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Westminster THE BILL AND VIEVE GORE SCHOOL OF BUSINESS: PAST, PRESENT, AND FUTURE

REVIEW

EDUCATION IN ACTION: MEET FIVE FIRSTGENERATION GRADUATES

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Dean JinWang Celebrates The Bill & Vieve Gore School of Business: Past, Present & Future

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SECRET GARDEN IN SUGAR HOUSE

TIPS AND TRICKS FROM THE MASTERMINDS OF WESTMINSTER’S LANDSCAPE

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ALUMNI NEWS

JOE MUSCOLINO AND HIS BAND ARE EVERYWHERE

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YEARS OF THE GORE LEGACY AT WESTMINSTER

THE BILL & VIEVE GORE SCHOOL OF BUSINESS: PAST, PRESENT & FUTURE P A G E 24


WESTMINSTER PLAYERS by Marsha Norman

2013 | 2014 S E A S O N

Agatha Christie’s superlative 1930s-era sleight-of-hand murder mystery And Then There Were None kicks

off the new theater season on October 17 followed by one woman’s heartrending struggle to start a new life against all odds in Getting Out by Marsha Norman on November 14. AGATHA CHRISTIE® And Then There Were None © 1944, 1946, renewed 1971, 1974 Agatha Christie Limited. All rights reserved.

Anton

Chekhov’s

classic

masterpiece Three Sisters about a provincial Russian family living in a world of what might have been hits the main stage on March by Anton Chekhov

13, 2014, and the season ends on a spirited note with the popular student-directed One-Act Festival on April 3.

For more information, call 801.832.2457.

VISIT WESTMINSTERCOLLEGE.EDU/CULTURALEVENTS FOR DETAILS OR CALL 801.832.2457. FOR WESTMINSTER DISABILITY ACCOMMODATIONS, CONTACT THE SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES AT 801.832.2300 FIVE BUSINESS DAYS PRIOR TO THE EVENT.


C O N N E C T I N G YO U T O T H E W E S T M I N S T E R C O M M U N I T Y

Westminster REVIEW

F A L L

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THE COMMONS

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THE LEGEND CONTINUES by Jeremy Pugh and Robin Boon

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Opening Shot

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The Sporting Life

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Strategic Plan

10 Fulbright Scholars 12 Commencement 2013 14 News & Notes

DEPARTMENTS

How a basement lab became a

16 Good Works

global powerhouse of products,

18 Faces

culture, and eventually, school of business here at Westminster.

P A G E

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I’M FIRST by Johanna Snow and Joanna Pham (’13) portraits by Adam Finkle From the president to a non-

22 Travel 44 Gifts in Action

ALUMNI NEWS 48 Westminster’s Music Man 50 Volunteer of the Year 52 The Man in the Orange Hat 54 Save the Date 59 In Memoriam 60 Alumni Events

traditional student, being “first” in your family to graduate from college is something to be proud of.

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THE GREEN GROUNDS OF WESTMINSTER

ON THE COVER

by Jessica Smith (’14) portraits by Adam Finkle Our master gardeners create a welcoming haven…and share their secrets with us.

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WESTMINSTER REVIEW

Dean Jin Wang photographed at The Bill and Vieve Gore School of Business by Chris Jameson


President Dr. Brian Levin-Stankevich

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Vice President of Advancement Steve Morgan Executive Director of Integrated Marketing Communications Sheila Yorkin Managing Editor Robin Boon Consulting Editor Jeremy Pugh Associate Editor Jessica Smith (’14) Art Direction Heidi Larsen, foodiecrush.com Photography Tom Cronin Adam Finkle Chris Jameson John McCarthy Contributors Lisa Actor Robin Boon Krista DeAngelis Joshua Fisher Michelle Barber Lynakis (MPC ’06) Audrey Maynard (’03) Sara McCaskey (’14) Joanna Pham (’13) Jeremy Pugh Jessica Smith (’14) Johanna Snow Westminster College Board of Trustees Kim T. Adamson* Hamid Adib** Jeanne Ambruster** Gretchen Anderson, Vice Chair Martha Felt Barton* Judith Billings Michael Bills* Preston Chiaro James R. Clark Curt P. Crowther** Thomas A. Ellison, Chair Bing L. Fang* Thomas Fey Robert J. Frankenberg Robert Garda Clark P Giles Susan Glasmann Hank Hemingway Colleen Kearns McCann* Peter D. Meldrum O. Wood Moyle IV* Jeffrey R. Nelson* William Orchow Catherine Putnam-Netto Robert Rendon Patricia Richards Alvin Richer* David E. Simmons Greg Winegardner

CH RIS JAMESON

*ALUMN I **PAR ENT Give us your feedback The editors of the Review would like your feedback. Let us know what you like or what misses the mark. Please direct your comments to Westminster Review Office of Communications Westminster College 1840 South 1300 East Salt Lake City, UT 84105 review@westminstercollege.edu

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t seems impossible that a year has gone by since I wrote my first Review letter to you—a year filled with excitement and discovery. The students, alumni, faculty, and staff who make Westminster one of the “Best Colleges to Work For” energize me every day. My involvement with the Chamber of Commerce, the Economic Development Corporation of Utah, and the Utah Technology Council gives me greater perspective on our challenge to create the future leaders and the opportunities for our graduates right here in Utah. One of the great joys of the presidency is to witness the culmination of the hard work of our faculty and students in developing their talents to the fullest and to watch those talents displayed through events and performances. And, wow, do we have great students. Many of our students are first-generation college students—the first in their family history to attend college. First-Generation College Students. Please take a moment to look at an article that focuses on first-generation students. I was fortunate to be the first to attend college in my family and to have parents who always made education a priority. For too many students, the hurdles are unattainably high, but we are committed to serving motivated learners through the generous scholarship support we receive from our alumni and friends. Strategic Plan. Over the past year, we have embarked on a strategic planning process, and you will see an article that outlines our progress. I feel passionate about our direc-

tion, and I look forward to our next update, where I can fully debut our plan, our priorities, and our aspirations. I often refer to the Franciscan definition of labor: “to give example and to serve.” I believe Westminster will live that definition— be even greater exemplars of a learning environment grounded in the outcomes of liberal arts education, while preparing students for life and profession. We also have programs that employ competency-based assessment, and they are built on the same educational philosophy: a very strong reliance on social and intellectual relationships through mentoring and coaching. We welcome diverse learners in a campusbased environment, while we also amass the best of tradition and innovation to benefit students beyond our campus boundaries. We will demonstrate that Westminster graduates acquire the skills and attributes for success, that access to Westminster can be broadened, and that this education can be affordable—all while preserving our principles. Thank you and enjoy this issue of the Westminster Review. Sincerely, Brian Levin-Stankevich W EST MIN ST ER C OL L E GE P RES ID ENT

WESTMINSTER REVIEW

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commons

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KEEPING UP WITH WHAT WESTMINSTER ALUMNI HAVE IN COMMON

THE CLASS OF 2017 UNLEASHED Westminster welcomed the Class of 2017 as more than 465 students begin their first day of classes on August 21, 2013. Hailing from more than 15 countries and 33 states, this year’s freshman class comes from as far as Kazakhstan to as close as Salt Lake. Several new programs are new this year, including the college’s new RN to BS program (Registered Nurse to Bachelor of Science in Nursing), a geology major, the Master of Strategic Communication program, and the Outdoor Leadership Minor. 2013 FRESHMAN PROFILE

In terms of academic accomplishment, this year’s freshman class possesses an average high school grade point average of 3.54, well above the national average for high school seniors. Demographic

215 or 46% are male 252 or 54% are female 78 or 16% are US students of color 24 or 5% are international/ non-resident students   Average GPA is 3.54 Average ACT is 24.7 Geographic Information UTAH

246 or 53% 221 or 47%

OUT-OF-STATE

33 states and 15 countries are represented including:

AK, AL, AZ, CA, CO, CT, DC, GA, HI, IA, ID, IL, MA, ME, MD, MN, MS MT, NV, NH, NJ, NM, NY, OH, OR, PA, TN, TX, UT, VT, VA, WA, WY COUNTRIES Afghanistan, Cambodia, China, Ecuador, Germany, India, Hong Kong, Kazakhstan, Korea, Nepal, Norway, Russia, Saudi-Arabia, Sweden, and Vietnam   STATES

Financial Aid Awarded

96% of incoming freshman class received a financial aid award Average financial aid award is $23,632 (This amount includes funding received from all sources, such as scholarship, work, federal loans, and grants)

  Total College Enrollment UNDERGRADUATE GRADUATE

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810

2,309


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SPORTS ROUND-UP Griffins’ Success Continues

MEN’S BASKETBALL

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The Westminster men’s basketball team recorded the team’s 11th straight season with at least 20 wins, as they posted a 21–8 mark this season. The Griffins started the year by winning 12 of the first 13 games they played and went 11–2 at home during the season. They finished fourth in the Frontier Conference at 9–6, but were upset in the first round of the conference tournament by fifthseeded Rocky Mountain.

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WOMEN’S BASKETBALL

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The 2012–13 season was the most successful season in school history for the Westminster women’s basketball team. They finished the season at 29–4, setting the record for most wins in a season, while winning a fifth-straight Frontier Conference regular season title and the school’s first Frontier Conference Tournament championship. The Griffins reached the quarterfinals of the NAIA Women’s Basketball National Championships for just the second time in school history and finished the year with a No. 7 ranking in the NAIA Coaches’ Poll.

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GOLF

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The Westminster golf team had one of the most successful years in school history. The Griffin men finished second in the Frontier Conference final standings, finishing six strokes behind Lewis– Clark State for the title. The women recorded a third-place finish in the Frontier Conference. Dan Jensen (’13) won the men’s individual title after shooting 643 over the nine rounds during league tournaments and was named the Frontier Conference Player of the Year for a second-straight year.

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1. ALEX DRECKSEL (’13) 2. NICOLE YAZZIE (’13) 3. DANE JENSEN (’13) 4. MATT LAMBOURNE (’13) 5. MAGGIE HERRNECKAR (’15) 6. JUSTINE KUEFFNER (’15)

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DAN JENSEN’S (’13) final position in the Frontier Conference men’s golf standings. Jensen was named the Frontier Conference player of the year for a second straight season.

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The number of Griffins to qualify for the NAIA Outdoor Track & Field National Championships. OLIVER LANGE (’13) made the field for the marathon, while JUSTINE KUEFFNER (’15) qualified in the Heptathlon.

2nd

The final finish for the MEN’S LACROSSE TEAM as they went 17–6 on the year before losing in the MCLA Division II Championship Game.

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The number of NABC HONORS COURT RECIPIENTS from the men’s basketball team to lead the nation. The Honors Court includes student-athletes that play for teams that are members of NCAA Division I, II, III, or NAIA Division I or II institution.


KEY FALL MATCHUPS 8

Tuesday, August 20 – Men’s and Women’s soccer kick

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off the new season with a doubleheader against Jamestown at Dumke Field. Men at 1:30 pm with the women at 6:30 pm.

Friday, August 23 – Women’s volleyball opens the

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WOMEN’S VOLLEYBALL The Westminster women’s volleyball team took a step forward in 2012, finishing at 14–13 for the team’s first winning season since 2007. The Griffins started the season by winning seven of the first eight matches they played, including a 3–0 record to win the Westminster Tournament of Champions. Ashley Marchant (’13) was named First Team All-Frontier Conference and Emily Atkinson was named to the second team.

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MEN’S LACROSSE

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Playing in Division II of the MCLA for the final season, the Westminster men’s lacrosse team put together one of the best seasons in school history. The Griffins finished the year at 17–6, establishing a new school record for wins during a season. They won a third-straight RMLC championship before advancing to the championship game of the MCLA National Championships for just the second time in history. They ended the year ranked No. 2 in the MCLA Coaches’ Poll after spending most of the season in that position.

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WOMEN’S LACROSSE

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The Westminster women’s lacrosse team made the move to Division I of the WCLA in 2013. The Griffins responded by going 11–5 during the season and spending most of the season ranked in the WCLA top 15 and finished with a No. 15 ranking in the final poll. They claimed the team’s first win over a DI ranked opponent when they defeated No. 11 Colorado, 14–12, on March 17.

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TRACK & FIELD Oliver Lange (’14) made Westminster history this year when he was named NAIA All-American in the Outdoor Track & Field National Championships after placing sixth in the marathon with a school-record time of 2:31:01.

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The number of DAKTRONICS–NAIA Scholar-Athletes from Westminster in the sports of men’s basketball, women’s basketball, golf, and track & field.

Saturday, August 31 – The 2013 cross country season

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begins with the Griffins traveling to Logan, Utah, for the Utah State Open.

Friday, September 20 – Women’s Soccer faces rival College of Idaho at Dumke Field at 5:30 pm.

Saturday, September 21 – Men’s soccer welcomes Frontier Conference rival Great Falls to Dumke Field at 2:00 pm.

Sunday, September 29 – Men’s soccer hosts Cal State

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San Marcos at 12:30 pm at Dumke Field on Senior Day.

Saturday, October 12 – Frontier Conference power 12

Lewis-Clark State invades the Behnken Field House for a 2:00 pm Women’s volleyball match.

Sunday, October 20 – Defending Frontier Conference 20

Women’s soccer champion Rocky Mountain visits Dumke Field for a 10:00 am contest.

Saturday, October 26 – Women’s volleyball welcomes 26

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2012 NAIA National Championship qualifier Carroll to SLC for a 2:00 pm match.

Sunday, October 27 – Women’s soccer hosts Carroll on Senior Day at Dumke Field with a 2:00 pm kickoff.

Wednesday, October 30 – The Women’s basketball 30

team begins the new season with a 7:00 pm game versus University of Mary in the Behnken Field House.

Friday, November 1 – Men’s basketball tips off the

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The final ranking of the WOMEN’S LACROSSE TEAM after completing an 11–5 season in the team’s first as a member of the WCLA Division I.

Westminster Tournament of Champions with matches against Hope International and Olivet Nazarene. The event continues on Saturday as the Griffins play Cornerstone and Dixie State.

2013–14 home slate with a 7:00 pm game against Azusa Pacific in the Behnken Field House.

Saturday, November 9 – Defending NAIA Women’s

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basketball national champion Westmont comes to town for a 7:00 pm game with the Griffins in the Behnken Field House.

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G O I N G FO RWA R D

STRATEGY SESSION The Westminster Community Works Together To Plan the Future

Members from the Westminster community—faculty, staff, adminstration, alumni, students, and neighbors—gathered in a large town hall meeting to kick off the creation of a new Strategic Plan for the college. From that first meeting, ideas, ideas, and more ideas are being refined, reviewed, and recommended, and we want you to join the conversation.

VISION S TAT E M E N T

TOWN HALL MEETING

RESULTS OF TOWN HALL MEETING I

TOWN HALL MEETING II

RESULTS OF TOWN HALL MEETING II

Westminster will use the

power of learning relationships to reorient itself to a new educational environment. Our commitment

to those relationships will

improve the student experience, deepen student learning, define policies, frame marketing, and shape

decisions about budget, ex-

penditures, and innovation. Most importantly, it will

use learning relationships

to create more vibrant, just, and successful lives for its

students—who will, in turn, make those same contributions to their families, friends, neighborhoods,

communities, and world.

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Strategic Planning The strategic planning process began with a town hall meeting where the Westminster community established a common vision for the next 10 years. Small groups spread out across campus and met as separate groups, but all were connected by technology. The groups discussed the college’s vision and the comments became a draft vision statement, which was reviewed and edited by all constituents. The vision statement then guided discussions about where the college should focus to be successful in the next decade.

We’ve Got Big Ideas The first meeting generated 695 ideas for improving the college and moving it toward our common vision for the future. 

Institutional priorities • Identity • Community • Academics & Experience • Resources • Our Story • Recruitment • Success • Alumni

The second Town Hall meeting provided the Westminster community with a chance to weigh in on what Westminster’s priorities should be, and to volunteer to help craft goals in those priority areas.

Sticky Notes The Westminster community visited multiple classrooms, each one dedicated to one of the institutional priorities. They wrote priorityspecific ideas on sticky notes and placed them on a graph, based on the ease of implementation and the impact on the college. The notes were then digitally recreated online, and members of the Westminster community voted and commented on each idea. Each point on the graph increased in size for each vote received, making it easy to visually determine priorities.


MEET THE WORK GROUPS

WORK GROUP 1

WORK GROUP 2

WORK GROUP 3

WORK GROUP 4

WORK GROUP 5

WORK GROUP 6

Identity

The Westminster

Academic

Optimizing

Marketing—

Recruitment,

Who are we, and what makes us distinct? Define clearly our core identity, educational philosophy, and positioning platform for the future.

Community—

Programs and

our Resources

How do we

Student Success,

Institutional

the Westminster

tell our story?

and Alumni

Morale and

Experience. 

Assess the proper mix of programs, price, and delivery options with greater clarity of purpose, including vision, and with an eye toward focus and a more purposeful program mix in the future.

Given the complexity and uniqueness of the marketplace, we must recommit to a stronger brand promise, living out the vision, positioning, and institutional identity with greater clarity and purpose.

