, it felt like a beautiful summer day. (Which it almost was — we hit 65 degrees in the afternoon.) The assignment was to cover a Community Board 9 meeting, but when I got to the George Bruce Library at 518 West 125th Street, where the meeting was to be held, it was closed. “Excuse me,” I said to a man who looked like he worked there, “isn’t there a meeting concerning senior issues at 11 a.m.?” “Sorry,” he replied, “the library opens at noon,” It was 10:45 a.m. I met a kind, elderly woman waiting outside. I figured she was probably thanking her lucky stars that today was not a day she had to stay inside with her heat on full blast and fuzzy socks. But she was angry, and told me that the only thing keeping this library afloat was her and her fellow senior citizens, and how despicable it was that they could change the hours without letting them know. A former Chase banker, Osi Ororokuma, also standing outside of the library, said he’d been there for an hour. Later, in a phone-call, still angry, he said it was a disgrace that “there

The panel for a discussion of banking for seniors included, left to right, Osi Ororokuma and JP Morgan Chase representatives Robert Benitez and Melvin Collins. Photo: Michelle Naim weren’t any chairs brought outside ... after they found out that the seniors were waiting.” As time slowly trickled by, community members proudly attempted to enter their library, only to find that the front door was locked. Attorney Anthony Fletcher, who served as the Community Board 9 interim chair for the meeting, but regularly serves as the treasurer, said, “With respect to Tuesdays ... it had traditionally been the case, at last for the least ten years, that ... the library opened in time for us to begin our 11:15 a,m. meeting.” Asked about the library’s communication with the board about the change in hours,

Fletcher said, “I did not receive that correspondence, and when I went into the office to retrieve what was in my box ... there was no mail. What I can tell you is that the librarian upstairs, who would not identify herself, told me the following: We notified the city of the change in hours and it is the city’s obligation, downtown, the department of libraries, to notify community residents and other organizations that the library hours are changing.” According to Fletcher, the library never consulted with the community board members about the change, “For the three of us who are here,” he said, “each of us has confirmed that the com-

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munity board was never asked or informed as to the change in the schedule for today or the other days.” When the library finally opened, the seniors carefully descended the steps to a theater-like room. The topic of the meeting was the business of banking and the services available to seniors and people with disabilities. Fletcher, Martin Wallace, and Carolyn Thomas were the three community board members in attendance. Fletcher moderated the panel. Melvin T. Collins, current JP Morgan Chase branch manager, and Arif Seyal, market director for Washington Heights and Harlem, represented the

bank. After many community members voiced their complaints about the customer service they had received at their local Chase Bank, Collins apol-

ogized. “I want my employees to treat you like a billionaire,” he said. After many suggestions from the audience of ways for Chase to better serve the community, Seyal informed the seniors that the Chase Bank on 55 West 125th Street was closing for four months in order to build an innovative workshop room for its clients. Dr. Theda Palmer, a Harlem business owner who was attending her first community board meeting, said, “I think it would be a lovely physical place ... [but] if the content is not going to affect the people’s learning curve then they may as well stay where they are.” She continued, “I saw nothing at that meeting that was a teaching experience.” As the meeting ended, a beloved woman who everyone called Ms. Gilmore was swarmed over by her friends and other community members. Lunch was served, and as I walked to the subway, I felt like I was already part of this small community, called District 9. It was late, and it was time to head back to midtown. Maybe I should’ve worn my fuzzy socks.

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FEBRUARY 14-20,2019

BLOOD, SNAKES AND SQUARE KNOTS CAMP BY DAVID NOONAN

Going to Boy Scout camp in the ďŹ rst half of the 1960s was a raw and exhilarating experience. It was also kind of nuts. We didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t play tennis or softball. We didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have coed cookouts with girls from all-girl camps. We didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t sleep in cabins with electricity and screen doors. And we didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have toilets. We slept in A-wall tents set up on wood platforms, two scouts to a tent. And we did our business in latrines, which, on a hot summer day in New Jersey, you could ďŹ nd with your eyes closed. It was supposed to be rugged, and it was. We were there to learn the kinds of arcane skills you really couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t learn anywhere else â&#x20AC;&#x201D; how ow to start a ďŹ re in the rain, how w to identify edible plants, how to build a rope bridge strong enough to hold a 250-pound man, how to make your way cross-country through the woods with a com-

pass and a topographical hical map, how to tell time with a stick k in the ground, how to cook a decentt meal over an open ďŹ re. The point was to climb mb through the ranks of the quasi-military military organization, from lowly Tenderfoot to Eagle Scout, to earn merit badges and patches that you could ould wear on your uniform m to signal your achievements. nts.

building. (There was were always bu as a hatchet on even a way to wear w your belt.) We shot bows and arrows at the archery range and we lay on funky old mattresses at the rifle mattress range and shot .22 caliber riďŹ&#x201A;es at paper targets. I used to pretarge tend I was shooting g the Nazis who had at th d invested so much time and vest energy trying to kill ene my father and hiss friends during fri the Battle of th the Bulge. World War II W had ended less ha than 20 years tha before, and I can bef see now how it shadowed our experishad erience as a Boy Scouts. Many of our dads and scout leaders were veterans, some with combat experience. They heavy com about it, but we did. One didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t talk ab of our leaders, Mr. M G., had fought in the PaciďŹ c theater. I can still jungles of the Pa see the massive scar on the front of his

Armed to the teeth Another difference between Boy Scout camp mp and the sleep-away ay camps where some of my friends went was the weaponry â&#x20AC;&#x201D; we were ere armed to the teeth, and we liked it. We wore sheath eath knives on our belts, elts, carried multi-bladcar -bladed pocket knives e in our pockets kets and sharpened ed them obsessively. vely. We used official Boy Scout hatchets and axes to cchop wood for the ďŹ res we

thigh, which we thi decided he got in d hand-to-hand h combat with a machetewielding enemy soldier. I also remember a the night he punth ished a group of us ishe some infraction for so having us stand in a by hav circle and pick up and put down melon-sized rocks, over and over ro again, for a halfa hour or so. Try it sometime â&#x20AC;&#x201D; youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll be amazed how exhausting it is. As I recall, Mr. G. said it was a method that was sometimes used in camps. POW cam We didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t give it a lot of thought, but we were clearly on a kind of war footing, in our uniforms, with our ranks and chains of command, our Morse code and semaphore ďŹ&#x201A;ags, our marching songs and salutes. Before the end of the decade, our Senior Patrol Leader,

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Jimmy, one of the older scouts, would become an Army Ranger and lose a leg in Vietnam.

Spilled blood We spent a lot of time learning first aid, and we needed it. Spilled blood was as common as wood smoke. We sliced our fingers and hands open regularly with those carefullysharpened knives (I can show you the scars), burned ourselves over campfires, sprained our ankles hiking the rocky terrain the camp was built on and bashed our heads on trees playing flashlight tag in the woods at night. I earned a trip to the local hospital when I crushed my left thumb between two large rocks I was removing from one of the paths that linked the campsites. (The rural ER had a board on the wall where they displayed the fish hooks, rusty nails, giant splinters and random hunks of metal they had removed from people.) I lost the nail — the top of the thumb is flat now, with a notch in the middle — but I was back in camp that night, showing off my enormous bandage, an arrangement of white gauze the size of a chicken drumstick.

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Sssss... Without question, though, the most memorable thing about Camp Allamuchy in those days was the snake pit. Yes, we had a snake pit. It was a rectangular hole in the ground big enough to bury a small sedan. There was a wooden structure about three-feet high built around it, with a wire mesh top, so you could look down and see the snakes. And here’s the best part — it was up to the scouts to supply the snakes. By August it was quite the exhibit. (We knew what New Jersey’s venomous snake, the copperhead, looked like. We were ordered to leave them alone, an order we were happy to obey.) Forty years later, my two sons attended the same camp with their Boy Scout troop. There were a lot of upgrades, of course, including the addition of a number of cabins and a very nice shower house. Not surprisingly, the snake pit was no more. But the latrines were still in use, the tents still drooped in the rain, the scouts still practiced tying knots. And there were plenty of knives and hatchets to go around.

