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Healthy Manhattan: Forty is still the new 40

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Since 1985

CHOPPER MADNESS PHOTO: ANDREW SCHWARTZ

Last week’s deadly crash renews call to limit helicopters over city Page 4

MEET THE UPPER WEST SIDE’S NEW LEADER: P.5 New Parents Expo: The best new products for your baby Everything you need from Pre-Natal to Preschool, plus speakers and activities for the whole family

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express

Tapped In

Colorful flights of fanCy

Notes from the neighborhood Compiled by Megan Finnegan

SENATOR DUANE ASSESSES SELECT BUS SERVICE

OCCUPY WALL S TREET DRAWS U PPER WEST SIDE ATTENTION Some Upper West Side residents have been supporting the Occupy Wall Street

Community

meeting Calendar Monday, Oct. 17 • CDEC3 Middle School Committee Meeting, 6:30 p.m., Joan of Arc Complex, 154 W. 93rd St., Rm. 204. • Community Board 7 Park and Environment Committee, 7 p.m., Community Board office, 250 W. 87th St. Wednesday, Oct. 19 • Jt. CEC3 & District 3 Presidents’ Council Meeting, 6:30 p.m., P.S. 241, 240 W. 113th St.

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PUBLIC ELEMENTARY SCHOOL FAIR Community School District 3 will host an elementary school fair for parents whose children are slated to attend Upper West Side public elementary schools. The event will take place from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Oct. 15 at P.S. 165, 234 W. 109th St., between Broadway and Amsterdam Avenue. For more information, visit www.cec3. org.

FREE UWS CABARET SHOW A free cabaret show will take place at 8 p.m. at St. Paul the Apostle Church, 405 W. 59th St. The show’s 12 performers are alumni of the American Musical and Dramatic Academy on the Upper West Side, and they will be singing original material. The performance is open to the public.

October 13, 2011

andrew schwartz

A three-week study of the M15 Select Bus Service (SBS) conducted by State Sen. Tom Duane’s office has found that the most pressing problem the MTA needs to address is that of peeling, obstructed or missing signage on ticket machines that explains how the SBS works. The report called the absent instructions “vitally important, since riders who do not purchase a ticket before boarding are subject to a $100 fine.” The study was conducted by Duane’s staffers and interns, who purchased tickets at every kiosk in the 29th District, which encompasses much of the Upper West Side below 85th Street. They rode the bus at different times over three weeks in July, observing drivers, enforcement and ticket machines and chatting with riders about the service in general. Since the biggest problem is one of information, hopefully, the MTA can easily solve it.

movement downtown since its inception last month. Last week, Upper West Side Assembly Member Linda Rosenthal lent her support to the protestors as well. “This was the day the unions and all of the other people, generally progressive groups, were down there to support them. I thought it was important to acknowledge their efforts,” said Rosenthal. She said that while she’s aware of the criticism that there isn’t a clear message coming from the protestors, that’s one of the hallmarks of the movement and she is supportive of their call for a more equitable tax distribution. “I’m for the millionaires’ tax—I think that’s one thing that might come out of this on a state and federal level,” Rosenthal said. “I think it’s great that people are finally rising up and saying, ‘I’m sick of what’s happening.’ Of course, it has to be followed up with voting and discourse.” So far, the protestors’ anger is being directed at Wall Street and, just this week, the wealthy residents of the Upper East Side, but Rosenthal said the message is resonating everywhere. “It’s clear that the middle class is rapidly disappearing. We see that every day on the Upper West Side—people can’t afford to live here,” she said.

A student from Goddard Riverside Head Start Program gets a close-up look at an owl butterfly, one of many butterflies fluttering around the American Museum of Natural History’s Butterfly Conservatory. The exhibit, which houses up to 500 iridescent butterflies, runs through May 28, 2012.

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Looking for Something to Do? Graduate School of Social Service Information Meeting Saturday, October 15 | 11 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. 155 West 60th Street | Room 109 Register: (212) 636-6600.

Faithful Citizenship II: Keeping the Faith in a Season of Spin Fordham Center on Religion and Culture Tuesday, October 18 | 6 p.m. Pope Auditorium | Free Reservations: CRCevent@fordham.edu or (212) 636-7347.

Next Generation Advanced Analytics Fordham Center for Digital Transformation and IBM Symposium Wednesday, October 19 | 9 a.m. – noon Lowenstein Center | Café Atrium | Free Registration Required: www.eventbrite.com/event/2232511502.

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The Masculine Ideal and Renaissance Portraits St. Robert Southwell, S.J. Lecture

Poets Out Loud Reading Series: 20th Anniversary Celebration

Wednesday, October 19 | 6 p.m.

David Rubenstein Atrium Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts 61 W. 62nd St. | New York City | Free Reservations: pol@fordham.edu or (212) 636-6792.

Tatiana C. String, Ph.D. Associate Adjunct Professor, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 12th-floor Lounge | Free Reservations: wabuda@fordham.edu.

Graduate School of Social Service Information Meeting Monday, October 24 | 6 – 7:30 p.m. Lowenstein Center | Room 109 Register: (212) 636-6600.

Brandalism: Balancing Give and Take Center for Positive Marketing Symposium

Thursday, October 27 | 8:30 p.m.

Think Fordham Lincoln Center. Fordham University’s 12th floor lounge and Pope Auditorium are located at 113 W. 60th Street, New York, NY 10023.

Thursday, October 27 | 8 a.m. – 1 p.m 12th-floor Lounge | Free Registration Required: (212) 636-7484.

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October 13, 2011

W E S T S I D E S P I10/7/11 R I T 11:14 • AM3


news

Deadly Crash Reignites Call to Ban Tourist Helicopters

andrew schwartz

By Megan Finnegan copter flew overhead After a deadly helicopter crash in literally every minute. the East River that left one person dead Brewer recently filed and several critically injured, some local a formal petition with elected officials are renewing their call the Federal Aviation to restrict tourist helicopter flights over Administration (FAA) Manhattan. to require helicopters to Last Tuesday, a helicopter ferrying display larger registrafour tourists took off for a sightseeing tion numbers in easierjaunt over the East River but crashed to-read locations on the almost immediately into the water aircraft so residents can below, leaving one woman, Sonia Marra report rogue pilots who of Australia, trapped in the inverted fly too low and disrecab of the helicopter unable to escape. gard regulations. But Marra died, while her partner, father and after the recent crash, mother, as well as the pilot, were resBrewer said that such cued. While the National Transportation small measures are no Safety Board begins the investigation longer enough to ensure into the cause of the crash, which pilot public safety. Paul Dudley initially reported as engine Brewer said it was trouble, local officials have jumped lucky only one person on the incident as an example of what died in the accident. can happen when airspace goes largely “There’s a ferry boat unregulated. that goes over there—if Rep. Jerrold Nadler, along with othhe had hit them when er state and city officials, immediately they were packed, or issued a call for a complete ban on heliGod forbid if he had hit copter tourism in New York City’s air corsomething on land, [it ridors, which would include the rivers could have been disasand harbors. trous]” she said. A copter crash that killed a woman last week has local elect“Yet another terrible tragedy involving ed’s pushing for a ban on tourist helicopters. The FAA regulates a helicopter should send us a clear mesairspace, including sage in flashing neon lights,” said Nadler I’m not talking about press or police over New York, so while the City Council in a statement. “Sightseeing and nones- or commuting between airports. It’s a could theoretically ban helicopter sightsential helicopters are dangerous, unnec- quality-of-life issue that doesn’t need seeing tours from taking off from New essary and not worth it. We have been to exist. It’s unbelievably noisy and York City heliports, it could not prevent calling for more oversight of our air corri- there are health concerns and safety helicopters from elsewhere from flydors for years, with only modest improve- concerns.” ing into the space. The city’s Economic ments to assuage our fears.” Brewer has been battling the noise Development Corporation is responsible Officials latched on to the fact that the and disruption created by helicopters for for regulating how closely helicopters tour was a private, nonessential helicop- years; she worked to restrict helicopter can fly to the ground and other specifics, ter trip, citing the crash as another reason flights over Central Park and recalled a but they don’t control the airspace. to completely ban tourist helicopters. press conference she held a few years Earlier this week, the Associated City Council Member Gale Brewer ago at the 30th Street heliport to dem- Press reported that the FAA allows some Harrigan_ad_horizo:Harrigan_ad_10x2.687 10/7/11 5:05 PM Page 1 said she wants a ban “just for tourism— onstrate the nuisance at which a heli- sightseeing helicopters to fly through the

presents

A Tribute to Harrigan and Hart: The Original Men Who Owned Broadway

A Concert Featuring Mick Moloney, Vince Giordano and the Nighthawks (Boardwalk Empire) and more! 4

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airspace corridor over the Hudson River, which is supposed to be off-limits to local air traffic. Assembly Member Linda Rosenthal has also been working to regulate helicopters flying over the city for years. She pointed out that another problem is how pilots navigate. “It’s all by sight,” she said. “So the pilot judges just by looking if he’s too close to a building or not.” The FAA’s exemption for some tourist helicopters to fly in the otherwise restricted corridor over the Hudson River exacerbates this problem, Rosenthal said, because other pilots aren’t expecting to see them flying there. Rep. Carolyn Maloney has also advocated for changes at the federal level to the regulation of the city’s airspace. “There have been at least 28 helicopter crashes in our city over the last three decades,” Maloney said in a statement. “Federal transportation officials should investigate not only the causes of this crash but also whether it is safe to have such a high volume of helicopter traffic over our densely populated city.” Any legislative attempts at the city level to ban tourism flights are likely to be vetoed by Mayor Michael Bloomberg. At a press conference last week, Bloomberg said he wouldn’t support any restrictions. “This is a city that has to be open to business and open to tourists,” said Bloomberg. “Helicopters are a very safe way to travel, if you look at the number of miles that they fly and the number of trips that they make. We’re not just going to ban helicopters.” Brewer said the argument for tourism just isn’t necessary. “If there wasn’t anything else to do in New York, I could understand it,” she said. “If you want to see the Statue of Liberty, you can take a ferry.”