Engagement

Unity.

Westminster must re-evaluate the financial model under which assumptions are based. The future program mix and demand should elicit agreement on the right size institution, revenue model, and cost structure for the future.

DRAFT PLAN

Stakeholders must be inspired for the next chapter in Westminster’s history. Institutional morale and unity are essential for this next step.

Join the Conversation A full draft of the Strategic Plan is posted on the strategic planning website and will be open to feedback from the Westminster community: http://strategicplanning.westminstercollege.edu.

STILL TO COME

We must focus on the proper student recruitment and retention models and pipelines for the future, given the potential for revamped program, price, and delivery mixes.

More Input, More Input, and More Input The Westminster community will have opportunities to provide feedback on a draft of the plan. The plan will then be revised for formal approval processes on campus and with the Board of Trustees.

View our timeline at http://strategicplanning.westminstercollege.edu/timeline.

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THE FULBRIGHT PROGRAM Everything you needed to know BY KRISTA DEANGELIS CASSIDY JONES, FIRST RECIPIENT OF THE FULBRIGHT ENGLISH TEACHING ASSISTANTSHIP

C

assidy jones (’11) will forever feel

connected to the country of Turkey. As Westminster’s first recipient of the Fulbright English Teaching Assistantship (ETA) in 2011, Jones was able to turn her passion for travel, teaching, and the Muslim culture into a reality—all on the US government’s dime. In the summer of 2011, Jones journeyed to Gazintep, Turkey, where she immersed herself in the Turkish culture and taught first-year intensive English to Turkish and international students at the local university for 10 months. “Going from being a student to teacher is one of the scariest things I’ve ever done,” she said. “But I grew to love it.” Through the Fulbright US Student Program, all of Jones’ travel and living expenses were paid for. The program serves as the US’s flagship interna-

tional educational exchange program sponsored by the US government. The program offers opportunities for students and young professionals to undertake international graduate study, advanced research, university teaching, and primary and secondary school teaching worldwide. Due to the prestige of the program, applying for a Fulbright grant can be an intimidating process. However, Jones believes Westminster applicants can be very competitive if they start early. “I think people from this area really need to apply more, and I believe the Intermountain West is hugely underrepresented,” she said. Once students are serious about pursuing the grant, they should meet with Tim Dolan, Westminster’s coordinator for national fellowships, and work to pick the right kinds of activities that would make them competitive, she added. Finding a mentor was really helpful as well.

“Going from being a student to teacher is one of the scariest things I’ve ever done,” she said. “But I grew to love it.”

DID YOU KNOW THAT YOU DON’T HAVE TO HAVE A PHD TO PARTICIPATE IN A FULBRIGHT PROGRAM?

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Largest US Exchange Program

TYPES OF FULBRIGHT GRANTS T O A P P LY, V I S I T HTTP S ://US .F UL BRI GHTONL I NE .OR G

STUDY/RESEARCH

FULBRIGHT PUBLIC POLICY FELLOWSHIPS

THE FULBRIGHT US STUDENT

The study/research grant category includes projects in both academic and arts fields. The study/research grants are available in approximately 140 countries. Special grant opportunities are available in the fields of business, journalism, sciences, and public health.

This fellowship allows fellows to serve in professional placements in foreign government ministries or institutions and to gain hands-on public sector experience in participating foreign countries, while simultaneously carrying out an academic study/ research project.

PROGRAM is the largest US ex-

ENGLISH TEACHING ASSISTANTSHIP

TRAVEL GRANTS

An English Teaching Assistantship (ETA) places a Fulbrighter in a classroom abroad to provide assistance to teachers of English to non-native English-speakers.

Travel grants are available only to Germany, Hungary, and Italy and are designed to supplement an award from any source that does not provide for international travel or to supplement a student’s own funds for study/research.

Program awards approximately 1,900 grants annually in all fields of study.

SUPPLEMENTAL GRANT

Fulbright US student alumni include ambassadors, members of Congress, judges, heads of corporations, university presidents, journalists, artists, professors, and teachers.

FULBRIGHT-MTVU AWARDS

Fulbright-mtvU Awards are available to all countries where there is an active Fulbright US Student Program. Projects center on research on an aspect of international musical culture and should focus on contemporary or popular music as a cultural force for expression.

Critical Language Enhancement Award. The CLEA provides a supplement for grantees to receive up to 6 months of intensive language study in addition to their research or study grants.

change program offering opportunities for students and young professionals to undertake international graduate study, advanced research, university teaching, and primary and secondary school teaching worldwide.

Program operates in more than 140 countries worldwide.

DR. BRIAN A FULBRIGHT FELLOW Did you know our own “DR. BRIAN” served as a Fulbright Fellow at St. Petersburg State University in Moscow, Russia, from August 1977–June 1978? Levin-Stankevich received a Fulbright Doctoral Dissertation/ Young Faculty Program grant that enabled him to pursue research for his doctoral dissertation on “Cassation, Judicial Interpretation and the Development of Civil and DR. BRIAN AND WIFE, DEBI, ADAPTING TO THE ENVIRONS

Criminal Law in Russia, 1864–1917.”

STUDENTS CAN STUDY ABROAD FOR ONE ACADEMIC YEAR, JUST LIKE THEIR PROFS HAVE DONE. WESTMINSTER REVIEW

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THOMAS ELLISON AND DR. BRIAN APPLAUD AS ROBERT REDFORD RECEIVES HIS HONORARY DEGREE.

DR. BRIAN AND THE SUNDANCE KID Robert Redford Given Honorary Degree at Commencement 2013 By Sara McCaskey (’14)

COMMENCEMENT IS an exciting time. Each year, soon-

to-be graduates line up, neatly clad in caps and gowns, anxiously awaiting their passage into life after college. Families wait eagerly to watch their sons, daughters, nieces, and nephews cross the stage to collect their diplomas. But at this year’s commencement, there was a whole new type of excitement in the air. Not only was it the first year Dr. Brian Levin-Stankevich would honor the achievements of Westminster students, but none other than Robert Redford, Utah’s very own “Sundance Kid,” was going to help him do it. Dr. Brian began his first Westminster commencement ceremony by congratulating the 946 students from 37 different states and 29 foreign countries who would be receiving degrees as part of Westminster’s Class of 2013. “Each one of our graduates has a story of his or her own,” he stated, “…one that began long before their arrival and will continue after they leave here today.” Robert Redford, actor, director, and philan-

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thropist, urged the graduating class to take risks in pursing their own individual passions. But his moments on the stage also served as an apology. “Here you are, going forward, stepping into the world, and I’m sorry to say that I think we’ve done a piss-poor job of leaving you all with something to work with,” he said, “and I apologize for that.” But he did not see the current condition of the world as a reason to lose hope. In fact, quite the opposite: “This new generation that’s coming forward, I can’t tell you how excited I am,” he stated, “because I think that you want the reins. And what you’re basically saying is give us the reins, don’t tell us what you did or didn’t do, don’t give us examples from the past, don’t bother us with that, just give us the reins and please, step aside.” After a brief pause, Redford continued on saying, “I’m happy to do that on your behalf, and I give you all the encouragement in the world to grab those reins and run with them.”

THIS PAGE: “ROBERT REDFORD, DOCTOR OF ARTS AND PUBLIC SERVICE” OPPOSITE PAGE: 1. CAROLYN JENKINS RECEIVES HER HONORARY DOCTORATE. 2. THREE FRIENDS­­—SO PROUD. 3. TOM ELLISON HANDS ROBERT REDFORD HIS NEW DEGREE. 4. FORMER TRUSTEES FRED BALL AND GINGER GIOVALE. 5. SO DELIGHTED! 6. BREANNA BODGEN BEAMING. 7. MICHAEL TOOMEY, PRESIDENT’S LEADERSHIP AWARDEE. 8. INTERNATIONAL MBA GRADS FROM CHINA. 9. ROBIN SMITH, NEISEN R. BANK MEMORIAL AWARDEE. 10. TWO MBA GRADS COULDN’T BE HAPPIER. 11. STUDENT SPEAKER, CONSTANCE DEIANNI, DISPLAYS THAT INSPIRATIONAL PAPER. 12. ROBERT REDFORD INSPIRES US ALL. 13. KACEY GORRINGE RELISHES THE MOMENT. 14. A MOMENT OF LEVITY PROVIDED BY THE PRESENTERS.

FRANCIE AUFDEMORTE

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N EWS & N OT ES

JOT TING DOWN Westminster is a WWII Veteran, a Clever Entrepreneur, and One of the Greenest Colleges

WESTMINSTER

DID YOU KNOW? SAME PLACE/BETTER NAME

WESTMINSTER ALUMNUS WINS $40,000 GRANT TO CREATE JOBS

JASON KNOTT’S ( ’10) company, BreathAdvisor, recently won a $40,000 grant

from the Technology Commercialization & Innovation Program (TCIP). The company, which places law-enforcement-grade breathalyzer kiosks in local bars and restaurants to reduce drunk driving, will use a portion of the grant to create internships for Westminster business and computer science students. TCIP is a state-funded grant program designed to bring university-developed technologies to market, creating jobs for Utahns.

Beverly Taylor Sorenson’s Impact on Westminster

Gene Falkenrath Honored as Alumnus, Veteran

BEVERLY TAYLOR SORENSON’S substantial contributions to Westminster College, both financial and otherwise, have helped shape our liberal arts college. Our community will miss Sorenson, an advocate for the arts and education, and extends genuine thanks to her and her family for the ways they have served Westminster and the children of Utah. Sorenson passed away May 27, 2013.

PRESIDENT BRIAN LEVIN-STANKEVICH presented a certificate to Gene Falkenrath, honoring him as an alumnus of Westminster and for serving our country in World War II. Gene was attending Westminster when the war broke out, and the Air Force was in need of experienced pilots. Having had his pilot’s license since age 16, Gene left Westminster and joined the Air Transport Command.

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Westminster’s Institute for New Enterprise has a new name: the Center for Entrepreneurship! This year, the center helped over 20 students launch companies. Contact Linda Muir, the center’s director, at lmuir@westminstercollege.edu to learn about what the center does for students, and how you can get involved. WESTMINSTER THINKS BIG Last year, Westminster students and staff came together to bring the campus “Westminster Thinks Big.” The event is an annual conference where innovative speakers from the Westminster network present their big ideas in ten-minute, TED-style presentations. The next Thinks Big event will be held on Sept. 27. Visit westminsterthinksbig. wordpress.com to see the speaker lineup! WE PASSED THE BIG EXAM Westminster hosted members of the Northwest Commission on Colleges and Universities (NWCCU) this April for an on-site evaluation to assess whether Westminster should continue to be accredited according to NWCCU criteria. After a period of evaluation and public comment, the college’s accreditation was reaffirmed.


Westminster Class uses Social Media, Crowdfunding to Help Fund Alumna’s Adoption

ANITA BOERIA, instructor for Westminster’s Social Media Marketing class, was planning her class when she heard about adjunct professor Mandy Anger. Mandy, a Westminster alumna, and her husband, Josh, had adopted a little girl, Mia, two years ago. Now they wanted to adopt another child. The couple needed the final $5,500 of adoption costs, and Boeria set her class to the task. Utilizing Gofundme.com, Facebook, Twitter, and Squarespace, six students in the class helped promote the “Mia Wants a Little Brother” campaign and raise funds for the cause. During the semester, they raised $1,000. Check out the campaign at facebook.com/miawantsalittlebrother.

Sibling Legacy of Leadership Continues

AS ONE OF the nation’s top Army ROTC (Reserve Officer Training Corps) cadets, Westminster senior Jake Arthur not only graduated with a bachelor’s degree in biology this year, but followed in his two sisters’ footsteps by being commissioned as a second lieutenant in the U.S. Army through the University of Utah’s ROTC program. Arthur finished in the top five percent of all Army ROTC cadets nationwide, and Lt. Col. Troy Heineman, Utah Army ROTC professor of military science, says that “In addition to living the Army values, he is a scholar, athlete, and leader.”

PRINCETON REVIEW RANKS WESTMINSTER AS ONE OF THE “GREENEST COLLEGES” For the second year in a row, Westminster was chosen for the Princeton Review’s 2013 Guide to 322 Green Colleges. To celebrate, the college’s En-

vironmental Center hosted an event on Earth Day­—complete with the Bicycle Collective’s pedal-powered, smoothie-making bike—and students were invited to measure their “Green Point Average” score. Kerry Case, the center’s director, said that Westminster has worked hard to be a model for sustainability.

Westminster Graduate Student Presents a Latin@ Transgender Photo Exhibit

WESTMINSTER GRADUATE student Rebecca Valverde presented a unique photo exhibit entitled “(Trans*)forming Salt Lake City” at the Broadway Theater this spring. The project included poster-size images and stories of individuals who identified themselves as “transgender” or allies of transgender Latin@s in Salt Lake City. Valverde developed the project for her thesis in the Master of Arts in Community Leadership (MACL) program at Westminster.

Westminster Alumnus Debuts Comic Book Series CHRIS HOFFMAN, a Westminster alumnus, debuted his comic book series, Salt City Strangers, in May. The series features the world’s first all Latter-Day Saint (LDS) superhero team. The heroes, The Gull, Den Mother, Deputy Deseret, and Son of Bigfoot are led by Golden Spike as they battle the unseen forces of darkness in Salt Lake City.

WESTMINSTER’S 2013 MCNAIR GRADUATES ARE SET FOR SUCCESS This year, eight students graduated having completed the McNair Scholars Program: GUADALUPE AGUILERA (University of Utah), DUKE CRUZ (Westminster), YV (CLARK) FRANCIS (Westminster), NICK GAILEY (Westminster), HALI IPAYE (Westminster), FAITH MARTINEZ (Westminster), ROBIN SMITH (Westminster), and DEXTER THOMAS (Westminster). Westminster’s McNair Scholars Program is the only one in the state and serves students at Westminster, the University of Utah, and Salt Lake Community College. For more about the program, visit westminstercollege.edu/mcnair. WESTMINSTER REVIEW

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FACE S OF W ES T MINSTER

)

LISA GENTILE, DEAN OF THE SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES

THE SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES HAS GROWN TO INCLUDE 25 MAJORS, 33 MINORS, AND OVER 100 FACULTY MEMBERS.

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WARM WELCOME Transplanted Dean LISA GENTILE Acclimates to the Intermountain West BY JOHANNA SNOW

W

hen lisa gentile

first came to Salt Lake City a few years ago for a meeting of the American Chemical Society, she was immediately taken with the city and the surrounding snow-covered mountains. Now that she is the new dean of the School of Arts and Sciences at Westminster, she and her family are settling in to their new home in the heart of Sugar House and enthusiastically exploring their surroundings. Before joining the Westminster community, Lisa was the associate dean of Arts and Sciences at the University of Richmond. While in that role, she led their Arts Initiative, supported faculty in their role as academic advisors, and directed the Howard Hughes Medical Institute Science Education Award, which focuses on interdisciplinary approaches to STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) education, with an emphasis on removing barriers that impede persistence and retention for groups traditionally underrepresented in STEM areas. Lisa attended Colgate University as an undergraduate,

where she majored in chemistry. She completed her PhD in biochemistry at Brown University and was a postdoctoral fellow at the University of British Columbia. Passionate about science, Lisa says, “For as long as I can remember, I have loved math and science.” Growing up in a small town in western Massachusetts, she was always fascinated by how things worked. In high school, her chemistry teacher captivated her imagination and challenged her in new ways. Her fate was sealed. Drawn to a community focused on student learning, with progressive faculty and staff, Lisa looks forward to conversations about liberal education, the Garfield School, and the new strategic plan. She is impressed with the range of student scholarship and the commitment of faculty mentors.

Flatbread loaded with veggies fresh from the garden FAVORITE MOVIE: Dead Poets Society CONTINUALLY INSPIRED BY: the time when the stars are beginning to fade and the sun is beginning to rise WISH I HAD TAKEN: Italian 101 CAN’T RESIST:

SINCE 2010, STUDENTS IN THE SCHOOL HAVE INTERNED AT COMPANIES FROM A TO Z (WE’RE ONLY MISSING J, Q, AND Z). WESTMINSTER REVIEW

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FACES O F WE S T MI N S T ER

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BOB SHAW, DEAN OF THE SCHOOL OF EDUCATION

ADVOCATE LEAVES ATREMENDOUS LEGACY BOB SHAW, Dean of the School of Education

B

ob shaw’s years at Westminster have been all

about the students. Named Dean of Education in 2007, Bob has seen over 375 students graduate to become teachers. “What I’ve enjoyed the most,” he said, “is creating opportunities for students to help each other.” He’d never be the one to tell you, but one of the opportunities he’s most proud of creating for education students is the Montessori training program. Westminster’s Institute for Montessori Innovation is the only one of its kind offered through a college or university in the western region. “It fits well with our philosophy here,” Bob said, “because it takes a constructivist approach. The goal is not to teach the students, but to create an environment where they can learn themselves.” Bob has also helped facilitate the Master of Arts in Teaching and the Master of Arts in Community Leadership programs which have drawn numerous professionals toward a path of educating others. That path is one he’s

BY SARA MCCASKEY (’14)

familiar with. When he was just a kid, his family moved to Peru for two years so his father could teach—but when Bob started college, he wanted to be a psychology major. Then a roommate asked for help with a tutoring program, and Bob fell in love with education. “I realized that the kids I was tutoring weren’t dumb.” he said, “They were really smart kids, they just weren’t doing well in school. I decided I wanted to figure out what schools could be doing differently, and that’s what I’ve been working towards ever since.” Bob has searched for the answer, traveling to Jamaica where he helped establish a grassroots education system as a member of the Peace Corps; to Chile, where he served as a Fulbright Scholar; to Mexico on a service-learning trip with the MAT students; and to the Hopi and Navajo nations for Westminster’s May Term. While he hopes others will carry on his search after he retires next spring, Bob now believes he knows how to start answering his life-long question: “above all else, care about your students.”