Boy Scout camp in the 1960s was not for the faint of heart. Some of the author’s gear, including his Eagle Scout medal. Photo: David Noonan

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Write to us: To share your thoughts and comments go to westsidespirit.com and click on submit a letter to the editor.

RX FOR ALL: CARING COMMUNICATION BY BETTE DEWING

“I’m just so sorry this happened to you,” said Dr. Sarah Flannery. She meant the freak accident which brought me to the Lenox Hill Hospital emergency room. Details later, but this column is about caring communication, and how much it’s needed in the medical profession and beyond. No, it wasn’t a fall. I was sitting on a kitchen step stool when a heavy cast-iron skillet fell from its spot on a peg board hook — right onto my right leg. Yi-i-i-i-! Excessive bruising and swelling sent me to Urgent Care (what a much-needed city resource), and from there I was sent to the ER.

Dr. Flannery had the report, of course, before her compassionate greeting, with its much appreciated understanding of my fears, pain and distress at being back in an ER again. No broken bones, thankfully, but the blood thinner link landed me in the hospital after the usual many hours in the ER. No doubt some of you know how communication matters during those long, long waits — especially for those alone without family or other advocates. But some patients and/or their advocates sometimes look out for patients who are alone. I was loaned a phone that worked, along with some encouraging words.

Surely caring communication from doctors and nurses needs to be stressed. With so many patients to see, maybe what we need is more medical personnel, and not more new medical buildings, which replace the much-needed the neighborhood kind. Indeed, the neighborhoods are distressed by the expansion plans of both Lenox Hill and Weill Cornell Medical Center. And I can think of no better example of of the kind of people we need in our hospitals than Dr. Sarah Flannery. In time for Valentine’s Day, please consider some of this column’s caring communication ideas. Consider the shy, and those who are

not so “easily verbal,” for example, and see that they are not left out. Everything really depends on the talk being shared. A friend who had jury duty recently reports how the aggressively verbal jury members tried to take over the deliberations, Thankfully, this one angry jury member didn’t let that happen. Just and democratic communication couldn’t be more essential. But to stay with the caring theme, let’s remember the words of communication expert and author, Sherod Miller, in a Jane Brody interview: “Communication is the way relationships are created, maintained and destroyed ... to be heard and understood is central to any ongoing relationship — husband and wife, parent and child, employer and employee, friends, siblings, you name it.” Miller’s book, “Straight Talk: A New Way to Get Closer to Others”

needs a mighty revival. And hey, maybe so do some related thoughts from a previous column of mine titled “Sympathize, Don’t Analyze.” which suggests, no, commands, by golly: “When someone says they feel rotten, don’t pile on the advice or regale them with tales of your own, or someone else’s travails. Don’t say ‘Everyone has problems,’ or ‘It could be worse.’ Meet a person where they are — this and other 1970s human potential directives need a mighty revival. Now, we sure don’t mean indulge complainers who don’t listen to the complaints of others. Caring communication also means reprimands.” But enough from me already — let’s hear it from you. Along with the Dr. Flannerys’ message, that is what Valentine’s Day is very much about — sharing talk — the kind that is caring.

WELCOME TO THE SECOND-MOST HELLISH PLACE IN NYC PUBLIC EYE BY JON FRIEDMAN

Penn Station is the most hellish place anywhere in the five boroughs during the evening rush hour. Hundreds of thousands of people race around like lab rats, flashing twisted looks on their anguished faces. I’m making that train, damn it — and damn you! If you dare to stand in their path, they’ll trample you, like Larry Csonka used to do on a power slant. Speaking of hellish places: Clocking in a close second, in a photo finish, is Penn Station some 12 hours later, at 5:30 in the morning. To be sure, nobody is running anywhere — they’re too sleepy to move much at all. Instead, they just stand there in place, as if stuck in quicksand, their glassy eyes peeled to The Sign. Lucky me. As a reverse com-

muter on the Long Island Rail Road, I get an exposure to both atmospheres on a regular, twicea-week basis. I leave for my teaching assignment at Stony Brook very early in the morning — usually on the 5:47 a.m. train heading east — and then return in time to endure the mad scramble of the evening rush hour, just as the throng is going home on the train. In every situation on the LIRR, life revolves around The Sign, which reveals what track their train will be leaving from. At dawn, when they spot their track, the people trudge on over there. Inevitably, they creep past the handful of assembled cops on duty. These men and women in blue cluster together, utterly oblivious to the reverse commuters. It’s hard to tell if the officers are secretly elated or resentful that they have quite possibly the dullest shift on the entire New York Police Department assignment sheet.

Penn Station at the crack of dawn. Photo: Jon Friedman

Judging by the detached looks on their faces, though, one point is clear. To quote a line from a Bob Dylan song: “The cops don’t need you — and, man, they expect the same.” Sure, Penn Station can seem quaint at that hour and the extreme reverse-commuter sport has its charms — kind of. I am on a first-name basis with Steve and Jackie, my faithful allies who work at the Starbucks near the LIRR area. They work hard and remain cheerful, day in and out (and neither of them has threatened to run for President). Just to convey what a BMOC I am at that shop, Jackie often begins to prepare my mocha drink as soon as I walk in, enabling me to make my train easily. Now, that’s status! And sure, Penn Station has slowly been a teeny bit less hellish. Such innovations as the establishment of a trendy Shake Shack helps modernize the joint. The people who play music pro-

vide a nice diversion. But Penn Station could use better ventilation, access for disabled people and some system to cut down on the general atmosphere of chaos. And don’t get me started on the bathrooms. To save time, look under “disgusting” in the dictionary. So, why do I put myself through this nonsense? Two reasons: I like to teach at Stony Brook and (on a good day) shape young minds and encourage them to be better citizens. And, No. 2: I have no choice. I don’t have a car, so there is actually no alternative. The LIRR has got me in its clutches. I’ve been doing this drill for so many years that I rationalize it by telling myself that I can sleep or work on the train and that it really isn’t so bad to hang out at Penn Station at 5:30 in the morning. But, of course, it really is.

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BREWER CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 Similarly, the two-terms-andyouâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re-out cap means that City Council Member Helen Rosenthal, who succeeded Brewer in Council District 6 in 2014, is also barred from running again for the same post. In fact, she has already tossed her hat in the ring to run for comptroller in 2021. That clears the path for a potential encore run by Brewer, who was first elected to the Council in 2001 and represented the West Side, Lincoln Square, the northern part of Hellâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Kitchen and all of Central Park â&#x20AC;&#x201C; before moving up to win election as Manhattanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 27th beep in 2013. But a bigger job could be in the wings: Brewer commands enormous respect. If she runs and wins, sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll have more seniority than anyone else in the Councilâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s incoming class of 2022 because she had racked up 12 years in the legislative body before term limits was changed from three terms to the current two. Meanwhile, change is in the offing. City Council Speaker Corey Johnson is also out of a job at the end of 2021 due to term limits, and he has already started accepting contributions for a probable mayoral run. With Johnsonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s exit dawning, the buzz among political cognoscenti is that Brewer is already well positioned to step into the power vacuum and succeed him as the next Council speaker. In a handful of brief conversations, Brewer declined to comment about her intentions for 2021. She didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t confirm that she was running for her old seat; but she didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t deny it either. And she appeared to take herself out of contention for the mayoral race that year. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I love Manhattan,â&#x20AC;? Brewer said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s all that I can tell you â&#x20AC;&#x201D; I love Manhattan,â&#x20AC;? she repeated. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I do not have a ďŹ veborough orientation.â&#x20AC;?

Who Needs Money or Power? Typically in politics, officeholders seek to move up, not down, and rare is the official who would blithely trade in a $179,200 salary, which is what a borough president makes, to pull down $148,500, which is a Council memberâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s wages. â&#x20AC;&#x153;She loves being a legislator,â&#x20AC;? said George Arzt, the Democratic political strategist who served as Mayor Ed Kochâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s press secretary in the late 1980s. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Many people have asked her many times to run for mayor, and she is always

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NEIGHBORHOODâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S BEST To place an ad in this directory, Call Douglas at 212-868-0190 ext. 352.