Thursday, October 13 | 8pm 2537 Broadway at 95th Street

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Mick Moloney and an all-star cast perform a musical tribute to 1870s Broadway legend Edward “Ned” Harrigan and his partner Tony Hart. Through story and song, the evening captures the humor of the times through ballads of New York working class immigrants, and salutes this Irish-American tunesmith's importance in musical theater.

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news

Meet the New Community Board 7 Chair By Megan Finnegan If the incumbent chair of Community Board 7 had a motto, it would probably be akin to the Boy Scouts’ “be prepared,” nuanced by a strong dose of legal reasoning and humility. Mark Diller, co-secretary of the board and a member since 2008, will take over the chair position

from Mel Wymore Nov. 1. When he ran for the position against long-time member and one-time chair Sheldon Fine, Diller used a portion of the three minutes allotted to him before the vote to speak about a time that he had failed, deciding to hold a resolution he hadn’t explained well enough instead of pushing it through. He told the board

andrew schwartz

“He’s very serious about whatever task he undertakes and I think he’ll work to engage people,” Council Member Gale Brewer said.

that he views them as a group of 50 experts, and he sees the role of chair as negotiator and advocate of their expertise—a characterization they evidently liked. Diller is relatively new to the board, but he’s no stranger to the art of diplomacy. After bartending his way through Fordham Law School in the ’80s, he landed briefly at a Wall Street firm as a litigator before finding his niche at a boutique firm specializing in intellectual property and copyright law representing clients in the music industry. “If you work in copyright and trademark issues and the rights of publicity and privacy, one of the things you learn quickly is that counseling and planning ahead give you better options and give you the ability to give better advice than trying to fix it after it’s broken,” Diller said of a philosophy he applies now to his professional and volunteer life. During his time as in-house counsel at ad conglomerate Young & Rubicam, Diller honed his diplomacy skills when he helped the company buy a stake in an advertising network in the Middle

Mark Diller is the new Community Board 7 chair. East. The legal team discovered that the holding company based in Dubai they wanted to purchase had only handshake agreements with its own clients. “We needed to turn that into a relationship that an auditor in the United States would look at and say, ‘This isn’t a fraud, this isn’t something that you’re

taking a flier on, this is an actual investment that should be viewed as a real asset of the company,’” said Diller. “So what I had to do was help that company restructure itself so that it actually had on-paper relationships—tangible relationships—with its affiliates.” continued on page 11

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Greening Mother Nature’s Call at Riverside Park

Bard Graduate Center Gallery presents

Hats: An Anthology by Stephen Jones in the Main Gallery through April 14, 2012

American Christmas Cards, 1900–1960 in the Focus Gallery through December 31, 2011

Hats: A Field Guide Gallery Talk with milliner Melinda Wax Thursday, November 10, 6 pm

Hats-in-Progress: A Study Day with milliners Gretchen Fenston and Rodney Keenan Friday, November 11, 10 am–4:30 pm

The Surrealist Hat

Lecture by fashion curator Dilys Blum Thursday, November 17, 6 pm

“With Every Christmas Card I Write” Concert of American Holiday Songs, 1900–1960

By Megan Finnegan A group of tennis players are hoping to bring the most amazing toilets in the world to a new small patch of Riverside Park with the help of a few million dollars and their Green Outlook campaign. The Riverside Clay Tennis Association

with Robert Osborne, Katie Geissinger, and Richard Gordon Sunday, December 11, 2 pm

The Hatmaker’s Muse: A Conversation with New York Milliners

Lola Ehrlich, Albertus Swanepoel, and Patricia Underwood. Moderated by costume and textiles curator Phyllis Magidson Thursday, December 15, 6 pm

Women Designers and Greeting Cards of the Arts and Crafts Movement

Lecture by historian Anne Stewart O’Donnell Thursday, December 1, 6 pm

andrew schwartz

For complete information and tickets please visit bgc.bard.edu or e-mail programs@bgc.bard.edu

Stephen Jones for Christian Dior Haute Couture. ‘Olga Sherer inspirée par Gruau’ Hat. Autumn/ Winter 2007/2008. ©Christopher Moore/ Catwalking.

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a scenic overlook area alongside the upgraded restrooms. The price tag for such a project is about $5 million, but the campaign already has $1.2 million secured, allocated by City Council Member Gale Brewer, who praised both the plan and the group executing it. “This is an absolutely wonderful group of people,” said Brewer. “The garden there is extraordinary, which they planted; it’s just beautiful. They have potlucks, they have concerts—they don’t have to do that, they can just play tennis. The fact that they put so much effort into the park makes me want to be supportive.” An abandoned parking lot at Riverside Park will house Brewer said the prosself-composting toilets and a new green facility. pect of a zero-impact (RCTA), a nonprofit organization that facility also drew her interest and disworks in conjunction with the Parks cretionary dollars. Department and the Riverside Park “It makes it expensive, but I think it’s Fund to maintain the 10 clay tennis a prototype for other parks,” she said. courts in Riverside Park at 97th Street, Robin Noble-Zolin, a volunteer has launched a fundraising drive to con- board member of the RCTA and chair vert an abandoned 1.5-acre parking lot of the steering committee for the Green adjacent to the park into an overlook of Outlook campaign, said they hope to the river that will house self-compost- receive funding from multiple sources ing public toilets and a green facility for and have applied for a variety of fedmaintenance equipment and offices. eral, state and city grants. “What was once a fairly isolated part “This is definitely a public-private of the park, that once was only for ten- venture that we’re trying to do,” Noblenis players and fishermen, now sees Zolin said. “There are precedents all over thousands of people over the week- the city in parks. One specific example ends,” said Mark McIntyre, executive is the Peter Jay Sharp Volunteer House, director of the RCTA. This increase in also in Riverside Park.” traffic is due to the completion of the The execution of the plan will require Riverwalk along the Hudson. the city’s Department of Environmental With such heavy traffic, McIntyre Protection to update their regulations; said, they began to think about how to currently, the waste from self-compostprovide a vital and more pleasant ame- ing toilets has to be trucked offsite for nity to park users while making the park use elsewhere—this will be the first itself more environmentally friendly— location in the city to utilize treated hence the self-composting toilets. waste directly onsite. But the RCTA The bathrooms will be built under- says it’s only a matter of time before the neath the overlook, and the treated DEP recognizes the green methods. waste will be used onsite to fertilize a Noble-Zolin said they’re most excitwildflower meadow, which in turn will ed about the project’s inspiration for obscure from view the solar panels future designs. installed to power the restrooms as well “If we can meet the International as the new maintenance building. Living Building Challenge [parameters “We won’t have to connect to the set by an NGO that promotes sustainelectric grid, we won’t connect to the able building] and make a building that sewer grid—it will be a self-sustaining is highly green as well as beautiful, we complex,” said McIntyre. The plan is will be setting the stage for what others to landscape the entire space to create can do,” she said.

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WSS 1-2p Parties 10-13-11_WSS_1-2p_Parties_10-13-11 10/6/11 10:36 AM Page 1

Catskill Farms, a historic feel and customized touch By Roland Li est Value

•B Planning s s e r t S o •N Facilities ic t n e h t u A

Designed and built by Catskill Farms, Cottage 28 is a charming 1,276-square-foot home with two bedrooms, one-and-a-half bathrooms and a covered porch. Courtesy of Catskill Farms.

When Charles Petersheim left the city for the upstate county of Sullivan, he sought, like many new arrivals, to renovate his own historic home. Although he was a builder by profession, Petersheim soon learned the process took time – and money – a realization that was reinforced when he did the same for others. Petersheim realized that while typical buyers craved the aesthetic of a centuries-old building, there might be a market for new properties, if he could capture the same atmosphere. In 2003, he founded Catskill Farms – a designer and builder of new single-family homes that are customized for buyers, mostly Manhattan residents looking to stretch their legs. His typical customer is a 30to 45-year-old, many in a design or creative industry, who have been sheltered from layoffs or a plummeting 401(k).

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By using classic materials like cedar, local stone, plank walls and ceilings and salvaged barn wood, the company not only emulated older neighbors, but exceeded them with energy efficient utilities and features. Spray foam insulation and high efficiency gas boilers reduce the costs of heating and cooling. “Our homes have a sense of history and style to them,” said Petersheim. “And as importantly, they work.” The company has completed over 100 homes with around $32 million in sales. And although the recession has stymied virtually all new construction outside of major cities, Petersheim continues to churn along, finishing a home every three weeks, at prices comparable to the peak. Homes are sold for around $290,000 to $420,000, starting at 1,300 square feet on five acres of land. Prices have stayed stable, with slight increases due to additional features like security systems, surround sound speakers and on-demand hot water. “I think the real marvel is that our prices have held our own,” said Petersheim Although construction labor prices have lowered slightly, materials remain about

the same. The key to the company’s profits is its organization. Catskill Farms takes a comprehensive approach to development, with in-house land acquisition, construction management, architectural design and relationships with local banks that provide financing for building, and occasionally buyers as well. Having been in business for eight years, Catskills has developed relationships with such lenders, and while underwriting standards are tougher, the company’s buyers are all well qualified for mortgages. One of the developer’s first tasks, after securing a buyer, is locating a sprawling parcel of land. And while upstate doesn’t have the furious density of Manhattan, an ideal plot is still elusive. “There is a real challenge of marrying good land with the right house,” said Petersheim. But Catskills saves the buyer the headache of searching, and it assumes the risk of construction by assuming ownership over a project until it is completed, after which it is sold to the buyer. Catskills also managed to shift one ubiquitous profession in-house: real estate brokerage.“We found brokers couldn’t sell our homes,” said Petersheim. Instead, the company uses digital and social media marketing, connecting directly with buyers. Catskills has grown from three employees in 2008 to 14, occupying a historic steel building that has been converted to an office loft. It is now expanding to the neighboring Ulster County, and its pace of development has made it a small, but steady job creator and economic engine for the area, said Petersheim. The new arrivals also contribute thousands to the county in property taxes. Although he’s carved a niche for himself in upstate, and has experience in constructing commercial buildings in the city earlier in his career, don’t expect to see Petersheim breaking ground in Manhattan. “We’re happy to visit,” he said.