FAVORITE WESTMIN-

Running Ragnar with his colleagues. MOST LIKELY TO Be found enjoying the outdoors with his wife. STER MEMORY

PLANS FOR RETIRE-

He’s keeping his options open. SPECIAL SKILLS Excellent Spanish psychology vocabulary. MENT

THE SCHOOL OF EDUCATION HAS 264 STUDENTS ENROLLED: 50 UNDERGRADUATES AND 214 IN FOUR GRADUATE PROGRAMS.

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ESSENCE OF DIVERSITY AND GLOBAL LEARNING NOHEMY SOLÓRZANO-THOMPSON ,

Associate Provost for Diversity and Global Learning BY SARA MCCASKEY (’14)

TH IS PAGE AN D OPPOSITE: ADAM FI N KLE

N

ohemy solórzano-thompson is no stranger

to diversity. Her entire life has been colored by an array of cultural influences, and she has an amalgamation of interests funky enough to make just about anyone feel the need to pick up a new hobby. Nohemy was raised in Mexico as an only child. Her mother was a Mexican Catholic, her father a Sephardic Jew. Her family moved to the United States when Nohemy was 11, but she never lost interest in living abroad. During her time as an undergraduate, Nohemy participated in two foreign exchange programs. She spent one summer on an archaeological dig in Honduras and her entire junior year living in Seville, Spain, working towards her bachelor’s degree in Spanish. A few years later, as a PhD candidate, Nohemy was accepted as a Fulbright Scholar, which gave her the opportunity to finish her dissertation on portrayals of lower class men in Mexican and Mexican-American popular culture. Nohemy is excited to continue pursuing her passion for diversity at Westminster. As the new Associate Provost for Diversity and Global Learning, she hopes to continue to attract diverse students, staff, and faculty to Westminster’s rich cultural community and help students from all majors integrate study-abroad experiences into their undergraduate education. “My definition of diversity is one that’s very broad,” she said. “And having the ability to influence and motivate students from any background is a really important task.” Nohemy now lives in Sugar House with her husband, Jonathan, and her lab mix/substitute child, Monsi. As a selfproclaimed foodie, she is excited to try as many restaurants in Salt Lake City as she can.

Drive to work. She prefers to commute on foot. GUILTY PLEASURE Over-the-top, campy science fiction. FAVORITE ARTIST Alma Lopez CURRENT WISH Fewer miles between her and her family in Mexico. LEAST LIKELY TO

NOHEMY SOLÓRZANOTHOMPSON, ASSOCIATE PROVOST FOR DIVERSITY AND GLOBAL LEARNING

THE STUDENT BODY COME FROM 41 COUNTRIES. THIS SEMESTER, 12 STUDENTS WILL STUDY ABROAD IN 8 COUNTRIES. WESTMINSTER REVIEW

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TRAV EL

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CLOCKWISE: AT THE U OF GLASGOW’S CLOISTERS. A VIEW FROM SPEAN BRIDGE. FALCONRY WITH A TAWNY OWL. THE GLASGOW CATHEDRAL.

JUSTTHE FOXES: STUDY-ABROAD IN GLASGOW The People of Glasgow are Happy—a Deep Down in-Your-Soul Kind of Happy BY SARA MCCASKEY (’14)

F

or years I imagined myself studying abroad, living

in Italy, France, maybe Australia. But when I found out about the Principia Consortium, a study-abroad opportunity offered through the Westminster Honors program and the University of Glasgow in Scotland, I knew that was it. I applied as early as I could and spent

the next few weeks anxiously awaiting a response. “Congratulations! You’ve been accepted.” I was so excited about having the chance to travel all around Europe; unfortunately, my budget did not match the level of my enthusiasm. But what I initially thought was a great blow to my study-abroad experience turned out to be one of the most reward-

WESTMINSTER AND STUDENT GOVERNMENT ARE LAUNCHING THE FIRST-EVER FUND TO HELP STUDENTS

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WESTMINSTER REVIEW


ing experiences of my life. Because I was rooted in one place, I appreciated the rich historical culture, found a sincere love for the people of Glasgow, and realized that studying abroad is about so much more than collecting passport stamps. As I look back on my time abroad, what really stands out to me are the little things that made me feel less like a tourist and more like a local. Mostly, they’re things I’d typically take for granted: being able to use public transportation without reading any of the signs or navigating grocery stores with such ease. Magellan himself would be impressed. Falling into a comfortable groove was a gradual process, but one I expected to deal with. Other things were sudden surprises. All sinks in Scotland have separate hot and cold water taps, one of which is better suited for boiling pasta than washing your hands. Eggs are not refrigerated. Whisky is never ever called scotch. It’s the little things, really. Not all foreign oddities sit patiently, waiting for you to discover them. They infiltrate your life when you least expect it, causing excitement, distress, or a combination of emotions. These quirks are the catalyst of memorable experiences. One such quirk is the subway system. The Glasgow subway was a really daunting hurdle for me. But “facing your fears” is a common theme when you’re studying abroad, so I gave myself a little pep talk and headed underground to face the beast. Turns out, the Glasgow subway system is easy. In the late 1800s, London built the first underground transit system. Glasgow, not wanting to fall too far behind, soon followed suit. In 1896, Glasgow proudly unveiled its first subway system: 6.5 miles long, featuring two concentric loops: one running clockwise, one counterclockwise. London expanded its subway system, but the Glaswegians did not. The mere existence of a subway was more than enough to be happy about. Its bright orange cars and cyclic routes have even garnered the nickname “The Clockwork Orange.” And so, the simple, one-circle subway system remains,

ensuring that locals and visitors alike are never lost. Not all of my experiences with the local oddities were positive. One night I was startled awake by the bone-chilling sound of a woman screaming. I ran out into the hall pajama-clad and wide-eyed, where I found my local flat mates calmly munching on biscuits and drinking tea. “What is that?!” I exclaimed. “Should we call the cops?” They looked at each other, smiled, and started to laugh. “It’s not funny!” I asserted, angry at their wildly inappropriate nonchalance. “Calm down,” they said, “its just the foxes.” Understandably, my middle-of-the-night logic could not make sense of this. The woman is screaming because of foxes? And why does this mean the woman is okay? Turns out, there was no woman. But there were foxes. Lots of foxes. All over the city. Foxes are the Glasgow equivalent of rats in big cities, except there aren’t really rats in Glasgow because of the foxes. In fact, the locals appreciate the foxes so much, it’s not uncommon to see table scraps left out for a fox-friendly midnight snack—a small gesture of thanks, I suppose. But my favorite and most life changing observation is a bit trickier to pin down: despite the terrible weather, perpetually grey skies, and historical struggles, the people of Glasgow are happy—a deep-down-in-yoursoul kind of happy. This intrinsic satisfaction and unrelenting kindness (powerful enough to move a population to feed scavengers and preserve a potentially out-of-date transportation system) absolutely fascinated me. The barista at my favorite coffee shop genuinely seemed to care how I was, always asking about my classes, bringing up papers I’d been working on in the cafe weeks ago. Grocery store employees would stop in the aisles to ask how my day was going and wish me a delicious dinner, whatever I was planning to cook. Even perfect strangers would smile and say hi as we passed on the sidewalk. I may never be entirely sure where this bone-deep happiness comes from, but I work towards it daily and smile as I remember the kind people of Glasgow who made me feel like I was home.

May Term in Italy A MUSICAL JOURNEY BY JOHANNA SNOW

Westminster students don’t have to spend an entire semester abroad for academic travel experiences. Take the lucky students who went on a “viaggo musicale” (musical journey) through Italy for May Term this spring. Led by music professors Brandon Derfler and Michael Chipman, students experienced Italian culture, musical history, and delicious food firsthand. To prepare, the group studied conversational Italian and Italian music history. Then it was off to Venice. They explored the city, sampling Italian gelato and singing with a gondolier. They visited museums and landmarks, including St. Mark’s Basilica. For their Venetian finale, they attended Mozart’s Don Giovanni at the famous Teatro La Fenice. Next stop: a converted farmhouse in the Tuscan countryside. To get a taste of the culture, they explored olive orchards, sampled local dishes, and tasted wine. In the trip’s final evening, students attended the opera Gotterdamerung at the world-renowned La Scala opera house in Milan. When student Kimberly Fallis (’15), was asked, “What part of the trip was most memorable?” she replied, “the whole trip!”

TRAVEL DURING MAY TERM. IF YOU’D LIKE TO HELP, CALL 801.832.2825 OR SDEMKO@WESTMINSTERCOLLEGE.EDU. WESTMINSTER REVIEW

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the

Legend CONTINUES How the Gore Family Changed the Future of the World and Westminster College BY J E R E M Y P U G H & RO B I N B O O N

It’s 1957.

A middle-aged couple is up in the night, crunching numbers at their dining room table. The husband, a chemist, has the opportunity of a lifetime—to own the commercial development rights to a polymer with properties diverse enough to provide a non-stick surface in the bottom of a frying pan and insulate electrical wiring in mainframe computers. In the lab at DuPont, he has performed experiments proving the polymer’s possibilities are great. Known by material scientists as polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE), the polymer’s trade name, Teflon, is a household word. Yet the management at DuPont is not interested in further developing this plastic.

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The chemist is Bill Gore. His wife, Vieve, believing in her husband, suggests that they gather their resources to create their own company—all at a time when they have two kids in college and three younger children sleeping down the hall. “They were both adventurers,” recalls their daughter, Ginger Gore Giovale. “Dyed-in-the-wool Utahns. They loved mountain climbing, sunsets, hiking the countryside.” Bill and Vieve Gore signed the paperwork creating W. L. Gore & Associates on their wedding anniversary— January 1, 1958—embarking on what would become their greatest adventure together. And, like most of their adventures, they brought their family along.


CLOCKWISE: VIEVE GORE. THE BILL AND VIEVE GORE SCHOOL OF BUSINESS. VIEVE ADORNED WITH WILD FLOWERS WHILE BACKPACKING. BILL AND VIEVE GORE, TRUE PARTNERS. BILL AND VIEVE DECKED OUT FOR THE COLD. GINGER GORE GIOVALE, VIEVE GORE, DR. STEVE BAAR, AND STEVE MORGAN. JOHN GIOVALE AND GINGER GORE GIOVALE. DR SHANNON BELLAMY AND STUDENT IN THE CENTER FOR FINANCIAL ANALYSIS.

WESTMINSTER REVIEW

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BASEMENT LABORATORY The Gore’s mid-century modern home, built by Bill on 15 acres of Delaware farmland, became the first headquarters for their fledgling enterprise. Lacking a real laboratory, they repurposed the basement and raided the kitchen. Additional ovens were installed. Decommissioned culinary appliances were pressed into alternative service. Random measuring cups here, a reassigned electric skillet there. “The basement manufacturing just happened to be under the bedroom my sisters and I shared,” recalls Ginger. “Everything was smelling bad, and we were missing essential things like the blender and the best pots in the kitchen and the measuring cups! Sometimes I’d look at the measuring cups when we were cooking, and I’d think, ‘Do I really want to measure anything in it?’” America was in the midst of a chemical revolution and in an age of optimism about the future. Material scientists had created polymers with names like Dacron and Nylon. In the Gore’s basement, a motley team of friends and family was experimenting with one of the greatest polymers in history, transforming lives and industries around the world—a start-up well before the term “start-up” came into vogue. Long before Jobs and Wozniak worked out of a garage to create Apple computers, Bill and Vieve Gore and their son, Bob, paved the way in their Delaware home. Ginger describes that posse in the basement: “a group of relatives, a one-legged mechanic who used to work at a gas station nearby, and it was friends and the friends’ friends and so on…it was a ragtag bunch of people.” Bill Gore loved being the pied piper of this ragtag collection of associates with a cool new material. In contrast to the white-jacket-chemist-in-the-lab stereotype, Bill was an extrovert who took great joy from selling their new ideas for Teflon. It wasn’t long before he and Vieve realized they had found their niche as entrepreneurs. Initially, they found that manipulating PTFE, flattening it or thinning it, produced properties

that were perfect for electrical insulation. And so it began: insulated wires became their first product. A machine twisted wires into pairs. On one occasion, Ginger recalls, when the twisting machine broke, they simply laid everything on the lawn and twisted it by hand, and any imbedded grass got yanked out. Those first years were tough financially. Associates, many of whom were close relatives and friends, were occasionally paid with shares of stock. During the early days, the company was really more of an extended family than a typical corporation. Computer giant, IBM, placed the biggest orders. And as the computer industry grew, so did W. L. Gore & Associates. In 1961, they moved into their first manufacturing facility. As demand for cable grew, they realized the need for a plant closer to their customers. They traveled the West checking on transportation, higher education, and looking for nearby mountains to climb. In each community, they asked, “Would we want our associates to move here?” In 1967, they settled on Flagstaff, Arizona, where today, 14 plants thrive. From there, they spread into Europe, then Asia. Ginger explains, “It’s an amazing spread of success and the Gore philosophy.” Although those not-so-mad scientists in the Gore’s basement cooked up multiple uses for PTFE, the game changer came in 1969 when Bob Gore discovered a new technology that nobody expected—expanded PTFE or ePTFE. “He found that by heating and stretching Teflon, it puffed up like a marshmallow changing its basic structure,” explains Ginger. “That discovery brought us a whole new way of thinking about the uses for PTFE.” Many years of development with ePTFE resulted in GORE-TEX® laminate, as well as many other products that aren’t as commonly known, but benefit people and businesses worldwide. Today, global sales exceed $3 billion. The company that had a risky start in 1958 in Delaware, now has 10,000 associates operating on every continent on earth, except Antarctica (although a lot of GORETEX® apparel is worn, there).

T H E W O R L D A G R E E S : W. L. Gore & Associates is a Great Place to Work F O R T U N E ’ S “ 10 0 B E S T C O M PA N I E S T O W O R K F O R ” 1 2 Y E A R S R U N N I N G . U N I T E D S TAT E S L O N D O N ’ S S U N D AY T I M E S “ O N E O F T H E “ B E S T C O M PA N I E S T O W O R K F O R ” U N I T E D K I N G D O M R A N K E D E I G H T H I N T H E “ 10 0 B E S T P L AC E S TO WO R K I N G E R M A N Y ” A M O N G M I D - S I Z E D C O M PA N I E S . G E R M A N Y R A N K E D S I X T H A M O N G “ 3 5 B E S T P L A C E S T O W O R K I N I TA LY. ” I TA LY R A N K E D # 1 A M O N G “ B E S T WO R K P L AC E S I N F R A N C E . ” F R A N C E R A N K E D # 4 A M O N G “ B E S T WO R K P L AC E S I N S W E D E N . ” S W E D E N L I S T E D 1 2 T H O N “ 50 B E S T L A R G E WO R K P L AC E S I N E U RO P E 20 0 9 . ”

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THE WESTMINSTER CONNECTION The heart and soul of the enterprise were, respectively, Vieve and Bill Gore. They met in the 1930s at Westminster. Bill was a student and Vieve was spending time with a friend, Genevieve Green, who lived in Ferry Hall. One day, Vieve looked out the window and saw a guy doing handstands on the lawn. She asked her friend who he was. The answer: Bill Gore. In later years, Bill would say he had done handstands to attract Vieve’s attention. Regardless whose story you believe, Bill’s acrobatics resulted in a lifelong love. Thus began a tradition (three generations) of Gore family members finding the loves of their lives at Westminster: their daughter, Ginger, met her husband, John, in the 1960s; then their son Danny met his wife, Melissa, in the

Ginger says, “I realized that I was Dad’s Westminster legacy.” At the time, Westminster’s financial stability was a little dicey, but Ginger and her mother knew the organization well, they believed in its strong leadership and accomplished faculty, and they felt Westminster, at its core, was stable. Together, they founded the Bill and Vieve Gore School of Business in 1988 and its ribbon cutting was a turning point for Westminster. In 1990, after some estate planning, Vieve decided to donate the $7 million in Bill’s retirement account to the college. This significant donation, in addition to her Gore School of Business and Challenge for Freedom gifts, demonstrated Vieve’s confidence in Westminster. Ginger is proud of what has taken place in the Bill and Vieve Gore School of Business, particularly its strong leadership, starting with Dean Charlie Ehin, then Dean Cid Seidelman. Cid opened the aviation program, which was a huge step, along with the MBA program. Now the school is being considered for accreditation with the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business, all of which are accomplishments brought about by good thinkers and good leaders. It pleases Ginger to see Dr. Jin Wang as Dean. With Dean Wang, she knows both faculty and students will gain an even better sense of business in a global economy. Ginger continued to serve on the Westminster board for 29 years, retiring in 2006. She dedicated 18 of those years of leadership as board chair and remains one of the longest continuously serving trustees in Westminster’s history. Bill and Vieve were innovators, creators, and they were also Utahns, enamored by the West. They were healthy, active people who loved camping, hiking, and backpacking, anything to do with the outdoors. Both Bill and Vieve were among some of the intrepid testers of the GORETEX® fabric—its successes and its failures—testing its limits with long backpacking trips. In fact, Bill’s favorite outdoor activity was backpacking. It was on one of those traditional two-week-long backpacking trips with Vieve and a grandson that Bill Gore died of a heart attack in the rugged Wind River area in Wyoming. Vieve was grief stricken for a long time. However, Ginger said, “Oddly enough, it made us feel a little bit more at peace to think that he was out there doing what he loved. It was just so appropriate. So him.”