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Manhattan Borough President Gale Brewer joins other elected officials outside the Lorimer Street L train stop in Brooklyn on Jan.6, where she demanded transparency from the MTA. She has been exploring a bid in 2021 to reclaim her old seat as a City Council member representing the Upper West Side. Photo: Brewerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Instagram page quickly dismissive â&#x20AC;&#x201D; but she loved being in the Council.â&#x20AC;? If she makes the move, her constituency would shrink dramatically, said New York County Democratic Party Chair Keith Wright, a former state Assembly Member from Harlem. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d go from representing 1.8 million people to representing 155,000 people,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;But itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s never been about money or power for her. It is about staying grounded, doing what you love, bringing a vast wealth of experience and knowledge about how government works, and being a wonderful partner to all communities.â&#x20AC;? Could she painlessly win back her old seat? â&#x20AC;&#x153;I presume she wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have any difficulty,â&#x20AC;? said Wright, who has been Manhattan Democratic leader since 2009. But he added a cautionary note: â&#x20AC;&#x153;You never know â&#x20AC;&#x201D; just ask Joe Crowley,â&#x20AC;? he said, referring to the 10-term incumbent Congressman from Queens who was ousted by the 28-year-old newcomer Alexandria OcasioCortez. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Still, weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re very lucky to have a public servant of her caliber, and the people of her district would be very lucky to have her again, too,â&#x20AC;? Wright said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I am ecstatic!â&#x20AC;? The 67-year-old Brewer is clearly in no hurry to take the plunge, declare for office and vie for her old seat, political consultants say â&#x20AC;&#x201D; and there is no compelling reason to do so when the primary isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t until June 2021 and the general election isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t until Nov. 2021. But by putting out the word so early that sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s exploring a run in her home district and longtime political base â&#x20AC;&#x201D; where she would almost certainly become the prohibitive favor â&#x20AC;&#x201D; her backers are sending a clear message to other potential candidates for the seat: Stay away. Preliminary indications suggest that the strategy has been

working. Consider one well-regarded hopeful, Micah Lasher, a former chief of staff to the state attorney general, incoming chair of the Riverside Park Conservancy, ex-aide to Rep. Jerry Nadler and unsuccessful candidate in 2016 for a West Side state Senate seat. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Absolutely!â&#x20AC;? he said when asked if he was considering a run. But at the same time, he described Brewer as an â&#x20AC;&#x153;extraordinary Council member and an extraordinary borough presidentâ&#x20AC;? and said that the district would be â&#x20AC;&#x153;incredibly well servedâ&#x20AC;? if she came back to her old post. â&#x20AC;&#x153;If Gale were to decide that she wanted to return to the City Council again to represent our community, I would accord that an enormous amount of deference,â&#x20AC;? Lasher added. As for the timetable of any announcement, Curtis Arluck, a West Side Democratic district leader for the past 40 years, notes that Brewer is â&#x20AC;&#x153;only a little more than a quarter of the wayâ&#x20AC;? through her second term as beep. â&#x20AC;&#x153;If she were suddenly to be seen as running for an office that other people would like to have, then the vastly beloved Gale Brewer would not be above the fray anymore,â&#x20AC;? said Arluck, whose longtime club is the Broadway Democrats. â&#x20AC;&#x153;She would be in the thicket. So why not keep the glow that she has for another year or more?â&#x20AC;? he asked. Unlike so many politicians, Arluck added, Brewer doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have the ego that says she has to be in the top position: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Gale in a nutshell,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t matter whether itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a higher title or if itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a lesser title, she just wants to continue to serve â&#x20AC;&#x201D; and she wants to continue to serve Manhattan.â&#x20AC;? invreporter@strausnews.com

Â&#x203A;Â&#x2019;Â&#x2014;Â?ČąÂ&#x2019;Â&#x2014;ČąÂ&#x2DC;Â&#x203A;Čą Â&#x2013;Â&#x17D;Â&#x2014;Â?Â&#x2019;Â&#x2DC;Â&#x2014;ČąÂ?Â&#x2018;Â&#x2019;Â&#x153;ČąÂ&#x160;Â? Â?Â&#x2DC;Â&#x203A;ČąÂ&#x160;ȹȹÂ&#x17D;Â&#x153;Â&#x153;Â&#x17D;Â&#x203A;Â?ǡ Â&#x203A;Â&#x2019;Â&#x;Â&#x160;Â?Â&#x17D;ČąÂ&#x160;Â&#x203A;Â?¢ȹÂ&#x2DC;Â&#x2DC;Â&#x2013;Â&#x153;ČąČ&#x160;ČąÂ&#x17D;Â&#x2022;Â&#x2022;¢ȹÂ&#x160;Â&#x2014;Â&#x152;Â&#x2019;Â&#x2014;Â?ČąČ&#x160;ČąÂ&#x160;Â?Â&#x17D;Â&#x203A;Â&#x2019;Â&#x2014;Â? Ĺ&#x2122;Ĺ&#x2014;Ĺ&#x2013;ČąÂ&#x17D;Â&#x153;Â?ČąĹ&#x203A;Ĺ&#x2122;Â&#x203A;Â?ČąÂ?Â&#x203A;Â&#x17D;Â&#x17D;Â?ČąČ&#x160;ČąĹ&#x2DC;Ĺ&#x2014;Ĺ&#x2DC;ČŹĹ&#x2DC;Ĺ&#x153;Ĺ&#x203A;ČŹĹ&#x203A;Ĺ&#x203A;Ĺ&#x2013;Ĺ&#x2013;    ǯÂ?Â&#x17E;Â&#x203A;Â&#x201D;Â&#x17E;Â&#x160;ÂŁÂ&#x203A;Â&#x17D;Â&#x153;Â?Â&#x160;Â&#x17E;Â&#x203A;Â&#x160;Â&#x2014;Â?ÇŻÂ&#x152;Â&#x2DC;Â&#x2013;Čą

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Discover the world around the corner. Find community events, gallery openings, book launches and much more: Go to nycnow.com

EDITOR’S PICK

Feb 7 - Feb 16 ROBERT ASHLEY: IMPROVEMENT (DON LEAVES LINDA) The Kitchen 512 West 19th St 8:00 p.m $25 thekitchen.org 212-255-5793 This newly reconstructed opera by the late Robert Ashley (written in 1985 and first performed in 1991) follows the adventures of its protagonist Linda, whose travels and romances can be read as attempts at assimilation and cultural cross-pollination, with varying degrees of success and

Thu 14 Fri 15

Sat 16

► JAZZ JAM

JAZZ CAFE: ERLI PEREZ

VOICE OF MY CITY GALLERY TOUR

NY Society for Ethical Culture 2 West 64th St 7:00 p.m. $15 Erli Perez began his career as a jazz vocalist a few years after moving to New York City. With the likes of mentors such as Jay Clayton, Sheila Jordan, Mark Murphy, Marilyn Maye and Marianne Solivan, Erli has quickly created a style and a reputation all his own. His style ranges from straight-ahead Jazz/Bebop to more modern styles. ethical.nyc 212-874-5210

Library for the Performing Arts 40 Lincoln Center Plaza 11:00 a.m. Free Take a tour of the exhibition Voice of My City: Jerome Robbins and New York, with Library staff and special guest exhibit curator Julia Foulkes to discover how all of Robbins’ love, frustration, and identity as a New Yorker were infused into his works. nypl.org 917-275-6975

Cleopatra’s Needle 2485 Broadway 11:30 p.m. Free with Food Watch artists play freely and loosely at this wildly fun jazz jam. Get food and drink while you’re here! cleopatrasneedleny.com 212-769-6969


FEBRUARY 14-20,2019

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ACTIVITIES FOR THE FERTILE MIND

thoughtgallery.org NEW YORK CITY

Sunday Platform | Jeff Behler: The 2020 US Census

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 17TH, 11AM NY Society for Ethical Culture | 2 W. 64th St. | 212-874-5210 | nysec.org Jeff Behler, New York Regional Director for the U.S. Census Bureau, talks about the changes and improvements in the 2020 Census and its importance to our democracy (free, donations to shared charity welcome).