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Feature

Last Chance for Mega Historic District Input By Megan Finnegan Local preservation advocates are rallying support for what will the last chance for public input into the massive historic district expansion on the Upper West Side. Oct. 25, the Landmarks Preservation Commission (LPC) will hold the third public hearing on the final section being

“Eating away at the proposed area would really risk degrading the value of the historic district and defeat the purpose of having a district,” Christiana Peña, senior director of Preservation at Landmark West, said.

andrew schwartz

considering for designation, an area that the LPC has deemed the Riverside-West End Historic District Extension II. The area encompasses a handful of buildings lining the west side of Broadway between West 89th and 94th streets and most of the buildings north of 94th Street

between Broadway and Riverside Drive, up to 109th Street, with only a few of the buildings carved out. After the hearing, at which any member of the public can speak in favor of or against the proposal, the LPC will schedule separate votes on each of the expansion areas, which could take months. Advocates are hopeful that the designations will pass with little alteration. “The very first hearing in March was overflowing with people; the LPC put chairs in the hallway for people to sit,” said Josette Amato, communications and design director for the West End Preservation Society (WEPS), the group that initially proposed an expansion of the existing West End-Collegiate historic district. “The second hearing, we had fewer people but we still filled the hearing room.” WEPS is working with Landmark West and the Three Parks Independent Democrats to let people in the community know their last chance to speak on the record before LPC makes a decision is fast approaching. “We’ve been trying to keep the momentum going all year. It’s a long haul,” Amato

forum this week with Andrew Dolkart, director of the Columbia University Historic Preservation Program, and Simeon Bankoff, executive director of the Historic Districts Council, to educate people on what it will be like to live in a historic district. Amato said that most of the opposition her group has heard has been from individual building owners, people who own small brownstones and are concerned about what a designation would do to their property values and how it would affect them on a day-to-day basis. “Paperwork and red tape seem to be a big concern for people,” Amato said. They are worried “that if they have to go through the LPC to make changes, it’s just going to slow things down.” Cristiana Peña, senior director of preservation at Landmark Brownstones being considered by LPC for expansion. West, said that they are also said. “We’re just hoping that we can keep aware of the individual buildings that the enthusiasm going.” wish to be exempt, but hopes LPC won’t The groups are holding a public continued on page 11

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He also had to sidestep the pitfalls of disrespecting a different business culture and appearing to be the pushy American. Diller said that by the end of the deal, the relationship between the companies was even stronger. Diller has been married to Meg Parsons, a former opera singer who now works on the creative side at cosmetics giant Estée Lauder, for 25 years. They have one son, who has attended Upper West Side public schools his whole life and is currently a student at LaGuardia High School for the Arts. Diller credits his involvement with his son’s schools with getting him engaged with the local community. When Young & Rubicam went private, Diller accepted a severance package from them that included a noncompete clause. With more time on his hands (he now works for a firm that allows him a flexible schedule), Diller dove into parent leadership; first at P.S. 87, then at M.S. 54. City Council Member Gale Brewer, who encouraged Diller to apply for a seat on the board, said she met him

through his diligent work at his son’s schools and was impressed with his deep level of involvement. “He has always assumed leadership and does the work,” said Brewer. “Those PTAs are endless phone calls, endless challenges, endless auctions— fix the library, find a new principal.” She was also impressed with Diller’s willingness to jump into the board and take on the often thankless task of taking minutes as the co-secretary. “He’s very serious about whatever task he undertakes and I think he’ll work to engage people,” she said. He’s even seriously engaged in his hobbies. Diller is an accomplished performer in the Japanese drum practice called taiko, which he picked up to play with his son. He now plays regularly with the New York Taiko Aiko Kai group. Diller expects to continue in the forward-thinking direction that Wymore has led the board. He said the biggest issues he foresees over the next several years will be working with Jewish Home Lifecare as they likely construct a new facility at Park West Village, pushing for street redesigns to make them safer and more efficient and continuing to fight for affordable housing

Historic

allow too many exceptions to the proposed designations. “There’s likely to be a continuation of individuals talking about these carve-outs,” Peña said. “Eating away at the proposed area would really risk degrading the value of the historic district and defeat the purpose of having a district.” The Real Estate Board of New York has spoken strongly against all three proposed expansions on the Upper West Side, asserting that they would stifle development and growth and interfere with building owners’ abilities to maintain their property. Several churches, including Rutgers Presbyterian Church on West 73rd Street, have objected to

their inclusion in the district, arguing that it would place undue hardship on them. Amato said that the owners of the Schwab House on Riverside Drive and 73rd Street support the designation as a whole but want to be left out because they have many tenants in the building. The LPC’s vote is not the final say, but the City Council has historically approved the LPC’s recommendations. Preservation enthusiasts are hoping that this final hearing will garner enough public support to resonate strongly with LPC when they actually vote on the proposal months down the line. “One thing that we’re really lucky to have in the northern part, in the West 100s—there are some really strong block associations there” that support the designation, said Peña. “That really speaks to West Siders’ appreciation and understanding of how important preservation is.”

options on the Upper West Side. While he said he prefers complete solutions, it doesn’t mean he will reject small steps toward solving bigger problems. “You really have to take it on a case-

by-case basis,” said Diller. “I understand government a little bit. I understand glaciers a little bit too—sometimes you need to make incremental progress and sometimes you just need to hold out for what it is you really need.”

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October 13, 2011

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City arts

Puccini’s Tosca at Dicapo Opera Theatre By Parker Woolf Dicapo Opera Theatre opens its 30th anniversary season with Puccini’s Tosca, and does so with admirable simplicity and grace. A small venue in the basement of the Saint Jean Baptiste Church, Dicapo creates the closest thing to chamber opera available in New York City. And for $50 a ticket in an intimate setting akin to sitting in the third row of the orchestra at the Met, the occasional glitch in quality becomes part of Dicapo’s charm. New York operagoers who witnessed Luc Bondy’s 2009 production of Tosca at the Met will be relieved to see a production of the opera that does not seek to upstage Puccini’s score or the vocal performances therein. Michael Capasso has staged his Tosca with a meat-and-potatoes sort of clarity that honors the narrative without interrupting the music. John Farrell’s set design is rickety and distractingly flimsy at times (a rotating central set was the source of mechanical failure and excessive movement), but much is made of both the limited budget and space, a reminder that opera need not be a mul-

timillion-dollar affair to achieve its dramatic ends. As the title role, Kristin Sampson brings a good deal of petulance to her characterization, which imbues the first act with a wonderful comedy and playfulness that are often missing but ultimately hinders her delivery of the final act. She’s a soprano of excellent phrasing, and while she may lack vocal depth, she has sufficient breadth to satisfy in the role. As her lover Cavaradossi, the tenor Paolo Buffagni sang the first two acts with accuracy and fervor, but began to flail in the final act at “O dolci mani,” with seeming fatigue at the moment

when passion is most necessary. Baritone Gustavo Ahualli sang a consistently chilling and rich depiction as the evil Scarpia; his “Tre sbirri” at the end of the first act brought goosebumps to more than one arm. The only possibly lessthan-charming element of the evening was the stage director (and general director of the theater) sitting in the audience of the 200-seat hall, audibly murmuring unprintable expletives when all of the elements onstage were not executed to his liking. We’re our own worst critics, it would seem.

Puccini’s Tosca runs through Oct. 16 at the Dicapo Opera Theatre in the basement of Saint Jean Baptiste Church.

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The New SONiC Youth A new music festival for the under 40 takes over Manhattan

We st Si d e S p i r it . c o m

Bermel described today’s fest as “a window into the vast and diverse worlds that musicians are exploring today. There are no more aesthetic or stylistic barriers out there; SONiC is offering a whirlwind showcase for the boundless creativity of our contemporary composers.” The events are as diverse as the music. Highlights include “Extended Play,” an all-day marathon event on Sunday, Oct. 16, that begins at noon at Columbia University’s Miller Theatre. Critically acclaimed modern-day string quartet JACK Quartet will play the role of both host and performer during the 12-hour event, along with performances from Talea Ensemble, The New York Virtuoso Singers, Dither, Imani Winds, PRISM Quartet, Young People’s Chorus of New York City and NOW Ensemble. For a taste of the new vanguard of contemporary ensembles, check out eighth blackbird, the Grammy-winning septet with the self-described “energy of a rock band,” when they perform Fractured Jams Oct. 15 at the Miller Theatre. Either/ Or, a cutting-edge ensemble, will perform

the U.S. premiere of smear, Jonny Greenwood’s classical piece, on Monday, Oct. 17, also at the Miller. On a shoestring budget? Check out the free closing night concert “American Pie” on Saturday, JACK Quartet will host and play at the “Extended Play” event Oct. 22 at the World at Columbia University on Oct. 16 as part of the SONiC Music Financial Center Festival. Winter Garden, featuring the world premiere of St. Carolyn enced Grindhouse, Andrew Norman’s by the Sea by The National’s Bryce loop-based energetic Unstuck and Dessner, who will perform the adaptation Suzanne Farrin’s site-specific, resonant of Jack Kerouac’s Big Sur with his broth- Infinite Here. er Aaron on electric guitar backed by a Tickets for SONiC events range from full symphony orchestra. Commissioned free to $50 and are available for purby the American Composers Orchestra, chase at participating SONiC venues. You it’s sure to be a little bit classical and a can also buy a SONiC pass for $25 that little bit rock ‘n’ roll. provides at least 20 percent off all tickThe program also includes the world ets, along with other perks. For more premieres of Paul Yeon Lee’s Ballade, information and a full schedule and lineRuby Fulton’s alt-kitsch Road Ranger up, visit www.sonicfestival.org or call Cowboy, Ryan Gallagher’s B-movie influ- 212-977-8495. STEPHEN POFF

