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westminster college, salt lake city, utah

an institution transformed 2010 president’s annual report


President’s Message After I became Westminster’s 16th

had abolished tenure. We struggled

guide the college for the next

president in 2002, friends from

to get enough highly qualified

decade. But people agreed to the

other institutions asked what I

applicants to fill our freshman class.

proposal, rolled up their sleeves,

really thought of the college and

The vast majority of our students

and got down to work.

of Utah. I could honestly tell them

were from Utah, and the campus

that I was thrilled with the state:

seemed deserted most weekends.

During the next year, over 300 people worked on that strategic

its mountains, lakes, and deserts Despite those problems, I could

plan. We involved faculty, staff,

sense the possibility of change.

students, and administrators. We

My predecessor, Peggy Stock, had

invited members of our board,

developed an ambitious campus

as well as alumni and friends of

master plan to add new facilities

the college, to participate. We

to the campus and had completed

asked leaders from business, the

three important building projects:

professions, public service, and

expanding the Bill and Vieve

the not-for-profit sector, as well as

Gore School of Business, building

national higher education leaders, to

the Giovale Library, and creating

give us their advice. And in the end,

a residential village to provide

we produced what I believe was an

much-needed residence-hall

ambitious yet practical plan. It was

I quickly realized that the core

space. More significantly, I sensed

endorsed by the faculty with only

strengths of the college were its

that among the many talented

five dissenting votes and approved

commitment to students, its culture

and dedicated faculty and staff

unanimously and enthusiastically

of caring, and its belief that it was

on campus, a number had a real

by our board of trustees.

a special place. But I also had some

interest in thinking through some

concerns. I sensed that its near

of the difficult problems facing

bankruptcy in the 1970s caused

higher education. I would not say

lingering fears about our financial

that everyone was excited when

viability among faculty and staff.

I indicated that I wanted to turn

We were still on the censured list

their “interest” into a yearlong

of the American Association of

collaborative process designed to

University Professors because we

develop a strategic plan that could

were spectacular; the people were exceptionally warm and welcoming; and I found Salt Lake to be an increasingly diverse and sophisticated city. I was, however, more reserved in describing the college: I would indicate that the school was in good shape, but I’d also note that it seemed to be going through a transitional period…and I wasn’t sure where it would end up.

PRESIDENT’S ANNUAL REPORT 2010

We have followed that plan scrupulously ever since it was adopted midway through the 2003– 2004 academic year. And as a result, I believe we have moved through our transitional period and emerged as a transformed institution.


When I say we have been

new level of trust and a genuine

we have been careful to empower

transformed, I do not mean that we

belief that if faculty members

local champions who believe in an

have abandoned our traditions or

have good ideas, bold plans,

idea and will shepherd it through

ignored our historic strengths. Far

and expansive visions, then the

what can often be a complex and

from it. Indeed, the strategic plan

administration will help them try

prolonged approval process. The

explicitly called on us to “build on

to realize them. Many of our new

result is that we have had more

our strengths”—and I think we have.

majors, centers, and expanded

success getting plans adopted—and

programming were the direct result

minimized political problems at the

of proposals that “bubbled up” from

same time.

I also do not mean to claim or seek credit for the plan. As Abraham Lincoln said, “I admit I have been more controlled by events than in control of events.” I simply tried to

faculty and staff, were considered by the administration, and were then supported with the resources needed to make them successful.

set up a process, spread seeds and

s7EMADEACOMMITMENTTO promote change in multiple ways and in multiple venues. Some theorists suggest that cultural change

fertilizer here and there, and applaud

s4HEIDEASTHAThBUBBLEDUPv

should be a step-by-step process,

from the sideline as the landscape

were easy to embrace because

undertaken at a measured pace. But

began to change.

they were grounded in a set of

I prefer to have lots of balls in the

educational principles that were at

air because I have always believed

the heart of the strategic plan. These

that you can do more, quicker and

principles covered a range of issues:

with less resistance, if multiple

establishing and assessing learning

ideas are being considered at the

goals; promoting active, experiential,

same time. Of course, some plans

collaborative, and cross-disciplinary

will fail, but the success of even a

learning; controlling costs without

few bold initiatives creates a sense

compromising quality; and

of momentum and excitement, a

supporting our vision of becoming a

feeling that things are happening.

