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WILDLIFE SPOTTING WE TEAMED UP WITH TALENTED ILLUSTRATOR TODD TELANDER AND COLORADO PARKS AND WILDLIFE TO TELL YOU WHAT ANIMALS YOU MIGHT BE ABLE TO SPOT THIS WINTER

TODD TELANDER While earning degrees in Environmental Studies and Biology, Todd Telander discovered he was happiest when his coursework took him out of the classroom, particularly when he was sketching birds, plants and insects as part of his journal. Telander recognized his calling as a science illustrator after enrolling in a natural science illustration program at his university. His freelance work took off, eventually landing him work with clients on a national and international level. Telander provided highly-rendered and scientifically-accurate ink drawings and paintings for the likes of museums, aquariums, zoos, field guides and other books.

WHITE-TAILED PTARMIGAN Lagopus leucurus This small ptarmigan goes through a dramatic molt each year to remain camouflaged in every season. Well adapted feet for walking, the completely feathered feet and toes of ptarmigans act as snowshoes and insulation for walking in snowy conditions. Colorado is the most southern portion of the range and they can be found in rocky and tundra areas of the mountains.

ELK Cervus canadensis Male elk grow and shed their antlers each year, while females and juvenile animals do not have antlers. Elk are a light brown with a distinctly darker brown neck and head. The best time to spot elk is at dawn and dusk, however, keeping a respectful distance will ensure you and the animal stay safe.

After moving to Boulder, Telander explored impressionism, surrealism and abstraction, noting artists such as Georgia O’Keefe, Claude Monet and Mark Rothko as influences. He also spent time in Denver at the Art Student League where he first explored figure drawing and plein air painting. Telander and his wife now operate The Telander Gallery in downtown Walla Walla, Washington. Telander paints in his home studio, teaches classical painting to community members and offers landscape-painting workshops. In addition to selling existing paintings, he regularly takes on commissions.

MOUNTAIN GOAT Oreamnos americanus Covered in white fur with short black horns, mountain goats blend into the rocky slopes of mountaintops perfectly and usually do not venture below tree line. A native species of Colorado, the Mountain goat was reintroduced to parts of the Collegiate Peaks, Gore Range, San Juan Mountains and West Elk Mountains in the 1950’s-1970’s.

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GREAT HORNED OWL Bubo virginianus The Great Horned Owl is one of the most widespread owls, found throughout North America in wooded areas. This large nocturnal predator sits on perches and hunts for mammals as large as rabbits using its excellent night-vision, hearing and sharp talons to catch its prey.

Profile for West of 105 magazine

West of 105 Magazine, Winter 2018 - 2019, Issue 2