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THE ELIZABETHAN NEWSLETTER 2012/2013

THE ELIZABETHAN NEWSLETTER 2012/2013

The Elizabethan Newsletter is produced annually by the Development Office of Westminster School and is available to all OWW. Letters are positively encouraged and should be sent to: The Development Office Westminster School 17a Dean’s Yard, London SW1P 3PB T: +44 (0)20 7963 1115 F: +44 (0)20 7963 1064 E: developmentoffice@westminster.org.uk


MARCH – MAY

OW Calendar 2013 We are pleased to provide advance notice of some events coming up in 2013 so do use this list to save the dates of those events you wish to attend. All dates are correct at the time of going to press and any changes will be published on www.oldwestminster.org.uk along with full details of the events and booking information. Certain events, like the Ben Jonson Drinks and Medics’ Drinks are for OWW who work in specific professional fields. To make sure that you receive an invitation to the events you wish to attend please send us your up-to-date business details by updating your profile on our website or emailing alumni@westminster.org.uk.

14th March 1st May 22nd May

1990s Decade Gaudy OW Abbey Tour Dryden’s Society Drinks

JUNE – JULY 6th June 11th June 13th June 20th June 9th July 11th July

Medics’ Drinks Women’s Network Mentoring Evening Rigaud’s Society Dinner Ben Jonson Drinks Old Grantite Club House of Commons Drinks Old Westminsters at Home (Westminster Abbey & College Garden)

SEPTEMBER – DECEMBER 12th September 26th September 7th November 21st November 9th December

Young Gaudy College Society Dinner Elizabethan Club Dinner OW Wine Society Tasting Event Carol Service

Above: Lottie Kirk (HH, 2005–07) and Henrietta Southby (BB, 2005–07) at the Elizabethan Club Dinner 2012 Above left (top): David FitzSimons (LL, 1960–62) and Simon Brew (RR, 1958–62) at the 1960s Decade Gaudy Above left (bottom): Eduardo Musciacco (AHH, 2002–07) and Bertie Milward (WW, 2003–08) at the OW Business Drinks


CONTENTS From the School

03

Head Master • The Dean • Bursar Westminster Development • Call Room Report Building on Excellence Update • Legacies House Reports • School Station Highlights

OW Social

To advertise in next year’s Elizabethan Newsletter, please contact: The Development Office, Westminster School 17a Dean’s Yard, London SW1P 3PB T: +44 (0)20 7963 1115 F: +44 (0)20 7963 1064 E: developmentoffice@westminster.org.uk Head of Alumni Relations/Editor: Katharine Robinson Design: Tam Ying Wah Photographs: Colin Wagg, Sandy Crole, Angie Garvich, Katharine Robinson, Danielle Shaw, Cleo Jordan, Sam Baldock and the Dean and Chapter of Westminster Printed by: The Marstan Press

29

The Elizabethan Club • School Society Edinburgh Drinks • Oxford Drinks • OW Women’s Network Mentoring Evening • OW Abbey Tour 1960s Decade Gaudy • Cambridge Drinks Wine Society Tasting • Business Drinks Ben Jonson Drinks • Medics’ Dinner Young Gaudy • Elizabethan Club Dinner

House Societies

53

Ashburnham • Busby's • College • Dryden’s Hakluyt’s • Liddell’s • Milne’s • Grant's Purcell’s • Rigaud’s • Wren’s

OW Sports

59

Angling • Athletics • Cricket • Fives • Football Golf • Netball • Real Tennis • Tennis • Water

OW Articles First published by Westminster School, 2013 © Westminster School

Prag Award • Neville Walton Award From the Archives

All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted, in any shape or form by any means electronic, mechanical photocopying, recording or otherwise without the prior permission of Westminster School.

OW News

The views and opinions expressed by writers within the Elizabethan Newsletter do not necessarily reflect those of Westminster School. No responsibility is assumed by the publisher for any injury and/or damage to persons or property as a matter of products liability, negligence or otherwise, or from any use or operation of any methods, products, instructions or ideas contained in the material herein.

Alumni Relations • Careers and Mentoring 2001–2011 Leavers’ Notes • 2012 Leavers OW Updates • Letters • OW Recollections Oli Bennett Charitable Trust • Obituaries • Deaths

69

81


FROM THE SCHOOL • Dr Stephen Spurr (Head Master) headmaster@westminster.org.uk • The Very Reverend Dr John Hall (Dean of Westminster) info@westminster-abbey.org • Chris Silcock (Bursar) chris.silcock@westminster.org.uk • Angie Garvich (Director of Development) angie.garvich@westminster.org.uk


FROM THE SCHOOL • Dr Stephen Spurr (Head Master) headmaster@westminster.org.uk • The Very Reverend Dr John Hall (Dean of Westminster) info@westminster-abbey.org • Chris Silcock (Bursar) chris.silcock@westminster.org.uk • Angie Garvich (Director of Development) angie.garvich@westminster.org.uk


Dushyant Gupta (DD, 2006-08), Harry Rose (LL, 2003-08) and Rameez Kahn (LL, 2003-08)

And next year, some of the scholars who are processing here this evening, will be re-enacting the salutation of Vivat Regina to mark the 60th anniversary of her coronation. That is something we are all looking forward to. Buoyed up by these thoughts, this time last week I was addressing an international conference in Singapore. The theme of my talk was how to educate the pupils of today to become the global leaders of tomorrow.

Head Master’s Address at Big Commem 2012 Dr Stephen Spurr Head Master

Above: The Head Master and the Dean of Westminster at the 2012 Elizabethan Club Dinner

‘

 recent letter from an A Israeli academic informed me that careful research shows that Westminster is among the top 10 schools worldwide. Flattery will get you everywhere.

Citius, altius, fortius: by any measure of national success this Olympic year has been remarkable. One OW competed in the Games; and now that we have our magnificent new Sports Centre we can anticipate many more in the years ahead. After biding our time, arguably for several centuries, we have now found exactly the right building, in a perfect location, with the very Westminster aesthetic of sport through art-deco. Our most closely guarded secret now is that sport makes us more intelligent still.

While Singapore and other Asia Pacific countries seek ambitiously to improve, the UK, as we all know, is in danger of standing still and effectively sliding down the international tables, threatening the competitiveness of the next generation. Why, then, given the educational and economic plight of the UK, was Westminster invited by Cambridge to speak at the conference? Well, we do alright by Cambridge. And I hope no one here will be overly surprised to know that the reputation of Westminster is high among schools, universities and employers in the eastern hemisphere. The same goes for the Middle East. A recent letter from an Israeli academic informed me that careful research shows that Westminster is among the top 10 schools worldwide. Flattery will get you everywhere. Unlike here, where we often seem to apologise for success, in Singapore and throughout the East and Middle East they celebrate it. They also read the Financial Times. I trust this momentary immodesty is not too embarrassing on an evening where, within these ancient walls, among the memorials of the great and good, we look back over our history and hope to be judged worthy of it and of the faith our benefactors have had in the School over the centuries and continue to have.

If you have not yet seen the new Sports Centre or the new Purcell’s, until earlier this year the last Anglican monastery in London and now, with a nice twist of fate, a girls’ Boarding House, and the small School chapel next to it, or the wonderful new building for the Under School, please do join us for the Open Evening next Tuesday. May I also say it is a particular pleasure to welcome some 100 Under School parents to Big Commem for the first time. Our Olympic athletes provided a great example to us all. But undoubtedly the greatest example of steadfast leadership through selfless service has been given by her Majesty the Queen, the School’s Visitor, in this 60th year of her reign.

4 | THE ELIZABETHAN NEWSLETTER | 2012/2013

The delegates came from all over the Asia Pacific region; the conference was organised by Cambridge University’s international examinations syndicate, which works with over 2000 schools in the region and marked the opening, by the Vice-Chancellor of Cambridge, of their new educational office strategically located in Singapore.

Why Singapore? Well, in the World Economic Forum’s 2012–2013 Global Competitiveness Report, Singapore is ranked second in the world. And the report recognises that Singapore’s competitiveness is underpinned by its strong focus on the education necessary to provide its young people with the skills for success in a rapidly changing global economy.

Above: The Head Master and Zara Carey (HH, 2005–07) at the 2012 Young Gaudy

Let us for a moment consider the words of Elizabeth I at the top of the first page in tonight’s service booklet. She described Westminster pupils as ‘tender shoots in the wood of our state’. Given the incomparable importance of timber in Elizabethan times, let me paraphrase for you as follows: ‘Westminster pupils are a national treasure’. >> THE ELIZABETHAN NEWSLETTER | 2012/2013 | 5


Dushyant Gupta (DD, 2006-08), Harry Rose (LL, 2003-08) and Rameez Kahn (LL, 2003-08)

And next year, some of the scholars who are processing here this evening, will be re-enacting the salutation of Vivat Regina to mark the 60th anniversary of her coronation. That is something we are all looking forward to. Buoyed up by these thoughts, this time last week I was addressing an international conference in Singapore. The theme of my talk was how to educate the pupils of today to become the global leaders of tomorrow.

Head Master’s Address at Big Commem 2012 Dr Stephen Spurr Head Master

Above: The Head Master and the Dean of Westminster at the 2012 Elizabethan Club Dinner

‘

 recent letter from an A Israeli academic informed me that careful research shows that Westminster is among the top 10 schools worldwide. Flattery will get you everywhere.

Citius, altius, fortius: by any measure of national success this Olympic year has been remarkable. One OW competed in the Games; and now that we have our magnificent new Sports Centre we can anticipate many more in the years ahead. After biding our time, arguably for several centuries, we have now found exactly the right building, in a perfect location, with the very Westminster aesthetic of sport through art-deco. Our most closely guarded secret now is that sport makes us more intelligent still.

While Singapore and other Asia Pacific countries seek ambitiously to improve, the UK, as we all know, is in danger of standing still and effectively sliding down the international tables, threatening the competitiveness of the next generation. Why, then, given the educational and economic plight of the UK, was Westminster invited by Cambridge to speak at the conference? Well, we do alright by Cambridge. And I hope no one here will be overly surprised to know that the reputation of Westminster is high among schools, universities and employers in the eastern hemisphere. The same goes for the Middle East. A recent letter from an Israeli academic informed me that careful research shows that Westminster is among the top 10 schools worldwide. Flattery will get you everywhere. Unlike here, where we often seem to apologise for success, in Singapore and throughout the East and Middle East they celebrate it. They also read the Financial Times. I trust this momentary immodesty is not too embarrassing on an evening where, within these ancient walls, among the memorials of the great and good, we look back over our history and hope to be judged worthy of it and of the faith our benefactors have had in the School over the centuries and continue to have.

If you have not yet seen the new Sports Centre or the new Purcell’s, until earlier this year the last Anglican monastery in London and now, with a nice twist of fate, a girls’ Boarding House, and the small School chapel next to it, or the wonderful new building for the Under School, please do join us for the Open Evening next Tuesday. May I also say it is a particular pleasure to welcome some 100 Under School parents to Big Commem for the first time. Our Olympic athletes provided a great example to us all. But undoubtedly the greatest example of steadfast leadership through selfless service has been given by her Majesty the Queen, the School’s Visitor, in this 60th year of her reign.

4 | THE ELIZABETHAN NEWSLETTER | 2012/2013

The delegates came from all over the Asia Pacific region; the conference was organised by Cambridge University’s international examinations syndicate, which works with over 2000 schools in the region and marked the opening, by the Vice-Chancellor of Cambridge, of their new educational office strategically located in Singapore.