In truth, I think the process has done more than changed our landscape. I believe it has brought us to the forefront of educational reform and made us one of the few institutions that is seriously working on the critical issues facing higher education in our country. In fact, when I look at the work that

nationally recognized community of

has been done over the last few

learners. Using these core principles

years, I am astonished by how much

as a screen for proposals, we have

we have accomplished. In the pages

been able to identify, fairly easily,

that follow, we’ll try to document

which would advance our goals and

our transformation with noteworthy

give priority to those that have the

accomplishments, as well as data. But

greatest lifting power.

here I want to focus on what I believe may have been the key to what we have accomplished: the culture of the campus has been changed. Let me give you a few examples:

Following our strategic plan has enabled us to make remarkable progress in the last few years. And our success gives me every confidence that we can deal with the challenges that still lie ahead of us.

s,EADERSHIPHASBEENDISPERSED and “local champions” control the development of programs and proposals. I was once a sociologist and taught students that the same

s4HERELATIONSHIPBETWEENTHE

idea would be received differently

faculty and administration has

depending on whether it was seen

evolved; while we may not be BFF

as a plan from a peer or a dictate

(for those not yet sending text

from a boss. And while I have not

messages or using Twitter, that is

taught that particular class in many

“Best Friends Forever”), there is a

years, the precept remains true. So

Michael S. Bassis

PRESIDENT’S ANNUAL REPORT 2010

1


table of contents

2

PRESIDENT’S ANNUAL REPORT 2010


President’s Message • 1 A Transformational Journey • 4 Data to Support the Case • 24 Honor Roll • 34

Westminster College Board of Trustees Kim T. Adamson* Jeanne Ambruster Gretchen Anderson Martha Felt Barton* Judith Billings Michael Bills* *AMES2#LARK 6ICE#HAIR #URT0#ROWTHER E. R. “Zeke� Dumke III Thomas A. Ellison

Bing L. Fang* Thomas Fey 2OBERT*&RANKENBERG #HAIR Robert A. Garda #LARK0'ILES Susan Glasmann !NDREW(ARDING (ANK(EMINGWAY #OLLEEN+EARNS-C#ANN

Peter D. Meldrum

*Alumni

Editors 2OBIN"OONs0AMELA#LEMs(ELEN(ODGSON ,AURA-URPHYs"OB3ELTZER

Writers -ICHAEL"ASSISs#URTIS2YANs"OB3ELTZER

Design Roger Jones, Poolhouse Design

Photography

Dale E. Miller O. Wood Moyle IV* William Orchow Joe Reyna Alvin Richer* Noreen Rouillard Andrew J. Schilly David E. Simmons 7#ARTER3TINTON

R. Anthony Sweet

Trustee membership July 1, 2009, through June 30, 2010

Senior Administration President Dr. Michael S. Bassis Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs Dr. Cid Seidelman Vice President for Advancement and Alumni Relations Steve Morgan Vice President for Finance and Administration Curtis Ryan Vice President for Enrollment Services Joel Bauman Associate Provost for Student Development Dr. Susan Heath %XECUTIVE$IRECTOROF#OMMUNICATIONSLaura Murphy Special Assistant to the President Dr. Bob Seltzer $IRECTOROF!LUMNI #OMMUNITY AND"OARD2ELATIONSAnnalisa S. Holcombe

&RED(AYESs*ASON*ONES -ICHAEL3CHOENFELDs"RIAN4WEDE

Cover Atrium Sculpture in the new Meldrum Science Center: Metamorphic Synergy, conceived, created, and INSTALLEDBYGLASSARTIST$AN#UMMINGSANDMETALARTIST$ANA+UGLINWITHTHEASSISTANCEOF*UDITH#HRISTENSEN

PRESIDENT’S ANNUAL REPORT 2010

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a transformational journey Changing our educational paradigm from teaching to learning is at the core of the transformation under way at Westminster. We no longer describe ourselves as a first-rate teaching institution. We prefer to be known as an exemplary community of learners.

4

PRESIDENT’S ANNUAL REPORT 2010


When we adopted our 10-year strategic plan in 2004, it looked terribly ambitious‌even to me. It called for nothing less than a dramatic change in some basic operations of the college. But I was convinced then, and believe even more strongly now, that we cannot just continue to follow the educational model that has dominated colleges and universities for hundreds of years. It has become too rigid and too unresponsive to the dynamic needs of students and society in the twenty-first century. We have made significant progress in every area of the strategic plan and, in the process, transformed Westminster. The following pages present a snapshot of the unique learning environment that we have created. And what we have done prepares us to be on the cutting edge of the additional changes that higher education will need to make in the years ahead.