By Anna Margaret Hollyman If the words “composer” and “orchestra” conjure up images of stodgy concert halls replete with white-gloved conductors in tails and orchestra pits full of faceless musicians in black formal wear, this year’s SONiC (Sounds of a New Century) Music Festival will shake those associations up, introducing audiences to the most talented, cutting-edge composers, ensembles and orchestras working today. Making its debut as a festival of 21stcentury music, SONiC will take over 11 venues in Manhattan and Brooklyn from Oct. 14 through Oct. 22, hosting over 100 composers and ensembles from across the world, all of whom are 40 years old or under. Co-curated by composer Derek Bermel and pianist Stephen Gosling and produced by the American Composers Orchestra and the Alice M. Ditson Fund of Columbia University, the festival is loosely based on the Ditson Festival from the 1940s and ’50s. That fest—which predated CMJ by a few decades—showcased premieres from the likes of Charles Ives and Aaron Copland.

October 13, 2011

• W ES T S ID E S P IR IT

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DINING

Red Badge for Barolo

Piemonte Region produces some of the best wines in the world

F

extra splurge. There are as many styles of Barolo as there are subregions that make the wine itself. One of my favorites is the more floral style of Barolo. The Serralunga Barolo d’Alba 2007 ($29.99 at Beacon Wines and Spirits, 2120 Broadway at 74th St., 212-877-0028) is a terrific and affordable example of this style. Rosewood and fresh-cut vioBy Josh Perilo lets burst out of the glass and into the nose, and the palate has even more to offer. A pungent bo uquet of wildflowers up front leads to a bracingly tannic middle, with sour black cherry on the finish. This is bang for your buck Barolo! One of the great, venerable producers of Barolo that comes through year after year is Vietti, and their Vietti Barolo Castiglione 2007 ($49.95 at SherryLehmann, 505 Park Ave. at 60th St., 212838-7500) is no exception. If this wine were a piece of furniture, it would be your favorite old leather recliner—the one everyone fights to sit in. The nose is rife with familiar smells from an English study: cedar, old leather and aged hardwood. The palate unleashes a tannin monster. Beware: While I recommend decanting all Barolos, I might even double decant this one. Once the wine has been given a little time to relax and open up, there is layer upon layer of complexity— bitter chocolates, underripe berries and wisps of pipe smoke, to name a few. On the subtler, lighter side of Barolo there’s the G.D. Vajra Barolo Albe 2006 ($27.99 at Union Square Wines, 140 4th Ave. at 13th St., 212-675-8100). Scents of mild earth and shaved white truffles waft from the glass. Whispers of baked cherry lead to a middle with chalky tannins and

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an earthy, tightly wound finish. While this one is drinking well now, it’s a great example of a wine that will continue to improve over the next decade. Then there is the Elio Grasso Barolo Rüncot 2004 ($130.69 at Morrell & Company, 1 Rockefeller Plaza, 212-6889370). To quote Peter Boyle’s Frank

Follow Josh on Twitter: @joshperilo.

When in Rome... When in Rome, my friend says pizza is THE thing to eat. When in Rome, you crowd the counter, using your fingers to show how large a slice. When in Rome, you fold the pizza and the olive oil drips down your hand—and that’s a good thing. She doesn’t think the Roman-style pizza at Farinella quite matches up. Yes, it’s pre-sliced and not as oily. Yet, in New York we tweak the foods from other lands to create something wholly new. In this case I’d say “holy,” because my rectangular prosciutto slice ($4.75) inspired something like religious ecsta- Superb ingredients, chewy, thin crusts sy. Generous layers of quality prosciutto and an array of quintessential Italian toplay dappled with mozzarella and I’d say pings make Farinella worth trying. I also just enough oil, salt and pepper. I had appreciated the mini calzoni, puffy packmy piece cut into thirds ets of ricotta, mozzarella to prolong the experiand tomato ($2.50). ence and share with And speaking of tweakmy friend, who ordered ing: the smiling-faced 1132 Lexington Ave. that nod to summer, the Farinella logo looks like (betw. 78th & 79th Sts.) Caprese ($4.75), with Coney Island’s “Tillie mozzarella, basil and Face.” When in New York… 212-327-2702 tomato. It turns out the www.farinellabakery.com bakery was awaiting a —Nancy J. Brandwein shipment of buffalo mozzarella that would have turned the Caprese Got a snack attack to share? into Farinella’s “DOC”—drug of choice. Contact nancybrandwein@gmail.com DANIEL S. BURNSTEIN

or the most part, I try very hard to stay true to the “Penniless” part of my moniker. There are times, however, when opportunity presents itself and wines appear that are so amazing they must be reviewed and shared with the public, no matter the expense. That is the case with Barolo. Made exclusively from the nebbiolo grape, Barolo is from the Piemonte region of northwestern Italy. Like many other old world wines, Barolo’s name comes from its place of origin—in this case, a village in Piemonte near Alba. There are actually over half a dozen townships and subregions within Barolo itself that pinpoint exactly where each wine is from, sometimes down to the kilometer. Why so much fuss over a bottle of wine? A lot of it has to do with tradition. The wines from Barolo have been made in the same way, producing the same intense, garnet-hued red wine, since the mid-19th century. The townships that have perfected this style of wine wear it as a badge of pride—not only that their hills and countrysides are the best in the world for growing this grape (which, arguably, they are) but that their techniques for handling this specific grape are well-honed. Barolo is traditionally a wine meant to age considerably before drinking, but more and more producers are attempting to make wines that can be available without shoving a bottle away for 10 to 15 years. Some look at this as forward-thinking; others as heresy. The results are, as with all wines, mixed. I have been lucky enough to try many Barolos over the last several months. Most were great but there were a handful that were truly spectacular—worth the

Barone, holy crap. The nose is intense and sweet, with cedar, pine, and other sweet wood scents. The palate starts with flavor notes of caramelized sugar which morph into molasses then lead to baked fig. The tannins balance the fruit flavors with a pleasant, espresso-like bitterness. The finish is stoic. Elio Grasso has long been one of my favorite producers from this region and they have outdone themselves with this offering. An absolute masterpiece.

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WCMC OT_Fl2011_v8_OurTown 10/7/11 1:32 PM Page 2

THE

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Free Health Education Seminars All Lectures are FREE and Open to the Public

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RONALD O. PERELMAN HEART INSTITUTE / THE WOMEN’S HEART PROGRAM 5:30 to 7 pm / Doors open 5 pm Griffis Faculty Club 525 East 69th Street (York Avenue), New York, NY 10065 TO REGISTER: 1-877-NYP-WELL (1-877-697-9355) Registration required. Light refreshments will be served.

LUNG CANCER SEMINAR SERIES

TIME:

LOCATION:

TIME: LOCATION:

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Wednesday, October 12, 2011 Go Active and Stay Active! Physical activity not only reduces your risk of heart disease and stroke, it improves your mood, your waistline and your memory. Learn how to enjoy a more active life. Gail L. Flanagan, MS, RD

Wednesday, November 9, 2011 Have a Heart: “Let Go” of Your Anger Learn about anger management and the importance of stress reduction before you head into this holiday season. Robert Allan, PhD

Wednesday, December 14, 2011 You Are What You Eat Learn how to make healthier choices in your diet and learn shopping tips to fill your home with healthier foods. Heidi Skolnik, MS, CDN, FACSM

Wednesday, January 18, 2012 Living a Healthy Life!

Thursday, November 3, 2011 Lung Cancer Explained: Advances in Treatment and Technology Nasser K. Altorki, MD, Professor of Cardiothoracic Surgery, David B. Skinner Professor of Thoracic Surgery Katherine Novak Parker, MD, Assistant Professor of Radiology

Thursday, November 10, 2011 What’s New in Drugs for Lung Cancer? The Importance of Translational Research: From the OR to the Research Lab Lorraine J. Gudas, PhD, Chairman, Department of Pharmacology Brendon Stiles, MD, Assistant Professor of Cardiothoracic Surgery

Thursday, November 17, 2011 Lung Cancer: Advances in the Diagnosis, Current Management and Future Treatment Mark W. Pasmantier, MD, Clinical Professor of Medicine Daniel M. Libby, MD, Clinical Professor of Medicine, Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine

It is January—time to make important changes in your life. Take easy steps to improve your health. William Borden, MD

IRIS CANTOR WOMEN’S HEALTH CENTER TIME: LOCATION:

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6:15 to 7:15 pm • Q & A following Weill Greenberg Center 1305 York Avenue at East 70th Street, Second Floor New York, NY 10021 212-821-0971 or EMAIL: womenshealth@med.cornell.edu

Monday, October 24, 2011 Robotic Surgery in Gynecology: Is It Really Better for the Patient? (Live Robotic Demonstration) Tirsit Asfaw, MD, Assistant Professor, Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology; Urogynecology and Reconstructive Pelvic Surgery Divya Gupta, MD, Assistant Professor, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Gynecologic Oncology; Assistant Attending, Gynecologic Oncology Kevin Holcomb, MD, Director, Minimally Invasive Surgery, Obstetrics and Gynecology; Associate Professor of Clinical Obstetrics and Gynecology; Associate Attending, Gynecologic Oncology

6:15 to 7:15 pm • Q & A following Weill Greenberg Center 1305 York Avenue at East 70th Street, Second Floor New York, NY 10021 646-962-5721 or EMAIL: mmprc@med.cornell.edu

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6:15 to 7:15 pm • Q & A following Weill Greenberg Center 1305 York Avenue at East 70th Street, Second Floor New York, NY 10021 646-962-5721 or EMAIL: mmprc@med.cornell.edu

Thursday, December 1, 2011 What You Need to Know About PSA Screening: An Update for Men and Their Partners Michael P. Herman, MD, Instructor in Urology

Tuesday, December 6, 2011 New Advances in Cosmetic Surgery David M. Otterburn, MD, Assistant Professor of Surgery (Plastic Surgery)

Thursday, December 8, 2011 Winter Skin Care Cynthia L. Chen, MD, Assistant Professor of Dermatology

Thursday, December 15, 2011 Healthy Eating During The Holidays Rachel Neifeld, RD, CDN, Clinical Dietitian

NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital/Weill Cornell Medical Center, located in Manhattan on the Upper East Side at York Avenue and 68th Street, comprises NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital and Weill Cornell Medical College.