Why Singapore? Well, in the World Economic Forum’s 2012–2013 Global Competitiveness Report, Singapore is ranked second in the world. And the report recognises that Singapore’s competitiveness is underpinned by its strong focus on the education necessary to provide its young people with the skills for success in a rapidly changing global economy.

Above: The Head Master and Zara Carey (HH, 2005–07) at the 2012 Young Gaudy

Let us for a moment consider the words of Elizabeth I at the top of the first page in tonight’s service booklet. She described Westminster pupils as ‘tender shoots in the wood of our state’. Given the incomparable importance of timber in Elizabethan times, let me paraphrase for you as follows: ‘Westminster pupils are a national treasure’. >> THE ELIZABETHAN NEWSLETTER | 2012/2013 | 5


Left: The Head Master and Martin Chan (WW, 2006–11) at the 2012 OW Cambridge Drinks

>>

Parents and teachers here tonight, I always find that a helpful thing to try to remember in one’s occasional frustrated moments.

as service to others becomes a reality. You will be pleased to know that my description of this overall formative experience gained in Westminster’s interdependent, outward-looking community of adults and young people, appealed to my audience in Singapore as a concept worthy of imitation.

National treasures need looking after. So this evening, as we take stock of the past and look ahead, let us determine to use all the experience built up over centuries to ensure that the Westminster curriculum and our methods of teaching continue to challenge and to develop highly academic pupils, who expect to operate globally during their careers – firstly at university and secondly in the work-place of the world. We are not doing too badly to date. A new measure of academic success in the FT tables I referred to a moment ago was, for the first time this year, the inclusion of successful admission to the top-ranked universities worldwide; and we were ranked first. That was mainly based on successful admission to Oxford and other Russell Group universities in the UK, the Ivy League in the US and some top European institutions, but it won’t be long before Westminsters are going further afield – to China, other Asian and Middle Eastern countries, which are pouring money into the university sector, producing superb teaching and research facilities, and making English the language of instruction. Similarly, if this is to be ‘the Asian century’, Westminster pupils will need to be prepared for employment in the East as well as in the West, going there to work willingly and confidently, no longer forced to go with the threat of ‘Mumbai, Shanghai or goodbye’. So how to build on Westminster’s success to date and educate tomorrow’s global leaders? Excellence in the academic subjects most valued by the globally ranked universities will remain absolutely paramount. I am convinced of that; so let me focus briefly on the teaching of those subjects. In Singapore, I found many of the teachers in something of a quandary. Used to the Confucian principle that teachers teach and pupils memorise, they are now encouraged to see themselves 6 | THE ELIZABETHAN NEWSLETTER | 2012/2013

principally as facilitators of learning, showing pupils how to access information through IT. For in many disciplines, they argued, the acceleration in the creation of new knowledge means that what pupils are taught in school will be obsolete by the time they graduate. So what is important, the argument goes, are the skills of research rather than the learning of knowledge; less what pupils know and more what they know how to do; and the ‘brick school and university’, where teachers and pupils physically gather to teach and to learn as a community of scholars, will gradually be replaced by the ‘click school and university’. My own view, that IT should facilitate teaching not the other way around, is unlikely to be as controversial here as it was at the conference. If you want real excellence, you need well-qualified, self-motivated teachers able to inspire their pupils with the current state of knowledge. The corollary of this is that a school must be committed to giving its teachers every opportunity throughout their career to keep abreast of fast-moving developments in their subject specialisms. Teachers, too, just as pupils, therefore, are a national treasure. Pupils and parents, please remember that. Old Westminsters sitting here will bear me out. How often, when I speak to you, do you reminisce about individual teachers

‘

Old Westminsters sitting here will bear me out. How often, do you reminisce about individual teachers who helped develop the arts and habits of mind that have served you well, who intervened at a critical moment with friendly moral advice as a tutor, or who inspired a life-long interest in the theatre, music, sport or the arts?

who helped develop the arts and habits of mind that have served you well, who intervened at a critical moment with friendly moral advice as a tutor, or who inspired a life-long interest in the theatre, music, sport or the arts? For, while placing academic and intellectual endeavour at the heart of the Westminster curriculum, we must also emphasise the importance of this overall curriculum for the formation of future global leaders. Here we can also mention the many exchanges and expeditions that promote self-confidence, self-awareness, respect and understanding of other cultures; the developing programme of civic engagement, where altruism learns to prevail over egoism and the concept of leadership

The communities to which Westminsters will belong will now be global; and they will often be virtual. But the values they learn here at School must still apply. In a recent interview, the new President of MIT, himself a great proponent of virtual, online learning, makes the point: nothing replaces the residential community of professors and pupils, where, he says ‘you learn how to interact with people, you learn morals’. The aim, of course, is not to mirror society or just to fit in, but to change it for the better. And goodness knows we need to improve. St Paul, the global networker of his day, as a citizen of Rome, equally at home in the West and the East of the known world, teaches us that. Consider the third and fourth lines of the reading by the Head Girl: ‘Be not conformed to this world: but be ye transformed by the renewing of your mind’. A Westminster education must aim to provide the overall transferable skills of synthesis, analysis and persuasive expression of complex ideas, but must also teach our pupils to use those skills for constructive, ethical ends and solutions. Competing in a globalised world, working across international jurisdictions, young people will need to be adaptable and mentally agile. But we do not want moral flexibility. We want to win but not to win at all costs. ‘Be not overcome of evil, but overcome evil with good’, as St Paul writes, in the last line of this evening’s reading. Citius, altius, fortius: as global leaders seek to ‘transform not conform’, the need for a strong personal moral foundation will increase not diminish: a foundation which the inextricable link between School and Abbey, celebrated here this evening, will be sure to continue to provide in the years ahead. THE ELIZABETHAN NEWSLETTER | 2012/2013 | 7


Left: The Head Master and Martin Chan (WW, 2006–11) at the 2012 OW Cambridge Drinks

>>

Parents and teachers here tonight, I always find that a helpful thing to try to remember in one’s occasional frustrated moments.

as service to others becomes a reality. You will be pleased to know that my description of this overall formative experience gained in Westminster’s interdependent, outward-looking community of adults and young people, appealed to my audience in Singapore as a concept worthy of imitation.

National treasures need looking after. So this evening, as we take stock of the past and look ahead, let us determine to use all the experience built up over centuries to ensure that the Westminster curriculum and our methods of teaching continue to challenge and to develop highly academic pupils, who expect to operate globally during their careers – firstly at university and secondly in the work-place of the world. We are not doing too badly to date. A new measure of academic success in the FT tables I referred to a moment ago was, for the first time this year, the inclusion of successful admission to the top-ranked universities worldwide; and we were ranked first. That was mainly based on successful admission to Oxford and other Russell Group universities in the UK, the Ivy League in the US and some top European institutions, but it won’t be long before Westminsters are going further afield – to China, other Asian and Middle Eastern countries, which are pouring money into the university sector, producing superb teaching and research facilities, and making English the language of instruction. Similarly, if this is to be ‘the Asian century’, Westminster pupils will need to be prepared for employment in the East as well as in the West, going there to work willingly and confidently, no longer forced to go with the threat of ‘Mumbai, Shanghai or goodbye’. So how to build on Westminster’s success to date and educate tomorrow’s global leaders? Excellence in the academic subjects most valued by the globally ranked universities will remain absolutely paramount. I am convinced of that; so let me focus briefly on the teaching of those subjects. In Singapore, I found many of the teachers in something of a quandary. Used to the Confucian principle that teachers teach and pupils memorise, they are now encouraged to see themselves 6 | THE ELIZABETHAN NEWSLETTER | 2012/2013

principally as facilitators of learning, showing pupils how to access information through IT. For in many disciplines, they argued, the acceleration in the creation of new knowledge means that what pupils are taught in school will be obsolete by the time they graduate. So what is important, the argument goes, are the skills of research rather than the learning of knowledge; less what pupils know and more what they know how to do; and the ‘brick school and university’, where teachers and pupils physically gather to teach and to learn as a community of scholars, will gradually be replaced by the ‘click school and university’. My own view, that IT should facilitate teaching not the other way around, is unlikely to be as controversial here as it was at the conference. If you want real excellence, you need well-qualified, self-motivated teachers able to inspire their pupils with the current state of knowledge. The corollary of this is that a school must be committed to giving its teachers every opportunity throughout their career to keep abreast of fast-moving developments in their subject specialisms. Teachers, too, just as pupils, therefore, are a national treasure. Pupils and parents, please remember that. Old Westminsters sitting here will bear me out. How often, when I speak to you, do you reminisce about individual teachers

‘

Old Westminsters sitting here will bear me out. How often, do you reminisce about individual teachers who helped develop the arts and habits of mind that have served you well, who intervened at a critical moment with friendly moral advice as a tutor, or who inspired a life-long interest in the theatre, music, sport or the arts?

who helped develop the arts and habits of mind that have served you well, who intervened at a critical moment with friendly moral advice as a tutor, or who inspired a life-long interest in the theatre, music, sport or the arts? For, while placing academic and intellectual endeavour at the heart of the Westminster curriculum, we must also emphasise the importance of this overall curriculum for the formation of future global leaders. Here we can also mention the many exchanges and expeditions that promote self-confidence, self-awareness, respect and understanding of other cultures; the developing programme of civic engagement, where altruism learns to prevail over egoism and the concept of leadership

The communities to which Westminsters will belong will now be global; and they will often be virtual. But the values they learn here at School must still apply. In a recent interview, the new President of MIT, himself a great proponent of virtual, online learning, makes the point: nothing replaces the residential community of professors and pupils, where, he says ‘you learn how to interact with people, you learn morals’. The aim, of course, is not to mirror society or just to fit in, but to change it for the better. And goodness knows we need to improve. St Paul, the global networker of his day, as a citizen of Rome, equally at home in the West and the East of the known world, teaches us that. Consider the third and fourth lines of the reading by the Head Girl: ‘Be not conformed to this world: but be ye transformed by the renewing of your mind’. A Westminster education must aim to provide the overall transferable skills of synthesis, analysis and persuasive expression of complex ideas, but must also teach our pupils to use those skills for constructive, ethical ends and solutions. Competing in a globalised world, working across international jurisdictions, young people will need to be adaptable and mentally agile. But we do not want moral flexibility. We want to win but not to win at all costs. ‘Be not overcome of evil, but overcome evil with good’, as St Paul writes, in the last line of this evening’s reading. Citius, altius, fortius: as global leaders seek to ‘transform not conform’, the need for a strong personal moral foundation will increase not diminish: a foundation which the inextricable link between School and Abbey, celebrated here this evening, will be sure to continue to provide in the years ahead. THE ELIZABETHAN NEWSLETTER | 2012/2013 | 7


Right: The roof terrace on the new Purcell's

June next year, when at the Abbey we celebrate the 60th anniversary of the Coronation of Her Majesty which took place on 2nd June 1953. I hope that some at least of the Queen’s Scholars will be able to take part in the service much as their predecessors did sixty years ago. The Abbey has had a remarkable year of its own, with two particular events that could have a lasting impact. In June the choir and clergy fulfilled an invitation from the Pope to visit Rome, to sing at a papal service on St Peter’s Day in St Peter’s Basilica with the Sistine Chapel choir. This was the first time in the papal choir’s 500 year history that another choir had sung not just alongside it but with it: the Pope had instructed that the two choirs sang separately but also for part of the liturgy formed one choir. It was amazing how well the two different styles of singing came together: true harmony, and a sign perhaps of forthcoming (not quite yet, but in God’s good time) Christian unity in diversity.