PRESIDENT’S ANNUAL REPORT 2010

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WE ASSUMED A

NEW LEVEL OF ACCOUNTABILITY FOR THE QUALITY OF OUR GRADUATES

Westminster professors no longer spoon-feed students “knowledge” in lectures; now they create learning experiences that require students to draw and test their own conclusions. Our students do more than take notes: they are involved in, and increasingly responsible for, their own learning. Our approach helps students master both subject-specific information and the broader, more enduring traits embodied in our college-wide learning goals. National surveys of employers tell us that too many graduates are ill-prepared for the workplace. To make sure our graduates are prepared, we radically shifted our focus from teaching to student learning, and we established college-wide learning goals in order to ensure our graduates would have the broader skills that they need.

6

PRESIDENT’S ANNUAL REPORT 2010


Based on input from faculty, higher education leaders, and employers, the following

#OLLEGE 7IDE Learning Goals were established: s #RITICAL ANALYTICAL ANDINTEGRATIVETHINKING s #REATIVEANDREFLECTIVECAPACITIES s ,EADERSHIP COLLABORATION ANDTEAMWORK s 7RITINGANDOTHERCOMMUNICATIONSKILLS s 'LOBALCONSCIOUSNESS SOCIALRESPONSIBILITY and ethical awareness

Westminster nursing graduates “always display excellent problem-solving skills. You know they have gone, and continue to go, far beyond book learning.” —Susan Goodwin, University Hospital nurse manager

E-Portfolios are being piloted to assess student achievement of college-wide learning goals. We plan to make successful completion and evaluation of e-portfolios a requirement for graduation.

v7ESTMINSTER#OLLEGEISTOBECOMMENDEDFORTHEQUALITYOFITSPROGRAMOF

Educational Assessment. Both college-wide and program-specific learning goals have been established, mechanisms for measuring the progress towards the achievement of these goals have been discussed and adopted, and the results of these measurements are being used for the improvement of student learning at the institution.

The college recognizes this represents an important shift, and there is much evidence that it is sincerely engaged in the cultural transformation it implies.“ —Northwest Commission of Colleges and Universities, Regular Interim Report, 2008

PRESIDENT’S ANNUAL REPORT 2010

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WE ADOPTED

STATE-OF-THE-ART LEARNING DESIGNS AND RESOURCES

We know that students learn more and are better able to apply what they learn when they are actively engaged. So we immerse students in a process that requires them to integrate knowledge and test learning in the real world. Students participate in learning communities, which apply the perspectives from different disciplines to particular topics. They engage in service projects related to their courses. They work collaboratively on projects that require knowledge and skills from multiple disciplines. And in the end, they create a coherent mosaic from what appear to be discrete pieces of knowledge, creatively apply what they have learned to solve problems, and become lifelong learners.

8

PRESIDENT’S ANNUAL REPORT 2010


Using an innovative, interdisciplinary curriculum, the team-taught

(ONORS0ROGRAM emphasizes the development of high-level research, critical-thinking, and communication skills. Students are energized by the special opportunities they have for research, course-related travel, and leadership development.

Seven New Academic #ENTERSAND)NSTITUTES have been added since 2004:

 #ENTERFOR#HINA !MERICA"USINESS3TUDIES  #ENTERFOR#IVIC%NGAGEMENT  $IVERSITYAND)NTERNATIONAL#ENTER  %NVIRONMENTAL#ENTER 5. Great Salt Lake Institute 6. Institute for New Enterprise  7RITING#ENTER

Westminster’s 100% project-based,

#OMPETENCY "ASED(YBRID,EARNING$ESIGN —combining the best of high touch with the best of high tech— has been introduced in two business programs.

All freshmen participate in learning communities : two courses in different disciplines, taught by DIFFERENTFACULTY BUTLINKEDBYACOMMONTHEME,EARNING#OMMUNITYFACULTYALSOSERVEASSTUDENTMENTORS Westminster Scholars, a program for academically motivated students and one of the only programs of its kind in the country, takes the problem-based learning model and synthesizes it into a liberal education core curriculum.

PRESIDENT’S ANNUAL REPORT 2010

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WE BUILT AN ENVIRONMENT RICH WITH

DIVERSE IDEAS, PERSPECTIVES, CULTURES, AND PEOPLE At one point Westminster was a homogeneous, self-enclosed community. But we have worked hard to bring diversity to campus. What we have done and are doing works. We have a growing out-of-state student body; more international students on campus and more travel-abroad opportunities for our students; and a student body with an exciting mix of ethnic, racial, and religious backgrounds. As a result, students regularly interact with people from different backgrounds and, in the process, encounter different perspectives. As those differences are explored, cultural sensitivity increases, prejudices decline, and a rich intellectual climate is nurtured.