Today, W. L. Gore & Associates’ global sales exceed $3 billion, and it now has 10,000 associates on every continent on earth, except Antartica. 1990s. Westminster had actually been a part of the Gore family for earlier generations, as Bill’s mother, Dora Clark Gore, and others had graduated from Westminster in the early 1900s. The Gores’ connection to Westminster continued to grow. In 1977, Bill was asked if he would become a trustee. Too busy, he graciously declined and suggested they consider his daughter Ginger. President Helmut Hoffman called Ginger and invited her to visit campus to get acquainted. She did and accepted the offer to be a trustee. As a young woman expecting a baby, Ginger was hardly the average board member for that era. The time between her campus visit and her first meeting was several months, which added a certain air to the meeting. Sitting at a table with 12 men gazing at her, Ginger thought to herself, “They’re all looking at me and whispering to each other, ‘Geez, she sure put on a lot of weight!’” She explained, “I’m sure I’m the only board member who was ever pregnant while serving on the board.”

THE GORE SCHOOL COMETH After Bill’s death in 1986, Ginger and Vieve remembered that he had intended to make a substantial donation to the college, but Bill had died before fulfilling that dream. “At that point,”

The Bill and Vieve Gore School of Business “Deans List” CHARLES EHIN, PHD (1986–1990)

Founding of the Bill and Vieve Gore School of Business (1988) n Faculty grew from seven to 22 members. n Accredited in 1990 by the Association for Collegiate Business Schools and Programs. n Converted the Master of Management program to the MBA program. n

JAMES “CID” SEIDELMAN, PHD ( 1 9 9 0 – 2 0 0 3 )

Led planning and fundraising of an $8 million expansion­—the Bill and Vieve Gore Center for Business, Aviation, and Entrepreneurship. n Led planning, fundraising, and implementation of the college’s $7.4 million Sam and Aline Skaggs Flight Operations and Simulation Centers. n Developed Westminster Executive-in-Residence program, bringing seniorlevel business leaders to campus for class visits, colloquia, and curricular development. n Established advisory boards to help faculty redesign the MBA program, the development of the Center for Financial Analysis, the MBA–Technology Management, the Financial Services program and the implementation of the Flight Operations program. n Supported development of mentorship programming for MBA students, curriculum reform to emphasize the integration of liberal and professional requirements for all undergraduate business students. n

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H OW T O S U C C E E D I N B U S I N E S S T H E G O R E WAY While the Gores are responsible for creating an inordinate number of innovative products, the organization is equally legendary for Bill Gore’s greatest “discovery”—a “team-based, flat lattice” organizational structure, developed by Bill to “foster personal initiative.” W. L. Gore & Associates sustains a culture built around Bill’s deeply held beliefs—a philosophy that fosters an environment of trust, respect, and teamwork that encourages innovation and creativity. To begin with, Gore has no “employees.” All individuals who work for Gore are “associates.” There are no organizational charts, no chains of command, no bosses (but “sponsors”). Everyone is accountable to his or her team. Leaders are defined by “followership.” The fundamental difference is that in Gore, associates become leaders by gaining the respect of colleagues and peers, rather than the support of a boss. W. L. Gore & Associates arose from Bill’s experience with DuPont. Had he been allowed to work on that little polymer, DuPont would have realized huge profits. So Bill created a culture that encourages freedom for creativity: at Gore, associates are free to talk to anyone in order to do their jobs. There are no formal channels to navigate. There is a commitment to four prin-

ciples, but no “fighting your way to the top,” rather, gaining followers. The company could be said to have a very “unbusinesslike” style. Provost Cid Seidelman recounts the time when the Gores were considering Western cities in which to build. When then Utah Governor Norm Bangerter, asked, “How many employees do you have?” Bill resplied, “Well, we don’t have any employees.” That puckish response was typical of Bill and Vieve being playful. Cid’s favorite is Bill’s response to a new hire who asks, “What should I be doing?” Answer: “Look around and see what needs to be done.” Another legendary reply was about his visit to the new Flagstaff operation: “Oh, they are doing wonderfully. They’re making SO many mistakes.” Cid recalls Vieve as being incredibly smart, very perceptive around people, very playful, particularly when asking questions. She was an equal partner in the team. Ginger concurs. “Mom and Dad did everything together. When Dad would go to a technical meeting, Mom would go to the technical meeting. He wanted her to be there. Mom was a people person. When visiting plants,

Dad would meet with the scientists. Mom would find the accounting and human resources people. She made heroes. When she learned what someone was doing, she’d tell them, ‘I think you’re doing something wonderful.’ She’d make them feel like a hero—and then they would be a hero. She made Dad and Bob heroes, simply by saying what a wonderful job they were doing.” Many companies try to emulate the flat lattice culture, and there is considerable debate about altering an existing culture, rather than starting a new

Associates become leaders by gaining the respect of their colleagues and peers, rather than the support of a boss. lattice organization. Can you create a Gore-like culture in one that already exists? Dr. Michael Pacanowsky, who knows W. L. Gore & Associates from the inside out, can answer that question. This fall he joined Westminster as the first Gore-Giovale Chair in Business Innovation. His new role, in addition to teaching, is to write a book about the unique Gore culture, and he will reveal the difference between Gore 101 and Gore 401 (Intro and reality).

BILL GORE’S “FOUR PRINCIPLES OF GORE,” which have been the framework for the company’s philosophy since its inception.

F RE E D O M

FA I RN ESS

CO M M ITM EN T

WAT E R L INE

Each of us will allow, help, and

Each of us will try to be fair

Each of us will make our own

Each of us will consult with

encourage associates to grow in

in all our dealings: with each

commitments—and keep them.

appropriate associates who will

knowledge, skill, scope of

other, with our suppliers, with

No associate can impose a

share the responsibility of taking

responsibility, and range of

our customers, within our

commitment on another.

any action that has the potential

activities. Authority is earned

communities and with all people

All commitments are

of serious harm to the reputa-

through the power of

with whom we have transactions

self-commitments.

tion, success, or survival of the

followership.

or agreements.

enterprise. Our enterprise is like a ship that we are all in together. Boring holes below the waterline could sink our ship.

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ARIC KRAUSE, PHD (INTERIM DEAN 2003–2005)

Revised the MBA program. n Developed the competency-based BBA program. n

JIM CLARK ( I N T E R I M D E A N 2 0 0 5 – 2 0 07 )

Developed the exchange program, with Chris Tong and Aric Krause, and completed agreements with two Chinese universities. n Developed the Institute for New Enterprise (now Center for Entrepreneurship) with Mike Glauser. n

JOHN GROESBECK ( 2 0 07 – 2 010 )

Created the MAcc and hired faculty to support it n Created and grew the dual degree in Economics with Nankai University n

AT THE HELM

/// Get to Know DEAN JIN WANG

While Dr. Jin Wang walked between villages in the mountains of China, he sang. As a young man, he was tasked with ensuring the quality of high school education in 12 villages, and the only way to travel among them was on foot. That was his first job ensuring quality education. Fast forward past his years at Zhongshan University, then on to Ohio University and Kansas State, to the time when his title reads “Doctor.” After teaching for several years, he became Associate Dean of the College of Letters and Science at the University of Wisconsin–Stevens Point. At the university, he worked with students of all majors, who came into the arts and sciences for general education degrees. Working in arts and sciences gave him the opportunity to impact each student on campus in some way, and he knew the value of the arts for their education. So he decided to continue working in liberal arts. “This type of education is so important for professional programs,” he said. “It gives students the foundation they need—the skills, capacity, and knowledge—to apply critical thinking, communica-

tion and speaking to their professional lives.” As a Dean at Westminster, he has set goals to ensure that students of the Bill and Vieve Gore School of Business have ample opportunities to apply their liberal arts educations. He has established and extended partnerships between Westminster and universities abroad. He has created a board of advisors to help guide the school’s decisions. He has also made a global perspective a priority, and revised the school’s vision statement to better reflect a goal of being regionally and nationally recognized. “At my age, your selfish desire is less, and your desire for society grows,” he said. He knows he’s been fortunate to have opportunities to learn and to benefit from his education. He wants students to have the opportunities he had and more. He does this not only to help students get jobs, but to help them make a difference for the better in local and global society. Together, he and the team of faculty and staff in the Bill and Vieve Gore School of Business aim to help students to be “effective and principled in this complex, changing world.”

GARY DAYNES ( I N T E R I M D E A N 2 010 - 2 011 )

Developed and implemented the Gore School of Business writing initiative. n Implemented the Salt-Lake-based PMBA program. n

JIN WANG ( 2 011 – P R E S E N T )

Added the Gore-Giovale Chair in Business Innovation to the school’s faculty team. n On February 17, 2012, the Westminster College Flight Operations and Aviation Management programs received AABI accreditation. n Created an international dual-degree program in Aviation Management with Guangzhou Civil Aviation College in China. n

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A Sampling of Bill and Vieive Gore School of Business All-Stars The Bill and Vieve Gore School of Business has generated top talent in the business world. Here are five success stories:

MARK DEYOUNG /// CEO,

AL L I AN T T ECH SY S T E M S

Mark DeYoung (MBA ’86) knows the value of a Westminster education. As an MBA student and later as an adjunct faculty member, he has grown profoundly from his experiences on campus. He is now the President and CEO of Alliant Techsystems (ATK), an aerospace, defense, and commercial products company. After graduation, Mark worked for Hercules Aerospace, which ATK acquired in 1996. Many relocations and leadership positions later, he was elected President and CEO and a member of the board of directors. Mark said the most rewarding aspect of his career was the impact he had on the future of the business. His time at Westminster greatly influenced his professional life and his ability to think critically about business decisions. Mark said. “This focus on personal learning and the practical application of theory and principle proved very valuable and allowed me to put my education to work immediately.” The biggest lesson Mark learned is persistence and thorough planning. “If you set responsible yet lofty goals, commit those goals to defined and measurable plans, and then execute those plans with passion and persistence, you can accomplish amazing things.” Mark said.

RAY BRADFORD /// PART N ER,

K L E I N E R PERK I N S CAU F I EL D & BY E RS

Ray Bradford (’07) , a partner at Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers, works with entrepreneurs on new products and technologies that have potentially significant impact on the world. At Westminster, Ray was heavily involved in student government, the Honors program, and was an all-star student in the Gore School of Business. After graduation, he enrolled in the Stanford’s MBA program, then took a position at Amazon.com, where he led a product management team building cloud computing and data businesses. “I’m reminded daily of the successes of companies like Google and how juggernauts can be started from a garage,” Ray said. “I love being involved early in a company’s development and working with the team to shape the business. Old adages such as working hard, being persisten, positivity, and opening yourself up to opportunity have guided him to professional success. “I’m a big believer in continuous self-improvement and trying to be better/smarter/wiser each day,” he said. “In general as I’ve gotten older I’ve concluded the most important ‘keys to success’ are hidden in plain sight.”

LISA GOUGH /// PRE S I D EN T,

SYS CO I N T ERM O U N TAI N

Lisa Gough (MBA ’07) is a dynamic leader who understands the impact of mentorship and developing leaders. As president of Sysco Intermountain, she enjoys the challenge of working for a national company with global reach and staying engaged in a fast-paced, constantly changing environment. While an MBA student, Lisa gained many of the skills and passions she applies daily: communication, constant learning, critical thinking, and being passionate about what she does. Westminster’s culture has had a profound impact on who she is. “The way Westminster embraces its alumni changed my perception about the importance of being a mentor and a resource for students, colleagues, and our community,” Lisa said. “Westminster instilled that going beyond the call of duty is as important as anything else we can do. Lisa emphasized the importance of balancing her time and has placed greater emphasis on her family and personal passions—including golf—during the past year, which has led her to a better understanding of her professional life and has guided her leadership at Sysco Intermountain.

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REBECCA BROWN JENSEN /// CE O,

WASATCH F RO N T M U LT I PL E L IS T IN G S ERV ICE

Shortly after graduating from Westminster with a degree in computer science, Rebecca Brown Jensen (’02, MBATM ’09) went to work at the Wasatch Front Multiple Listing Service. Her talent and work ethic were soon noticed, and she was promoted quickly. She was about to leave her job to spend more time with her children when the company asked her to serve as vice president. And they asked her to go back to school. She enrolled in the MBA–Technology Management program and shortly after, the CEO was let go. She says the coaching she got from faculty like Michael Keene was invaluable in preparing her for a c-level interview process. During her first year as CEO, Rebecca was involved in Westminster’s coaching and mentoring (Master Track) program, where she was able to get critical feedback and learn from seasoned professionals like Shahab Saeed, David Spann, and Bob Frankenberg. When the company’s revenue dropped in 2008, she drew on lessons from the MBATM program, focusing on the company’s core competencies and diversifying revenue streams.

SCOTT BECK /// PRE S I D EN T

AN D CH I EF O PE RAT I N G O F F I CER, CH G HEA LT HCA RE

Scott Beck graduated from Westminster’s MBA program in 1994 and credits Westminster with developing his entrepreneurial mindset. His coaching and consulting business led him to the executive leadership team at CHG, a health care staffing organization. There, he began developing the internet division and 15 years later, he is President and COO. “I got interested in the idea of entrepreneurial business development at Westminster,” he said. “It is the common thread between Westminster, starting my own company, and ultimately becoming an executive leader. I credit Westminster with how I think about the world and how I invested in growing my career.” CHG is third on Fortune’s “100 Best Companies to Work For” list. “We are developing a culture at CHG that helps people strike a work-life balance,” he said. He said the most rewarding aspect of his job is being able to connect nurses, doctors, and patients who need vital care that they wouldn’t otherwise receive. Last year CHG impacted more than 17 million people by staffing with CHG’s providers.

GORE-TEX® LAMINATE : THE WORLDWIDE MIRACLE The most well-known creation of W. L. Gore & Associates is yet another derivative of that magical compound ePTFE, known the world over as the gold standard in waterproof/breathable outerwear: GORE-TEX® fabric. Family lore has it that Bill and Vieve suffered through a rainy backpacking trip in a leaky ePTFE-coated tent, spurring efforts to improve the product. What emerged was the material that breathes

and lets out moisture as it protects from the elements. Not only is the GORE-TEX® laminate a miracle for outerwear, it has medical, electronic, and industrial applications. Gore makes stent-grafts to combat vascular disease and textile products for hernia repair. Gore products are used in automotive vents, computers, and cooling filters. Soon they will be coming out with fireproof fire fighter’s jackets that are lightweight and cooler. WESTMINSTER REVIEW

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I’m First

w

First-generation college graduates change the world (and Westminster) with a relentless love of learning. BY J O H A N N A S N OW A N D J OA N N A P H A M ( ’ 1 3 )

///

P O RT R A I T S B Y A D A M F I N K L E

ESTMINSTER is a melting pot of students, faculty, and staff

from many different backgrounds, all of whom have one thing in common: a love of educational exploration. For many people in our community, college was not in their family history. But that love of learning led them to overcome obstacles and become the first members of their families to graduate from college.

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ROBIN SMITH (’13)

Westminster Alumna B Y J OANNA PHAM (’13)

F

OR ROBIN SMITH (’13), at one time college wasn’t even a consideration. Times were grueling and paychecks were limited. Growing up in Cincinnati, Ohio, Robin’s mother had few expectations for her daughter: to graduate with a high school diploma and to work full-time—all without getting pregnant, of course. In 2006, Robin made her way to Utah for a breast cancer study. While being a part of the study and working as a phlebotomist, she stumbled upon Venture, a Utah Humanities Council program that provides adults with the opportunity to start college. Through this program, she met (former) Associate Provost for Diversity and Global Learning, Dr. Bridget Newell, who would help Robin with her college application, and—like many others—find that Robin belonged at Westminster. As a non-traditional student, Robin faced the exhausting responsibilities of being a McNair scholar, studying full-time as a sociology major, and working full-time. When asked how she handled such a workload, Robin chuckled, “It was hard; I wanted to quit every three weeks, but there was no reason for me to leave. It wasn’t easy, but it was never impossible.” For Robin, college was a product of going with her gut: attending Westminster, earning scholarships, engaging in people, making it possible to go to school. Though still surreal to her, being a first-generation college student proved both possible and successful. Loyola University of Chicago—where she will pursue a dual master’s degree in social work and child development—obviously approves.