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October 13, 2011

NEWS YOU LIVE BY


October 2011

NEWSLETTER

ORNELL

Dr. Steven J. Corwin Named CEO of NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital; Dr. Robert E. Kelly Named President The Board of Trustees of NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital announced that it has named Steven J. Corwin, MD, as the new Chief Executive Officer of the Hospital. Dr. Corwin succeeds Herbert Pardes, MD, who has retired as head of the Hospital and is now Executive Vice Chairman of the Board of Trustees.

Carlos Rene Perez

Brad Hess

environment to enhance patient care, to The Board also announced that Robert strengthen the Hospital’s financial stability E. Kelly, MD, has been named President and to promote community health. They of the Hospital, reporting to Dr. Corwin. will continue NewYork-Presbyterian’s The new appointments follow a national commitment to advancing quality care for search by a committee of the Board patients and their families.” of Trustees and became effective Mr. Mack and the Board of Trustees, September 6, 2011. Steven J. Corwin, MD including vice chairs Frank A. Bennack Jr., John J. Mack, Chairman, Board of Charlotte M. Ford, Peter A. Georgescu Trustees, said: “I am delighted to make and Jerry I. Speyer, paid tribute to the this announcement about the new leadextraordinary service rendered by ership at NewYork-Presbyterian. Steve Dr. Pardes during his 11-year tenure. Corwin is uniquely qualified to chart a “We all owe Dr. Pardes a tremendous course through the opportunities and debt of gratitude for his outstanding challenges ahead for this great hospital. Robert E. Kelly, MD leadership. He has transformed NewYorkHe is a thoughtful and bold leader who Presbyterian into a national leader has already made a significant mark on amongst academic medical tcenters, making the NewYork-Presbyterian. He and Dr. Kelly 1997 merger of The New York Hospital and The represent the next generation of leadership for Presbyterian Hospital a success, raising the this remarkable institution. They, along with the worldwide profile of the Hospital and ensuring rest of our senior executive team, have exceeded its strength into the future,” Mr. Mack said. ambitious objectives in a very challenging

John Abbott

Dr. Laurie Glimcher Announced as New Dean at Weill Cornell Medical College

Laurie Glimcher, MD

Dr. Laurie Glimcher, one of the nation’s leading physician-scientists and researchers, has accepted the offer to become the new Stephen and Suzanne Weiss Dean of Weill Cornell Medical College and Cornell Provost for Medical Affairs. The Irene Heinz Given Professor of Immunology at the Harvard School of Public Health and Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School, Dr. Glimcher was chosen from a field of 51 candidates. Her appointment was unanimously approved by both the Weill Cornell Board of Overseers and the Executive Committee of the Cornell Board of Trustees. She will assume the new position effective January 1, 2012. Dr. Glimcher will succeed Dr. Antonio M. Gotto Jr., who has served with great distinction as Dean and Provost since 1997 and who will become Co-chair of the Board of Overseers and Cornell University Vice President.

For general information, call (212) 746-5454. For information about physicians and patient programs, call (877) NYP-WELL. www.nyp.org • weill.cornell.edu Produced by the Department of Public Affairs of NewYork-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell, (212) 821-0560.

WestSideSpirit.com

October 13, 2011

WEST SIDE SPIRIT

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Healthy Manhattan

a monthly advertising supplement

Forty is Still the New 40

Many breast cancer experts say it’s the right age to begin mammograms By Laura shin

Dr. Dara Richardson-Heron was diagnosed with breast cancer at the age of 34. She said it was breast self-awareness and a mammogram that saved her life. “My doctor initially said, ‘You’re too young to get a mammogram and you’re too young to have breast cancer,’ but I insisted on having a mammogram and it turned out that I had breast cancer,” said Richardson-Heron, a 14-year cancer survivor and CEO of the Greater New York City Affiliate of Susan G. Komen for the Cure. There is no universal set of guidelines when it comes to mammograms. In fact, changes to some mammogram guidelines in recent years have stirred debate, leaving many women confused about when and how often they should get mammograms. “I think the confusion has led to a complacency among women,” said Richardson-Heron. “Since they don’t know what to do, many of them are just not doing anything. My concern is that these women will be diagnosed later, and a later diagnosis is far more difficult to treat.” Richardson-Heron recommends women begin receiving annual screening mammograms at age 40—earlier if the woman has higher risk factors such as a strong family history of the disease, like she did. The American Cancer Society, The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, The Mayo Clinic and Susan G. Komen for the Cure all currently support a set of guidelines that recommends routine mammograms beginning at age 40

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‘I think the confusion has led to a complacency among women,’ said Dr. Dara Richardson-Heron. for women at average risk. But in 2009, the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force, a group of health experts that reviews research and makes recommendations on preventive health care, revised their guidelines to include a recommendation that screening mammograms should be done every two years beginning at age 50 for women at average risk. The task force reported that the benefits of screening mammograms do not outweigh the harms for women ages 40 to 49. Potential harms include false positive results that could lead to unneeded biopsies along with anxiety and stress. There are, however, some issues with the task force’s findings, said Dr. Laurie Margolies, chief of

breast imaging at Mount Sinai Medical Center. “The studies they looked at were very old, and there are several problems with that. One is that they’re all on analog mammography,” Margolies said. Analog mammography takes images on film, whereas most mammogram machines sold now are digital, she said. Digital mammography finds more cancers in younger women than analog. Even the disputed report emphasized it was not suggesting that women ages 40 to 49 not have mammograms at all, but rather that they should not be done routinely and should be conducted based on a woman’s values regarding the risks and benefits of mammography. Margolies acknowledges that there are instances of false positives in screening mammograms and there are some associated harms, but she believes the risks do not outweigh the benefits. “Anxiety is painful and having a benign biopsy is not great, but I would rather have a benign biopsy than die from breast cancer,” she said. While women in their forties have a lower overall incidence of breast cancer, younger women tend to have more aggressive types of breast cancer, said Richardson-Heron. “If you wait to diagnose these women, you potentially decrease the chance of detecting the cancer before it is spread to different parts of the body,” she said. “The most compelling stories are the women who tell me that they were diagnosed on their first screening mammogram at age 40, so I shudder to think what would’ve happened to them if they had waited to age 50 to get a mammogram,” she said. In addition to beginning regular mammogram screenings at age 40, it is also important to get a mammogram every year as opposed to every other year, said Mary Gemignani, MD, a surgeon at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center. “Yearly screening may potentially decrease the risk of interval cancers, cancers that occur between screenings, which occur more commonly in younger women,” Gemignani said. Mammography has been proven to save lives, said Margolies. “The death rate from breast cancer has decreased 30 percent since 1990, and that’s predominantly due to mammography screening,” she said. Richardson-Heron encourages women to know their family history and to be able to identify changes in their breasts. As far as mammograms go, she hopes women can move toward one set of guidelines. “I want to cut through the confusion altogether. Don’t even think about it. Get a mammogram at age 40 or earlier if you have any risk factors that make you more likely to get diagnosed with breast cancer,” she said.