Nationalism in the Modern Era

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 19TH, 6:30PM “Jeopardy!” host Alex Trebek at the 2016 USO Gala, Washington, D.C., Oct. 20, 2016. Photo: U.S. Army National Guard by Sgt. 1st Class Jim Greenhill, via Wikimedia Commons

Sun 17 Mon 18 Tue 19 MARYS SEACOLE 20 Lincoln Center Plaza 7:00 p.m. $30 In MARYS SEACOLE, Mary (Quincy Tyler Bernstine) is an ambitious Jamaican woman determined to live a grand life; her adventures take her across oceans and eras, from a battlefield of the Crimean War to a contemporary nursing home, and many times and places in between. Directed by Lileana Blain-Cruz (Pipeline, War). lincolncenter.org (212) 875-5456

GARY: A SEQUEL TO TITUS ANDRONICUS BY TAYLOR MAC WITH NATHAN LANE, ANDREA MARTIN AND GEORGE C. WOLFE Guggenheim Museum 1071 Fifth Ave 7:30 p.m. $45 Set just after the bloodsoaked conclusion of William Shakespeare’s first tragedy, Titus Andronicus, in Gary, Mac’s singular world view intersects with Shakespeare’s first tragedy. guggenheim.org 212-423-3500

▲ WHO IS ALEX TREBEK? CELEBRATING 35 SEASONS OF JEOPARDY! 92y 1395 Lexington Ave 8 p.m. $50 This 10-day tournament kicks off the day after Trebek’s 92Y appearance. Join him as he talks about his remarkable history with the show, the fascinating contestants he encounters every day, his facial hair through the years, and much more! 92y.org 212-415-5500

New-York Historical Society | 170 C.P.W. | 212-873-3400 | nyhistory.org Looking at historic nationalist movements from the 16th-century all the way up to Brexit, Israeli philosopher and conservative political theorist Yoram Hazony talks about the positive role of love of country and self-rule, as outlined in his new book, The Virtue of Nationalism ($38).

Just Announced | From Page to Screen: Richard Russo and Guests

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 27TH, 6:30PM NYPL Schwarzman Building | 476 Fifth Ave. | 917-275-6975 | nypl.org Novelist Richard Russo (Nobody’s Fool, Empire Falls) leads a panel of authors-turnedscreenwriters in discussing the creative challenges involved with converting fiction to the big and small screens (free, RSVP required).

For more information about lectures, readings and other intellectually stimulating events throughout NYC,

sign up for the weekly Thought Gallery newsletter at thoughtgallery.org.

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Advertise with The West Side Spirit today! Call Vincent Gardino at 212-868-0190

Wed 20 THE UPSTAIRS PLAY SERIES: WONDERLAND BY KATE DOUGLAS Book Culture 450 Columbus Ave 7:00 p.m. Free Wonderland is a story of nonimaginary people populating an imaginary town. Wonderland is a staged suburb built to conceal a World War Two fighter jet factory in case the Japanese bombers fly over. Three actresses have been hired to live ordinarily as townspeople as a finishing touch. But World War Two never ends, and the summer job stretches on forever. bookculture.com 212-595-1962

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OLD MASTERS IN A NEW LIGHT The Met’s gorgeous show of Dutch treasures turns an overwhelming cache of riches into a jewel box of wonders BY MARY GREGORY

Thanks to a revamping of the skylights and spaces in the Met’s European Paintings galleries, we can now see Old Master treasures in a new light. The makeover’s not done yet, so, ironically, it’s the quieter light in the smaller, more intimate downstairs of the Lehman wing that offers up-close reconsiderations of beloved masterworks alongside seldom seen works by less known artists. “In Praise of Painting: Dutch Masterpieces at The Met” is presented in sections: “Faces of a New Nation,” “Questions of Faith,” “Staking a Claim,” “Masters, Pupils, Rivals,” “Comic Painting,” “Contested Bodies,” “Eloquent Things,” “Lives of Women,” and “Behind Closed Doors.” Each section groups works and concepts into interesting visual conversations.

IF YOU GO WHAT: “In Praise of Painting: Dutch Masterpieces at The Met” WHERE: The Met Fifth Avenue WHEN: Through October 4, 2020 Culling the hundreds of Hals, Vermeers, Rembrandts, de Hooches, Ruisdaels, Heems, Hedas and Kalfs to a scant 67 allows a focused but relaxed tour of one of art’s greatest periods. Holland’s Golden Age — roughly the 17th century — was a period of domesticity, prosperity and peace. The Dutch had just emerged from a long, costly war with Spain. Scientists, artists, writers and philosophers whose thoughts didn’t sit well with the Inquisition, found a warm welcome in Holland. Trade routes were opening globally. Thanks to natural ports, lots of canals, and busy shipbuilders, Holland became a prime supplier to both the Old and the New Worlds. The Dutch East Indies Company was the

Rembrandt’s “Self-Portrait” 1660 (left) and his painting “Hendrickje Stoffels” mid-1650s (right) from “In Praise of Painting: Dutch Masterpieces at The Met.” Photos: Adel Gorgy

richest, most successful corporation the world had ever seen. Holland’s Golden Age was the first time that working class Europeans, rather than just the aristocracy and churches, could afford luxuries and finery. They lived close together in elegant houses in bustling cities like Amsterdam, Rotterdam, Delft, and Leiden. Land wasn’t their investment of choice. For many, it was art. Wealthy burghers, ship captains, merchants and their families all wanted their portraits painted, along with pictures of fancy dinners, beautiful tulips (another passion) and views of their beloved towns, roads, rivers and windmills. Lots of painters showed up to fill the demand. Some of the most successful of them needed extra hands to complete orders. They took on students and opened studio workshops. One was Rembrandt. A tour of the galleries will bring you to works by Nicolaes Maes, Samuel van Hoogstraten, Gerrit Dou, and Govert Flinck. All of them studied with Rembrandt. Flinck’s 1645 “Bearded Man with a Velvet Cap” is a marvel of verisimilitude. As Rembrandt had done, Flinck dressed his sitter in exotic clothes and rendered him brilliantly. The realism of the rumpled red cap, the soft, brown fur collar, the shine on the nose, and the cottony, white curls of a well-tended beard are testament to Flinck’s extraordinary skill. Rembrandt’s own 1640 “Herman Doomer” portrait focuses on other aspects. The sitter’s translucent skin, plump lips, and the sparkling wetness of his eyes bring him to life. Meanwhile, his brown suit recedes into the background, as the white collar frames his face, in service of the soul of the man whose crow’s feet enliven a direct, confident gaze.

“A Maid Asleep,” Johannes Vermeer, ca. 1656–57. Photo: Adel Gorgy By that time in his career, Rembrandt was leaving behind perfection of form for the search for spirit, manifested in art and humanity. His 1654 “Self-Portrait,” one of the treasures of the Met, is included in the section featuring masters and pupils. Too bad it couldn’t be hung next to his “Hendrickje Stoffels” portrait done around the same time (she shows up in “Lives of Women”). Stoffels was Rembrandt’s common-law wife, his second great love, and the mother of his only child to survive him. Some historians believe these two paintings were made as pendant portraits, typically made in pairs, often of husbands and wives, meant to be hung side-by-side, completing each other. The paintings’ similar dates, sizes, backgrounds, and poses that face

one another support the idea. The tenderness of Hendrickje radiates from one canvas. The weariness of the artist who’d just been bankrupted, lost his home and possessions, but still retained his spirit and drive, comes through in the other. That’s just one of the stories behind the pictures. Frans Hals, in my mind the original Impressionist, laid flat broad strokes of color on his canvases that somehow translate into pudgy bodies wearing shiny fabrics that reflect multitudes of flickering candles. How? Gerard ter Borch had a way with velvet. Rich red gowns and plump cushions show up often in his paintings, to show how good he was in capturing velvet’s uniquely shimmery shift from plushness to shine. Vermeer’s frozen moments, still

and perfect, transcend time. They became increasingly popular when, at the beginning of the 20th century, audiences got used to photography’s ability to arrest action. Did Pieter de Hooch plan to reveal interior lives when he painted complex, interior scenes with layers of depth? Or do we just infer them? The show offers starting points for many explorations. The smaller, dimmer galleries in the Lehman wing almost mimic the household rooms for which these great paintings were intended. They’re hung close together, mostly at eye-level, and invite near, slow viewing. Their grandeur will be back, once they return upstairs. Through October 4, 2020, this gorgeous show of treasures turns an overwhelming cache of riches into a jewel box of wonders.