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Parents and students need to know what an investment they are truly making by going to college.

ANNALISA HOLCOMBE (’92)

Westminster Alumna and Staff Member B Y JOANNA P HAM (’13)

O ANNALISA HOLCOMBE (’92) and her parents, it was never a question of whether or not she would go to college. With support from her family and guidance from her admissions recruiter, Annalisa wound up at Westminster as a first-generation student—and with a Presidential Scholarship. Thanks to the donors of her scholarships, Annalisa graduated from college owing the school the humble amount of $1,000. Annalisa remembers one of her earliest memories as a student at Westminster—writing a thankyou note to her scholarship donor, Berenice Bradshaw. Although for most first-generation college students, the topic of finances can be messy and unnerving, Annalisa stresses that parents and students need to know what an investment they are truly making by going to college. She quotes her mother, “The benefit of higher education is that you can make more choices.” As the new Associate Provost for Integrative and Community-Based Learning, it’s apparent that Annalisa has made terrific choices regarding her education and her career at Westminster—choices that included enjoying classes taught by our favorite, Cid Seidelman.

T

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BRIAN LEVIN-STANKEVICH

President of Westminster College B Y J OH AN NA S N OW

W

HEN PRESIDENT LEVIN-STANEKVICH (Dr. Brian) was growing up in Kaisertown, a blue-collar neighborhood in Buffalo, most people didn’t need to go to college. There were plenty of good manufacturing jobs for high school graduates. But that doesn’t mean that a college education wasn’t highly valued—and for Dr. Brian, there was never a doubt that college was in his future. Dr. Brian grew up in a home where curiosity was celebrated. His parents, children of Polish immigrants, were hard-working and had a love of learning that they passed on to their son. They made every effort to broaden his horizons and send him on a path toward college. His childhood was filled with books, educational exploration, and culture. He attended Canisius High School, a Jesuit school, where his education gave further support to the values of his parents and prepared him for college. While there, he was surrounded by instructors who encouraged learning and students who dreamed of college. When the time came to apply for college, Dr. Brian faced some challenges that many first-generation students encounter. His parents were unfamiliar with the applications process, but he was able to figure it out on his own—with the love and support of his parents, of course—and was accepted to Hamilton College, where he studied history. From there, it was on to SUNY Buffalo, then as a graduate student to St. Petersburg State University in Russia, where he was a Fulbright Fellow.

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REBECCA VALVERDE (’13)

Westminster Alumna and Staff Member BY J O HANNA SNOW

R

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EBECCA VALVERDE (’13) grew up in Los Angeles, California, as the daughter of recent immigrants. Her mother was from Guatemala and her father was from Mexico. Her parents dreamed that Rebecca would become a lawyer or a doctor. She dreamed of making a difference and helping people. In high school, Rebecca got involved with the Fulfillment Fund, an LA-based organization that is committed to making college a reality for students growing up in communities with economic and educational challenges. The fund empowered Rebecca to work hard and aim high. When her family moved to Salt Lake City, she knew that without the help of the fund, progressing to college would be hard. She enrolled at Salt Lake Community College, then transferred to the University of Utah, where she completed a double major in political science and international studies. Next, it was on to Westminster where she enrolled in the Master of Arts in Community Leadership program. While a graduate student, Rebecca served as a board member for Transgender Education Advocates of Utah and completed a landmark thesis project: a photo exhibition that celebrates transgendered Latinos and Latinas in our community, “(Trans*)forming Salt Lake City.” Because of her exhibit, she was honored to participate in the Sixth Annual Clinton Global Initiative University (CGIU) at Washington University. Rebecca recently received word that she has been accepted as a leadership fellow for the Utah Chamber of Commerce—a position chosen by the mayor’s human rights commission. The leadership program runs for a year, and Rebecca is considering law school when it’s over.

WESTMINSTER REVIEW


JERRY VAN OS

Associate Dean of the Gore School of Business BY J O HANNA SNOW

WHEN PROFESSOR JERRY VAN OS’ parents got married in 1952 in Utah, they were recent immigrants from Holland. While Jerry’s father had planned to return to Holland where he had been a member of the Royal Police, his mother had other ideas. She knew that her son would have more opportunities if they stayed in Utah, and she dreamed of Jerry graduating from college one day. Jerry’s father also had a fondness for Westminster, so it was on the top of Jerry’s list when he was considering

colleges. But at that time, Westminster did not have an accounting program, so Jerry attended the University of Utah. To finance his education, Jerry cashed in an insurance policy purchased for him by his parents that was worth $1,000. To cover the balance, he lived at home and worked. After completing his BS and MBA at the University of Utah, and his PhD at Brigham Young University, Jerry finally landed at Westminster, where he’s been a member of the faculty for 25 years. WESTMINSTER REVIEW

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Tips and Tricks from Your Alma Mater’s Greenest Thumbs for Making Your Own Landscapes as Lush as Ours BY J E S S I E S M I T H ( ’ 1 4 ) P H OTO G R A P H Y BY A DA M F I N K L E

DALE BIANUCCI AND CRAIG MCLEAN, HIDING THEIR GREEN THUMBS.

Green Grounds THE

OF WESTMINSTER

WESTMINSTER IS INSULATED FROM THE REST OF THE CITY. Stepping onto campus, you find a quiet, a coolness, and a slower pace than on the streets you just left. Leaves soften sounds, and the red brick soaks in the sun instead of reflecting it onto you. After a time away, the first thing to do upon coming back to the college is to take a deep breath and let your heart rate slow a bit.

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R THE SUN ILLUMINATES THE BARK OF A UTAH JUNIPER (JUNIPERUS OSTEOSPERMUM)

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The grounds are a rambling place, inviting enough for students to spend the first 15 minutes of class making the case to move outside, weather permitting, and most professors don’t need the full 15 minutes of lobbying to be convinced. Regulars from the neighborhood flock to our campus—the man with a blue tick heeler who you’ll see every morning or the couple with two Labradors that walks through most afternoons. For how small our campus is (29.49 acres), the trees and slope of the space block the view from one end to the other. It’s easy to see the depth and height that the trees give the space, the colors that stand against the green of the grass in summer, or the neat lines of the freshly shoveled sidewalks in the winter. The big picture is beautiful and inviting, but it’s the close-up views that make Westminster’s landscape different from any other.

Meet the Gardeners

DALE HAS THE PERFECT JOB FOR A GUY WHO JUST LOVES TO WORK OUTSIDE.

In the Salt Lake Valley, everyone struggles with iron chlorosis, an iron deficiency in trees and plants. Utah’s soils have a naturally high alkalinity and a lot of iron that is often inaccessible to a tree’s roots because chemical reactions in the soil make the iron more difficult for trees to absorb. You’ll know if your tree is not getting enough iron. Leaves will turn yellow and the veins, remaining green, will bulge. “The most important thing to do at this point is not panic,” Craig advises. Too many people come to him expecting the tree to die. It’ll most likely recover. For the trees on campus, Craig and Dale apply a soil supplement. Try asking for an iron supplement at your local hardware store or greenhouse, and the staff will most likely be able to help you find a fitting solution.

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Most people come to campus with some sort of business and pass through the grounds to get to it. For Craig McClean and Dale Bianucci, the grounds are their business. These two men, along with their small staff, rule the land. Craig came to Salt Lake City 25 years ago in a 1977 Pontiac LeMans. He still has the car. When he started working at Westminster, he worked on building maintenance, grounds, and security. Soon, the college split those jobs into three separate departments, and he’ll tell you he was just “more of a gardener guy.” Dale grew up in Nevada and was hired on at Westminster in 1997, if the two have remembered right. He’s got the story to back his reason for being in this job: he loved working outside his whole life, and he likes it here because it lets him do just that. As managers of the grounds, they oversee the planting, transplanting, and care of the landscape. Try to look up their office number, and the listing reads “maintenance shop.” Together, they make the college grounds a place with utility and appeal. Sometimes, that means appointing a plot of land for a student project. Other times, that means simply checking in on the landscape’s tenants— trees, shrubs, and flowers alike. The responsibilities change with the seasons, as the landscape adjusts to the weather.

Landscape through the Ages Take a look at the plants on campus, and they’re most likely just as old as the building they grow next to. The Mother’s Club landscaped Nightingale Hall in 1964. When Dick Science Building opened in 1949, the shrubs along the building’s east side


GOOD ONES

GOOD ONES

SHRUBS

TREES

FOR YOU TO PLANT:

Rose-of-Sharon

FOR YOU TO PLANT:

HI BI SCUS SY RIACUS

The Rose-of-Sharon is considered a large shrub or small tree. This plant is in the hibiscus family and has the flowers to prove it. The Rose-of-Sharon is a good tree for those in the city, as it’s tolerant of air pollution and prefers hot weather. Because this plant blooms later in the spring and into the summer, it adds interest to gardens that finish blossoming in the spring. WHERE: Rose-of-Sharon is planted between the Bassis Center and Bamberger Hall, on the west side of the path. ZONE: 5–8 // SUN: partial shade // SOIL: moist, well-drained // SHAPE: vertical, bushy // MATURE HEIGHT: 8 to 10 feet

Bottlebrush Buckeye A E SC U LU S PAR V I FLOR A

The bottlebrush buckeye is a low-maintenance shrub that produces a series of small, white flowers along each stem in the summer. Make sure that this shrub is well watered, especially in the first few years after planting. You won’t have to worry about pruning your bottlebrush buckeye and may even notice more butterflies in your yard after planting it. WHERE: Westminster’s bottlebrush buckeye is growing in between Foster and Carleson halls, near the parking lot. ZONE: 4–8 // SUN: partial shade // SOIL: moist, well-drained // SHAPE: bushy // MATURE HEIGHT: 8 to 12 feet

Daphne DAPHNE X BU R K WOODII Shrubs in the Daphne family have thin, green leaves along the entirety of their branches. Look for this shrub to put out fragrant, light pink blossoms in the spring, and keep its thick foliage through the summer. Make sure that your Daphne is in part shade to get the best growth out of this plant. WHERE: The path between Bassis Learning Center and Bamberger Hall is lined with Daphnes. ZONE: 5–7 // SUN: partial shade // SOIL: well-drained // SHAPE: bushy // MATURE HEIGHT: 2 to 3 feet

Dawn Redwood METASEQUOIA GLYPTOS TROB OIDES

The dawn redwood is a fast-growing shade tree that grows in a pyramid shape. It leafs out in the spring and turns a rust-red color in the fall. This tree should be planted in a spot where it can grow freely, as it will grow several stories high and up to 25 feet wide, if allowed. Expect your redwood to grow fast and make sure it is well watered. WHERE: Westminster’s dawn redwood stands just south of Dick Science building. ZONE: 5–8 // SUN: full // SOIL: moist, well-drained SHAPE: pyramid // MATURE HEIGHT: 70 to 100 feet

Ginkgo GINKGO The ginkgo tree is commonly known for its fanshaped leaves. This tree is a hardy one, with a tolerance for dry and cold periods. It also tolerates air pollution well, making it a good choice for those living in urban areas. Although the ginkgo doesn’t grow as quickly as some trees, its unique, erratic shape and vibrant fall colors will add interest to your landscape. Choose a male tree. WHERE: Westminster’s ginkgo grows on the north end of the lawn adjacent to the commons. ZONE: 3–8 // SUN: full // SOIL: deep, moist soil // SHAPE: erratic, pyramidal

Witch Hazel H A M A M ELIS VIRGINIA NA Witch hazel is a quirky plant that blossoms in the late fall and winter, bringing it beyond landscape tool to conversation piece. You’ll find stringy orange or yellow blossoms on this large shrub (or small tree) when it blooms, a stark contrast against the snow that will likely be on the ground. In the first few years, make sure that you give this large shrub ample water and partial shade so that it can establish itself. WHERE: Look on the south side of the Dick Science Building to find Westminster’s resident witch hazel. ZONE: 3–8 // SUN: partial shade // SOIL: moist, well drained soil // SHAPE: erratic, bushy // MATURE HEIGHT: 15 to 30 feet 

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GOOD ONES FOR YOU TO PLANT:

FLOWERS & GRASSES Obedient Plant PH Y SOSTEGIA VIRGINIANUM The obedient plant looks similar to a snapdragon, with a tall stem holding multiple blossoms. This plant has more leaves and bare stem than a snapdragon, and the flowers are smaller. Expect your obedient plant to blossom in late summer and early fall. With some luck, the plant will spread, filling in the empty spaces around it. WHERE: Take a walk toward Giovale Library, and you’ll find obedient plant on the west side of the sidewalk as it runs north toward the commons. ZONE: 3–9 // SUN: full to partial sun // SOIL: moist, welldrained soil // SHAPE: tall, pointed stalks // MATURE HEIGHT: 3 feet

EVEN THE LESSER-USED PARTS OF CAMPUS, LIKE THE SOUTH SIDE OF GIOVALE, ARE TENDED.

Echinacea E C HI NAC EA P URP UREA With its large, beautiful purple flowers and full, thick leaves, the echinacea plant can make a stunning addition to your garden. This plant is low-maintenance and adapts well to drought and heat. For the best appearance, though, deadhead spent blossoms and new blossoms will take their place. Toward the fall, let seeds develop and this plant will spread. WHERE: You can see echinacea on campus in the pollinator garden, between the Dick Science Building and Malouf. ZONE: 3–8 // SUN: full to partial sun // SOIL: dry to medium, well-drained soil // SHAPE: full bodied with tall stems // MATURE HEIGHT: 2 to 3 feet

Flowering Pears

PYRU S C A LLERYA NA

The flowering pear tree has beautiful light pink or white flowers, which is why it was popular in the 1980s, and was planted on Westminster’s campus around then. Craig and Dale avoid planting these trees now; they were overused, so they don’t add much interest to a landscape. They also have a weak wood, making them a bad choice for the extremes of Utah’s weather.

Northern Sea Oats

Linden Tree

C HA SMA NT HI U M LAT I FOLI UM

While the linden produces a cluster of cream flowers and grows into a tall shade tree, Craig and Dale suggest steering clear of this tree. Westminster’s linden tree creates a mess with its seeds, and has attracted aphids to the landscape.

Northern sea oats are a type of grass distinct for the flat seed heads that form on the ends of its stalks. This grass grows densely and makes an interesting ornament with seeds that start out a vibrant green, weighing down stalks and turning a light tan color as the summer progresses. This grass is thirsty, so make sure that it’s in a well watered area. WHERE: You’ll find Westminster’s northern sea oats in the pollinator garden. ZONE: 3–9 // SUN: partial sun // SOIL: moist, well-drained soil // SHAPE: dense groups of thin stalks // MATURE HEIGHT: 2 to 3 feet

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Avoid planting…

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TILIA A M ERIC A NA

Honeylocust

GLEDITS IA TRIAC A NTH OS

The honeylocust was very popular in the 1970s, and students planted it on campus then. Some varieties of honeylocust have thorns, and the plant generates large seedpods which, after falling, can quickly make a yard look unkempt.


were planted. More recently, the landscaping around Meldrum was contracted out; it meets LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) criteria. It’s not only with the building, but with the surrounding plants that we see the style of the eras. The campus’s plant life is arguably the oldest resident of the grounds. Walking alongside the college’s vegetation, knowing how many seasons each plant has seen, it’s easy to separate the campus from the people on it, and begin seeing it as a thing of its own.

The War on Turf “The last time that you used your lawn was probably to walk on it while you mowed,” Craig says. He’d be happy to have a campus without the thirsty, high-maintenance stuff. Instead, he notches out nooks and corners, filling them with flowers and herbs, shrubs and trees. He knows the students study on the grass, but he also knows the amount of resources it takes to maintain: six to eight people working for six hours each week. When the grounds crew in house did the mowing, they’d start on one end of campus and reach the other on Friday only to begin again the next week. Besides, it’s just not that pretty, he says. The variety of trees on campus is staggering—120 species or more. Some are evergreen. Some find their glory in spring, like the magnolias and flowering dogwoods with their delicate flowers. Others revel in the fall, like the tupelo and zelcova trees, which set themselves blazing when the weather starts to cool. One tree near the ceramics studio throws a fit and sheds its leaves the first evening that temperatures dip below 60 degrees. Craig and Dale come upon it, bald, the next day, with a pile of leaves underneath its branches. Next time you’re on campus, take a purposeful look around, and you’ll see the Dawn Redwood (south of Dick Science Building) that stands straight as an arrow and stories high. Notice the way that the bark on the paperbark tree peels away from the trunk (between the sidewalks, just south of the commons). These aren’t the trees that you’ll see in most parkways or yards. Craig and Dale have done their research, and they plant the unusual. They

see the row of elms along the sidewalk, and raise you one Serbian spruce and a gingko. Anytime they have the chance, the crew replaces grass with flowers. Half-moon gardens take the place of turf with poppies and daisies. Plots lining sidewalks are full of Joe Pye weeds and beard tongue. And look for the native yarrow in the pollinator garden and bachelor’s button by the library. Take the full range of colors—hot to cool—and find a blossom to match them. Walk the campus from early spring to late summer and you’ll be sure to see something blooming. Whether it’s the large, commanding blossoms on the Echinacea or the tiny white blossoms of the hydrangea, there’s a flower for each day of the warm months. Sometimes, they get lucky and the plants spread. Walk from the commons to the library, and you’ll see the obedient plant spreading its way along the edging. Down in the pollinator garden, you’ll find a sea of mint. Sometimes, there are so many new sprouts that the crew has to turn down volunteer stems. But, when you fertilize a garden twice a week and give it a staff to meet its needs, you can’t really argue with it for thriving.