The Dean’s Report The Very Reverend Dr John Hall Dean of Westminster 2012 has been an extraordinary year for the country, with the brilliantly successful Olympic and Paralympic Games and many imaginative and beautifully staged celebrations of The Queen’s Diamond Jubilee. For many of us it all came together wonderfully at the moment when Her Majesty half turned and said, ‘Good evening, Mr Bond.’ I have it on reasonably good authority that the film-makers had at first expected, if they had permission at all, to stage the moment with a stand-in for The Queen, though they were rather impressed to have the real thing, and then that those words were unscripted and unexpected, a spontaneous gesture from a really remarkably poised and thoughtful person. A number of people have said to me what a brilliant year it has been for the Abbey. Well, it has been, since, a good year for the country is a good year for us all. But not, as I think they imagined, because the Abbey itself was involved in any direct way either in the Diamond Jubilee or in the Olympic or Paralympic Games. We did hold a remarkable service on a Sunday evening a couple of weeks before the Olympics began for over a thousand of mostly senior figures – volunteers and staff – who had been involved, in some cases for many years, in planning the events and were 8 | THE ELIZABETHAN NEWSLETTER | 2012/2013

Above: The Duke of Edinburgh opens the Cellarium

facing within a few weeks both the culmination of all their efforts and the end of their engagement. Princess Alexandra attended the service and stayed valiantly long wanting to talk to everyone at the reception in the East Cloister. In fact there will be a great service in connection with the Diamond Jubilee but that will be in

The second event was the culmination of a building programme that turned the old 14th century monastic cellar (Cellarium) that runs south from the cloister entrance in Yard into the Cellarium Café – open to the public during the day and for hire in the evening – with a first floor Terrace (enclosed but affording wonderful views), running east west over the former monastic misericord (a room with a fire) along the line of the South Cloister as far as the back of the Fives courts in Ashburnham House garden. The Duke of Edinburgh opened the Cellarium on 17th October and rather fancied the cakes. This is the second stage of the Dean and Chapter’s great development plan. Stage one was the Education Centre opened in 1 Dean’s Yard by the Queen on 21st May 2010 and stage three will be galleries in the eastern Triforium taking the place of the museum in the 11th century Undercroft and able to show the visitor many more of the Abbey’s treasures. We are busily raising funds for that great project. My role as Chairman of Governors continues to be immensely stimulating and there have been some excellent developments this year with the purchase of the Sports Centre and St Edward’s House. And for the first time this year I took the leaving Queen’s Scholars on an Abbey roof tour, which is itself quite an experience.

Bursar’s Report Chris Silcock In my report last year I looked ahead to some major capital projects and to what can be described as a purple period of development in the history of the School. Opportunities to acquire a special building can arrive in pairs or even threes, but given the nature of where we are and the School’s dependence on acquiring new space rather than being able to expand on land we own, such opportunities have to be seized. The Under School’s new building was finally opened by the Dean, our Chairman of Governors, on 15th December last year and it has been a huge success. The new dining hall and kitchen has allowed more exciting fare to be offered at lunch and has freed up the main hall in Adrian House just for assemblies, plays, music and clubs. The new art department has also been a great improvement to the teaching and the relocation of a Latin classroom freed up space for a dedicated and much needed Under School library. The Great School finally took possession of St Edward’s House, the last Anglican monastery in London, on 31st May 2012 and conversion began that day, continuing without a break even for Jubilee celebrations until it opened in late August. Purcell’s boarding girls, with the Housemaster, Resident Tutor and Matron, moved and were joined by new Fifth Form and Sixth Form day boys. By 2014, the House will be a boarding/day House similar to Busby’s and Liddell’s. This has been a huge and welcome improvement. >> THE ELIZABETHAN NEWSLETTER | 2012/2013 | 9


Right: The roof terrace on the new Purcell's

June next year, when at the Abbey we celebrate the 60th anniversary of the Coronation of Her Majesty which took place on 2nd June 1953. I hope that some at least of the Queen’s Scholars will be able to take part in the service much as their predecessors did sixty years ago. The Abbey has had a remarkable year of its own, with two particular events that could have a lasting impact. In June the choir and clergy fulfilled an invitation from the Pope to visit Rome, to sing at a papal service on St Peter’s Day in St Peter’s Basilica with the Sistine Chapel choir. This was the first time in the papal choir’s 500 year history that another choir had sung not just alongside it but with it: the Pope had instructed that the two choirs sang separately but also for part of the liturgy formed one choir. It was amazing how well the two different styles of singing came together: true harmony, and a sign perhaps of forthcoming (not quite yet, but in God’s good time) Christian unity in diversity.

The Dean’s Report The Very Reverend Dr John Hall Dean of Westminster 2012 has been an extraordinary year for the country, with the brilliantly successful Olympic and Paralympic Games and many imaginative and beautifully staged celebrations of The Queen’s Diamond Jubilee. For many of us it all came together wonderfully at the moment when Her Majesty half turned and said, ‘Good evening, Mr Bond.’ I have it on reasonably good authority that the film-makers had at first expected, if they had permission at all, to stage the moment with a stand-in for The Queen, though they were rather impressed to have the real thing, and then that those words were unscripted and unexpected, a spontaneous gesture from a really remarkably poised and thoughtful person. A number of people have said to me what a brilliant year it has been for the Abbey. Well, it has been, since, a good year for the country is a good year for us all. But not, as I think they imagined, because the Abbey itself was involved in any direct way either in the Diamond Jubilee or in the Olympic or Paralympic Games. We did hold a remarkable service on a Sunday evening a couple of weeks before the Olympics began for over a thousand of mostly senior figures – volunteers and staff – who had been involved, in some cases for many years, in planning the events and were 8 | THE ELIZABETHAN NEWSLETTER | 2012/2013

Above: The Duke of Edinburgh opens the Cellarium

facing within a few weeks both the culmination of all their efforts and the end of their engagement. Princess Alexandra attended the service and stayed valiantly long wanting to talk to everyone at the reception in the East Cloister. In fact there will be a great service in connection with the Diamond Jubilee but that will be in

The second event was the culmination of a building programme that turned the old 14th century monastic cellar (Cellarium) that runs south from the cloister entrance in Yard into the Cellarium Café – open to the public during the day and for hire in the evening – with a first floor Terrace (enclosed but affording wonderful views), running east west over the former monastic misericord (a room with a fire) along the line of the South Cloister as far as the back of the Fives courts in Ashburnham House garden. The Duke of Edinburgh opened the Cellarium on 17th October and rather fancied the cakes. This is the second stage of the Dean and Chapter’s great development plan. Stage one was the Education Centre opened in 1 Dean’s Yard by the Queen on 21st May 2010 and stage three will be galleries in the eastern Triforium taking the place of the museum in the 11th century Undercroft and able to show the visitor many more of the Abbey’s treasures. We are busily raising funds for that great project. My role as Chairman of Governors continues to be immensely stimulating and there have been some excellent developments this year with the purchase of the Sports Centre and St Edward’s House. And for the first time this year I took the leaving Queen’s Scholars on an Abbey roof tour, which is itself quite an experience.

Bursar’s Report Chris Silcock In my report last year I looked ahead to some major capital projects and to what can be described as a purple period of development in the history of the School. Opportunities to acquire a special building can arrive in pairs or even threes, but given the nature of where we are and the School’s dependence on acquiring new space rather than being able to expand on land we own, such opportunities have to be seized. The Under School’s new building was finally opened by the Dean, our Chairman of Governors, on 15th December last year and it has been a huge success. The new dining hall and kitchen has allowed more exciting fare to be offered at lunch and has freed up the main hall in Adrian House just for assemblies, plays, music and clubs. The new art department has also been a great improvement to the teaching and the relocation of a Latin classroom freed up space for a dedicated and much needed Under School library. The Great School finally took possession of St Edward’s House, the last Anglican monastery in London, on 31st May 2012 and conversion began that day, continuing without a break even for Jubilee celebrations until it opened in late August. Purcell’s boarding girls, with the Housemaster, Resident Tutor and Matron, moved and were joined by new Fifth Form and Sixth Form day boys. By 2014, the House will be a boarding/day House similar to Busby’s and Liddell’s. This has been a huge and welcome improvement. >> THE ELIZABETHAN NEWSLETTER | 2012/2013 | 9


‘

The Westminster School Sports Centre offers a 5 badminton court size main hall in which there are: 6 cricket nets, 4 fencing pistes, two superb climbing walls, and courts for basketball, badminton, volleyball and netball.

dance studio and a dojo room for martial arts. The School is now able to host proper sports teas for visiting teams and there are also changing facilities which have thinned out the crush in the Pavilion. As the Head Master wryly noted at Commem this year, Westminster delivers sport through art-deco.

Above: The new Sports Centre

>>

The monks’ refectory in St Edward’s is now used each day for tutor lunches with Upper Shell, Sixth Form and Remove pupils, rotating through by House every 11 days. This has also greatly enhanced the pastoral life of the pupils. The Chapel was rededicated by the Dean on 5th September and Evensong is now held there fortnightly. In addition, Latin Prayers is held there for Lower School year groups when it is their turn not to be up School. The space is also used for organ and piano lessons as well as for choir rehearsals. In short, the building has been a wonderful addition to the estate and the School is grateful to all donors but in particular the Westminster School Society for their most generous gift towards this project. The School concluded an excellent deal last December to buy the Lawrence Hall from the Royal Horticultural Society (RHS); it is 70 yards from the front gate of Vincent Square so could not be better located. We took possession on 1st May and, despite some doubts, we opened on time. The Westminster School Sports Centre offers a 5 badminton court size main hall in which there are: 6 cricket nets, 4 fencing pistes, two superb climbing walls, and courts for basketball, badminton, volleyball and netball. In the former conference centre there is a rowing suite, a fully equipped fitness suite, a

10 | THE ELIZABETHAN NEWSLETTER | 2012/2013

We continue work to refurbish the old Adrian Boult music centre and designs for Yard paving have been approved by Westminster Council. Engraved stones may be purchased from the Development Office! Works should begin in summer 2013. Some will ask how we have afforded this and others will question whether we are as committed to bursaries as we were and should be. OWW will recall the generous legacy made by A.A. Milne: that and existing smaller endowments enabled us to fund an increasing number of bursaries from income down the years. Bursary numbers continue to rise as we become more successful at getting the message out to London parents that bright pupils who can make the grade may be educated here irrespective of how little money they may have. The School used some of the endowments to fund the four big projects and we are now fundraising hard to replenish our coffers so that the income thereof may support our Bursary Programme. The Director of Development has reported separately on the Building on Excellence Campaign but I would be remiss if I did not acknowledge with enormous gratitude the Elizabethan Club’s most generous donation of £25,000. I will end as usual by saying that finances are sound notwithstanding the many projects and applications to the School increase year on year – truly Dat Deus Incrementum. We are very fortunate indeed. Floreat!