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Healthy Manhattan

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UES 336 E 86th St (Betwn 1st and 2nd Ave.) 212.772.3627

Raynaud’s Disease: Cold Feet Not Related to Weddings Symptoms include numb fingers and toes, particularly for younger women By Dr. Cynthia Paulis

Red, white and blue may be patriotic colors, but when they occur on your fingers it may be a sign of something known as Raynaud’s disease. The condition is characterized by a vasospasm and in some cases can be associated with autoimmune diseases such as lupus or scleroderma. We st Si d e S p i r it . c o m

In Raynaud’s, areas of your body such as your fingers, toes, the tip of your nose, ears and, on rare occasions, tongue will feel numb and cool in response to cold temperatures and stress. Smaller arteries that supply blood to the skin narrow and go into spasm, causing the numbness. The symptoms experienced depend on the severity, frequency and duration of the vasospasm; the first

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thing a patient notices is that the area, usually the fingers, turns white due to inadequate blood flow. As oxygen is depleted in the tissues they turn blue, and when the spasm stops and blood returns, the skin turns bright red and can be tingling or painful. The attack can last from less than a minute to several hours. Dr. Robert Dickerson, a rheumatologist in Manhattan, said Raynaud’s often affects women between the ages of 17 and 25. “The problem with trying to diagnose the disease is that they look very normal,” he said. “The first line of treatment is to give the patient an understanding of the event, because that reassures them and [helps them] understand the triggers that will cause this problem.” The two most common triggers are cold temperatures and stress. In both cases the body’s normal response is to preserve core temperature—in people with the disease, this response is exaggerated. Dickerson also stressed that other triggers that can cause the event are “smoking, caffeine, estrogen-based birth control pills, occupations where vibrations are constant, such as working with

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a jackhammer” and perhaps vinyl. “I once had a patient many years ago who was a disc jockey. She was working with vinyl records and developed symptoms of Raynaud’s disease,” said Dickerson. Certain over-the-counter medications that contain pseudoephedrine can also act as triggers. Beta blockers used to treat high blood pressure and heart disease such as Lopressor, Toprol, Corgard, Inderal and Innopran XL have also been know to trigger Raynaud’s disease. The problem with Raynaud’s is that if attacks increase in frequency, poor oxygen supply to the tissues can cause the tips of the fingers to ulcerate and become infected. With a continued lack of oxygen, gangrene can occur—although this is very rare, it does happen. When an attack occurs, Dickerson advises, “Warm your hands by putting them in warm water. If that’s not available, gently massage your hands or, if it’s your feet, wiggle your toes. Make wide circles like a windmill with your arms or place your hands under your armpits to warm them up.” Prevention is the best way to mini-

October 13, 2011

mize the attacks. In cold weather wear gloves, a hat, a scarf and boots. Dickerson advises, “Wear socks and gloves to bed. If you are drinking a cold drink, use a napkin or insulator around the glass to keep your hands warm.” If you are taking food out of the refrigerator or freezer, wear gloves or oven

‘I once had a patient many years ago who was a disc jockey. She was working with vinyl records and developed symptoms of Raynaud’s disease,’ said Dr. Robert Dickerson. mitts to keep the cold from your hands. Air conditioning may trigger the attack, so set the temperature higher to prevent attacks. Dickerson reassures patients that

“80 percent of people will do well with prevention and avoidance of the triggers that cause the attacks.” The most common drugs used for treatment are calcium channel blockers such as Adalat, Procardia, Norvasc and Plendil. They work by relaxing and opening up the small vessels in your hands and feet, thereby decreasing the frequency and severity of the attacks. They also can be used to heal ulcers on the fingers and toes. Another class of medication used is alpha blockers, which counteract the effects of the hormone norepinephrine, which constricts the blood vessels. Minipress and Cardura are commonly used alpha blockers. Niacin, also known as vitamin B3, has been used to treat the problem and biofeedback has been used to cope with stressful situations. One of the more unusual treatments is Viagra, which is a potent vasodilator. Raynaud’s disease can’t be cured, but its symptoms can be minimized by eliminating the triggers that cause it—cold, stress ( easier said than done), smoking and caffeine. So, the next time you feel inclined to go for the 60-ounce cup of coffee, think about switching to green tea instead and maybe booking a nice trip to Hawaii in December.

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WestSideSpirit.com

October 13, 2011

WEST SIDE SPIRIT

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Healthy Manhattan

A Tough Cancer to Treat Pancreatic cancer is often detected late because symptoms do not seem serious By Ashley Welch

Last week, pancreatic cancer took the life of Apple co-founder Steve Jobs. Several days earlier, Dr. Ralph Steinman, winner of the 2011 Nobel Prize for medicine, died from the same cancer, just days before the award was announced. The National Cancer Institute estimates that there will be 44,030 new cases and 37,660 deaths resulting from pancreatic cancer in the United States this year. The American Cancer Society says pancreatic cancer patients have only a 20 percent chance to live at least one year after diagnosis, and fewer

than 4 percent will be alive after five years. Many doctors agree that the reason for such daunting numbers is that pancreatic cancer is one of the most difficult cancers to treat. Why is this and what is it about its nature that makes it so deadly? Pancreatic cancer begins in the tissues of the pancreas, a six-inch-long organ located horizontally behind the stomach in the abdomen. It secretes enzymes that aid in digestion and produces hormones that help regulate the metabolism of sugars. Cancer occurs when cells begin dividing uncontrollably Apple co-founder Steve Jobs died last week from pancreatic cancer, which continues to have and form lumps of tissue, which become one of the lowest cancer survival rates, 4 percent after five years. tumors and interfere with the main functions of the pancreas. radiation oncology at Albert Einstein health conditions. The first reason pancreatic cancer is College of Medicine and Montefiore “Most of the time, pancreatic cancer difficult to treat is that it is often goes presents very nonspecific symptoms that Medical Center. undetected until it’s in its advanced These early symptoms include bloatdo not necessarily give any indication stages. This is because the early signs ing, nausea, indigestion and abdominal of a serious disease,” said Dr. Chandan of pancreatic cancer are varied and are T:10” Guha, a professor and vice chair of common with many other, less serious continued pg 26

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88-year-old World War II D-Day survivor Ralph Goldsmith and his doctor, Mark Adelman, MD, Chief of Vascular Surgery, both know what it means to save lives. The nationally recognized team of specialists at the NYU Langone Cardiac and Vascular Institute use the most advanced techniques to treat aortic aneurysms at New York’s largest aortic disease center. To find an NYU Langone aortic disease specialist, call 888.769.8633 or visit www.NYULMC.org/findadoc.

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October 13, 2011

N ew s YO U Li V e B Y


Seeking Advanced-Stage Cancer Patientswith Anxiety For Research Study Seeking Advanced-Stage Cancer Patients with Anxiety For Research Study We are looking for volunteers to participate in a scientific study exploring the effects of spiritual or mystical states of consciousness on anxiety and emotional distress associated with a diagnosis of advanced cancer ___________________________________________ A person receiving a diagnosis of advanced cancer is faced with multiple and severe physical, emotional, and spiritual or existential challenges. Often, the feelings of hopelessness, anxiety, and questions around meaning and spirituality contribute to more overall suffering than physical symptoms. It is now widely believed that issues related to meaning, spirituality, anxiety, and depressed mood are at the core of the suffering that patients with advanced cancer may experience. Researchers at New York University School of Medicine and Bluestone Center for Clinical Research are conducting a scientific study using a novel drug, psilocybin, a psychoactive agent found in a specific type of mushroom and used for centuries for religious and spiritual purposes. Entheogens, the class of plants and chemicals that includes psilocybin, have been used for thousands of years as sacraments to induce mystical or spiritual states of consciousness as part of spiritual and healing observances. Volunteers who participate in this study will receive careful medical and psychological screening, preparation, and educational materials about the details of the study. The study will consist of two study sessions. Additional meetings will involve preparation and supportive counseling to assure comfort and safety throughout the study. Questionnaires and interviews will be used to evaluate the effects of the study drug on mood and quality of life. This research study is fully approved by and adheres to the strict regulations of the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Participants must be between the ages of 18 and 76, have received a diagnosis of advanced-stage cancer, and be experiencing anxiety or mood changes secondary to their diagnosis. Further information regarding eligibility is available upon inquiry. Strict confidentiality will be maintained on all persons inquiring or participating in the study. If you, a family member, or someone you know is interested in this study, please call Krystallia Kalliontzi, M.Sc., Clinical Research Coordinator, at (212) 998-9252. Version Date – 1/20/09

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This important meeting will offer self-care programs and support for the Family Caregiver, providing guidance, healing, and hope on how to make the most of the experience without losing yourself in the process. Caregiving presents considerable challenges: physical, emotional, and economic. Stop trying to do it alone. We are here for you! You will receive valuable information on resources available to help you meet the challenges of a Caregiver with a new strength and vitality, helping you provide better care to your loved one and help you protect your own health and well-being. Each meeting includes a Creative Visualization Guided Relaxation Meditation and Stress-Release Self-Healing Exercises. Presented on a Love-Offering Basis For More Information, Call Marion A. Gambardella at: (212) 582-1300

WestSideSpirit.com

October 13, 2011

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Take Charge Of Your Fertility For anyone a diagnosis of cancer is overwhelming. And while it may be difficult to think about, it is critically important that you take steps to preserve your fertility before, during and after life-saving cancer treatments. The doctors at the Fertility Preservation Program at the Center for Reproductive Medicine stand ready to help both male and female patients have a baby after cancer.* If you or someone you know is of child- bearing years and has been recently diagnosed with cancer, please contact us at (646) 962-5450.

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October 13, 2011

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Turning Patients into Parents

The Fertility Preservation Program at the Ronald O. Perelman and Claudia Cohen Center for Reproductive Medicine of Weill Cornell Medical College gives cancer patients the greatest chance of having a baby. Infertility is often a by-product of life-saving treatments like chemotherapy and radiation. And whether you’re newly diagnosed about to begin treatment, in the middle of that treatment or in remission, our team stands ready to expedite the process and support you through this challenging time. For many women, the path to fertility preservation begins with freezing eggs or embryos. Before beginning cancer treatment, women can undergo a cycle of ovarian stimulation. The eggs are then removed and either frozen or fertilized with available sperm. Both frozen eggs and embryos can be used after cancer treatments are completed. Women who cannot delay their treatments and take the time for an IVF cycle can have their ovarian tissue frozen.

Using a state-of-the-art minimally invasive technique, surgeons can remove tissue from the ovary and freeze it. After cancer treatments are complete, the tissue can be transplanted back into the woman. Men who have been diagnosed with cancer can choose to have their sperm or testicular tissue frozen prior to treatment. And for men who have no sperm after cancer treatment, surgeons can perform microscopic sperm recovery. Any sperm found in the testicular tissue is then used to fertilize eggs. By using these cutting-edge techniques, our doctors try to minimize the effects of chemotherapy and radiation treatments and preserve your ability to become a parent in the future.