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YOU WROTE A BOOK? SO PUBLISH IT! BOOKS “Upper East Siders delight in cubits of closets, while Upper West Siders measure it in board lengths of bookshelves.” —Anonymous BY MEREDITH KRUZ

We are a bookish clan up here. If you’re like me, bedtime finds you drooling slightly on your pillow, fingers splayed about a book and the light on. (True Confession? I dog ear.) I’m convinced that for every rabid reader there’s a secret writer. They have perhaps a few typed pages, maybe a chapter or three. Most believe their story will never become a physical book. Well, there’s good news, hidden storytellers — Shakespeare and Co. offers a chance to be published, at a reasonable price, without undue delay. The legendary bookseller has an East Side store, and recently expanded across the park to 2020 Broadway, between West 69th and 70th Streets. If you peek in the window you’ll see a coffee bar to the left, a huge book collection beyond the stairs, a seating area to the right, and in the middle a large device called the Expresso Book Machine. If you’re an admitted author and keep a graveyard of publisher rejections, here’s your solution. You no longer have to order 500 copies of your great American novel from a vanity publisher, push it on innocent family members whilst the rest molder under your bed, like a forever I-Told-You-So. For $10, plus 5 cents per page for black and white, 25 cents a page for color, you can print one copy. There are bulk rates as well, promotional and design services, and other services to make

Liza Stepanovich, with the machine that publishes writers’ dreams, at Shakespeare and Co. on the Upper West Side. Photo: Meredith Kurz publishing easier. They print so quickly, often you can come in, order a free cup of coffee while your story is framed into pages, printed, cut and turned into a book. Congratulations, you are now a published author. I had a lot of questions for Liza Stepanovich, who operates the machine, consults with clients and assists in design. “You not only can bring in your digital file to turn into your own book,

we have the right to print seven million titles on demand, with any cover you like,” she explained. She told me that most of her clients have never had a book in print. Cover design is wide open. If you’re obsessed, say with the color aqua, you could have all your books printed with aqua covers. Imagine that bookshelf! “Typically it takes about 20 to 30 minutes,” Stepanovich said.

RESTAURANT INSPECTION RATINGS JAN 30 - FEB 5, 2018 The following listings were collected from the Department of Health and Mental Hygiene’s website and include the most recent inspection and grade reports listed. We have included every restaurant listed during this time within the zip codes of our neighborhoods. Some reports list numbers with their explanations; these are the number of violation points a restaurant has received. To see more information on restaurant grades, visit www.nyc.gov/html/doh/html/services/restaurant-inspection.shtml. Shake Shack

366 Columbus Ave

A

Bodrum

584 Amsterdam Ave

A

So with your free cup of coffee in your hand, and perhaps a newly purchased book, you can wait for your creation, whether it’s yours or your favorite author, to be completed. One hundred pages can be printed in about five minutes. There’s a 28-page minimum and a 700page maximum. In the independent author world, creating a cover that compels the potential reader to grab your book is an art form. It’s currently a high-demand, low-supply industry, so it can hit an author’s bottom line hard. Shakespeare and Co. offers cover design templates, and by-the-hour cover design services. Having an in-house designer and the ability to print out a single book at a reasonable price gives authors the opportunity to preview their tome before ordering 100. I wrongly assumed that digital books had the lion’s share of the market. According to Retail Dive, which does in-depth

retail analysis, in the first three quarters of 2018, eBooks brought in about $771 million, while hardbacks and paperbacks brought in $4 billion. And some big-name authors have started self-publishing, like Andy Weir, who wrote The Martian, and E. L. James, who wrote Fifty Shades of Gray, removing the stigma of the “vanity press.” I met up with Lese Dunton, a children’s book author who’s written a series called “Charlotte’s New York Adventure.” There are currently three books, with another on the way. These books are sold online as well and at Shakespeare and Co. and other bookstores throughout the city. Dunton said she uses Shakespeare and Co. to print her books because the finish of the covers is better, the colors are sharper, and the paper is higher quality than Amazon’s. It’s slightly more expensive than Amazon, but when she does readings at

schools she likes to bring books with a good feel to sell in person. “The printing ability is empowering, but also, having a neighborhood book store is so important,” Dunton told me. With a place to sit and mingle, and books to browse, it has a local feel. Independent book stores are enjoying their 10th year of bookstore growth according to the American Booksellers Association. This local movement runs alongside the artisan and maker revolution, which gives a neighborhood, a restaurant, or a bookstore a unique flavor. Along with the printing services, of course, Shakespeare and Co. has a hefty collection of books. I was searching for a book that couldn’t be printed on the fly, so I ordered it, and they called me when it came in, which typically takes five days max. Here’s the link, for more info: www.shakeandco.com.


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Cultural Events in and around where you live (not Brooklyn, not Westchester) Joanne Kwong, Upper West Side resident and president of Pearl River Mart retail, is honored by New York State Comptroller Tom DiNapoli during his annual Lunar New Year Celebration. Photo: Andy Hill

CELEBRATING LUNAR NEW YEAR NYS Comptroller Thomas P. DiNapoli holds an annual Lunar New Year Celebration honoring prominent Asian-Americans who are civic-minded. This year five women were honored, including Joanne Kwong, President, Pearl River Mart and an Upper West Side resident.

Pearl River Mart has been a NYC institution offering its wide variety of imported Asian goods. Their flagship store is now in Tribeca. The “Year of the Pig” festivities were held at Grand St. Settlement’s new facility on the Lower East Side.

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Business

REQUIEM FOR A PET STORE Petland Discounts is expected to shutter all 78 of its shops in the tri-state area by April – including these five locations across upper Manhattan

1 2 3 4 A stray named “Noodles” lounges in his cat condo in the back of a Petland Discount shop on West 23rd Street in Chelsea. The five-month-old kitten is up for adoption – even as the chain prepares to close its Manhattan stores. Photo: Douglas Feiden

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167 EAST 125TH ST.

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Between Third and Lexington Avenues

56 WEST 117TH ST. Between Malcolm X Boulevard and Fifth Avenue

1954 THIRD AVE. Between East 107th and 108th Streets

2708 BROADWAY Between 103rd and 104th Streets

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137 WEST 72ND ST. Between Broadway and Columbus Avenue

THE SHOP THAT SAVED KITTENS After 54 years and a celebrated track record for animal rescue work, Petland Discounts is expected to close all its stores and face a possible sale or liquidation by April BY DOUGLAS FEIDEN

“Noodles” was a homeless orphan living on the streets of Virginia. His prospects seemed dire. Then, he was rescued and brought to New York for adoption. Now, he’s living in a cozy pad in the heart of Chelsea. But the idyll may not last. His fate, at least for the moment, is unclear. He may have to relocate all over again. The reason for his change of circumstances? The expected closing of a venerable retail pet chain. Hundreds of Manhattan bookstores, clothing stores, barbershops, thrift shops, Judaica shops, bars, restaurants, corner bodegas, green grocers and mom-and-pops of every variety have already suffered