Westminster Development Angie Garvich Director of Development If for nothing else, we will remember 2012 as the year we all became intimately acquainted with the term “Capital Campaign”! The Head Master learned to recite by heart the cost per square metre of London property, teachers went on the campaign trail to extoll the virtues of sport and Governors set about shaking out sofa cushions for spare change, all in an effort to help us to bring about the largest single upgrade of the School’s fabric we have seen in centuries. Never happy to do things by halves, in the space of a few months Westminster acquired a brand new home for Purcell’s House, an additional building for the Under School and a breath-taking new Sports Centre. Add to that plans for the complete redevelopment of Little Dean’s Yard and you have a programme of capital works that would leave other institutions faint with anxiety (and perhaps more cautious Development Directors contemplating a hasty run for the hills…). The School knew that one of the major components to our success would be the support of our wider Westminster Community, with

Above: xxxxxx

Above: The climbing wall in the new Sports Centre

OWW hopefully leading the way. With the understanding that this group has never been particularly shy about making their opinions known, our intrepid student callers braced themselves for the start of our summer OW Telethon and the first opportunity our alumni would have to weigh in on these new developments. Armour on, phones in hand and rebuttals at the ready, they placed their first calls and met with… excitement and support! Old boys >> THE ELIZABETHAN NEWSLETTER | 2012/2013 | 11


‘

The Westminster School Sports Centre offers a 5 badminton court size main hall in which there are: 6 cricket nets, 4 fencing pistes, two superb climbing walls, and courts for basketball, badminton, volleyball and netball.

dance studio and a dojo room for martial arts. The School is now able to host proper sports teas for visiting teams and there are also changing facilities which have thinned out the crush in the Pavilion. As the Head Master wryly noted at Commem this year, Westminster delivers sport through art-deco.

Above: The new Sports Centre

>>

The monks’ refectory in St Edward’s is now used each day for tutor lunches with Upper Shell, Sixth Form and Remove pupils, rotating through by House every 11 days. This has also greatly enhanced the pastoral life of the pupils. The Chapel was rededicated by the Dean on 5th September and Evensong is now held there fortnightly. In addition, Latin Prayers is held there for Lower School year groups when it is their turn not to be up School. The space is also used for organ and piano lessons as well as for choir rehearsals. In short, the building has been a wonderful addition to the estate and the School is grateful to all donors but in particular the Westminster School Society for their most generous gift towards this project. The School concluded an excellent deal last December to buy the Lawrence Hall from the Royal Horticultural Society (RHS); it is 70 yards from the front gate of Vincent Square so could not be better located. We took possession on 1st May and, despite some doubts, we opened on time. The Westminster School Sports Centre offers a 5 badminton court size main hall in which there are: 6 cricket nets, 4 fencing pistes, two superb climbing walls, and courts for basketball, badminton, volleyball and netball. In the former conference centre there is a rowing suite, a fully equipped fitness suite, a

10 | THE ELIZABETHAN NEWSLETTER | 2012/2013

We continue work to refurbish the old Adrian Boult music centre and designs for Yard paving have been approved by Westminster Council. Engraved stones may be purchased from the Development Office! Works should begin in summer 2013. Some will ask how we have afforded this and others will question whether we are as committed to bursaries as we were and should be. OWW will recall the generous legacy made by A.A. Milne: that and existing smaller endowments enabled us to fund an increasing number of bursaries from income down the years. Bursary numbers continue to rise as we become more successful at getting the message out to London parents that bright pupils who can make the grade may be educated here irrespective of how little money they may have. The School used some of the endowments to fund the four big projects and we are now fundraising hard to replenish our coffers so that the income thereof may support our Bursary Programme. The Director of Development has reported separately on the Building on Excellence Campaign but I would be remiss if I did not acknowledge with enormous gratitude the Elizabethan Club’s most generous donation of £25,000. I will end as usual by saying that finances are sound notwithstanding the many projects and applications to the School increase year on year – truly Dat Deus Incrementum. We are very fortunate indeed. Floreat!

Westminster Development Angie Garvich Director of Development If for nothing else, we will remember 2012 as the year we all became intimately acquainted with the term “Capital Campaign”! The Head Master learned to recite by heart the cost per square metre of London property, teachers went on the campaign trail to extoll the virtues of sport and Governors set about shaking out sofa cushions for spare change, all in an effort to help us to bring about the largest single upgrade of the School’s fabric we have seen in centuries. Never happy to do things by halves, in the space of a few months Westminster acquired a brand new home for Purcell’s House, an additional building for the Under School and a breath-taking new Sports Centre. Add to that plans for the complete redevelopment of Little Dean’s Yard and you have a programme of capital works that would leave other institutions faint with anxiety (and perhaps more cautious Development Directors contemplating a hasty run for the hills…). The School knew that one of the major components to our success would be the support of our wider Westminster Community, with

Above: xxxxxx

Above: The climbing wall in the new Sports Centre

OWW hopefully leading the way. With the understanding that this group has never been particularly shy about making their opinions known, our intrepid student callers braced themselves for the start of our summer OW Telethon and the first opportunity our alumni would have to weigh in on these new developments. Armour on, phones in hand and rebuttals at the ready, they placed their first calls and met with… excitement and support! Old boys >> THE ELIZABETHAN NEWSLETTER | 2012/2013 | 11


Left: The rowing suite in the new Sports Centre

year OWW would be able to make use of the facility themselves! The School is also offering, for the very first time, the approved addition of OW names carved into Little Dean’s Yard through the sponsorship of new Yard stones. While the operation might now lack a bit of its former cloak and dagger excitement, we hope that won’t put too many of you off and that we will soon see the names of OWW young and old adorning this special space at the very heart of the School. When we reached the half-way point of our fundraising only six months after our official launch, the collective sigh of relief could be heard from Dean’s Yard to Vincent Square. While we still have miles to go, the reassurance offered by the Westminster Community was enormous and has inspired us to push on even more determinedly towards our goal.

of the Under School were very pleased that the art department was being given the chance to spread out into beautiful new facilities, and old Purcell’s girls couldn’t wait to see their amazing new House (with old boys of other Houses wishing they could have been a part of that inaugural group of new Purcell’s boys!). Still, the project that garnered the greatest praise was the new Sports Centre. Setting aside a few very OW comments about the old gym “building character” (you are a stoic bunch!), the general response was one of overwhelming approval – even more so when they learned that from next

>>

‘

 When we reached the half-way point of our fundraising only six months after our official launch, the collective sigh of relief could be heard from Dean’s Yard to Vincent Square.

12 | THE ELIZABETHAN NEWSLETTER | 2012/2013

With so much focus on the Capital Campaign, we wanted to be sure not to lose sight of the fact that in recent years Old Westminsters have also shown an outstanding commitment to the School’s Bursary Programme. As a direct result of this generosity, we were able to offer double the number of both 11+ and Sixth Form bursaries for the 2012 School Year, taking the amount Westminster commits to the Programme to roughly £1.2m a year. Let me reassure you that when we say we truly couldn’t do it without you, we are not just being polite! While we would love to count ourselves in the same financial category as other schools blessed with endowments reaching into the hundreds of millions of pounds, the level of Westminster’s financial reserves sadly pales in comparison. It is for this reason that where investment is concerned, Westminster will never seek what is simply “newer” or “shinier”, but always what is necessary and important, and what represents significant added value. In return for your invaluable support, our promise is that every step forward will be made with eyes to the future and tempered by respect for the past. Floreat!

Fund for Westminster Telephone Campaign

Caller’s Report We invited former Head Girl, Bea Natzler (WW, 2010–12) to reflect on her experience as an OW caller as part of the Fund for Westminster telephone fundraising campaign last summer. “I was already regretting my decision to participate in the telephone fundraising campaign and I hadn’t even made my first call. How was I going to phone up a parent, strike up a conversation with them, and hopefully end the call with a donation to the Fund for Westminster? The stress on “character-building” from callers who had taken part before did little to lessen my unease. Nor did my boss’s explanation of the game “Evolution”, in which on the white board we all had an egg drawn by our name, which would apparently “evolve” into a drawing of our choice every time someone we called donated. The thought of publicly remaining an oval blob for the two and a half weeks did not appeal… How wrong I was. After some excellent training from Emily, our supervisor, and some inevitably nervous first calls, I was surprised to find I was actually enjoying myself. Westminster parents proved themselves generous not only in donations but in the fascinating conversations they offered. Discussions ranged from the philosophy of art, incredible career paths and which foods melted cheese does and does not go with. I left with offers of work experience, occasional Facebook adds, and recommendations for reading, film and the world of work. It hadn’t occurred to me that what I saw as a fortnight of giving something back to the School would in fact, through stretching me

Above: Callers for the Fund for Westminster

and demanding much time and energy, prove a source of a great deal of intellectual stimulation and satisfaction. How typical of Westminster. As the Campaign progressed we evolved not only on the board, (I think I ended up as a dragon, whilst another caller alternated between a chicken and an egg), but into a team of assured and conversational callers. We left ebullient at the incredible sum raised, exhausted from hours of non-stop talking, and with the strong suspicion that we’d be seeing the majority of the group next year.”

Apply to be a caller! If you’ve left the School within the last few years and think you have what it takes to convince potential donors to make a vital investment in the future of Westminster we would love to have you on board for our next Campaign. On offer is a very competitive salary, full training and support, references for your CV and a fun experience in the company of other OWW. Most of all, you will have the chance to make a real difference that will benefit Westminster pupils for generations to come. For more information, or to apply, please email alumni@westminster.org.uk THE ELIZABETHAN NEWSLETTER | 2012/2013 | 13


Left: The rowing suite in the new Sports Centre

year OWW would be able to make use of the facility themselves! The School is also offering, for the very first time, the approved addition of OW names carved into Little Dean’s Yard through the sponsorship of new Yard stones. While the operation might now lack a bit of its former cloak and dagger excitement, we hope that won’t put too many of you off and that we will soon see the names of OWW young and old adorning this special space at the very heart of the School. When we reached the half-way point of our fundraising only six months after our official launch, the collective sigh of relief could be heard from Dean’s Yard to Vincent Square. While we still have miles to go, the reassurance offered by the Westminster Community was enormous and has inspired us to push on even more determinedly towards our goal.

of the Under School were very pleased that the art department was being given the chance to spread out into beautiful new facilities, and old Purcell’s girls couldn’t wait to see their amazing new House (with old boys of other Houses wishing they could have been a part of that inaugural group of new Purcell’s boys!). Still, the project that garnered the greatest praise was the new Sports Centre. Setting aside a few very OW comments about the old gym “building character” (you are a stoic bunch!), the general response was one of overwhelming approval – even more so when they learned that from next

>>

‘

 When we reached the half-way point of our fundraising only six months after our official launch, the collective sigh of relief could be heard from Dean’s Yard to Vincent Square.

12 | THE ELIZABETHAN NEWSLETTER | 2012/2013

With so much focus on the Capital Campaign, we wanted to be sure not to lose sight of the fact that in recent years Old Westminsters have also shown an outstanding commitment to the School’s Bursary Programme. As a direct result of this generosity, we were able to offer double the number of both 11+ and Sixth Form bursaries for the 2012 School Year, taking the amount Westminster commits to the Programme to roughly £1.2m a year. Let me reassure you that when we say we truly couldn’t do it without you, we are not just being polite! While we would love to count ourselves in the same financial category as other schools blessed with endowments reaching into the hundreds of millions of pounds, the level of Westminster’s financial reserves sadly pales in comparison. It is for this reason that where investment is concerned, Westminster will never seek what is simply “newer” or “shinier”, but always what is necessary and important, and what represents significant added value. In return for your invaluable support, our promise is that every step forward will be made with eyes to the future and tempered by respect for the past. Floreat!