How Many TONS of Snow? When the flowers aren’t blooming, a good portion of the year is spent removing what falls from the sky onto campus: snow. Sidewalks, stairs, ramps, and plazas included, the campus has almost two acres of space to be cleared after each snowfall. For a four-inch snow, that means moving 178,526 pounds, or 89.26 tons, of snow before people arrive on campus in the morning. That number for the parking lots and on-campus roads? 215.54 tons.

CRAIG ALWAYS TENDS TOWARD MORE FLOWERS, LESS LAWN.

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(

GIFTS IN ACTI O N

)

KENNECOTT SHINES Over the years the company has been a major student supporter BY AUDREY MAYNARD (’03)

S

ince 1960, kennecott has served as one of

Westminster’s most generous and loyal corporate partners, contributing nearly $2 million to support scholarships, building campaigns, and other initiatives. Kennecott even loaned Westminster its industrial relations manager, James “Pete” Petersen, to serve as president in 1979, and then again from 1982 to 1985, to help navigate the college through a turbulent financial crisis. But when Kennecott experienced one of the largest mining landslides in history at the Bingham Canyon Mine last April, its role as a community partner to Westminster and many more non-profit organizations was jeopardized. Kyle Bennett, a spokesman for Kennecott, said that although the company took proactive steps to mitigate the effects of the slide, it still had a significant impact on Kennecott’s business. With mined and refined copper production expected to be 50 percent lower this year, the company was forced to cut costs by reducing its workforce and suspending corporate giving programs until it has recovered. “We understand that this decision may create challenges for some organizations,” he said. “The community has collectively shared in our success and in our struggles for decades, and we appreciate their support and understanding as we write the next

chapter in our history.” Despite suspending corporate giving efforts, Kennecott continued to fund its Kennecott Scholars program­­—six $6,000 scholarships each year—to Westminster environmental science students. “We have been long-time supporters of education by providing scholarships to hard-working students who have achieved academic excellence,” Kyle said. “We are continuing that tradition with Westminster because it demonstrates that we value education and our relationship. Scholarships provide students with the opportunity to earn a valuable education, and we use these scholarships to cultivate a relationship with possible future employees,” he continued. “Our scholarships also educate students about the importance of our industry and the products we produce.” President Levin-Stankevich recognizes Kennecott for its continued support of Westminster’s students, especially in the face of such trying times. “More than 90 percent of Westminster students receive a scholarship, and demand for scholarship aid rises every year,” he said. “Despite such a devastating event to its business operations, Kennecott has maintained its commitment to Westminster students—many of whom may one day be Kennecott employees. We are most grateful to Kennecott and wish them a swift recovery.”

KENNECOTT SCHOLARSHIPS ARE AWARDED TO STUDENTS MAJORING IN ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES 44

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THESE STUDENTS WANTTOTHANK KENNECOTT FOR THEIR 2013–14 SCHOOLYEAR AT WESTMINSTER JESSICA DAVENPORT (’14) Jessy Davenport grew up in the Green Mountains of Vermont where it was difficult not to fall in love with the environment. She sought an active college experience, preferably at a school that reminded her of the small, liberal arts schools that surrounded her in New England, and Westminster was appealing for its location and strong commitment to the environment. As a Kennecott Scholar, Jessy has had the opportunity to pursue a variety of summer jobs and internships that fit her academic interests while lessening the financial burden she would have otherwise experienced. “This flexibility has allowed me to learn new skills and try a diverse group of jobs that would not have been a possibility,” she said. “As a Kennecott Scholar, I have become well-rounded and a more confident applicant for a variety of job opportunities.” Jessy plans to pursue a career in conservation, working with industries to maintain environmental quality.

MARGARET WOLF (’16) Meg Wolf hails from Liberty Lake, Washington, just outside of Spokane, and chose to attend Westminster because of its reputation for great professors, small class sizes, and opportunities for outdoor recreation. As an environmental science major, Meg is particularly interested in the mining industry and finding sustainable ways to improve the impact that mining operations have on their surroundings. She is grateful for the encouragement she has received to pursue an education in environmental science and thanks Kennecott for supporting her academic dreams. “I thank my advisors and teachers who encouraged me to apply for this great opportunity,” she said, “and I thank Kennecott Utah Copper and Rio Tinto for helping support my education.”

ASYLBEK ZHANSERKEEV (’16) Originally from Kyrgyzstan, Asylbek “AJ” Zhanserkeev set a goal of attending college in the United States. Westminster was on a list of schools he applied for, and once he was accepted, he was pleased to study at a smaller school that has helped him adapt to life in the US. A chemistry major and physics minor, AJ is thankful to the company for investing in international students. “This scholarship truly helped me get one step closer to achieving my dreams,” he said. “It has significantly lightened the weight on my shoulders, and now I can focus more on my education.” AJ hopes to attend graduate school in chemical engineering or material science to create novel materials that will benefit society.

Kennecott Through the Years 1960

Kennecott makes its first

donation to Westminster, beginning decades of consecutive giving to the college’s annual fund. 1979

Kennecott industrial

relations manager James “Pete” Petersen installed as Westminster’s interim president, serving again in the office from 1982 to 1985. 1996

Kennecott gives its largest

gift to date—$500,000—to name the Kennecott Utah Copper Room in the Giovale Library and establish the Kennecott Scholars program. 2001

Kennecott donates

$100,000 to support the building addition to the Bill and Vieve Gore School of Business. 2010

Kennecott donates

$600,000 to Westminster’s Meldrum Science Center’s LEED features.

We thank the following Kennecott employees, past and present, for serving on our Board of Trustees: PRESTON CHIARO ROBERT DIMOCK ANDREW HARDING BILL ORCHOW ROBERT PRATT JAMES “PETE” PETERSEN TRACY STEVENSON

OR THE PHYSICAL SCIENCES, STUDENTS MUST MAINTAIN A 3.0 AVERAGE AND BE FULL-TIME STUDENTS. WESTMINSTER REVIEW

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AUTHENTIC STORYTELLING INSPIRES ALUMNUS michael misiewicz (’03) has al-

ZAP FUNDS FOSTER ARTS PROGRAMMING in 1996, salt lake county voters approved the “Zoo, Arts, and Parks” tax, a one-tenth of a percent supplement to the sales tax, to generate support for zoos, arts, and parks throughout the county. Several of Westminster’s artistic offerings have benefited from this tax through the years, including the Westminster Players—the school’s theatrical program overseen by Dr. Michael Vought. “Because of ZAP funding, the quality of both our productions and student learning has gone through the roof,” Michael said. “ZAP’s support enables us to spend more on sets and costumes and makes it possible for us to hire professional choreographers, directors, designers, and musicians to work with our students. We are able to offer the community professionalquality shows at a fraction of the normal cost.” The ZAP tax has provided more than $95,000 to the theatre program, the Anne Newman Sutton Weeks Poetry Series, and the Concert Series. ZAP has also supported the Classical Greek Theatre Festival (now at Westminster) for many years. “It’s a win-win for everyone. Our audiences are larger because the community appreciates high quality theatre for less money, and our students get to work with the best of the best.” Michael said. “We love ZAP!”

ways understood that an important part of being an alumnus is giving back. A member of the in-house counsel at law firm WilmerHale in Washington DC, Michael has enjoyed numerous professional opportunities through Westminster’s alumni network and strong reputation, and he shows his thanks by donating each year to The Westminster Fund. But after reading a scholarship appeal letter he received last spring about a Westminster student who was disowned by his family for being gay, Michael decided to double his annual gift as a sign of his gratitude to the college for sharing such an authentic story. “I appreciate that Westminster is going the extra mile to support a student in that situation,” he said. “I thought it was very brave of Westminster, given its broad audience, to choose that story among many compelling stories it has about its students.” A gay man himself, Michael came out during his time at Westminster, and he credits the inclusive culture at the college for giving him the confidence to live his life truthfully. “I came out at Westminster as a result of having a gay roommate. He brought me out of my shell and has remained one of my closest friends to this day,” Michael said. “Since

then, I’ve been out in every subsequent aspect of my life, whether that be personal or professional.” While at Westminster, Michael met many people who encouraged him to be his true self, which is why he identified so closely with the student featured in the letter­—and why he decided to double his gift. “Whether or not it should be brave, it was. To send that letter to such a wide swath of the alumni really touched me,” he said. “I’m thankful that the school has provided that support and touts it so proudly.” Michael hopes more alumni will identify with the diverse students who attend Westminster and support their educational pursuits. “I contribute so that the next group of students has the same opportunities I was provided,” he said. “For some, this support will literally be the difference between going and not going.”

BELOVED PROFESSOR BOOSTS ALUMNI GIVING RATE what would you do if you received a call from your favorite professor? Dr. Alan Rogers’ former students enjoyed catching up and making a gift to The Westminster Fund. Alan, a pillar of the business school, maintains connections with many students. “I knew that if I called some of my former students, maybe I could give them that final push,” he said. “If our alumni only knew how impor-

tant it is for them to give back, they would—I certainly hope my accounting students would!” Alan called more than 100 former students and is truly gratified with his results—more than 70 alumni donated a total of $10,000 to the college. Perhaps more gratifying to Alan was the catching up—hearing the successes, both professionally and personally, that his former students have enjoyed.

TO LEARN HOW YOU CAN CREATE A SCHOLARSHIP FOR A WESTMINSTER STUDENT, 46

WESTMINSTER REVIEW


WESTMINSTER’S CAMPAIGN FOR SCHOLARSHIPS GOING STRONG with two years left in the $10 million campaign for scholarships, Westminster’s

FOUNDATION GRANT HELPS WESTMINSTER REMAIN A “PROMISE PARTNER”

a grant from the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Foundation is helping Westminster students achieve the collegewide learning goal of developing social responsibility through their work as mentors and tutors to low-income children in South Salt Lake (SSL) schools and neighborhoods. Westminster was named the 2012 “Promise Partner of the Year” by SSL for its participation in their Delinquency Prevention Project, one aspect of the city’s Promise initiative. The initiative is geared to improve the lives of SSL residents in the areas of health, income, safety, education, and, for the many who are refugees or other immigrants, integration into the broader community. Partnering with United Way of Salt Lake and the LDS Church, Westminster students have been working in various neighborhood centers that have been established. In most cases, these are after-school programs where students can spend the afternoon studying and playing in safety until their parents return from their jobs. As both tutors and mentors, Westminster students help younger children with their homework, read with them, and serve as examples and friends to them. Last year, 50+ Westminster students performed this work, some as paid student coordinators who arranged events on campus to involve more students, faculty, and staff, and others providing one-on-one volunteer service. The latest grant enables expansion of the program, hiring students to coordinate tutoring and leadership services and to recruit student volunteers.

community of alumni and friends have stepped up and given more than $6 million in scholarship aid for deserving students. Since July 2010, scholarship donors have created 23 new endowed scholarships, 81 new annual scholarships, 11 new estate gift scholarships—all benefiting more than 222 Westminster students. “Raising funds for scholarships remains a top priority for the college, especially as the need for aid continues to rise for our students,” said Steve Morgan, Vice President for Institutional Advancement. “We are deeply grateful to the alumni, foundations, corporations, and friends who have shown their support for Westminster’s students by investing in their academic success.”

WESTMINSTER COMMUNITY RALLIES AROUND HARDSHIP FUND elle jahara orfield is a bright, busy international business major and workstudy student. Working with the college’s Orientation Team, Elle loves building relationships with incoming freshmen and making them feel welcome. In addition to managing the demands of a full class schedule, Elle works in the Financial Aid office, and she has seen the excitement of other students who receive tuition assistance. She also knows firsthand how important scholarships are, as a recipient of the college’s Hardship Fund. “My family has gone through hard times, and we have worked to be persistently positive in the face of obstacles,” she said. “We keep our positive outlook and fight to make things work.” The Hardship Fund was established last year as the McCarthey Emergency Relief Fund by the McCarthey Family Foundation. The fund helps Westminster students weather unexpected life

events that can jeopardize their enrollment. Because the Hardship Fund’s impact to students is immediate, it has quickly become a popular place for giving within the Westminster community. For the last two years, the Advancement staff has chosen

to forgo holiday gift giving, opting instead to contribute to the Hardship Fund. “The office has raised $500 to $1,000 each year,” said Dana Tumpowsky, director of parent and campus relations. The Hardship Fund was also the top choice of campus projects to fund during “Love UT, Give UT,” a 24-hour, statewide campaign that occurred on March 22. Westminster won

the top spot in its schools and universities category, earning an additional $5,000 grant from the Community Foundation of Utah. “Not only did the Love UT, Give UT campaign raise funds for Westminster students in need of short-term help, it gained new supporters, and awareness of this fund grew immensely,” said Lynn Heinlein, director of annual giving. The 2013 graduating class supported the Hardship Fund with their class gift. Chaired by Brian Panter (’13) and Kito Temkin (’13), the class gift campaign was supported by more than 50 percent of the graduating class, securing a $5,000 challenge grant from alumna and trustee Kim T. Adamson (’79). “Kito and I noticed that students really connected with the opportunity to help each other,” said Brian. If you would like to support the Hardship Fund, please contact the Office of Advancement at 801.832.2730, or give online at westminstercollege.edu/ giving.

PLEASE CONTACT JANE CAMPBELL AT 801.832.2770 OR JCAMPBELL@WESTMINSTERCOLLEGE.EDU. WESTMINSTER REVIEW

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ALUMNI NEWS

49 HONORING SUCCESS 50 FALL REUNION/WHERE IN THE WORLD? 51 SAVE THE PLATE 52 CLASS NOTES 57 SAVE THE DATE 59 IN MEMORIAM 60 ALUMNI EVENTS 64 BY THE NUMBERS

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WESTMINSTER’S MUSIC MAN

While Westminster has to share him while he’s on the road, we feel like Joe Muscolino’s Band really IS our house band

J

oe Muscolino (’72) came to Westminster for its renowned jazz program and created a relationship with the college that has lasted a lifetime. Joe now heads the Joe Muscolino Band and has traveled coast-tocoast performing his music. After graduating with a degree in performance and composition, Joe became a full-time musician and band coordinator. He said music has moved him since an early age. “Everybody needs something they feel they’re good at,” he said. “I will play as long as I can. It keeps me happy and healthy.” For Joe, the reward of this program is being an integral part of people’s lives. “I’ve played weddings, anniversaries, and even funerals for families,” he said. “People call on me to make these days special, and I appreciate being able to build a relationship with them.” Joe has continued his involvement by performing on campus and by creating a scholarship for student musicians. He has also been a mentor in the Alumni Mentoring and Take a Griffin to Lunch programs.

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ALUMNI NEWS

LEADERSHIP CHANGES IN ALUMNI RELATIONS

It’s a Time of Change for Westminster’s Alumni Relations Program. Meet the New Connections.

Former Alumni Director Takes on Further Challenges

A New Leader for Westminster’s Vibrant Alumni Network

New Chair Brings Fresh Ideas to Alumni Board

Associate Provost for Integrative and Community-Based Learning Annalisa Holcombe (’92) will take the foundation of alumni programming to a whole new level. She will also be a leader for multiple centers on campus, while she also leads efforts for recruitment and retention, engagement, experiential learning, and the integration of alumni and community into the student experience. As a former alumni board member, she believed that we needed a “broader representation of who our alumni were,” a phrase that was her driving force during the past seven years. She managed the board of trustees, created the community relations program, developed and wrote the current master plan, spearheaded the presidential search, and developed the alumni mentoring program and the distinguished alumni awards. Annalisa says her time at Westminster has been transformative, and she has advice for her fellow alumni: get involved. “Give your engagement with Westminster a chance,” she said. “The impact you will have on the college is great, but the impact it will have on you is even bigger. All I wanted was to give back, and it changed my life dramatically—and in ways I never anticipated.”