They helped us with the adoptions of thousands of cats and dogs and puppies and kittens.” Joanne Yohannan, North Shore Animal League America

similar fates. This time, the victim of the far-reaching brick-and-mortar retrenchment is Petland Discounts, a mid-sized, Brentwood, L.I.-based chain that has 10 stores in the borough, including locations in Hell’s Kitchen, Chelsea, Greenwich Village, East Harlem, West Harlem and the Upper West Side. Founded in 1965, the company has long been buffeted by soaring rents and utility bills and hammered on price by webbased retailers — like online pet store Chewy.com, which

routinely undercuts it on guinea pig food, parakeet supplies, glass fish tanks and tropical reptile terrariums. But the final blow came on Jan. 14 when Neil Padron, Petland’s president, founder and sole proprietor, died of bladder cancer at the age of 74. Just four days later, the company filed a so-called WARN Notice with the New York State Dept. of Labor saying that all 367 of its employees would be laid off by April 18. The chain didn’t return calls. Amy Eisenberg, Padron’s daughter, who is Petland’s director of special events, didn’t respond to six calls to her office and cell phone over a week-long period. But the Worker Adjustment and Retraining Notification said that the retail workers, all nonunionized, were being let go as a result of “plant closings” and “economic dislocation.” After 54 years, all of Petland’s 78 stores in the tri-state area — down 34 percent from a peak of

3

SOURCE: New York State Dept. of Labor / WARN Notice 118 two decades ago — are now expected to be shuttered, and the company itself faces a possible sale or liquidation. The Manhattan shops are set to close on a rolling basis over the next two months, according to managers and employees at five of the locations. “I’m already looking for a new job,” said Tony Carrion, an assistant manager in the store at 312 West 23rd St. off Eighth Avenue in Chelsea, which will close in March. “There are five of us here, and only one of us has found a job so far. The rest of us are still out looking.” Feedback from pet-lovers has kept him going, Carrion said: “Customers have been very upset, they keep telling us they want us to stay, they wish we wouldn’t close, they hope somebody buys us out, and it’s been very, very comforting,” he added. The news has also rattled the local animal-rescue community because Padron’s company

— famed for its commercial jingle and the slogan, “For the best care a pet can get” — was also celebrated for its work tending to strays and abandoned or ill-treated animals. “They helped us raise awareness of the plight of homeless animals for close to 15 years, and they were always fantastic supporters of our adoption events and campaigns,” said Joanne Yohannan, the senior vice president for operations at the North Shore Animal League America. “It is fair to say that over all these years, they helped us with the adoptions of thousands of cats and dogs and puppies and kittens,” she added. North Shore, a no-kill animal rescue and adoption organization on Long Island, worked with Petlands on two separate initiatives: An in-store adoption program in which cats liked Noodles temporarily live in “cat condos,” or play cages, at select

View the full map online at WESTSIDESPIRIT.COM shops scattered across the city. And mobile adoption events in which vehicles housing 20 to 30 animals awaiting adoption park in front of the store so that potential adopters can view, visit, and perhaps, fall in love with them. Yohannan said that North Shore and Petlands teamed up for 43 events throughout the tri-state area in 2017, and placed felines that were available for adoption in nine stores. And that’s where poor Noodles comes in. The five-monthold neutered, domestic short hair was rescued from Virginia — he’s a “young Southern gentleman,” North Shore says — and relocated to Chelsea in January to be adopted. He’s still living on West 23rd Street. He’s got a nice view of Petlands’ fish tanks and bird cages. And he’s still available. But with the store closing in March, the clock is ticking. invreporter@strausnews.com


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NYPD CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 recent years, in part due to increased public awareness and the #MeToo movement. “This is tragically what was happening for a long time but not being reported,” de Blasio said in January. “It’s finally being reported.” Mary Haviland, the executive director of the NYC Alliance Against Sexual Assault, said this analysis is “likely” correct, but impossible to confirm without improved data collection. Haviland cited a 2015 study conducted by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention that found 1.2 percent of women in the United States had been raped in the previous year. “If you apply

FEBRUARY 14-20,2019

The Spirit|Westsider westsidespirit.com that to the female population in New York City you come up with about 50,000 rapes a year. But only 1,300 to 1,700 are reported to the police, so you know that there’s a big problem and there’s a lot of room for increased reporting without an increase in incidents,” she said.

“White shields”: Topic of contention Of the 35 new investigators that will join the SVD’s current staff of 260, 15 will be assigned to the division’s adult sex crimes unit, 16 will be assigned to the child sex crimes unit and four will be tasked with investigating transit sex crimes. Chief of Detectives Dermot Shea said that a majority of the new investigators will be so-called “white shields,” or investigators who are working

to achieve the rank of detective. The NYPD’s use of white shields in investigating sex crimes has been a persistent topic of contention between police and sexual assault advocates. “Our position is that there should be much more experienced detectives in that unit because sexual assault cases are difficult and complex,” Haviland said, adding, “Why are you putting new detectives on sexual assault cases? Put them on lower-level felonies and misdemeanors.” Shea disputed the notion that white shields are unprepared to handle sexual assault investigations.” I’m very comfortable with the training that they are receiving, the mentorship that they receive once they get into Special Victims,” he said. Cou ncil Member Helen

Follow The West Side Spirit on Facebook and Twitter

Reported Rapes by Year, Citywide 2014

2015

2016

2017

2018

1352

1438

1438

1449

1794

January Reported Rapes by Year, Citywide JAN 2014

JAN 2015

JAN 2016

JAN 2017

JAN 2018

JAN 2018

114

113

101

108

118

150 SOURCE: NYPD

Rosenthal, who represents the Upper West Side and serves as chair of the committee on women, echoed Haviland’s concerns with white shield investigators in SVD. “When NYPD reports that it has more detectives, it’s critical that we ask what grade they are,” Rosenthal said. “Because given the unique nature of the survivor-centric investigation, inexperienced detectives can bollocks up a case, which means there will be no justice for the survivor.” Legislation passed by the

Council last year requires the NYPD to file annual reports on SVD’s staffing levels, including detailed data on investigators’ caseloads and ranks. The NYPD has not yet filed its first such report, which was due Jan. 31, Rosenthal said. Chief of Crime Control Strategies Lori Pollock said the department will also begin holding weekly CompStat meetings dedicated solely to the Special Victims Division. “These will be closed meetings where we will have supervisors work through their cases and share

best practices,” she said. Rosenthal said she is concerned that the introduction of CompStat, the NYPD’s crime data performance management system, could cause SVD investigators to move too swiftly and “lose sight of the need to be survivor-centric in an investigation.” “I’m awaiting a briefing on it to see if they’re able to set up CompStat to be more sophisticated than just solving this crime as quickly as possible,” she said.

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TELL US ABOUT SOMEONE Making A Difference in the Neighborhood Once again this year The West Side Spirit will recognize West Siders making a difference in the neighborhood with a WESTY (West Side Spirit Thanks You) Award.

WE ARE LOOKING FOR YOUR SUGGESTIONS: who should we highlight and interview about their work in the neighborhood? Who’s making a difference? Please send your nominations to comm.engage@strausnews.com or call 212-868-0190 and ask for Aija

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YOUR 15 MINUTES

A POET AND HIS WORLDS BY BRIAN DEMO

Bob Holman remains on the move. He’s a poet and activist who travels the world, working to raise awareness for languages you may not know. He occasionally performs alongside his friend, Papa Susso — a Gambian griot and master kora player. You might find him at the Bowery Club, which he founded, where he recently concluded a workshop on poetry and theater. However, he managed to sit down for an interview in his apartment, home to souvenirs from Africa, troves of literature, and, in the living room, a painting by his late wife, the wellknown painter Elizabeth Murray.

What inspired you to write poetry? Was there an event or sense of self that made you say, “I think I could do this for the rest of my life?” I’m in love with language, words, reading, and was good at it. It was also an escape from the mundane life, into a place that was very special and my own. My mother’s voice taught me how to read and led me into all these other worlds. My teacher gave me a prize for my first poem I wrote when I was nine years old. She said, “Robert, where did you copy it from?” And I knew immediately. If you can get one over on your teacher, maybe you can get one over on the rest of the world.

What elements from your time as codirector of the Nuyorican Poetry Club did you hope to bring to the Bowery Poetry Club? When I left the Nuyorican Poetry Club, I wanted to have my own place. The Nuyorican’s performance dynamic is something for sure I wanted to do. The poetry slam that I started at the Nuyorican. I wanted to be sure that we had a poetry slam at the Bowery Poetry Club. I was moving into a more global kind of poetics. It’s always been kind of my dynamic to be inclusive until you got the whole world in your hands and one big bear-hug around the globe at the Equator ... The sister clubs — the Poetry Project at St. Mark’s, the Nuyorican, and the Bowery, I’ve worked at all three of them. They very much are complementary. You show me another spot on the planet where you can wander from poem to poem the way you can on the lower east side.