Fund for Westminster Telephone Campaign

Caller’s Report We invited former Head Girl, Bea Natzler (WW, 2010–12) to reflect on her experience as an OW caller as part of the Fund for Westminster telephone fundraising campaign last summer. “I was already regretting my decision to participate in the telephone fundraising campaign and I hadn’t even made my first call. How was I going to phone up a parent, strike up a conversation with them, and hopefully end the call with a donation to the Fund for Westminster? The stress on “character-building” from callers who had taken part before did little to lessen my unease. Nor did my boss’s explanation of the game “Evolution”, in which on the white board we all had an egg drawn by our name, which would apparently “evolve” into a drawing of our choice every time someone we called donated. The thought of publicly remaining an oval blob for the two and a half weeks did not appeal… How wrong I was. After some excellent training from Emily, our supervisor, and some inevitably nervous first calls, I was surprised to find I was actually enjoying myself. Westminster parents proved themselves generous not only in donations but in the fascinating conversations they offered. Discussions ranged from the philosophy of art, incredible career paths and which foods melted cheese does and does not go with. I left with offers of work experience, occasional Facebook adds, and recommendations for reading, film and the world of work. It hadn’t occurred to me that what I saw as a fortnight of giving something back to the School would in fact, through stretching me

Above: Callers for the Fund for Westminster

and demanding much time and energy, prove a source of a great deal of intellectual stimulation and satisfaction. How typical of Westminster. As the Campaign progressed we evolved not only on the board, (I think I ended up as a dragon, whilst another caller alternated between a chicken and an egg), but into a team of assured and conversational callers. We left ebullient at the incredible sum raised, exhausted from hours of non-stop talking, and with the strong suspicion that we’d be seeing the majority of the group next year.”

Apply to be a caller! If you’ve left the School within the last few years and think you have what it takes to convince potential donors to make a vital investment in the future of Westminster we would love to have you on board for our next Campaign. On offer is a very competitive salary, full training and support, references for your CV and a fun experience in the company of other OWW. Most of all, you will have the chance to make a real difference that will benefit Westminster pupils for generations to come. For more information, or to apply, please email alumni@westminster.org.uk THE ELIZABETHAN NEWSLETTER | 2012/2013 | 13


all match participants the chance to muse over the eventualities of that day’s games in an informal and relaxed setting.

A Campaign for Westminster

Building on Excellence

The new Sports Centre, the new Purcell’s, 21 Douglas Street and Little Dean’s Yard. Thanks so much to all of the OWW who have given to the Building on Excellence Campaign so far. Launched in March 2012 in support of the School’s newly-purchased buildings as well as the refurbishment of Little Dean’s Yard, the Campaign has already made a huge impact on the School experience of our current pupils. Old Westminsters will also reap the rewards through access to the new Sports Centre, new spaces for events and the chance to immortalise their names in Yard. We are delighted to announce that, at time of going to press, the Campaign is well over half-way to its £25 million target, and we are pleased to include an update on the various projects.

Sports Centre Above (top right): The main hall of the new Sports Centre Above (bottom): The Open House Evening

14 | THE ELIZABETHAN NEWSLETTER | 2012/2013

The impact of the new Sports Centre has been enormous, eliminating the need for time-consuming journeys to and from other sporting locations, and allowing more time for pupils to practise their skills. • The former Royal Horticultural Society Hall has been completely transformed, providing a space for an array of sports, including climbing, martial arts, fencing, rowing, table tennis, badminton, netball, indoor football and indoor cricket • Match teas in the new dining hall are a highlight of Tuesdays and Thursdays for many pupils! • Boarders enjoy using the facilities during their free time in the evenings

Sports Centre Manager Matthew Bull leads an experienced team to run the new facility. Here he outlines a typical working day which gives a sense of how the new building is used and the work undertaken by staff to keep it all going. “I live in Weybridge, Surrey, in a Victorian property, which backs onto the River Wey. I wake at 6.30 am. Soon after I rise, my two very young children wake. What then ensues is a manic rush of teeth brushing and dressing to enable me to have my breakfast with them before I depart to catch the train to Waterloo. I walk from Waterloo Station, over Westminster Bridge, so I consider this to be my early morning exercise. I arrive at the Sports Centre around 8.40 am. I discuss any eventualities that have occurred with the early shift Duty Manager. We then review the day’s timetable to ensure that the activities can take place as scheduled. On the day in question a full range of sports are planned. Under School PE takes place in the morning (an introduction to basketball). This is followed in the afternoon by Great School Station, which comprises of indoor football, fencing and rock climbing, all taking place in the main hall. On the other three floors gym fitness, bodystep, judo and triathlon training will also be in full flow. Home football matches will be played on Vincent Square, followed by match teas in the Sports Centre dining hall. The catering team will be on hand to ensure that nobody misses out on the opportunity of hot food and drink. This also allows

In contrast to the café, the building as a whole cannot really be described as relaxed and informal. It opened in 1928, is art-deco in style, and was built by the Royal Horticultural Society (RHS), with the express purpose of hosting exhibitions. It is great to work in an historic building and the scope and scale of the Sports Hall is awe inspiring. Having only started at the School in late August, this period has been an extremely busy one for me. I have worked very hard, first to understand how a building of this scale operates and secondly to come to terms with how the School functions. Two months in, I am happy to say everything is running smoothly. I meet with the RHS team that afternoon to discuss their autumn show. This meeting enables us to discuss timings and procedures. They are a great team to work with and their knowledge of the building has been of significant help to me. One of the main considerations for this first show (all four of their London shows will be held here annually) is protecting the specialist sports flooring. A protective floor cover has been purchased, and I have been assured that this will be more than adequate to meet the demands that will be placed upon it. The meeting goes well and all are in agreement that this show will be a learning process for both parties. In a later Sports Centre team meeting, discussions turn to the Sports Centre’s future use. Between us we have a range of ideas as to how it can best be used. These ideas offer a number of challenges and I look forward to being involved in the very exciting future the Sports Centre has. I leave the building around 6.30 pm, as Westminster Abbey Choir School’s pupils are using the hall to play football. The Centre will remain open until 10 pm so the evening boarding activities can take place. On returning home I try and fit in either a run or a swim, as this is how I choose to relax. I can then also go to sleep safe in the knowledge that I at least in part practice what I preach.”

THE ELIZABETHAN NEWSLETTER | 2012/2013 | 15


all match participants the chance to muse over the eventualities of that day’s games in an informal and relaxed setting.

A Campaign for Westminster

Building on Excellence

The new Sports Centre, the new Purcell’s, 21 Douglas Street and Little Dean’s Yard. Thanks so much to all of the OWW who have given to the Building on Excellence Campaign so far. Launched in March 2012 in support of the School’s newly-purchased buildings as well as the refurbishment of Little Dean’s Yard, the Campaign has already made a huge impact on the School experience of our current pupils. Old Westminsters will also reap the rewards through access to the new Sports Centre, new spaces for events and the chance to immortalise their names in Yard. We are delighted to announce that, at time of going to press, the Campaign is well over half-way to its £25 million target, and we are pleased to include an update on the various projects.

Sports Centre Above (top right): The main hall of the new Sports Centre Above (bottom): The Open House Evening

14 | THE ELIZABETHAN NEWSLETTER | 2012/2013

The impact of the new Sports Centre has been enormous, eliminating the need for time-consuming journeys to and from other sporting locations, and allowing more time for pupils to practise their skills. • The former Royal Horticultural Society Hall has been completely transformed, providing a space for an array of sports, including climbing, martial arts, fencing, rowing, table tennis, badminton, netball, indoor football and indoor cricket • Match teas in the new dining hall are a highlight of Tuesdays and Thursdays for many pupils! • Boarders enjoy using the facilities during their free time in the evenings

Sports Centre Manager Matthew Bull leads an experienced team to run the new facility. Here he outlines a typical working day which gives a sense of how the new building is used and the work undertaken by staff to keep it all going. “I live in Weybridge, Surrey, in a Victorian property, which backs onto the River Wey. I wake at 6.30 am. Soon after I rise, my two very young children wake. What then ensues is a manic rush of teeth brushing and dressing to enable me to have my breakfast with them before I depart to catch the train to Waterloo. I walk from Waterloo Station, over Westminster Bridge, so I consider this to be my early morning exercise. I arrive at the Sports Centre around 8.40 am. I discuss any eventualities that have occurred with the early shift Duty Manager. We then review the day’s timetable to ensure that the activities can take place as scheduled. On the day in question a full range of sports are planned. Under School PE takes place in the morning (an introduction to basketball). This is followed in the afternoon by Great School Station, which comprises of indoor football, fencing and rock climbing, all taking place in the main hall. On the other three floors gym fitness, bodystep, judo and triathlon training will also be in full flow. Home football matches will be played on Vincent Square, followed by match teas in the Sports Centre dining hall. The catering team will be on hand to ensure that nobody misses out on the opportunity of hot food and drink. This also allows

In contrast to the café, the building as a whole cannot really be described as relaxed and informal. It opened in 1928, is art-deco in style, and was built by the Royal Horticultural Society (RHS), with the express purpose of hosting exhibitions. It is great to work in an historic building and the scope and scale of the Sports Hall is awe inspiring. Having only started at the School in late August, this period has been an extremely busy one for me. I have worked very hard, first to understand how a building of this scale operates and secondly to come to terms with how the School functions. Two months in, I am happy to say everything is running smoothly. I meet with the RHS team that afternoon to discuss their autumn show. This meeting enables us to discuss timings and procedures. They are a great team to work with and their knowledge of the building has been of significant help to me. One of the main considerations for this first show (all four of their London shows will be held here annually) is protecting the specialist sports flooring. A protective floor cover has been purchased, and I have been assured that this will be more than adequate to meet the demands that will be placed upon it. The meeting goes well and all are in agreement that this show will be a learning process for both parties. In a later Sports Centre team meeting, discussions turn to the Sports Centre’s future use. Between us we have a range of ideas as to how it can best be used. These ideas offer a number of challenges and I look forward to being involved in the very exciting future the Sports Centre has. I leave the building around 6.30 pm, as Westminster Abbey Choir School’s pupils are using the hall to play football. The Centre will remain open until 10 pm so the evening boarding activities can take place. On returning home I try and fit in either a run or a swim, as this is how I choose to relax. I can then also go to sleep safe in the knowledge that I at least in part practice what I preach.”

THE ELIZABETHAN NEWSLETTER | 2012/2013 | 15


>>

The Under School Building

Our new building at 21 Douglas Street, directly flanking Adrian House provides a splendid dining room and new light-filled art studios. • A brand new dining hall provides a light and airy space for pupils to take meals in their House groups • The most popular menu items in the new dining hall are curries, lasagne and roast dinners – the most popular veggie option is the egg noodle stir-fry • A new IT suite provides pupils with the chance to use state-of-the-art technology to learn and create Sports Centre in numbers

6000: the size of the new Sports Centre in square metres

Fiona Illingworth, Head of Art and Design at the Under School comments on the new space:

1400: the number of multi-coloured holes in the climbing wall 520: the approximate length, in metres, of the new netting in the Sports Centre, that’s enough to stretch half the distance from the Great School to the Under School! 89: the combined number of hours taken

up by different activities at the Sports Centre by Great School and Under School pupils every week (Monday–Friday)

3: the number of days a week match teas are served Sample menu for a match tea Butcher’s Sausages, Mashed Potato and Baked Beans and a Chocolate Brownie Previously Westminster pupils and visiting teams were given a match tea of a sandwich, penguin bar and squash – not much after a hard match!