If you or someone you know is of child-bearing years and has been recently diagnosed with cancer, please call us at (646) 962-5450.

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Healthy Manhattan

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October 13, 2011

FOSAMAX

FEMUR INJURIES

continued from pg 22

pain, things Guha said people may often ignore because they are minor ailments that they expect to experience in their day-to-day lives. By the time more serious symptoms, such as severe weight loss and jaundice (the yellowing of the eyes and skin), occur, the cancer has often reached advanced stages and has most likely spread outside the pancreas. At this stage, the cancer is almost impossible to remove because it often spreads to vital blood vessels that are in close proximity to the pancreas. “The pancreas lives in a very protected location,” said Dr. Steven Standiford, a surgical oncologist and chief of staff at Cancer Treatment Centers of America in Philadelphia. “A small tumor in the pancreas can involve the portal vein, the major vein that drains the intestine into the liver, the hepatic artery, the artery to the liver, or the mesenteric artery, which is the main artery to the intestine, making the cancer inoperable at that point.” Doctors must then turn to radiation and chemotherapy for treatment. Yet, according to Standiford, although some progress has been made in treating pancreatic cancer with these methods, they do not yield the same dramatic results as for other types of cancer, such as breast cancer and Hodgkin’s disease. The reason for pancreatic cancer’s weak response to these methods, he said, is not known. “It could be that we haven’t found the right drugs,” he said, “or is it that the tumor is just that resistant, that it’s much

harder to find the right drugs.” Such limited treatment options, coupled with late detection, are the main reasons for the low life expectancy and high mortality rate associated with pancreatic cancer. So what hope is there for the future treatment of this deadly disease? Scientists are working all over the country on different ways to extend the lifespan of pancreatic cancer patients and possibly find a cure. Some methods under development include trying new chemotherapy drugs and improving the delivery of the drugs to the cancer site. Others are experimenting with “targeted therapy” drugs, which would attack the unique aspects of cancer cells while causing little harm to healthy cells. Still other doctors, including Guha at Einstein Medical College, are working on vaccines for pancreatic cancer. Though vaccines are typically thought of as a means to prevent a disease, this type of vaccine would help treat an existing cancer by strengthening the body’s natural defenses against it. Guha said this is essentially done by “trying to educate the body’s own immune system to consider the tumor as dangerous and to fight it.” He is studying whether a vaccine, coupled with chemotherapy, would improve overall survival and induce strong tumor-specific immunity in patients with inoperable pancreatic cancer. Though this vaccine is still in experimental trials, Guha said he has hope that such treatments will soon make for more positive outcomes for pancreatic cancer patients. N ew s YO U Li V e B Y


Women’s Healthcare Services Returns to Tribeca Following the closure of St. Vincent’s Hospital, many physicians came to New York Downtown Hospital so they could continue to serve their patients on the West Side. With the opening of a new Center on 40 Worth Street, we are pleased to welcome two exceptional physicians back to the community. They will be working in collaboration with physicians from Weill Cornell Medical Associates.

THE BREAST CENTER NEW YORK DOWNTOWN HOSPITAL Dr. Robbi Kempner, Chief of Breast Surgery at New York Downtown Hospital, will sponsor our Hospital’s first Mammogram-a-thon at its new Wellness & Prevention Center, on Thursday, October 27th, from 8 a.m. until 6 p.m. Please call (212) 312-5179 on weekdays between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m. to schedule your screening mammogram appointment for that day. Most insurance plans will be accepted. In 2010, an estimated 207,000 U.S. women were diagnosed with invasive breast cancer. In 2010, there were more than 2.5 million breast cancer survivors in the U.S.

Dr. Zhanna Fridel and Dr. Vanessa Pena are board certified obstetricians and gynecologists utilizing leading diagnostic and treatment methodologies across a broad spectrum of women’s health issues. • Normal and High Risk Obstetrical Care • Complete Well Woman Care • Diagnosis and Treatment of Gynecologic Conditions • Laparoscopic Surgery • Osteoporosis Detection and Treatment • Urogynecology (female urology) • Cord Blood Banking • Cervical Cancer Vaccination • Menopausal Management • Contraception

“A mammogram takes ten minutes and can save your life. If problems are found early, new treatments can be most effective.”

Early detection saves lives! For an appointment with Dr. Kempner, please call (646) 588-2578

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40 Worth Street, Suite 402, New York, NY 10013 www.downtownhospital.org WestSideSpirit.com

170 William Street, New York, NY 10038 Telephone: (212) 312-5000 www.downtownwellness.org October 13, 2011

WEST SIDE SPIRIT

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NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that a license, Serial Number Pending for Beer & Wine has been applied for by the undersigned to sell Beer & Wine at retail in a restaurant known as Kami Sushi Express Inc. under the Alcoholic Beverage Control Law at 1047 2nd Ave. New York, NY 10022 for on-premise consumption. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that a license # PENDING for Wine, Beer & Liquor has been applied for by the undersigned to sell Wine, Beer & Liquor in a restaurant under the

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NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that a license, Serial Number Pending for Beer & Wine has been applied for by Tri Tip City LLC d/b/a Tri Tip Grill to sell Beer & Wine at retail in a restaurant under the Alcoholic Beverage Control Law at 87 E. 42nd Street, New York, NY 10017 for on-premise consumption.

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RENOVATION, OPERATION&MAINTENANCE OF A NEWSSTAND, UNION SQUARE, MANHATTAN All bids submitted in response to this RFB must be submitted no later than Monday, October 24, 2011 at 3:00 pm. For more information, contact: Davita Mabourakh, Project Manager, Division of Revenue and Concessions, 830 Fifth Avenue, the Arsenal-Central Park, Room 407, New York, NY 10065 or call (212) 360-3454 or to download the RFB, visit http://www.nyc.gov/parks/businessopportunities and click on the “Concessions Opportunities at Parks” link. Once you have logged in, click on the “download” link that appears adjacent to the RFB’s description. You can also email her at charlotte.hall@parks.nyc.gov.

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Answers at www.sudoku-puzzles.net

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Puzzle www.sudoku-puzzles.net 141422698

WestSideSpirit.com

October 13, 2011

Solution:

WEST SIDE SPIRIT

29


open forum

A Kipling-Sized Hole in My Heart

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Tom Allon tallon@manhattanmedia.com CFO/COO Joanne Harras jharras@manhattanmedia.com grOuP PuBLisHer Alex Schweitzer aschweitzer@manhattanmedia.com direCtOr OF interaCtive Marketing and digitaL strategy Jay Gissen jgissen@manhattanmedia.com

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30

• w e s t s i d e spirit

By Jeff Nichols I am a Hungerford; yes, I wince when I volunteer that this is my middle name, but I feel I must to make a point. Only a Hungerford who lives on Park Avenue (qualifier: I took over the rent-controlled apartment from my mother and share it with a 52-year-old Sleepeezee mattress salesman) would have a complete (26 volumes) signed collection of Rudyard Kipling’s works (Bombay edition, leather bound) accumulating dust on a shelf. I had only a vague notion of who Kipling was and it was mostly negative: an imperialist and racist famous for stating that educating third-world countries was “the white man’s burden.” So I certainly did not cherish the collection. In fact, I’ve always been slightly embarrassed by being a WASP (imperialism, elitism, George W. Bush to name a few), so when my mom told me I could sell the collection she had left behind, I jumped at the chance. The whole experience took only a day, but I can say now that selling books that you inherited is demoralizing, while impulsively selling them for one-tenth of their value is downright gut-wrenching. The guy who showed up from WEBUYrareBookS4cash.com was good—real good. I instantly wanted him to like me, that’s how good he was. I knew I could probably get more money, but I wanted this cool, sleek chap to get the business. As he surveyed the rare books, punching relevant numbers and dates into his iPhone, I mused. Maybe we could become friends and he would invite me to literary events around town? Granted, I was also desperate for money. I needed to get my cell phone turned on again. So, in the end, I took $1,900 for the complete Kipling set. Cash can be so seductive. As soon as the door shut behind the salesman, who, within two minutes of meeting me had the books bundled safely in bubble wrap, the storm clouds of regret started rolling in. What had I done? When my mother had suggested I sell the books, I thought only of quick cash! I had once picked up and read part of one volume, Tales From the Hills, and found it depressing. The story, as I recall, is about an imperialist Brit who never returned to India for his Indian bride as he had promised he would after she nursed him back to health. But now I longed for Kipling.

October 13, 2011

The sentimental value of the books had never registered, but with the haggler gone and the initial thrill of easy money dissipating, I was deflated and left with remorse. I had just sold a part of English history, possibly a priceless collection, to pay off a cell phone bill! If I may mount a meager self-defense, I had done some due diligence before the salesman came over and undertaken a superficial Google search for the value of the collection. But I failed to include one critical word: “Bombay.” I saw what looked like a similar collection going for $4,000, signed, but the books were not as rare as the Bombay collection. I did come upon an auction house in Texas that had sold four of the books from the Bombay

After I had counted the $1,900 and he had left, I did another search—this time with the word Bombay in it—and saw my exact collection going for $23,000! I literally felt like falling on a knife. collection for $7,000. Using this as leverage with the salesman, I ultimately got more than he had planned to fork over, but for him my information was a mere bump in the road. “Yes, but they look like the 15-inch edition, the bindings look tighter, you never know what will happen at auction,” etc. (true). The day before, I had also lugged three of the volumes, including the one signed by Kipling, to Bauman, the high-end rare book buyer on Madison Avenue, where I was told they had sold a similar collection for $8,000. They said my signed volume was in relatively bad shape and needed $500 worth of work on the binding. Either way, I would have to leave one book with them and come back and talk to the final decision-maker. Yes, a pleasant academic Brit added, they were indeed looking for a Bombay collection, their last had sold for $8,000, but of course, they could not pay that price. Still, this was encouraging information. I figured I could get $3,500 from the good folks at Bauman. I was about to leave the book when I remembered I had an appointment with the WEBUYrarebooks4cash.com guy, so I told her I had to shop it around a bit.