“Poets don’t adapt to technology. Technology adapts to poetry,” says Holman. Photo: Brian Demo

How have you seen poets adapt to the development of digital and online? For instance, now there’s YouTube, Vimeo, SoundCloud, Spotify. Has it been beneficial? Has it been harmful? Poets don’t adapt to technology. Technology adapts to poetry. With digital, you are able to see and hear the poem in a way that you didn’t when it was locked onto the pages of a book. At the same time, you run into the problems of “Well, what is going to be your image track?” How are you going to allow the images in the poem to be as free for the viewer as the images of text are to the reader? These are all great challenges that technology has to adapt to the poem so that the medium can become an illumination of the poem, not an illustration of it. I think the new Bowery Poetry app — which is changing its name from SlamFind — you’ll find different examples of straight documentation of a poem to a full-blown production of it, to a simple film of words on the screen with soundtracks. It’s a great time for poetry because we’re moving into third consciousness — the synthesis, I think, of orality and literacy, which is what we call digital right now. I don’t think that name is going to stick, but that’s the name we use for it now.

What new projects have you been working or put out recently that really stick out to you? What are you excited about for the future? I got a couple of books coming out that are where I’m spending my time these days. “The Unspoken,” which are poems from the last ten years. Along with it is a book that I wrote 50 years ago when I really was proclaiming myself and spending my time at the Cummington Community of the Arts. I started working on a booklength poem called Life Poem, which has never been published. It’s gonna be published this year. It’s about a young man, falling in love with poetry — with the possibilities of art and wearing his love for that art as a heart-shaped thought poem. I’m also working on an anthology of poems in endangered and minority languages about New York City, continuing with the work that I did with the PBS series “Language Matters.”

Do you see some languages as inevitable — as in they may end up getting pushed out, or do you hope those that are really endangered can be preserved? It’s a natural thing for a language to be created and have its life and to morph into other languages, but never have we had so many languages that

are being pushed out at the same time. I think digital is at the root of this. Everyone wants to join in the great Twitter brigade. People can’t catch up with that if you’re speaking Occitan or Dogon. At the same time, the sense of identity [of people’s cultures] is truly growing. But as languages disappear, they’re not extinct. They’re simply sleeping. Because if the people of those languages want to bring their languages back — want to be able to understand the consciousness of their family, their lineage — they can because of documentation and the skills of the linguists, like the Wampanoags have done up in Cape Cod.

How do you juggle your time as a poet, a teacher, an advocate, and a traveler? Do you manage to find time to sleep at night? I wish I could sleep better at night. I’m not a great sleeper, but I write a lot when I’m traveling. I write a lot when I am visiting art museums. I write when I’m at a concert. I don’t know what I’d do if I were a novelist and had to turn out so many pages a day. I’m trying to write this book on third consciousness right now, and I’m finding to write prose to be a different kind of a discipline for me. But I’m getting there.

How does family, your late wife, fit into your work? The project I’m doing right now is a digital project — a film. I wrote poems for the each of the paintings that was in [Murray’s] show at Pace Gallery. [There were] 17 paintings. I wrote 17 poems. We filmed them. And the filmmaker Kristi Zia and I are turning that into a short, 23-minute film called Talking Pictures. The plan is for that film to be sort of the Bugs Bunny cartoon to open for the film about Elizabeth’s life, called “Everybody Knows Elizabeth Murray,” that was on American Masters on PBS this fall. Things start with the family. And then there’s time for everything else. And it’s interesting that you would get to this at the end of our conversation, because it’s actually where everything begins. This interview was edited for clarity and space.

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SUDOKU by Myles Mellor and Susan Flanagan

by Myles Mellor

55

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58

1

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to hav e is the sixthin the city. past thre been hit by a person car in the to The ee days alone. least 20New York Tim According cyclists pedestrians es, at have bee and thr accidents ee n kill more tha so far this ed in traffic VOL. 2, yea n ISSUE been inju 900 pedest r, and 08 rians hav It’s demred. e of victim oralizing. If fam s, ilies heighten a devoted mayor and a dent in ed awarenes the proble s can’t ma Amid the ke m, wh at can? New Yor carnage, Immedia kers once agathough, hit, bys tely after Da in rallied. A CASI group tanders ran to uplaise was MANH NO IN managof them, workin try to help. in hopesed to flip the carg together, A < BUSI ATTAN? of NESS, on res its cuing Unfor sid P.16 She wa tunately, it didDauplaise. e, Bellevues pronounced n’t work. The a short wh dead at citizensefforts of our ile later. fell to hearten save a str ow us, despit anger sho recklessn uld e who con ess of a danthe continued a place tinue to makegerous few THE SE of traged our street y. OFsOU COND DISG

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First, obvious: let’s start wit condition h the city’s hom s inside thi disgrace. eless shelte rs are as A ser one mo ies of terrible (includinre horrible tha crimes, month g the killing n the last of ear lier this daugh a woman has higters in Statenand her two hlighted Island), living con the the ma ditions for shameful cities inrgins of one ofpeople at Blasio, the world. Ma the richest wh yor o has bee Bill de his app from theroach to homn halting in has final beginning elessness proble ly begun to of his term, from thim, but years ofaddress the others, s administra neglect, tion and will take But years to correct. recent none of that exc office grandstanding uses the appareof Gov. Andrew by the Cuomo, he can’tntly sees no iss who In the try to belittl ue on which attempt governor’s late the mayor. officials at a hit job, est sta compla then pro ined te Post, abomptly to the to the city, homele ut a gang New York alleged ss shelter, purape at a city VOL. 77 had tim event before blicizing the , ISSUE pol e 04 As it turto investigate ice even ned out, it. never hap the officials pened, infuriaincident media hitwho called it ting city a ” “po aim the mayor ed at em litical . More cha barrassin counter-c rges and g THfolElow the me harges Dicken antimeA , of cou ed. In Tditrse men, wosian livingR OionF, the con in New men D kidsIM s for Yor andEN Here’s k goe s on. in shelters CITY ARTS, leadershi hoping tha t som P.2any eday our as intere p in Alb 0 as it is in sted in helpinwill become back fro agains scoring pol g them t sit itical poi 17 fee m FDR Drour ive byting mayor. nts t 16 to out of and raise

IN CEN KIDS AGTARIAL PARK, WEIGHI NST DOCNAl NG LiDnTtRo UMnP WEEK OF JA NUARY-FEBR UARY 28-3 MOVING FO R A GUIDE TO CAMP

NE W S

BUILDING, WARD ON THE DESPITE C ONCERNTSIN 3 Top Arts 8 Re 5 10 15 al Estate Minutes