Above (top): A School Choir Rehearsal in the new Chapel Above right (below): Guests on a tour of the new Purcell’s with a pupil guide

>>

The New Purcell’s

The recently purchased St Edward’s House is now a new, enlarged co-educational Purcell’s – a Boarding House for girls and a Day House for boys. • Sung Evensong in the St Edward’s Chapel has already been established as a regular fixture • The Chaplain and his assistant have a new office in a much more appropriate space! • The first BBQ on the roof terrace has already been held! • Each House takes it in turn to have a special House lunch in the St Edward’s Refectory

“In December 2011, we made our way from our temporary cabins in the Square to our newly completed luxury suite. We had requested a learning space where students felt safe, secure, challenged and stimulated, but were given so much more. Above: The new dining hall at the Under School

We now have our own IT suite, a kiln room and large store room that any art teacher would envy. There are two separate glass walled classrooms which can be reconfigured into one, to enable flexible groupings of students and shared learning areas.

An element in providing quality teaching is to be able to vary the workspace and the activities to suit the individual needs of the pupils, and in our new and wonderfully light-filled space, we are able to do this with ease. Our new environment is spacious and comfortable and to quote one of the boys ‘‘In winter we have heaters and in summer we have electric windows”. We conjured from our imagination a better place with a sense of theatrical occasion, and with shared efforts we have a unique and rewarding environment.”

Programme for Evensong 22nd November 2012 Introit: Byrd, Justorum Animae Preces and Responses: Radcliffe Psalm: 108. Evening Canticles: Byrd, Second Service Anthem: Tomkins, ‘When David heard’ Above: The new art studio at the Under School

16 | THE ELIZABETHAN NEWSLETTER | 2012/2013

THE ELIZABETHAN NEWSLETTER | 2012/2013 | 17


>>

The Under School Building

Our new building at 21 Douglas Street, directly flanking Adrian House provides a splendid dining room and new light-filled art studios. • A brand new dining hall provides a light and airy space for pupils to take meals in their House groups • The most popular menu items in the new dining hall are curries, lasagne and roast dinners – the most popular veggie option is the egg noodle stir-fry • A new IT suite provides pupils with the chance to use state-of-the-art technology to learn and create Sports Centre in numbers

6000: the size of the new Sports Centre in square metres

Fiona Illingworth, Head of Art and Design at the Under School comments on the new space:

1400: the number of multi-coloured holes in the climbing wall 520: the approximate length, in metres, of the new netting in the Sports Centre, that’s enough to stretch half the distance from the Great School to the Under School! 89: the combined number of hours taken

up by different activities at the Sports Centre by Great School and Under School pupils every week (Monday–Friday)

3: the number of days a week match teas are served Sample menu for a match tea Butcher’s Sausages, Mashed Potato and Baked Beans and a Chocolate Brownie Previously Westminster pupils and visiting teams were given a match tea of a sandwich, penguin bar and squash – not much after a hard match!

Above (top): A School Choir Rehearsal in the new Chapel Above right (below): Guests on a tour of the new Purcell’s with a pupil guide

>>

The New Purcell’s

The recently purchased St Edward’s House is now a new, enlarged co-educational Purcell’s – a Boarding House for girls and a Day House for boys. • Sung Evensong in the St Edward’s Chapel has already been established as a regular fixture • The Chaplain and his assistant have a new office in a much more appropriate space! • The first BBQ on the roof terrace has already been held! • Each House takes it in turn to have a special House lunch in the St Edward’s Refectory

“In December 2011, we made our way from our temporary cabins in the Square to our newly completed luxury suite. We had requested a learning space where students felt safe, secure, challenged and stimulated, but were given so much more. Above: The new dining hall at the Under School

We now have our own IT suite, a kiln room and large store room that any art teacher would envy. There are two separate glass walled classrooms which can be reconfigured into one, to enable flexible groupings of students and shared learning areas.

An element in providing quality teaching is to be able to vary the workspace and the activities to suit the individual needs of the pupils, and in our new and wonderfully light-filled space, we are able to do this with ease. Our new environment is spacious and comfortable and to quote one of the boys ‘‘In winter we have heaters and in summer we have electric windows”. We conjured from our imagination a better place with a sense of theatrical occasion, and with shared efforts we have a unique and rewarding environment.”

Programme for Evensong 22nd November 2012 Introit: Byrd, Justorum Animae Preces and Responses: Radcliffe Psalm: 108. Evening Canticles: Byrd, Second Service Anthem: Tomkins, ‘When David heard’ Above: The new art studio at the Under School

16 | THE ELIZABETHAN NEWSLETTER | 2012/2013

THE ELIZABETHAN NEWSLETTER | 2012/2013 | 17


>>

Little Dean’s Yard

Soon this historic space will be returned to a much more fitting condition in keeping with its practical use and aesthetic value. Original ancient pathways will be retained and the footprints of previous structures will be outlined in contrasting stone, resulting in an overall design that meets the needs of today while recalling the area’s rich architectural history. • Designs showing how OW names will look have now been put together • Paving stones are still available for sponsorship, and OWW can be quite specific about the location of their stones within Yard • Originally, the Purbeck paths were surrounded by sand and gravel, not paving • This is the first time that OWW will ‘legally’ be able to have their names carved into the fabric of the School!

Arch Inscriptions: Punctuating Eternity Will Kitchen (AHH, LS) had a wry take on the existing carvings in a recent piece for the School publication, The Elizabethan.

The A. A. Milne Society

Legacy Giving

Figure 2: Carve it well Having a deeply carved, and properly carved, inscription is a key factor in being noticed. The clarity and depth of one’s carving increases the prominence and likelihood of being noticed too. Being noticed for having a poorly done inscription also risks deletion, as has indeed happened in recent years. It is possible to carve well if one has the ability of a stonemason.

Figure 3: Don’t forget your name One might think it is very obvious indeed, and that it is ridiculous that someone might forget to put their name on the wall after inscribing the date. However, this does happen. Whilst being pleased with inscribing the date on the wall one must press on with the task at hand.

18 | THE ELIZABETHAN NEWSLETTER | 2012/2013

We asked two members of the A. A. Milne Society to reflect on why they chose to make a gift of this kind to the School: Stuart Steele (AHH, 1942–48) “In September 1945, after the end of the European War, 130 boys returned to Westminster from Herefordshire.

Figure 4: Remember to use a ‘.’ This is one of the best known of them all. However, if one looks carefully one can see that it is in fact G. Legge not Clegge. Using a clear full stop and a small gap avoids confusion.

Figure 1: Location, Location, Location Seen these names before? I thought not. These people have fallen at the first hurdle, the location of one’s inscription. These ones are almost never seen. A better height would be around eye level, neither too high nor too low. Choose a prominent position.

The A. A. Milne Society has been formed to recognise the generosity of those who have chosen to support Westminster through their wills, and those who have made a commitment to supporting the School in future through a bequest. The Society was named after one of the School’s most famous legacy donors, A. A. Milne, who bequeathed to the School a one quarter share of the copyright of the ‘Winnie the Pooh’ stories, a gift that later turned out to be Westminster’s greatest benefaction.

Figure 5: Use English After one has achieved the above one can simply be pleased with oneself. However, do not be lured beforehand to be boastful enough to do your inscription in another language. It makes your inscription completely illegible to the majority of the population who are not scholars in an obscure, old or ambivalent language.

I had spent three years with the School in Buckenhill where life had been fairly primitive in terms of living conditions and limited facilities. The Head Master, staff and boys worked hard to make the best of a difficult situation. The contrast when the School returned to its home was very marked even though some things took time to return to normal (for example the Churchill Club was still active in Ashburnham House). I spent three further years at the School in Westminster which made me very appreciative of all that went on there and its relationship with the Abbey. Visiting the School for events when I could I have been greatly impressed by its growth, development and extraordinary academic success. I am delighted that building particularly on the legacy given by A. A. Milne, significant funds have been raised with enormous benefit to the School and all it can do. I have always felt that I owed much to West-

minster and when the A. A. Milne Society was initiated, I saw this as an opportunity to express my appreciation by contributing to Westminster and its future.” Peter Gysin (BB, 1967–72) “Why a legacy pledge? A legacy, rather than a gift, because a severe road accident has reduced my earning power. Not that education should be seen as a mere a step towards remuneration (important though that is) since Westminster fostered a respect for learning, analytical curiosity about the world and, especially, readiness to question modish values, that lasts way beyond schooldays and the workplace. I hope the School, modern pressures notwithstanding, continues to value education per se. This legacy, as important as the lifelong friends, deserves one in return. Urban (and urbane) Westminster, after a strict rural prep school and elegiac Surrey childhood, was a culture shock, though the new-found freedom and weekly boarding (fewer day boys then) provided welcome compensation for lack of countryside. Chief memories? Quality teaching, especially Classics, under the stern but kindly Denis Moylan (lateness / yawning punished by fines), genial Ted Craven (not averse to digressions on the Navy) and, especially, inspirational Theo Zinn – family friend, instrumental in my coming to the School and producer of outstanding Latin Plays. Performing in Latin Plays (the pimp in Phormio) left vivid memories; reading them enhanced understanding of human nature. Outside the classroom - happy (occasionally successful) afternoons on the football field (kicking opponent as much as ball), cricket pitch and Towpath; Busby plays (saying “I’m a bastard” in Chips with Everything before proud, if bemused, parents); Abbey (we liked it more than we let on) and Latin Prayers. And schoolboy merriment; a sobering thought, but the one activity to mark me from the herd was as Busby’s champion jelly eater.” THE ELIZABETHAN NEWSLETTER | 2012/2013 | 19


>>

Little Dean’s Yard

Soon this historic space will be returned to a much more fitting condition in keeping with its practical use and aesthetic value. Original ancient pathways will be retained and the footprints of previous structures will be outlined in contrasting stone, resulting in an overall design that meets the needs of today while recalling the area’s rich architectural history. • Designs showing how OW names will look have now been put together • Paving stones are still available for sponsorship, and OWW can be quite specific about the location of their stones within Yard • Originally, the Purbeck paths were surrounded by sand and gravel, not paving • This is the first time that OWW will ‘legally’ be able to have their names carved into the fabric of the School!

Arch Inscriptions: Punctuating Eternity Will Kitchen (AHH, LS) had a wry take on the existing carvings in a recent piece for the School publication, The Elizabethan.

The A. A. Milne Society

Legacy Giving

Figure 2: Carve it well Having a deeply carved, and properly carved, inscription is a key factor in being noticed. The clarity and depth of one’s carving increases the prominence and likelihood of being noticed too. Being noticed for having a poorly done inscription also risks deletion, as has indeed happened in recent years. It is possible to carve well if one has the ability of a stonemason.

Figure 3: Don’t forget your name One might think it is very obvious indeed, and that it is ridiculous that someone might forget to put their name on the wall after inscribing the date. However, this does happen. Whilst being pleased with inscribing the date on the wall one must press on with the task at hand.