10

PRESIDENT’S ANNUAL REPORT 2010


Partnerships With Six International Universities  $ONGHUA5NIVERSITY 3HANGHAI #HINA  .ANKAI5NIVERSITY 4IANJIN #HINA  0AYAP5NIVERSITY #HIANG-AI 4HAILAND 4. Universidad Argentina de la Empresa, Buenos Aires, Argentina  5NIVERSIDAD#ATĂ˜LICA!RGENTINA "UENOS!IRES Argentina 6. Universidad de Piura, Lima, Peru

Of the 2010 entering class,

22% are from Diverse Backgrounds, up 12% from 2004.

Two local non-profit groups are located on campus, the

inclusion center and the utah council for citizen diplomacy. Both bring numerous opportunities for our students and faculty to interact with people from diverse backgrounds, both domestically and internationally.

Westminster has 17

National (ISPANIC Scholars in the entering class of 2010.

PRESIDENT’S ANNUAL REPORT 2010

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WE USED OUR LOCAL ENVIRONMENT AS

A LABORATORY FOR LEARNING When I first visited Westminster, I looked at the spectacular mountains only minutes from campus and said, “Wow.” I had the same reaction when I learned that Salt Lake was an increasingly diverse and sophisticated center for the arts, finance, high technology, international business, and entrepreneurship. But the biggest “wow” came when I realized that we were not taking much advantage of our location to foster student learning. That is changing. Now we bring a constant stream of community and business leaders to campus. We involve our students, through internships and other community-based learning activities, in the economic and cultural life that surrounds us. We have programs that get students off campus: they can study biology, geology, paleontology, and environmental science in what is perhaps the finest natural laboratory in the country. They can ski, explore, enjoy, and learn in—and from—the spectacular mountains that surround us. Our educational environment is far richer as a result.

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PRESIDENT’S ANNUAL REPORT 2010


Westminster ranks 13th in the nation for

“Quality Of Life� and 15th for “Town-Gown Relations are Great.� — The Best 373 Colleges, 2011 Edition, The Princeton Review

Recent internship opportunities for Westminster students have included positions with the following companies:

Arts Ballet West The Sundance Institute Utah Symphony

The new student-run

Business/Technology

#AMPUS#ONCIERGE

Boeing Delta Air Lines (EWLETT0ACKARD Sinclair Oil

helps students take advantage of all that the city of Salt Lake and Utah have to offer.

Communications #ITADEL#OMMUNICATIONS #LEAR#HANNEL"ROADCASTING +546#HANNEL46 Salt Lake magazine

Finance/Banking American Express Fidelity Investments '%#APITAL Goldman Sachs

Health Care (UNTSMAN#ANCER)NSTITUTE )NTERMOUNTAIN(EALTH#ARE NPS Pharmaceuticals 3T-ARKS(OSPITAL

“Utah’s life-science industry is growing rapidly, and the biotech companies increasingly count on Westminster’s science graduates.� —Peter Meldrum, CEO Myriad Genetics Fourteen students were named to the

2010 Winter Olympic Team.

“Each Each year, Westminster students perform more than 40,000 hours of

community communityservice. service.

A total of 65 US Ski and Snowboard team members and aspiring Olympians have attended Westminster since 2005.

PRESIDENT’S ANNUAL REPORT 2010

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WE REFOCUSED AND EXPANDED OUR

CO-CURRICULAR PROGRAMS TO SUPPORT COLLEGE-WIDE LEARNING GOALS Every college has clubs and sports teams and lectures and plays and recitals and dances. But we don’t just sponsor activities like that: we make them an integral part of our educational environment by intentionally and explicitly linking each activity to our learning goals. For example, our coaches make sure that athletes make a connection between what they do on the court and concepts related to leadership and teamwork. Our rich variety of programs encourages students to follow their interests and discover new ones. And as student interest in, and demand for, such activities has grown, both the number and kind of our co-curricular offerings have increased exponentially. As a result, our campus is a more engaging, active, and fun place to be.