Michelle Barber-Lyhnakis (MPC ’06) has a legacy at Westminster: her father graduated in 1976, her husband in 2010, and she is the mother of two future Westminster alumni (ages three and one). As Westminster’s new director of alumni relations, she has big ideas to grow and innovate the program. Michelle had worked in television, where she realized the importance of aligning work with your core values and working toward a larger purpose. She found that purpose at Westminster. “Westminster was at the top of my list because of my student experience— people invested in me and my success,” she said. “It was transformative in the way I thought about education.” Michelle intends to expand the strong, vibrant alumni network. “We want to engage people and facilitate a deeper sense of purpose,” Michelle said. “Trust and open communication are critical to our success.” Michelle will work closely with the alumni board to develop programming and engagement opportunities for Westminster graduates. Want to help better the future of alumni relations and student engagement? Do you have a passion that can be put to use? Contact Michelle at mbarber@westminstercollege.edu.

Jim Carter (’72) understands the impact of a Westminster education. Jim transferred to Westminster, where he found his passion for geology and project management. Jim brings considerable strengths and experience from a long career in resource management, planning, and project management. He later earned a master of geology degree and a JD. He worked for the Utah Division of Oil, Gas, and Mining; Governor Matheson’s office; specialty law firms; and was later the city attorney for Park City. Currently, he is the Regional Manager and Senior Planner for Logan Simpson Design. Jim has learned valuable lessons that can be applied in his leadership: resolving issues, appreciating different points of view, understanding people’s values and backgrounds, and building consensus. “I am excited for the opportunity to build on the big change I have seen in my first two years on the board,” Jim said. “It’s an integral part of the college.” He said former chair, Corbin Archer, set the bar high in terms of leadership and commitment to the board. One of Jim’s first initiatives is to better engage alumni throughout their entire lives. Contact Jim directly at jcw1221@westminstercollege.edu to learn how you can help.

WESTMINSTER REVIEW

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ALUMNI NEWS (

Reunite This Fall

REUNITE, RECONVENE, AND REUNIFY Come Back to Westminster at REUNION

Sept. 25–28, 2013 Return to Westminster to celebrate REUNION with us. This is an opportunity for all alumni from every class year to come back to campus, feel nostalgic for your alma mater, and reminisce with old classmates. Celebrate everything you loved about your Westminster experience with us at the following events:

Westminster Thinks BIG Campus Ghost Tour Reunion Brunch Kids on Campus Everyone’s favorite: Oktoberfest

A schedule of events and registration information are available at westminstercollege.edu/alumni.

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2 0 1 3 VO L U N T E E R O F T H E YEAR

)

WESTMINSTER’S VOLUNTEER OF THE YEAR

Spunky, Full of Life, and Always Ready for a Challenge

N

oreen Rouillard (Honorary Doctorate ’12) was the recipi-

ent of this year’s Volunteer of the Year award, selected by her peers on the alumni board for her decades of dedication to promoting Westminster. Noreen attended Westminster as a freshman with the class of 1951. After marrying her husband, Don, Noreen moved with him to Colorado, but her involvement with Westminster didn’t end there. Throughout her years in Colorado and later in New Jersey, Noreen represented Westminster at presidential inaugurations and admissions events. In addition, Noreen has served twice as the president of the Woman’s Board and served on the board of trustees for 21 years. She says making an impact on the student experience has been a deeply rewarding part of her life. “Westminster makes me who I am today,” Noreen said. “It makes me more welcoming about finding new things to do and ways to help others.”


ALUMNI NEWS

DRIVE YOUR PRIDE

Show Off Your Westminster Colors and Help Support Student Scholarships

L

ast spring, you helped Save the Plate—now what? To keep our spe-

cialty license plate, we need to (continuously) have 500 license plates on the road. Share this opportunity with your family, friends, and former classmates to help us maintain the plate. The Westminster license plate was in danger in 2010 when the Utah State Legislature passed a bill to end distribution of specialty plates from organizations with fewer than 500 registered plates. Now we have more than 500 plates on the road, raising more than $15,000 for student scholarships and showing pride everywhere our alumni, staff, faculty, and current students drive. “This is an opportunity to benefit Westminster College in a variety of ways,” said Michelle Barber-Lyhankis, director of alumni relations. “It allows students to afford a Westminster education and shows our alumni’s pride in their institution.” This ongoing project needs the help of all alumni. If at any time we fall below 500 plates, we will lose our opportunity to raise important scholarship funds for our students. Visit westminstercollege.edu/westminsterplate for a simple, printable order form. You don’t even need to go to the DMV! And drive your pride.

How Much?

$15

one-time license plate registration fee

$3

shipping fee

$48

for the first year

The result?

$30

tax-deductible donation to the Scholarship Fund

Visit westminstercollege.edu/westminsterplate for a printable order form and answers to frequently asked questions.

WESTMINSTER REVIEW

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CLASS NOTES

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THE MAN IN THE ORANGE HAT LES TANNER and his Low-Tech GPS

A

s a kid, Les Tanner (’58)

hated standing out in the crowd. These days, the retired mathematics professor from Caldwell, Idaho, stands out wherever he goes, known by many as “that guy in the orange hat.” Les began wearing an orange hat in 1979 after making the mistake of going fishing on the opening day of deer hunting season. Nerves frayed after flinching every time he heard a gunshot, Les entered a Boise sporting goods store and purchased a bright orange hat—a decision that proved handy time and again. At his daughter’s college graduation from Jamestown College, where Les taught for 17 years, he was easy to spot among the hundreds milling about. And when he’s separated from his wife, Ruby (Reynolds) Tanner, in a crowded shopping mall or airport, he’s never lost for very long. “[The orange hat] has truly become my trademark,” he said. “Most of the family think it’s cool—others, not so much!”

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B Y AUDREY MAYNARD (’03)

As a young man, Les struggled to distinguish himself. He planned to study chemical engineering at San Jose State and Stanford, but his mother died during his junior year in high school. Les moved with his mourning family to Boulder, where he attended the University of Colorado and

calculus (required for the pre-engineering program) were scheduled simultaneously. “I’m not sure why I chose calculus, but I did,” Les said. “My teacher was Ed Bradley, and that was that, mathematically speaking.” Les completed straight-A work his first semester and received a note that President Palmer wanted to meet him. Palmer acknowledged Les for his strong work and asked him to consider becoming a math teacher—even offering to pay tuition for Les to attend graduate school. “That’s one of the many great things about a small college—that its president might actually know who I was, let alone pay attention to me and how I was doing,” he said. “I didn’t take him up on the offer, but when I was a senior, the then-president, Frank Duddy, offered me a teaching assistantship for the following year. I jumped at the chance!” The small college experience at Westminster contributed to the most important events of his life. Les met his wife, Ruby, here, and close friendships developed during that formative time, including with mathematics professor Dr. Bruce Bemis— relationships that inspired him to pursue a 38-year career as a college professor. On his 60th birthday, he began writing: to date, he has had more than 40 pieces published and has won fiction prizes

“That’s one of the many great things about a small college—that its president might actually know who I was, let alone pay attention to me and how I was doing,” completed “dismal” performances in all his classes, especially calculus. “I failed it twice during my second year at CU,” he said. “The only non-‘F’ on my 1952–53 transcript is a ‘D,’ which was given by a grad assistant who apparently never failed anyone.” Les used his GI Bill to enroll at Westminster, a school recommended by Les’s father’s friend, Curtis Smart (’57). Of course, both organic chemistry and

sponsored by Idaho magazine. Many of his stories are inspired by his time at Westminster, which Les credits for his success.“Virtually all of the success I’ve had in my career and my life is due to my having been, very accidentally yet fortuitously, a student at good old ‘Westminny,’” he said. To read his collection of stories about his time at Westminster, visit westminstercollege.edu/lestanner.


CLASS NOTES

’10s Alana Boscan (MACL ’13)

Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) in the Prevention Research Branch.

has opened a record store, Diabolical Records, in the Granary Row District. Through her store, Alana hopes to bring lesser-known musicians to Salt Lake City and promote local bands.

Kendall Brannen (’13) recently completed an internship as the Summer Intern/Analyst for the Salt Lake County Economic Development office.

Tawnee Espinoza (’13) recently announced her engagement to Taylor Kinnebrew. The couple will be married on September 13 at the Homestead Resort.

Yvonne Francis (’13) was published with Dr. Christine Seifert in the spring 2013 issue of Bitch magazine. She was accepted to the University of Utah master of communications program and was awarded a communications fellow teaching stipend for her education.

Faith Martinez (’13) is currently attending the University of Texas–Austin in a dual master’s degree program in energy and earth resources and global policy studies. She completed an internship with Rio Tinto over the summer in Energy Programs and was awarded the McNair Fellowship for UT–Austin.

Dexter Thomas (’13) is currently in the Post-Baccalaureate Undergraduate Scholarship Program Fellow at National Institutes of Health. Dexter is working in the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National

Christina Della Iacono (’12) is enrolled in the Cognitive and Systems Neuroscience PhD program at University of Oregon and was appointed as a trainee on the Developmental Training Grant. She is happy to have checked several personal achievements off her bucket list this year, including buying a motorcycle, joining a Samba Troupe, and traveling to Guinea to immerse herself in dance culture.

Nicole Fisher (’12) is a research analyst for the Utah Autism and Developmental Disabilities Monitoring Project (UT–ADDM), one of 14 sites in the United States that study the changes in Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) prevalence in specific places and populations over time.

Karl Gerner (’12) is pursuing his JD at the University of Utah’s S. J. Quinney College of Law. He recently completed an internship with the Office of the New York State Inspector General.

Gary Gonzalez (’12) was hired by BrandHive as its public

A Modern Day Explorer Watch Out for the Leopard Seals

Chief Medical Officer and Department Medical Director of Mason General Hospital in Shelton, Washington, Dean Gushee (’80), is a master of many trades: in addition to a demanding career in medicine, he is an avid photographer and a modern day explorer, traveling the globe with National Geographic as an on-board physician. After graduating from Westminster as a biology major, he pursued a master of biological oceanography degree at Oregon State University, then attended the University of Utah School of Medicine and completed a residency in emergency medicine—a field in which he’s still involved today. “The Westminster experience provided a context for lifelong learning,” Dean commented. “It would have been quite easy, if I had attended another institution, to look at progress and learning as just one more exam toward a goal, rather than as something to absorb and internalize for future reference and retrieval.” Dean accompanied National Geographic to Antarctica twice. Once, he and the team members were attacked by 1,000-pound leopard seals—thankfully without serious injury. In March 2013 he was nominated for and elected to membership in the Explorer’s Club. “My career…stems from a willingness to be flexible and look for opportunities,” Dean said. “The unpredictable nature of my career has been very satisfying to me.” WESTMINSTER REVIEW

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CLASS NOTES relations coordinator to support the company’s continued growth. BrandHive was recently hired by Albion Human Nutrition as its integrated marketing and public relations agency.

Mai Ho (’12) completed an internship with Deloitte in London in spring 2013. Mai had the unique opportunity to learn about tax structuring and consulting for global hedge funds and private equity. After three months of adventures, Mai came back to Goldman Sachs as the first Westminster graduate to join the Global Investment Research division. Recently, Mai accepted an opportunity to finish her second year analyst program with Goldman Sachs in Singapore, where she continues her professional career and passion for travel. 

Desi Diselrod (’12), Kory Nieuwkoop (’12), and Suradee Thongkiattikul (’11), best friends from Westminster, had a mini reunion in Alaska this past June. After more than a year of planning, the reunion trip was a great success. They hope to make this a new tradition, with a different destination every year. Next stop: Chicago!

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save the date

Andy Larsen (’12) is marketing director for Keller Williams Salt Lake City, in addition to his role as managing editor of Salt City Hoops, the ESPN TrueHoop affiliate for the Utah Jazz. His work has been featured on UtahJazz.com, ESPN, Yahoo! Sports, Sports Illustrated, and more. Last summer, he started a podcast that Stitcher Radio listed as the 53rdmost-listened-to sports podcast in the world.

Scott Milner (MBA ’12) recently accepted a position as the pharmacy director for Cassia Regional Medical Center. He formerly worked in Intermountain Healthcare’s corporate office, where he managed infusion pumps and pharmacy databases.

ALUMNI PROGRAMMING YOU WON’T WANT TO MISS IN 2013–2014 Visit westminstercollege.edu for more information.

SEPTEMBER Celebrating the 25th Anniversary of the Gore School of Business SEPTEMBER 19–20

Visit westminstercollege.edu/ gorecelebration. REUNION Weekend SEPTEMBER 25–28 WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 25

Campus Ghost Tour 9:00 pm, West of Converse Hall Take a stroll around campus and learn the tales of Westminster’s haunted past.

Emilee Nailor (’12) was accepted as a research fellow to Mind and Life Summer Research Institute, an interdisciplinary conference on meditation, cognitive and contemplative neuroscience, philosophy, and Buddhist practice. She was awarded a graduate research fellowship from a grant from the John Templeton Foundation for a study examining the invention of imaginary worlds and the development of creativity in middle childhood. She is currently serving as the Imagination Laboratory Manager at University of Oregon and is applying to PhD programs in cognitive neuroscience and cognitive psychology in fall 2013.

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 26

Think Again: Diversity Lecture 7:00 pm, Jewett Center The campus welcomes immigration expert Cecilia Menjivar. FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 27

Westminster Thinks Big 7:00 pm, Jewett Center It’s May Term in a night! Favorite faculty members share their passions in 10-minute talks: Dick Chapman, Heidi Van Ert, Chris Cline, Kerry Case, Richard Badenhausen, Richel Raich (’09), Jeffrey Nelson (’04), Nicole Bedera, and Chrono Nu. SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 28

Victoria Valencia (’12) is pursuing her JD at Georgetown Law. She began a three-year position as the program director for the American Cancer Society’s Camp Reach for the Sky Day Camp in the summer.

Alumni Leadership Forum 8:30 am, Adamson Alumni House Alumni interested in volunteering with Westminster are

invited to learn more about the available opportunities.  Presidential Bike Tour 8:30 am, East of Converse Hall Join Dr. Brian on a morning bike tour of Sugar House. REUNION Brunch 11:00 am, Richer Commons Alumni are invited to brunch, where we’ll share our favorite Westminster memories. Tickets $20, at westminstercollege.edu/ alumni. Kids on Campus 11:00 am, Richer Commons Games and crafts for our youngest REUNION goers, courtesy of the Westminster Kids Club. Alumni Lacrosse Game 4:30 pm, Dumke Field Alumni lacrosse players take the field for the Annual Alumni vs. Students Lacrosse Game. Oktoberfest 6:00 pm, Richer Commons REUNION Weekend wraps up with Oktoberfest: traditional Bavarian food, drinks, and live music. Tickets $25, available at westminstercollege.edu/alumni. OCTOBER SUNDAY, OCTOBER 6

Alumni Soccer Game Noon, Dumke Field


CLASS NOTES Men’s Soccer Alumni take on this year’s varsity team in the Annual Alumni Soccer Game.

A PURR-fect Solution

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 26

risks allow you to find success. After developing the PURR-fect Solutions kitty litter idea at Ceramatec in 2012, the team formed a new company to commercialize and manufacture their product. And Westminster’s networking opportunities through its alumni department and Gore School of Business allowed the pair to forge valuable business relationships. “Build your network early,” Chett said. “Networking is how you get jobs, find funding, and solve problems in your current position. Westminster provides great opportunities to network and stay involved.” PURR-fect Solutions is unique because it is a blend of traditional clumping litter with environmentally friendly practices. Chett says they hope their product will surpass gold standard litters. The Westminster education Chett and Jessica received allows them to communicate effectively, work together, and be comfortable taking risks. “Chett and I speak the same language—we are problem solvers and critical thinkers,” she said. “I learned you have to be passionate and take risks. We know it’s not just a job, we’re building something.” PURR-fect Harmony litter by PURR-fect Solutions is currently available in several states and will be coming to Utah soon.

Westminster Kids Club 10:00 am, Shaw Center Dress up your kids and bring them for games, treats, and Halloween fun! NOVEMBER WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 6

Recruit Salt Lake, Ray Olpin University Union, University of Utah Westminster teams with all Utah’s colleges and universities for a huge recruiting event—more than 80 employers will be looking for experienced job candidates. DECEMBER FRIDAY, DECEMBER 6

Parson’s Holiday Party 11:30 am, Adamson Alumni House Alumni from the 50s, 60s, and 70s gather for the Annual Holiday Lunch.

An Environmentally Friendly Product

Chett Boxley (MBA ’06) and Jessica McKelvie (’09) know that

SATURDAY, DECEMBER 7

Westminster Kids Club 10:00 am, Shaw Center Celebrate the holiday season with the Westminster Kids Club! FEBRUARY FEBRUARY 7–8

Hall of Fame Weekend Join us as we honor the former Westminster athletes. MARCH FRIDAY, MARCH 14

Cocktails and Connections 6:00 pm, Salt Lake Country Club Westminster’s Annual Spring Networking Event.