18 | THE ELIZABETHAN NEWSLETTER | 2012/2013

We asked two members of the A. A. Milne Society to reflect on why they chose to make a gift of this kind to the School: Stuart Steele (AHH, 1942–48) “In September 1945, after the end of the European War, 130 boys returned to Westminster from Herefordshire.

Figure 4: Remember to use a ‘.’ This is one of the best known of them all. However, if one looks carefully one can see that it is in fact G. Legge not Clegge. Using a clear full stop and a small gap avoids confusion.

Figure 1: Location, Location, Location Seen these names before? I thought not. These people have fallen at the first hurdle, the location of one’s inscription. These ones are almost never seen. A better height would be around eye level, neither too high nor too low. Choose a prominent position.

The A. A. Milne Society has been formed to recognise the generosity of those who have chosen to support Westminster through their wills, and those who have made a commitment to supporting the School in future through a bequest. The Society was named after one of the School’s most famous legacy donors, A. A. Milne, who bequeathed to the School a one quarter share of the copyright of the ‘Winnie the Pooh’ stories, a gift that later turned out to be Westminster’s greatest benefaction.

Figure 5: Use English After one has achieved the above one can simply be pleased with oneself. However, do not be lured beforehand to be boastful enough to do your inscription in another language. It makes your inscription completely illegible to the majority of the population who are not scholars in an obscure, old or ambivalent language.

I had spent three years with the School in Buckenhill where life had been fairly primitive in terms of living conditions and limited facilities. The Head Master, staff and boys worked hard to make the best of a difficult situation. The contrast when the School returned to its home was very marked even though some things took time to return to normal (for example the Churchill Club was still active in Ashburnham House). I spent three further years at the School in Westminster which made me very appreciative of all that went on there and its relationship with the Abbey. Visiting the School for events when I could I have been greatly impressed by its growth, development and extraordinary academic success. I am delighted that building particularly on the legacy given by A. A. Milne, significant funds have been raised with enormous benefit to the School and all it can do. I have always felt that I owed much to West-

minster and when the A. A. Milne Society was initiated, I saw this as an opportunity to express my appreciation by contributing to Westminster and its future.” Peter Gysin (BB, 1967–72) “Why a legacy pledge? A legacy, rather than a gift, because a severe road accident has reduced my earning power. Not that education should be seen as a mere a step towards remuneration (important though that is) since Westminster fostered a respect for learning, analytical curiosity about the world and, especially, readiness to question modish values, that lasts way beyond schooldays and the workplace. I hope the School, modern pressures notwithstanding, continues to value education per se. This legacy, as important as the lifelong friends, deserves one in return. Urban (and urbane) Westminster, after a strict rural prep school and elegiac Surrey childhood, was a culture shock, though the new-found freedom and weekly boarding (fewer day boys then) provided welcome compensation for lack of countryside. Chief memories? Quality teaching, especially Classics, under the stern but kindly Denis Moylan (lateness / yawning punished by fines), genial Ted Craven (not averse to digressions on the Navy) and, especially, inspirational Theo Zinn – family friend, instrumental in my coming to the School and producer of outstanding Latin Plays. Performing in Latin Plays (the pimp in Phormio) left vivid memories; reading them enhanced understanding of human nature. Outside the classroom - happy (occasionally successful) afternoons on the football field (kicking opponent as much as ball), cricket pitch and Towpath; Busby plays (saying “I’m a bastard” in Chips with Everything before proud, if bemused, parents); Abbey (we liked it more than we let on) and Latin Prayers. And schoolboy merriment; a sobering thought, but the one activity to mark me from the herd was as Busby’s champion jelly eater.” THE ELIZABETHAN NEWSLETTER | 2012/2013 | 19


Extracts from House Reports produced for The Elizabethan (June 2012)

House Reports

House Reports are produced by pupils for the School magazine The Elizabethan at the end of each academic year. We’ve included extracts from these reports below – they look back over 2011/12 so there are quite a few OW names to look out for!

‘

 Busby’s Concert saw an evening of great musical sophistication climax in a pelvic-thrusting, hip-wiggling rendition of Don’t Stop Me Now.

Ashburnham While in ‘normal’ years Ashburnham’s policy of not buying a trophy cabinet is thoroughly vindicated, this year the trend has been bucked. Upon winning the House Rock Climbing Competition, many thought we had reached the summit. Yet, equally glorious was our netball team (despite the fact that Strat and Will were not allowed to wear skirts). We continued an excellent run of House plays with a hilarious performance of Death by Woody Allen, and against all odds argued our way to second in House Debating. With two trophies under our belts (more, rumour has it, than in the entire noughties) we then demonstrated the magnanimous spirit for which we are famous by ducking out of House Football in the qualifying round. At September Saturday we raised more money for PHAB than any other House with our already legendary bouncy castle. Raising money for charity may not be a competition, but we definitely won. Busby’s Busby’s this year has remained the bastion of a traditional Westminster education, demon-

20 | THE ELIZABETHAN NEWSLETTER | 2012/2013

strating on the one hand a veneer of cultural sophistication and on the other a primeval tribal loyalty to the House…Busby’s Concert saw an evening of great musical sophistication climax in a pelvic-thrusting, hip-wiggling rendition of Don’t Stop Me Now. Taking a tactical last in House Chess we nevertheless soared to the giddy heights of victory in House Debating. Perhaps it was this raw Busbite intellectual prowess that aided our 6 and 11-a-side football teams to fight their way to the finals of both competitions, although a full complement of team masseuses was undoubtedly a significant stimulating factor. Concerns surrounding the slightly ignominious exit of the Lower School team in the first round of their competition were nevertheless offset by the knowledge that training is already under way for Benjamin Botton’s entry into the team in 2023. College Life around College has continued to be as entertaining as ever, with a lot of fun hidden behind the dull, hard-working appearance we like to put on. After hearing for years of Mr Hargreaves’ famous pasta nights in Grant’s we decided to emulate the whole-House atmosphere by inviting the Dean for pizza in College, leading to a thoroughly enjoyable evening punctuated by a discussion ranging from the role of the media in law enforcement to genetic modification of human beings. The Dean was, as always, extremely witty, and as well as the more serious aspects of the discussion, the informal banter we were able to share with him was much appreciated. Dryden’s The Dryden’s scarlet is no ordinary colour. It is made from the blood, sweat and tears that each Drydenite sacrifices to further the glory of the Red Army. If the passionate cries within the table tennis sweatshop were condensed into a House shirt, it would look something like that of Dryden’s. It has been a year in which the House’s horizons have been broadened, and its strengths solidified. Another devastating loss in House Cricket was put swiftly to bed by a runners-up performance in House Tennis, before the Play Term began with Dryden’s

amassing by far the most money at September Saturday. The inaugural House Carol Service, created by the die-hard Drydenite that is Mr Edlin, is already a fixture in the House calendar. Great team chemistry, and sharp shooting from Bryce ‘Jackie Moon’ Leavitt, put Dryden’s within touching distance of its second House Netball victory in as many years. Grant’s One would have thought reaching the semis in the football was enough for the Grant’s ladies but they were hungry for success. They fought long and hard, and in the end it took Ashburnham cross-dressers to deny them the netball title. Yet the zenith of our achievements came one sunny, February afternoon. Who would have guessed that on that non-eventful morning, history was to be rewritten? Grant’s finished the six-a-side House Football an almighty sixth. A new record. Next came the 11s. We would deliver a full match report, but the hurt is too great. Refereeing decisions and a Pinter penalty robbed Grant’s of their rightful place among the best. >>

Above: Cake sale: just one of many activities undertaken to raise money for charity

THE ELIZABETHAN NEWSLETTER | 2012/2013 | 21


Extracts from House Reports produced for The Elizabethan (June 2012)

House Reports

House Reports are produced by pupils for the School magazine The Elizabethan at the end of each academic year. We’ve included extracts from these reports below – they look back over 2011/12 so there are quite a few OW names to look out for!

‘

 Busby’s Concert saw an evening of great musical sophistication climax in a pelvic-thrusting, hip-wiggling rendition of Don’t Stop Me Now.

Ashburnham While in ‘normal’ years Ashburnham’s policy of not buying a trophy cabinet is thoroughly vindicated, this year the trend has been bucked. Upon winning the House Rock Climbing Competition, many thought we had reached the summit. Yet, equally glorious was our netball team (despite the fact that Strat and Will were not allowed to wear skirts). We continued an excellent run of House plays with a hilarious performance of Death by Woody Allen, and against all odds argued our way to second in House Debating. With two trophies under our belts (more, rumour has it, than in the entire noughties) we then demonstrated the magnanimous spirit for which we are famous by ducking out of House Football in the qualifying round. At September Saturday we raised more money for PHAB than any other House with our already legendary bouncy castle. Raising money for charity may not be a competition, but we definitely won. Busby’s Busby’s this year has remained the bastion of a traditional Westminster education, demon-

20 | THE ELIZABETHAN NEWSLETTER | 2012/2013

strating on the one hand a veneer of cultural sophistication and on the other a primeval tribal loyalty to the House…Busby’s Concert saw an evening of great musical sophistication climax in a pelvic-thrusting, hip-wiggling rendition of Don’t Stop Me Now. Taking a tactical last in House Chess we nevertheless soared to the giddy heights of victory in House Debating. Perhaps it was this raw Busbite intellectual prowess that aided our 6 and 11-a-side football teams to fight their way to the finals of both competitions, although a full complement of team masseuses was undoubtedly a significant stimulating factor. Concerns surrounding the slightly ignominious exit of the Lower School team in the first round of their competition were nevertheless offset by the knowledge that training is already under way for Benjamin Botton’s entry into the team in 2023. College Life around College has continued to be as entertaining as ever, with a lot of fun hidden behind the dull, hard-working appearance we like to put on. After hearing for years of Mr Hargreaves’ famous pasta nights in Grant’s we decided to emulate the whole-House atmosphere by inviting the Dean for pizza in College, leading to a thoroughly enjoyable evening punctuated by a discussion ranging from the role of the media in law enforcement to genetic modification of human beings. The Dean was, as always, extremely witty, and as well as the more serious aspects of the discussion, the informal banter we were able to share with him was much appreciated. Dryden’s The Dryden’s scarlet is no ordinary colour. It is made from the blood, sweat and tears that each Drydenite sacrifices to further the glory of the Red Army. If the passionate cries within the table tennis sweatshop were condensed into a House shirt, it would look something like that of Dryden’s. It has been a year in which the House’s horizons have been broadened, and its strengths solidified. Another devastating loss in House Cricket was put swiftly to bed by a runners-up performance in House Tennis, before the Play Term began with Dryden’s

amassing by far the most money at September Saturday. The inaugural House Carol Service, created by the die-hard Drydenite that is Mr Edlin, is already a fixture in the House calendar. Great team chemistry, and sharp shooting from Bryce ‘Jackie Moon’ Leavitt, put Dryden’s within touching distance of its second House Netball victory in as many years. Grant’s One would have thought reaching the semis in the football was enough for the Grant’s ladies but they were hungry for success. They fought long and hard, and in the end it took Ashburnham cross-dressers to deny them the netball title. Yet the zenith of our achievements came one sunny, February afternoon. Who would have guessed that on that non-eventful morning, history was to be rewritten? Grant’s finished the six-a-side House Football an almighty sixth. A new record. Next came the 11s. We would deliver a full match report, but the hurt is too great. Refereeing decisions and a Pinter penalty robbed Grant’s of their rightful place among the best. >>

Above: Cake sale: just one of many activities undertaken to raise money for charity

THE ELIZABETHAN NEWSLETTER | 2012/2013 | 21


Hakluyt’s The Blue Army has, once again, proven to be a frightful force on the football pitch. Our female battalion made history by becoming the first team to win girls’ House Football and the boys recorded a heroic victory over Milne’s to achieve 3rd place later in the year. A further highlight has been the joint HH–LL House Play, The Young Idea by Noel Coward, which was a triumph and provided a night of amusement for all.