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PRESIDENT’S ANNUAL REPORT 2010


7ESTMINSTERWASNAMEDTOTHE0RESIDENTS(IGHER%DUCATION

#OMMUNITY3ERVICE(ONOR2OLL for four consecutive years. — The Corporation for National and Community Service 2006, 2007, 2008, and 2009

Westminster’s

Ethics Bowl

team

placed in the top four nationally in each of the past two years and will compete at the nationals again in 2011.

Twenty-two percent of undergraduates participated in co-curricular leadership activities in 2009–2010.

s ACTIVESTUDENTCLUBS s ENDOWEDLECTURESERIES s ANNUALSTUDENTMUSICALCONCERTS

eight new intercollegiate athletic teams have been added: men’s and women’s lacrosse, men’s and women’s skiing, men’s and women’s snowboarding, and men’s and women’s track.

s DOCUMENTARYFILMSERIES s ANNUALTHEATRICALPRODUCTIONS s ENDOWEDPOETRYSERIES

PRESIDENT’S ANNUAL REPORT 2010

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WE ADDED UNIQUE

MISSION-DRIVEN AND MARKET-SAVVY PROGRAMS I’ve worried that we might be growing too fast and expanding into too many fields. But so far, our programming—in areas like community leadership, environmental studies, and public health—has been both consistent with our areas of expertise and responsive to student interest and community needs. Additionally, we are testing different pedagogies in these programs and learning how to modify traditional instructional models to control costs, improve quality, and adapt to changes in student needs and demands.

16

PRESIDENT’S ANNUAL REPORT 2010


Eighteen New Undergraduate Programs s !RTS!DMINISTRATION s "ACHELOROF"USINESS!DMINISTRATION s "ACHELOROF&INE!RTS s #OMPUTER)NFORMATION3YSTEMS s %NGLISHASA3ECOND,ANGUAGE s &ILM3TUDIES s (UMAN0ERFORMANCEAND7ELLNESS s *USTICE3TUDIES s -USIC s .EUROSCIENCE s 0ALEONTOLOGY s 0UBLIC(EALTH s 3PANISH ,ATIN!MERICAN3TUDIES s 3PECIAL%DUCATION s 4HEATRE s 7ESTMINSTER3CHOLARS s 7INTERAT7ESTMINSTER s 7ESTMINSTER%NGLISHASA3ECOND Language Institute

Nine New Graduate Programs s 'LOBAL-"! s -ASTEROF!CCOUNTANCY s -ASTEROF!RTSIN#OMMUNITY,EADERSHIP s -ASTEROF!RTSIN4EACHING s -ASTEROF0UBLIC(EALTH s -ASTEROF3CIENCEIN.URSE!NESTHESIA s -ASTEROF3CIENCEIN.URSE%DUCATION s -ASTEROF3CIENCEIN0ROFESSIONAL#OUNSELING s 0ROJECT BASED-"!

PRESIDENT’S ANNUAL REPORT 2010

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WE EVOLVED FROM A LOCAL TO

A NATIONAL INSTITUTION During the strategic planning process, I lobbied for including the words “nationally recognized” in our vision statement. I had, to be honest, no precise definition of “nationally recognized” in mind. But I believed the goal would lift the aspirations of the entire Westminster community. It has. Our students have distinguished themselves in national competitions, and our faculty and staff have done the same among their professional peers. We have attracted the attention of the national media and, as more people learn about what we are doing, our enrollment of students from across the country has exploded. Our growing visibility has given us the ability to attract highly qualified faculty and exceptionally bright students. And perhaps most importantly, it has increased the value of a Westminster degree.

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PRESIDENT’S ANNUAL REPORT 2010


The national visibility of the college has expanded significantly as print media and online exposure have tripled.

Westminster is regularly mentioned in major national media, including nbc nightly news, the new york times, npr radio, usa today, and the wall street journal.

Faculty and their students regularly make on their scholarly work.

presentations at national meetings

7ESTMINSTER#OLLEGE0ROVOSTAND6ICE0RESIDENTFOR!CADEMIC!FFAIRS $R*AMESh#IDv3EIDELMAN WASRECENTLY appointed chair of the northwest commission on colleges and universities.7##5 

Of the freshman class,

54%

of the fall 2010 applications were from

Out-of-State

,

up from 27% in 2004.

Applications Increased 129% for the 2010 entering class from those in 2004.

Westminster was invited to join the

.EW!MERICAN#OLLEGES and Universities ,

a national consortium of 20 selective small to mid-sized independent colleges and universities dedicated to the purposeful integration of liberal education, professional studies, and civic engagement.