The next day, as I was pushing the sales guy out the door after he had doubled his initial offer of $600, his parting words were, “Yes, you might get $2,000 but you know the big retailers will make you pay taxes on that money!” I did some quick figuring in my head and let him slither back through the door. The rest is history. After I had counted the $1,900 and he had left, I did another search—this time with the word Bombay in it—and saw my exact collection going for $23,000! I literally felt like falling on a knife. Other collections were more modestly priced at $16,000 and $18,000. It was a small relief to see a similar set for $6,000 on eBay, but they were not leather bound. In the following days and weeks, my depression worsened. I romanticized; I had a very clear image of browsing the wonderful Jungle Books (among Kipling’s most famous) with my grandchildren (at the moment I’m 46 and have no kids). I had a picture in my mind of the books prominently displayed in a big red room with mahogany shelves. Perhaps we would call it the “Kipling room,” tucked inside a wonderful. warm townhouse. We might have “Kipling nights” or “Kipling parties.” For a spell I became obsessed with Kipling. I read everything I could about the man. He was an impressive writer, remarkably prolific—a literary titan— and he did capture an era. In a time when there was no video or TV, he brought India (then under colonial rule) to the British through books, not iPhones. Pathetically, I read one of his most famous novels, Kim, online next to the empty bookshelf that used to store his dust-covered collection. Some advice: If you have rare books (and by the way, don’t mistake old for rare; most old books are just that—old) and need/want to sell them, that’s fine. But for Christ’s sake, they have been sitting there for years—take a month and have fun getting different offers and finding out what they are worth. If they are first editions from a distinguished author, you have the power; someone wants those books no matter how bad the recession is. Cherish this fact. First edition signed books do not depreciate. Jeff Nichols’s memoir, TrainWreck, was made into a film. He can be reached at www.Jeff-nichols.com N ew s YO U Li V e B Y


Dewing Things BeTTer

Learning When to Repent Our ageist society rears its ugly head again and again By Bette Dewing If my Yom Kippur column had to be bumped from the last issue, I’m glad it enabled more apartment building workers space to be honored, because we tenants often take their services, which are so indispensable to everyday life, for granted. Here’s a radical and daring idea. To tell one another (very tactfully) what the other ought to repent for. It can be right helpful for each of us to recognize our faults, and the scriptures do claim: “Better the sharp reproof than the love that will not speak.” Now, where’s Dr Ernest Campbell’s great related sermon—oops, I mean essay about “speaking the truth in love,” not the in spite kind often found in cyberspace. Repent that! We’d all be better off believing, as doorman Jose Temprano does, that “a church or temple is the best place to lose a wallet because people there are usually

honest.” This was said after I attended the Epiphany Church on York Avenue’s annual Blessing of the Animals service and left feeling hopeful at the frequent smiles exchanged—thanks to the doggie presence. I didn’t even know my wallet was missing until the minister telephoned later to say it had been found on the church floor. Although a frequent critic of religious groups (i.e., too few smiles exchanged and age groups segregated with the younger ones favored), I do so believe in the inestimable good that faith can do. Indeed, I behave better when in touch with repentance, atonement and “love one another” ideas. And I worry a lot about society’s waning interest in faith—even on the High Holy Days. Consider that Andy Rooney might not have said he “feared dying—a lot” in his final 60 Minutes appearance if he’d had some of that faith. As for his “hating

old age,” there’d be less to hate if he’d denounce society’s aversion to growing and being old—and “looking it,” above all in the custom and view-shaping media where older men patch or dye their hair and women must be model-pretty. It would sure help to hear more about Rooney’s large family as a natural support system, not only in old age! But who will take Rooney’s place? Well, I’m available, but my long crusade against ageism and age apartheid may over- or disqualify me. But with real repentance, CBS would want someone who needs a cane and maybe a walker or wheelchair in the future. Someone who needs a hearing aid (make them affordable!) and several new teeth (make them affordable!) and looks their age! And they won’t have to mind an elder social critic demanding “Full speed back to G-rated TV fare!” Or who is gung-ho for low-speed, safe traffic conditions and lawful traffic behaviors you never see on the tube.

But for now, dear safety-first walkers who have long lamented safety-last-type bicycling, you must turn out big-time (like two-wheelers do) for Community Board 8’s full board meeting at 6:30 p.m, Wednesday, Oct. 19 at Marymount College, 221 E. 71st St. Urge the board to approve a bike licensing bill. And call Jackson Heights-based State Assemblyman Michael DenDekker (718457-0384), whose aide, David Shoreland, informed CB8’s Transportation Committee meeting of another bill to stem two-wheeled scofflawry. Heedless scootering? Shush—first things first! But a mass repentance by all traffic law-breakers, including the two-footed kind, is long, long overdue. It’s especially needed by the foot-pedaling kind before the invasion of the Bike Share Program’s 10,000 silent fast-movers for any who have the price of the rental—no experience needed. Help! Help! And more help! dewingbetter@aol.com

new york gal

Watch this Fashion Trend Ahead of the curve on sleepwear as streetwear By Lorraine Duffy Merkl I never really thought of my 16-yearold son, Luke, as a fashion bellwether. He looks like every other teen on the Upper East and West sides, with his uniform that consists of T-shirts with logos—from his school’s crest to The Mets to Bob Marley’s face—and a hoodie to complete the above-the-waist ensemble. Below, he alternates between jeans and khakis, when he’s not in his prized possession: a pair of pajama pants. (Contrary to popular belief, they don’t all dress like the dandies on Gossip Girl.) So imagine my surprise when the latest designer fashion trend touting sleepwear as streetwear revealed that Luke is not only chic, he’s ahead of his time. Luke acquired his PJs over a year ago, during a lengthy break between games at a baseball tournament in Mystic, Conn. We, along with my husband Neil and daughter Meg, went browsing in town. Luke isn’t much of a shopper, so I was We st Si d e S p i r it . c o m

taken aback when he led me into a store and showed me a pair of flannel pajama bottoms decorated with lobsters. “Can I get these?” he asked. Because Luke’s always ready with a good joke or a prank, I was wary that I was being “punk’d.” I walked away and over my shoulder yelled, “Oh, stop it.” Then we went to lunch. Luke was unusually pouty during our meal. Thus began the litany of “mom” questions one has to ask to feel as though one is doing her maternal duties: “Do you not like the food? Are you feeling OK?” And because Luke was his team’s catcher, there was the understandable, “Do your knees hurt?” In return, I got the teenage boy’s version of “No, no, a thousand times no”—the eye roll. Afterward, as we walked toward the parking lot, it finally dawned on me. “You were serious about those pants, weren’t you?” And with his

quirky smile that substituted for a “Yes,” we went back to the store. As Luke paid the cashier and her coworker/daughter wrapped them up, the girl made a face at her mother that clearly asked, “He’ll actually wear these?” Her mother shushed her with, “Boys are just…it’s what they do.” While they questioned Luke’s taste, I took an unexpected pride in his silly-looking purchase. (Did I mention that the pants are a very light blue and the lobsters all over them are a very bright red?) I was even uncharacteristically silent when he wanted to wear his new clothing acquisition not just to bed but out and about. Sans embarrassment. He has always acted confident, but this showed me it was more than false bravado. Luke liked what he liked. So when he entered the hotel’s game room to play pool and his teammates met him with a

sarcastic “Nice pants,” he shook them off, the way his pitchers often do to his signals. Each time he gets a perplexed or disdainful look from a fellow New Yorker, particularly on the subway, he just smiles and shrugs. We all got a good laugh in Montauk when a passerby actually did a double take. Now though, with everyone readying to jump on the night-clothes-for-day bandwagon, he’ll not want to be seen as one of the crowd and will probably delete from his wardrobe the “lobsters,” as they came to be known in our house. And believe it or not, I will miss them, because for me, they have become a symbol of his self-assurance. I hope Luke always wears his confidence the way he wore those pants. Lorraine Duffy Merkl’s debut novel Fat Chick, from The Vineyard Press, is available at amazon.com and barnesandnoble.com.

October 13, 2011

• WeS t S id e S p ir it

31


WHEN IT COMES TO RETHINKING EDUCATION, EIGHT HEADS ARE BETTER THAN ONE.

MEET THE AVENUES EDUCATIONAL LEADERSHIP.

Benno Schmidt Chairman Former President of Yale

Gardner Dunnan Academic Dean & Division Head: Upper School Former Headmaster, The Dalton School

Tyler Tingley Co-Head of School Former Head of Phillips Exeter Academy

Robert “Skip” Mattoon Co-Head of School Former Head of The Hotchkiss School

Sarah Bayne Director of Educational Design Former Head of Hillbrook School

Nancy Schulman Division Head: Early Learning Center Former Director, 92nd Street Y Nursery School

Libby Hixson Division Head: Lower School Former Middle School Head, The Dalton School

Tom Bonnell Division Head: Middle School Former Associate Head of School and Middle School Head, The Dalton School

WWW.AVENUES.ORG TO MEET THE LEADERSHIP TEAM AT OUR UPCOMING INFORMATION EVENTS, VISIT AVENUES.ORG OR CALL 212.935.5000.

ManhattanMedia_Pix.indd 1 E 32 • WEST SID

SPIRIT

October 13, 2011

10/10/11 AMY NEWS YOU L I V10:06 E B

West Side Spirit October 13, 2011  

The October 13, 2011 issue of West Side Spirit. The West Side Spirit, published weekly, is chock full of information—from hard news to human...

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