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PAGE 9

it on the floo as red d plain, e foot uc building e the heigh as well three. from four t of the storie HAPP s to The ref urbishe would SNOWY LITTLE d sit FLAKES pier pil atop newl bu ild ing y food ma ings and restored Reme board co Transpa officia sio’s fi mber Mayo Jean-G rket overseenntain a expre ls, but rst r Bil eorge linger ov rency concer by sse me W ch Th s Vong hat a winter in his l de Blaef mbers e pr ns develop d concern dif fer redeveloper Howard Hu new years the de oposal also erichten. er ’s vis s that the ence Se ma molit ca lls a coup job? Seaport ment plans ghes’ pieapor t is be ion for th Ho ion for Hit wi kes. le of for the ing e tw use and Lin of the He ceme after th a snow ad o dil k Bu compre al instead relea sed sto tak new ma ing off ice rm shortly of in on adjacen apidated str ild ing, hensive Howa BY DAN t e in pro uc The new would yor fumble in 2014, th IEL FIT front ofto the Tin Bu tures CB1’s rd Hughes posal. d in a wa ZSIMM e co Jan. 19 ly restored me Pie ild joi ONS Re half of ing r 17. to The joi cen Tin presen South nt La nd mamet with his ter define th y that nt La nd tation Building, as by the tly announ Stree un So rk e m. to Comm fi ut fir s lle envisio ced Ho h ma Ce Po an t Seap st d. Stree nter d Ce plans poration ward Hu ned unity Bo storm Official wa tholes we t Seap rks and nter gh pla ns on Jan. 19 or t/Civic nt ’s ard 1. in Howard Hu at the for the Tin es Corfor th to unve Residen severity wernings on the a resolucomm ittee or t/Civic ghes a fou e s passe re mu ts in ne re ce iveSouth Stree Building r-s tory Tin Build il the pr tion in did dd igh d n’t led t supp structur ing bo op prov al d preli mi Seaport plaine vote for de rhoods tha . e at thelandm arke , of Howa osal, but req or t of na co d from being that their strBlasio com-t comm ry ap - Hording to the Seaport. Acd pla n for rd Hughes uested plo un ity a was lat wed -- a eets weren - ing wa rd Hu gh presentation - the Seap redevelopmmaster su ’t es ort , wo to mo tion-trucer proven spicion tha ve the is propos uld inc as a whole ent at ou t Tin Bu , wh lude the This k GPS data. t by sanitailding compa ich new detime aroun ny’s CONTINU d, ED ON ch arge Blasio seem an entirely PAGE 5 was for . Before th ed to be Sanitati e storm in ceful, Ins on bu tea , t no he d architect Dept. build closin of jumpin t panicke d. g g storm ure, is press ing, praised waited subways or the gun an ed into for d service its then ac for the storm schools, he during detectedted decisive to develop the , We do a sense of huly. We even n’t wa mor in The bu cre nt it all dit tha to give BY DEE to life ilding looks him mo . someth n is due, PTI HAJ , all re bu ELA ing can loo angles an like a mode t there about seeme rn d wa thi d nation k bluish or gra edges, with art painting New Yo to bring ou s storm tha s t rkers. t the be in any of the three. yish or wh concrete wa come On Su itish, or settin lls st of functi g, but It would be some that alpine nday, the cit an no on pounds it was cre ne more tha unusual str combiskiers vil lage. Cr y felt like an ate uc of the n rock sal d for --- sto the fairly pro ture snow plied the pa oss-cou nt ry rin t bo sai tha rks g CONTINU c tho t the cit hot ch ots and pa , people y’s De usands of ED ON ololat rkas ord in partm PAGE 29 wi es, th su ered kid ent of of sledd nburned fac s came home es after ding. There a day tent. Qu were pock ets the plo eens reside of disco nand elew trucks by nts felt th at the sch cted offici passed them, als closed ools should there sa id for ha But ov another da ve stayed %TGCVKX just en erall, consid y. G9TKVK PIr &CPEG snows dured the secering we ha r/QVK torm in d QP2KE lovely our his ond-biggest VWTG# litt TVUr and his le chapter tory, it was /WUKE a for the subjects r6JG mayor CVTGr . 8KUWC

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Bu On Sa 13 10 15 siness BY EM ILY TOW parishioturday mo Minutes 16 NER rn and low ners, comm ing, archit 19 ered in er Manhatt unity me ects, mb vision St. Paul’s Ch an residents ers for Tr ap gat el hto discu inity Ch building ss urch’s The ex . new pa the rish Place acr isting bu ild been cle oss from Tr ing, on Tr inity inity Ch ared for 1923, urc de it the chu no longer sermolition. Buh, has tower rch and the ves the ne ilt in wi com ed The we ll be built in munity. A s of new in a ser ekend me its place. eti — collabies of commu ng was the needs orative for nity “charr fifth an um ett the low d wants of s to addre es” a whole er Manhatt the church ss the and an com . “In ou munit of r y initial as about charr buildinghow we wa ettes we talked for the to be a homented th is pa hood,” homeless an for the spi rish rit fer, Tr said the Re d for the neigh ual, v. Dr. Wi ini bor“We tal ty Wall Street lliam Lu ked ’s prector What ab . they wo out minis try act look,” uld be ivi Lu marke pfer said. , how they ties. wo t underst study in ord“We condu uld cte desires and neighbo er to objec d a dream as well as rhood needtively s.” parish s and He sai hopes and sion em d the churc tality braces a ph h communit The can tha ilo ride in coming t is “open sophy for y’s viCe carouseldidate’s owne ho , flexibl .” On the ntral Park. “We wa e and spifamilia puts New Yo rship of the wela white wall next to nt it street r bind rkers in , access to be visiblP.9 > that rea placard wi the entrance a Gemm ible to e from the com and Re ds, “Trum th red letter is well, a Whitema the CONTINU p Ca munit gulat ing who we n and ind It’s y, BY DAN Engla ED ON Joel Ha re on lat icatio ions” -- rousel Ru PAGE 6 weekd e afternoon IEL FITZSIMM presid ns that Do one of the les day, nd and rode vacation uxONS ay, an on only sai the en fro nald a mi tial d lining opera bearing d they notic carousel Mo m up to pakids and tou ld winter tes the candidate, J. Trump, ed the Trum ntially ow car ris y Tr $3 for “It p’s ns an placar New Yo a qu ts are see um p’s po ousel. d ma was in my name. OurTown d rk mo lit ics ping int n, he ment: intesenDowntow wh ad o the car have be 20gav a carou weigh 16 e he en asked ,” said Wh n gu sel an aft a deep ernoo ousel, as rid n in En r pause. “H if the realiz iteOTDOW O n esc ly divisiv gla ati ers e’s NTOW like, ‘Do nd, so in my not very lik on e candid ape again N.COM st he ed I want ate. Newsche to give ad I was a bit ck money @OTD CO Cri me Wa NTINU to this owntown 2 Cit tch ED ON y

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Accor DOB, Coding to sta STREETORY OF OU tis R agency nEd report tics provid S ed by over 20 in 2015, a ed 343 shutoff the The 40 Ruby BY DAN trend 14’s 67 shu 0 percent s to the New Yorworst and the IEL FIT ey on Mak has been ap toffs. increa ZSIMM takeo An So far pears to be Monday k were both best of ONS ut tha spending mid-d in 2016 increa d the upwa se on displa mo mo issert n acc mid a the sin re rd docto ording y town. rning on 36th mong eve re ha ation is worki Street in ng at lea , and her ne rate stude “Since to the DO ve been 157 n more: Ca rol “A lot nt B. Da shu w rice st as uplaise, toffs, noticing the spring owner cooker to eat of it is just ou hard. the a no gas, a lot of pe of last year crossingof a jewelry com 77-year-o cook at lot more,” t of pocket, op we sta going rted water either cookin le coming Street Madison Av pany, was ld steam home it’s jus said Mak. “W ,” out in ing an said Donna g gas or he that had when a during the mo enue at 36th cally.” things with t a rice cooker hen we at livery-cab rning rus it, or ma Ameri d commun Chiu, direct and hot cor . You can ner h dri ity or can La st Se and hit ke rice, her. ver turned the Chiu cal s For Equa ser vices forof housptemb The basihundred er Asian said AA led the inc lity. arresteddriver of the car no natur s of others her bu ild ing ing an FE is worki rease “freak pedest for failing to was joi ned an ins al gas, cut across the d pe off town almost a dong with Ma ish,” and been citrian, and cop yield to a Building ction blitz by Con Ed city with an ser vic d the Lowe zen others k’s buildtraffic vioed for at leasts say he had a month s that bega by the city’sison after es. 10 oth lations advocat And Ch r East Side in ChinaIt sin wa East Vil after a fat n last April, Dept. of iu, lik ce 2015. er es, ha al ga e ma to restor exp les litany ofs but the latest lage tha s t claim s explosion s than lon loitation by witnessed ny housinge that hav traffic deaths in a sad ed two bu g servic in the a lives. e interr ilding owne pattern of Mayor e lingered on, and injuries rs wh uptions curb traBill de Blasio’s despite CONTINU in an eff o proffic crashe efforts ort to ED ON Da to uplais s PA

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