Westminster has been widely recognized in the press—business week, inside higher ed, and utah ceo— and at numerous national meetings as being at the leading edge of educational change and for emphasizing the critical need for higher education to improve quality, while simultaneously reducing costs.

PRESIDENT’S ANNUAL REPORT 2010

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WE RESOLVED TO

REMAIN AFFORDABLE When prospective students look at small private colleges, Westminster is seen as a low-cost, high-quality alternative. Our tuition is below the national average, we offer generous financial aid packages, and we make sure that every year we devote an increasingly greater percentage of our resources to instruction and student services than we do to administrative functions. In fact, over the past five years we have implemented cost-saving initiatives in our operating budget that HAVESAVEDOVERMILLION)NTIMESLIKETHESE )BELIEVEWEHAVE an obligation to control costs so that qualified students are not turned away.

20

PRESIDENT’S ANNUAL REPORT 2010


Westminster has invested in student instruction, while

(OLDINGTHE,INEON Administrative Expenses. Since 2004, the budget for instructional expenses has increased 67%, WHILETHEBUDGETFORINSTITUTIONALSUPPORTHASINCREASEDONLY

Westminster’s 2010–2011 tuition and fees are

More than 95% of undergraduates receive

"ELOWTHE National Average

some form of financial aid. For 2010–2011 the

for four-year private institutions.

Average Award Totaled $21,035. Westminster was ranked among the best colleges for economic diversity by USNews & World Report. Twenty-six percent of Westminster students received Pell Grants in 2010.

Last year, Westminster awarded more

than $23 million in scholarships and grants.

Westminster is consistently named to USNews & World Report‘s “great colleges, great prices� list and as a top-tier institution.

PRESIDENT’S ANNUAL REPORT 2010

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WE DEEPENED OUR COMMITMENT TO

CONTINUOUS IMPROVEMENT, EFFECTIVENESS, AND VALUE I have tried to demonstrate that Westminster has gone through a transformational process in the past few years. But I do not want to suggest in any way that we are now satisfied with where we are. Our transformation has been rooted in taking a hard look at all of the traditional assumptions about how to run an institution of the highest quality. And we assess all of our operations on a regular basis and against the highest standards. But today’s reforms can become tomorrow’s orthodoxy, unless we continually reassess and reevaluate what we do and what results we produce. That is what we have done— and that is what we will continue to do.

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PRESIDENT’S ANNUAL REPORT 2010


Westminster has

2AISED-ILLION since 2004 and initiated the President’s Innovation Network to enable alumni and friends to invest in educational innovation.

Five New Facilities since 2004  %MMA%CCLES*ONES#ONSERVATORY ANAWARD winning facility known for its acoustics and multi-functional uses. Opened in 2004.  $OLORES$OR�%CCLES(EALTH 7ELLNESS AND !THLETIC#ENTER HOMETOOUR3CHOOLOF .URSINGAND(EALTH3CIENCES!LSOFEATURES an indoor field house, four-lane lap pool, and spaces for dance, fitness, and training. Opened in 2006. 3. Dumke Field, an elevated playing field and home to Westminster’s lacrosse and soccer teams, located above a parking structure. #OMPLETEDIN +IM4!DAMSON!LUMNI(OUSE AHOMEFOR ALUMNIANDFUTUREALUMNI/PENEDIN -ELDRUM3CIENCE#ENTER A,%%$0LATINUM certified, 60,000-square-foot facility. Opened in 2010.

Westminster developed a

new campus master plan, designed to expand the campus and integrate it into the surrounding community.

“ One of the Great #OLLEGES4O7ORK&ORh 7ESTMINSTER#OLLEGEn

— The Chronicle of Higher Education 2009 and 2010 One of only 97 schools so named in 2010

PRESIDENT’S ANNUAL REPORT 2010

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data to support the case

24

PRESIDENT’S ANNUAL REPORT 2010


PRESIDENT’S ANNUAL REPORT 2010

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Student Engagement The National Survey of Student Engagement (NSSE) is an annual study that measures the quality of the learning experiences reported by first-year students and seniors. Westminster participates in this study as a way to assess the learning environment and quality of learning that occur on our campus. And we are pleased that Westminster continues to outperform the other 66 schools in our classification (Master’s Institutions) and the total NSSE sample of 563 schools.

% 64 62

TOSTUDENTLEARNINGANDCOLLEGIATEQUALITY#OLLEGESAND 58 54

high expectations for student performance.