Talent Brings the Artist a Dream Job Alumnus Finds Passion in Concept Design

During his time at Westminster, Peter Markowski (’05) discovered his passion for creativity and design, skills he uses every day as a concept artist for Warner Brothers Animation. After graduation, Peter earned a master’s degree from Art Center College of Design in Pasadena, California. He then worked in theme park design, as a concept artist for LEGO, and has worked on several projects for Warner Brothers. “I do concept art—sketches, drawings, and paintings of what these worlds look like,” Peter said. “We create new cultures and terrains.” He says this job gives him a lot of personal satisfaction, allowing him to create for a living. It also allows him to engage in the narrative storytelling process. Through his experience, he has learned to stay sharp, not get too comfortable, and not to take anything for granted.

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CLASS NOTES Mamta Chaudari (’11) is enrolled in the master of public health program at George Washington University, studying maternal and child health.

Joseph Grover (’11), owner of portable solar systems company Goal Zero, was honored with an Innovation Award at the 2013 Consumer Electronics Show. Mercato Partners recently invested $7 million in the company to accelerate retail, online, and international sales.

A Tale of Two Roommates

The Distance Between Them is Mere Geography The first time they learned of each other was in their room assignment letters before freshman year. Now more than 10 years later, Candice Nyman (’03) and Ashley (Jorgensen) Gurling (’03) are still close friends. They went through the Honors program together, worked in ASWC together, and both found the men who they would marry during their time at Westminster. Candice is now an academic mentor at Western Governors University. She loves spending time with her family: husband, Brandon; son, Jack Wesley; and a baby girl on the way. Ashley moved with her husband, Mark, to the San Francisco Bay area immediately following

their graduation. She is now a stay-at-home mom for her four-year-old daughter, Adeline Pearl, and is a contract curriculum writer on the side. Both have fond memories of their time at Westminster: making playlists for their favorite memories, boiling a cactus they found outside Malouf, and becoming great friends throughout their four years living together. While they now live in different cities, they have kept in touch through email, letters, and phone calls. “Even though we don’t get together to have crazy adventures like we once did, it’s terrific that it feels like no time has passed whenever we get each other on the phone,” Candice said.

“Most Powerful Women in Banking”

Kim’s Team Gets Accolades from US Banker Magazine

Kim Casaday (’02), president of the Home Financing Division of Zions Bank, oversees residential lending activities for Utah and Idaho. She continued her education, earning her MBA from BYU. “Education brings confidence,” Kim said. “Education opens doors and gives you the confidence to walk through those doors.” The most rewarding aspects of her job are the community engagement and mentoring opportunities. She mentors Zions’ employees and Westminster students through the Alumni Mentoring Program. In 2008, US Banker magazine named Kim and her team among the most powerful women in banking. Utah Business magazine listed Kim as a rising star in their 2012 “40 Under 40” issue. Her next endeavor: spending more time on personal fulfillment and with her family. “When you’re at home, be home,” Kim said. “When you’re at work, be at work. You are there, present­—›100 percent invested.”

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Darien Hickey (’11) is enrolled in the sociology doctoral program at Louisiana State University in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. Darien was awarded a graduate assistantship at the college, which included a stipend, fellowship, and tuition exemption.

Cassidy Jones (’11) was selected as the visitor services and education conservation associate for the National Parks Service’s JFK National Historic Site. Cassidy moved to Boston for this 10-month position, providing visitor services including tours, historical research, resources, and events, and working with education specialists to develop place-based public education curriculum.

Debora Lee (’11) was recently chosen as the business development account executive for the Anaheim Ducks hockey team. Previously, Debora worked for the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim baseball team.

Jordan Loveridge (’11) is studying rhetoric and composi-


CLASS NOTES tion at Arizona State University. He is analyzing connections between community literacy and medieval literacy practices. He is a tutor at the Chandler Gilbert Community College Writing Center.

Spencer Luczak (’11) was recently recognized as “Utah’s Most Eligible Bachelor” by Cosmopolitan magazine. Spencer competed in the national competition in New York in October 2012.

Suradee Thongkiattikul (’11) will be serving in the Peace Corps in Ghana for 27 months as an agriculture/environmental advisor. She will be departing in September 2013 and will com-

plete her term in December 2015. She hopes to pursue a career as a foreign service officer after her term with Peace Corps.

adding thousands of listings to his search page. He is excited for the opportunity this gives him to get the best deal possible for his clients.

Jason Knott (MBA ’10) was recently featured on Fox 13 News for BreathAdvisor. The kiosk allows people to test their blood alcohol content and call a cab directly from their location for a nominal fee.

’00s

Hailee Hatch (MEd ’09) was named an International Education Administrators Fulbright Scholar. She will travel to Berlin and Frankfurt, Germany, and Strasbourg, France, in October to study higher education in these countries.

James Eaton (MBA ’09) re-

Daniel Saint Don (MBA ’07) was recently appointed as

cently innovated the search database for his company, Eaton Real Estate, to include the Wasatch Front Regional MLS database,

vice president and chief operating officer of Atna Resources Ltd. He previously worked for DMC Mining Services as general manager

of USA Mining Operations since 2007.

Lauren (Gibbs) Reber (’06) has joined law firm Parsons Behle & Latimer as an associate. She is a member of the litigation department in the Salt Lake City office and concentrates her practice on litigation, real estate, corporate transactions, and environmental law.

Mark Newman (’05), cofounder of digital interview company HireVue, was listed in INC magazine’s “30 Under 30.” HireVue is growing and has recently moved to a larger, updated office in South Jordan.

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CLASS NOTES Jevan Sadler (’05) is attending the Columbia Business School in New York. Jevan has worked at Zions Bank since he graduated from Westminster.

Robert Cummings (’04) has returned to Salt Lake with his wife and son to start a law firm, the Salt Lake Lawyers, with his friend Phil Wormdahl. He earned a master of economics degree from the University of Utah and a JD from Georgetown Law. Robert began his career as a litigation associate in the LA office of the preeminent law firm of Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom. During his first year of practice, Robert met the love of his life, Rebekah, on eharmony.com, and they were married on August 13, 2011. Rebekah and their son, Aidan, now love exploring Sugar House much the same as Robert did when he was at Westminster.

Landon Halverson (MBA ’04) was recently hired as the vice president of rehabilitation services by EnableUtah. Landon has 20 years of experience working with community organizations and nonprofits.

Aaron Clark (’03) was recently selected as one of 14 young and new professionals to join the 2012 ProNet Leadership Academy..

Rebecca Pugmire Lageschulte (’03) has been selected to serve on the board of directors for the Jordan Education Foundation.

’90s Sharon Montgomery (’97) was recently appointed as the vice president of Federal and Public Sector Sales for Sprint, a telecommunications leader for civilian and department of defense agencies.

David Litvack (’94) was recently named the YWCA’s Public Official of the Year for his integrity and dedication to the wellbeing of women and families.

Ronald Jibson (’91) was recently elected as chair of the American Gas Association. Ron is the president and CEO of Questar Corp. He joined Questar as a design engineer in 1980.

’80s CaraLyn Banks (’88) joined Kemp Smith LLP’s Las Cruces office as a partner in the litigation department. After earning her nursing degree from Westminster, CaraLyn earned her JD and master of health administration degrees from St. Louis University. She is on the board of the Community Foundation of Southern New Mexico and is a past chair.

Jennifer Hajj (’92) recently

Paul Frederick (’86) was

moved to Carlsbad, California, after a long history in Salt Lake City’s acoustic music scene. She was featured in the Salt Lake Tribune to celebrate the great contributions she has made to the community.

recently featured in Pittsburgh Live magazine for his devotion to music and entertainment for over 50 years. Paul played in the US Air Force Band in 1965 and has since studied at Berklee College of Music, played in the Berklee Recording Band, and more.

Kathleen McGilvray Nielson (’92) was recently hired for the YWCA of Hawaii Island’s new CEO. She previously served as a housing specialist 5 for the county of Hawaii and spent four years as the Hawaii county branch director for Goodwill Industries.

’70s

law firm focusing on oil, gas, and mining law.

Marva Barnett (’73) was recently named a chevalier by the French government for her work in French language and literature. Marva is a French professor at the University of Virginia, where she has worked since 1983.

’60s Fred Lampropoulos (’68) was recently installed into the Utah Technology Council Hall of Fame. Fred founded the medical-devicemaker Merit Medical in 1987, which now employs 2,700 people and has annual revenue of more than $400 million.

’50s Bob Halgren (’59) was inducted into the Westminster College Athletic Hall of Fame. He played from 1956 to 1958 and was cocaptain his senior season. He was awarded the Lloyd Gold Medal, given to Westminster’s outstanding senior student-athlete.

Thomas Bachtell (’77) is the “of counsel” attorney for MacDonald & Miller Legal Services PLLC, a new Salt Lake City 2011

HOW TO SUBMIT A CLASS NOTE Michelle Barber Lyhnakis wants to hear from you! We want to celebrate the milestones in your life. Email her about your wedding, new baby, promotion, retirement, new job, adventures, or honors and awards. We’ll include your update in the next issue of the Review. Send us your Class Note along with a 1-megabyte photo to mbarber@westminstercollege.edu.

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CLASS NOTES (

IN MEMO R I U M

)

Jessica Jackman (’12) died on June 20, 2013 Bruce Moriarty (’89) died on February 11, 2013 Karen Droubay (’88) died on January 9, 2013 Mary Simper (’87) died on May 4, 2013 Marlys Petterson (’86) died on April 25, 2013 Jeffrey Jones (’82, ’86) died on July 15, 2012 Whitney Wallace (’80) died on June 9, 2013 Mabel Eide (MED ’79) died on March 25, 2013 James Hadlock (’79) died on April 4, 2013 Joan Hanna (’79) died on May 5, 2012 Royalene Thomas (’79) died on April 3, 2013 Shirley Bradford (’77) died on March 12, 2013 Terry Healey (’74) died on April 3, 2013 Michael Plumlee (’72) died on April 24, 2013 Linda Ricci (’68) died on February 9, 2013 Ruie Green (’67) died on January 30, 2013 Charles Spence (’57) died on March 31, 2013 Colleen Sessions (’56) died on November 17, 2012 Ingo Swan (’55) died on January 31, 2013 Sam Juliano (’54) died on August 30, 2012 Clayton Ek (’53) died on March 20, 2013 Virginia Monks (’49) died on February 21, 2013 L.S. “Sam” Skaggs (’42) died on March 21, 2013 Arline Mattison (’39) died on January 17, 2013 Patricia Eager (’38) died on March 1, 2013 Margaret Butler (’37) died on February 23, 2013 Harold Drummond (’35) died on March 26, 2012

The Future’s so Bright, They’ve Gotta Wear Shades! Launching tomorrow’s leaders is simple. Including this sentence in your will helps future graduates achieve their potential: I give to Westminster College, a 501 (c) 3 nonprofit in Salt Lake City, Utah, ________% of my estate (or the sum

Alfred James Limb (’34) died on August 18, 2012

of $________ or property described herein) to be used for its general purposes.

For more information, contact Kaye Stackpole at 801.832.2735 or kstackpole@westminstercollege.edu.

Your Legacy, Your Way.

Future's So Bright They Gotta Wear Shades.indd 1

2/15/13 3:25 PM

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ALUMNI EVENTS

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ALUMNI EVENTS

ALUMNI MENTORING PROGRAM DINNER

Last year’s Alumni Mentoring Program students, mentors, and facilitators celebrated and reminisced about the year at their April Dinner.

BACK ROW: Jim Carter (’72), Riley Sheldon, Dominic Kallas, Greg Letey, Brian Panter (’13), John Duncan (’98), Kito Temkin (’13), David Litvack (’94). MIDDLE ROW: Michelle Barber Lyhnakis (MPC ’06), Hillary Pierce (’13), Keni Nelson (’13), Leslie Brown, Lexie Banks (’13), Amelia Matthews, Kim Casaday (’02), Xihe “Chenny” Chen, Kate Bradshaw (’03) FRONT ROW: Holly King, Brooke Niemeyer (’08), Alysa Jo Fratto, Amanda Higgins, Annalisa Holcombe (’92)

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ALUMNI EVENTS

COCKTAILS & CONNECTIONS Cocktails & Connections, our largest annual event, is a chance to reconnect with old friends and make professional connections within our alumni community. This year’s event included a networking how-to by our own networking master, Carlos Linares. Cocktails & Connections was a great opportunity to make new professional connections for Laura Dupuy (’97), Jodi Copyak, Alyssa Rhoda, Tim Jones (’09), Emily Foxley (’09), Jordan Renner, and Daniel Morgan (’08).

Carlos Linares (’02, MBA ’05) hosted the “How to Work a Room” event before Cocktails & Connections to give a networking refresher to attendees.

Distinguished Alumni Awards Dr. Brian Levin-Stankevich (center) congratulates our 2013 Distinguished Alumni Award winners. Solomon Awan (’07); Noreen Rouillard, Volunteer of the Year (Honorary Doctorate ’12); Julie Balk (’83); and Kim Adamson (’79). NOMINATE! Know someone deserving of the Distinguished Alumni Award? Nominate that person by November 1, 2013 @ westminstercollege/edu/alumni.

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ALUMNI EVENTS

Four tie-dyed and enthusiastic golfers, including past Alumni Board Chair Corbin Archer (MBA ’02), pose with Griff at the Golf Tournament.

Fred Fogo Dinner

Current students, staff, faculty, and alumni celebrated Dr. Fred Fogo’s retirement from Westminster. Fred was a communications professor for 23 years.

Golf Tournament

The 2013 Golf Tournament sponsored by Eureka Casino brought more than 130 golfers to Jeremy Ranch for a day of mulligans, trick balls, and photo ops with Griff. Proceeds from the golf tournament support student scholarships, allowing numerous students to continue their Westminster education. Marc Weyerstall’s hopes of winning the golf tournament went up in smoke after hitting a trick ball provided by trustee Wood Moyle (MBA ’06).

Practical Advice

Adrienne Shaw Smith (’10), Chair of the Young Alumni Committee, addressed a group of seniors approaching graduation about the realities of post-college life.

Senior Dinner

Alysha Webster (’13), Erica Maier (’13), Tory Hallenburg (’13), Emily Conger (’13), Abby Weymouth (’13), Amy Forker (’13), and Lindsey Krostoski (’13) pose for a picture with Griff before celebrating their graduation at Senior Dinner.

Tavern Night

Westminster alumni showed off their creative sides when the glow sticks came out.

Wine 101

Kim Urbom (’00) and Tommy Marshall enjoyed the wine and cheese pairings at the 2013 Wine 101 event. This event offered a chance to learn about the balance of pairings and the history of wine.

Benjamin Haverkost (’07), Taylor Felton (’10), Stefan van Duyvendijk (’10, MBA ’12), Adrienne Shaw Smith (’10), Tyson Smith (’08), Michelle Barber Lyhankis (MPC ’06)

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ALUMNI NEWS (

JOI N YOU R GRIFF IN S

)

HOW TO GET INVOLVED estminster alumni who volunteer with the college say it’s not only personally rewarding, but well worth the time invested. A Westminster education is marked by impassioned teaching, engaged learning, and unlimited opportunities for growth and personal development. We want more alumni involved in this process for current and future students. We’ve asked you to reconnect, audit a class, and come to events. But now we are asking for something bigger—your time, talent, and passion to help make a difference in the lives of Westminster students.

W

HERE’S HOW YOU CAN GET INVOLVED...

SPREAD THE WORD

SHARE YOUR EXPERIENCE AND PASSIONS

CONNECT WITH YOUR CLASSMATES

Refer a student to Westminster

Mentor a student

Host an admissions event

Take a Griffin to lunch

Help us find alumni from your era by calling or emailing

Help us welcome new students into our community

Hire students for jobs or internships

Attend events like Reunion Weekend

WANT TO GET INVOLVED? Email us at alumnirelations@westminstercollege.edu today to learn more about these opportunities.

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CONTINUE YOUR OWN DEVELOPMENT

Audit a class Join our LinkedIn group: Westminster College Alumni, Students, and Community Participate in networking events


Ways to Give

Scholarship support has helped Hannah Losser pursue a degree in biology while focusing on her true passion: volunteering. You, too, can help deserving Westminster students follow their dreams by creating a scholarship. Here’s how:

Annual scholarship Scholarships can be created to support every kind of student, including those interested in a particular field of study, future profession, community service, or athletics. You can name an annual scholarship for a little as $1,000 per year, payable over four years.

Endowed scholarship Whether you want to honor a loved one or a favorite professor, we will work with you to create a scholarship that will help deserving Westminster students in perpetuity. Your gift of $25,000, payable over five years, will forever provide scholarships for Westminster students.

Giving through your will The Converse Society, Wesminster’s planned giving society, honors those who have committed a gift to the college through their will or trust. You can create a scholarship through your estate, making Westminster a stronger institution and preserving the college’s culture of caring for future generations.

Corporate giving Creating a scholarship for Westminster students makes good business sense. Investing in scholarships strengthens your relationship with emerging talent, providing you with top interns and future employees. To speak to someone about how you can make a difference in the life of a Westminster student by creating a scholarship, please contact the Office of Advancement at 801.832.2730 or toll-free at 866.832.2730. You can also give online at westminstercollege.edu/giving.

your passion their future


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THAT’S ALL? It doesn’t have to be

S tay con n e ct e d w it h

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Review Fall 2013