52 50

First-Year Students

NSSE

emphasizing the importance of academic effort and setting

NSSE

56

Master’s Institutions

universities promote high levels of student achievement by

Westminster

#HALLENGINGANDINTELLECTUALLYCREATIVEWORKISCENTRAL 60

Master’s Institutions

Westminster

Level of Academic Challenge

Seniors

% 70 60

for the messy, unscripted problems they will encounter daily

20

during and after college.

10

First-Year Students

26

PRESIDENT’S ANNUAL REPORT 2010

NSSE

30

Master’s Institutions

solve problems or master difficult material prepares students

NSSE

40

LEARNINGINDIFFERENTSETTINGS#OLLABORATINGWITHOTHERSTO

Master’s Institutions

50

their education and asked to think about what they are

Westminster

Students learn more when they are intensely involved in

Westminster

Active and Collaborative Learning

Seniors


% 70

64

solve practical problems by interacting with faculty

56

First-Year Students

members inside and outside the classroom. As a result, NSSE

58

Students learn firsthand how experts think about and

Master’s Institutions

60

NSSE

Master’s Institutions

62

Westminster

66

Student-Faculty Interaction

Westminster

68

their teachers become role models, mentors, and guides for continuous, lifelong learning.

Seniors

% 60

NSSE

Master’s Institutions

NSSE

20

Master’s Institutions

30

Westminster

40

Westminster

50

Supportive Campus Environment Students perform better and are more satisfied at colleges that are committed to their success and cultivate positive working relations with different groups on campus.

10

First-Year Students

Seniors

%

Enriching Educational Experiences

60

NSSE

10

Master’s Institutions

20

Westminster

30

#OMPLEMENTARYLEARNINGOPPORTUNITIESINANDOUTOF NSSE

40

Master’s Institutions

Westminster

50

class augment academic programs. Diversity experiences teach students valuable things about themselves and others. Technology facilitates collaboration between peers and instructors. Internships, community service, and senior capstone courses provide opportunities to integrate and apply knowledge.

First-Year Students

Seniors

PRESIDENT’S ANNUAL REPORT 2010

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Enrollment Trends One of the most compelling pieces of evidence of the success of Westminster’s transformation is its growing appeal: s 4OUNDERGRADUATESTUDENTS s 4OGRADUATESTUDENTS s 4OSTUDENTSOFDIVERSEANDUNDERREPRESENTEDBACKGROUNDS s 4OINTERNATIONALSTUDENTS s 4OSTUDENTSFROMOUT OF STATE The charts that follow graphically depict the tremendous growth the college has seen among all of these segments. We believe this growth is due not only to the work of our admissions team and our increased levels of visibility, but to the changes in the total learning environment described in this report.

1200

New Student Enrollment From 2004 to 2010, total new student enrollment increased by 46%, including a 39% increase in new undergraduates and a

1000 Number of Students

(FTE report 9/14/2010)

800 600

77% growth in new graduate students.

400

Total

200

Undergraduate Graduate

Increasing Selectivity Westminster has maintained the academic qualifications of our incoming students, while simultaneously increasing selectivity and total freshmen enrollment.

Percent of Applicants Admitted

2004

PRESIDENT’S ANNUAL REPORT 2010

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

90 88 86 84 82 80 78 76 74 72 2004

28

2005

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010


Number of Students of Color

100 90 80 70 60 50 40 30 20 10

US Students of Color Enrollment of new students of color has nearly tripled since 2004 and now comprises 22% of the entering class.

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

60

New International Students

Number of Students

50 40

Through a combination of focused efforts on

30

internationalizing the campus and a number

20

Transfer

10

Foreign Exchange Freshmen

Number of Students

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

of new international students has increased from 1% of the undergraduate entering class of 2004 to 6.5% of the 2010 entering class.

2010

2000 1800 1600 1400 1200 1000 800 600 400 200

of foreign exchange programs, the population

Freshman Applicants In-State vs Out-of-State In 2009, for the first time in Westminster’s history, applications from out-of-state students Total In-State

exceeded those from Utah students. For 2010, 54% of applicants and 45% of enrolled students were from out-of-state.

Out-of-State 04 Fall

05 Fall

06 Fall

07 Fall

08 Fall

09Fall

10 Fall

PRESIDENT’S ANNUAL REPORT 2010

29


Financial Report Balance-Sheet Growth For the 27th consecutive year, Westminster ended the fiscal year with an operating surplus. That demonstrates a strong and steady record of fiscal discipline in managing its resources, particularly in a challenging economic environment. Strong enrollment and fundraising added to the net assets of the college, GROWINGTHETOTALNETASSETSTOMILLION ANINCREASEOFMILLION&UNDRAISINGADDEDMILLIONIN NETASSETSTOFUNDLONGER TERMPROJECTS INCLUDINGTHE-ELDRUM3CIENCE#ENTERANDPERMANENTENDOWMENTS Revenues from all sources reached $69.6 million, while expenses for all funds were $56.5 million. Million

140 120 100

$88.9 $89.0 $90.2

$97.9

$102.6

$114.4

$122.1 $127.2

$124.6 $111.5

80 60 40

Balance-Sheet Growth (Net Assets)

20 0 01

02

03

04

05

06

07

08

09

10

Total Revenues Net tuition revenues increased by 10.1 percent—from $41.7 million to $45.9 million—and accounted for MOSTOFTOTALREVENUES/VERALLENROLLMENTFORTHEFISCALYEARINCREASEDFROM TO ORPERCENT additionally, the tuition-rate increase for the year, along with added student scholarships, helped generate an increase in net-tuition revenues. The college began the new academic year with record student enrollment BOTHINUNDERGRADUATEANDGRADUATEPROGRAMS ANDRESIDENTIALSTUDENTSAREATANALL TIMEHIGHOF4HE college raised $9.5 million in charitable contributions, which supported the operations of the college, student SCHOLARSHIPS THE-ELDRUM3CIENCE#ENTER ANDOTHERCAMPUSPROJECTS $45,884,492

Net Tuition & Fees $9,492,014

Contributions

$6,176,174

Investment Activity

$4,271,749

Auxiliary Enterprises

$2,383,683

Federal & State Grants Other Income

Total Revenues for Fiscal 2010 = $69,629,432

$1,421,320

0

5

10

15 Million

30

PRESIDENT’S ANNUAL REPORT 2010

20

25

30

35

40

45


Total Expenses "ECAUSEOFENROLLMENTINCREASES TOTALEXPENSESINCREASEDPERCENTFROMTHEPRIORYEAR-ORETHAN percent of this growth was directed toward instructional areas and 15 percent toward other areas that support student learning. One of the strategic-plan goals is to spend more for student learning and less on administrative costs, and these allocations of capital helped accomplish that goal. The construction OFTHE-ELDRUM3CIENCE#ENTERBEGANDURINGTHESUMMEROFWITHTHEGOALOFACHIEVING,EADERSHIP in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Gold certification. The highest level of certification, LEED Platinum, was awarded in September 2010.

Public Service $6,295 Auxiliary Enterprises

$2,598,554

Academic Support

$7,487,431

Institutional Support

$10,487,263

Student Services

$10,812,514 $25,112,639

Instruction 0 2

4 6

Total Expenses for Fiscal 2010 = $56,504,696

8 10 12 14 16 18 20 22 24 26 28 30 Million

Endowment Funds Endowment fund contributions for 2010 totaled $1.6 million. The fund’s investment performance delivered a net return of 13.1 percent for the fiscal year and an average of 2.3 percent over five years, which compares favorably to the performance of other endowments comparable in size in the National !SSOCIATIONOF#OLLEGEAND5NIVERSITY"USINESS/FFICERS.!#5"/ %NDOWMENT3URVEY4HECOLLEGE COMPARESITSRETURNTOAPERCENT30)NDEXANDAPERCENT"ARCLAYS#APITAL53!GGREGATE"OND Index, which returned 13.2 percent for the year. The investment results increased the endowment by $6 million for the fiscal year. Million

70

$64.9

60 50

$46.7

40

$42.7

$43.0

02

03

$48.6

51.9

04

05

$64.2

$56.3 $47.5

$52.2

30 20 10

Endowment Fund

0 01

06

07

08

09

10

PRESIDENT’S ANNUAL REPORT 2010

31


32

PRESIDENT’S ANNUAL REPORT 2010


None of the progress Westminster has made would have been possible without the

EXTRAORDINARY DEDICATION, TALENT, AND HARD WORK OF OUR FACULTY AND STAFF.

PRESIDENT’S ANNUAL REPORT 2010

33


Westminster College 3OUTH%AST 3ALT,AKE#ITY 54  4OLL&REE www.westminstercollege.edu

We will be nationally recognized as an exemplary community of learners, distinguished by our distinctive educational programs, our record of preparing graduates for success in a rapidly changing world, and our commitment to continuous improvement, effectiveness, and value.


President's Annual Report 2010