‘

 The Wren’s House play was... well... I’ll go with shambolic but it all came together and more importantly we had a brilliant time.

course will always be a constant; the factions of Geordie Shore and Downton Abbey will continue their battles over the Common Room TV, the sportswomen of the House will yet again romp home to mud-smeared victory in the Bringsty Relay [a nod here to Nicola Mason (PP, 2010–12) and Laura Cavenagh (PP, 2010–12)], and forlorn-looking boys will inevitably litter the pavement along Barton Street.

Now, to the future: a great year of Hakluytians are leaving. Yet, the customary smell will linger, the sound of the piano will continue to instil a sense of warmth to the House, and above all, the girls’ football victory will find its way into the record books, a source of inspiration for future generations.

Rigaud’s has as its founding principle a culture of, and reputation for, inclusivity and fun – two things which are not incompatible. Fortress Building – once we had overcome the procedural nightmares of blocking fire exits and returning each mattress to its rightful owner – was an activity that brought boarders of all years closer together. Fun, laughter and originality are the lifeblood of the Rigaud’s community; we very much hope they will continue to be long into the future.

Liddell’s This year saw a return to the tradition of House Plays with the HH–LL production of the The Young Idea by Noel Coward. Under the directorship of Alex Bishop (LL, VI) and Rachel Finegold (HH, 2010–12), and featuring memorable performances from Jess Ormerod (LL, 2010–12), Louis Prosser (LL, 2007–12), Isa Ouwehand (LL, Remove) and Katy Hessel (LL, 2010–12) to name but a few, the play had the audience roaring with laughter and was so popular we had people sitting on the stairs just to get a view.

Above: House Athletics

Milne’s Fifteen years since its creation, Milne’s continues to keep Dr Hartley’s study full of silverware. Things got off to an ideal start with a sizeable victory at the Long Distance Races in September, the third Towpath victory in succession. Consistency was the key, as Milne’s was the only House to place in the top four in every category, even without star athletes. Further athletics success continued in March, where Milne’s retrieved the Bringsty Relays from Ashburnham, which included an impressive run from Oscar SatchellBaeza (MM, 2007–12) to bring home the win for the seniors, as well as the overall competition. As of March 2012 Milne’s has won six out of the last eight school running competitions. Purcell’s This year has been one of both distinction and routine for the girls of Purcell’s. Some things, of 22 | THE ELIZABETHAN NEWSLETTER | 2012/2013

Rigaud’s Proud successes in House Chess, Fives and running competitions rekindled the flame of Rigaud’s pride. The Remove rewrote House Concert protocol with their last-minute Lion King renditions. The most we ever won in House Football was crockery, but at least we had the most fun doing it – the sight of our young Fifth Form protégés screaming Ipsu Razu, unprompted, before each game they played was deeply inspiring.

Above: Purcell’s undertook a 24-hour funded cycle ride for the after-school club, Westminster House

However, several efforts on the part of the House should not be missed. At the end of July last year, we pulled off a 24-hour cycle ride, for the after-school club, Westminster House. Although the effects of sleep deprivation may have slightly unhinged some members of the House (towards the end of the marathon our Head of House, Ariane Moshiri (PP, 2010–12), produced the revelation that Westminster Abbey looked ‘almost… three-dimensional’), it was a bonding experience for this year’s Remove, and fantastic training for the late-night efforts which UCAS would demand in the following Play Term. Whilst being woken up at three in the morning in order to take my 40-minute shift is not an experience I wish to repeat, Ariane’s rousing combination of cheerleading and disco dancing got us through the night, and we raised over £4000 for Westminster House.

Wren’s At the start of this year, this writer had the pleasure of co-directing the Wren’s House play. It was... well... I’ll go with shambolic; by way of example I may have electrocuted myself trying to do the lighting, but it all came together and more importantly we had a brilliant time. The fact that we managed to enjoy ourselves, put on a brilliant show and cope with all our work without nervous breakdown must say something. The whole experience actually reflected a lot of things I will remember about Wren’s. I wouldn’t want to cheapen anything by putting it down to something as cliché or cheesy as, “House Spirit”, but I do not exaggerate when I say my great experience both with the play and in general, has been 100% down to the lovely atmosphere created by the friendliness of the people involved. It is this easy-going atmosphere that I will remember about Wren’s. Since I’ve been here, particularly this year, I have felt comfortable wandering into any day room just for a chat (excepting maybe with the terrifying Upper Shell). I’ve walked to lessons with Fifth Form and Sixth Form alike, and I’ve even received complimentary paper aeroplanes through the window from the Lower Shell as I sat in College Garden. THE ELIZABETHAN NEWSLETTER | 2012/2013 | 23


Hakluyt’s The Blue Army has, once again, proven to be a frightful force on the football pitch. Our female battalion made history by becoming the first team to win girls’ House Football and the boys recorded a heroic victory over Milne’s to achieve 3rd place later in the year. A further highlight has been the joint HH–LL House Play, The Young Idea by Noel Coward, which was a triumph and provided a night of amusement for all.

‘

 The Wren’s House play was... well... I’ll go with shambolic but it all came together and more importantly we had a brilliant time.

course will always be a constant; the factions of Geordie Shore and Downton Abbey will continue their battles over the Common Room TV, the sportswomen of the House will yet again romp home to mud-smeared victory in the Bringsty Relay [a nod here to Nicola Mason (PP, 2010–12) and Laura Cavenagh (PP, 2010–12)], and forlorn-looking boys will inevitably litter the pavement along Barton Street.

Now, to the future: a great year of Hakluytians are leaving. Yet, the customary smell will linger, the sound of the piano will continue to instil a sense of warmth to the House, and above all, the girls’ football victory will find its way into the record books, a source of inspiration for future generations.

Rigaud’s has as its founding principle a culture of, and reputation for, inclusivity and fun – two things which are not incompatible. Fortress Building – once we had overcome the procedural nightmares of blocking fire exits and returning each mattress to its rightful owner – was an activity that brought boarders of all years closer together. Fun, laughter and originality are the lifeblood of the Rigaud’s community; we very much hope they will continue to be long into the future.

Liddell’s This year saw a return to the tradition of House Plays with the HH–LL production of the The Young Idea by Noel Coward. Under the directorship of Alex Bishop (LL, VI) and Rachel Finegold (HH, 2010–12), and featuring memorable performances from Jess Ormerod (LL, 2010–12), Louis Prosser (LL, 2007–12), Isa Ouwehand (LL, Remove) and Katy Hessel (LL, 2010–12) to name but a few, the play had the audience roaring with laughter and was so popular we had people sitting on the stairs just to get a view.

Above: House Athletics

Milne’s Fifteen years since its creation, Milne’s continues to keep Dr Hartley’s study full of silverware. Things got off to an ideal start with a sizeable victory at the Long Distance Races in September, the third Towpath victory in succession. Consistency was the key, as Milne’s was the only House to place in the top four in every category, even without star athletes. Further athletics success continued in March, where Milne’s retrieved the Bringsty Relays from Ashburnham, which included an impressive run from Oscar SatchellBaeza (MM, 2007–12) to bring home the win for the seniors, as well as the overall competition. As of March 2012 Milne’s has won six out of the last eight school running competitions. Purcell’s This year has been one of both distinction and routine for the girls of Purcell’s. Some things, of 22 | THE ELIZABETHAN NEWSLETTER | 2012/2013

Rigaud’s Proud successes in House Chess, Fives and running competitions rekindled the flame of Rigaud’s pride. The Remove rewrote House Concert protocol with their last-minute Lion King renditions. The most we ever won in House Football was crockery, but at least we had the most fun doing it – the sight of our young Fifth Form protégés screaming Ipsu Razu, unprompted, before each game they played was deeply inspiring.

Above: Purcell’s undertook a 24-hour funded cycle ride for the after-school club, Westminster House

However, several efforts on the part of the House should not be missed. At the end of July last year, we pulled off a 24-hour cycle ride, for the after-school club, Westminster House. Although the effects of sleep deprivation may have slightly unhinged some members of the House (towards the end of the marathon our Head of House, Ariane Moshiri (PP, 2010–12), produced the revelation that Westminster Abbey looked ‘almost… three-dimensional’), it was a bonding experience for this year’s Remove, and fantastic training for the late-night efforts which UCAS would demand in the following Play Term. Whilst being woken up at three in the morning in order to take my 40-minute shift is not an experience I wish to repeat, Ariane’s rousing combination of cheerleading and disco dancing got us through the night, and we raised over £4000 for Westminster House.

Wren’s At the start of this year, this writer had the pleasure of co-directing the Wren’s House play. It was... well... I’ll go with shambolic; by way of example I may have electrocuted myself trying to do the lighting, but it all came together and more importantly we had a brilliant time. The fact that we managed to enjoy ourselves, put on a brilliant show and cope with all our work without nervous breakdown must say something. The whole experience actually reflected a lot of things I will remember about Wren’s. I wouldn’t want to cheapen anything by putting it down to something as cliché or cheesy as, “House Spirit”, but I do not exaggerate when I say my great experience both with the play and in general, has been 100% down to the lovely atmosphere created by the friendliness of the people involved. It is this easy-going atmosphere that I will remember about Wren’s. Since I’ve been here, particularly this year, I have felt comfortable wandering into any day room just for a chat (excepting maybe with the terrifying Upper Shell). I’ve walked to lessons with Fifth Form and Sixth Form alike, and I’ve even received complimentary paper aeroplanes through the window from the Lower Shell as I sat in College Garden. THE ELIZABETHAN NEWSLETTER | 2012/2013 | 23


Fields. After the matches – whether in the Square or the Centre itself – hot teas are now at last provided in the cafeteria area with tea and sandwiches for spectators and staff in the café. All PE lessons at the Great School are now double lessons – with 5th formers taking PE now on alternate weeks – and take place in the wonderful space available inside the Sports Centre with a variety of programmed activities on offer, including volleyball, basketball, handball and basic fitness training.

Westminster Station

Station Report 2011/12 J D Kershen Master i/c Station For all the Westminster exploits described below in the numerous competitions and on the various fields of play throughout 2012, the School’s sporting highlight of the year was undoubtedly the acquisition, planning and delivering (on time!) of the Sports Centre, housed in the former RHS Lawrence Hall just a matter of yards away from Vincent Square. This magnificent 6000 squaremetre, art-deco structure is now home to a number of Westminster sporting pursuits (including use by the Under School as well), and is a hive of activity throughout the week but especially on Tuesday and Thursday afternoons. The Sports Centre provides sporting facilities in its main hall for rock climbing (two separate walls), fencing, badminton (5 courts), cricket (6 nets), volleyball, basketball, 5-a-side football, netball and handball, as well as offering 4 table tennis tables on the raised dais. In addition, the front of the building offers three floors of what were previously conference rooms which have now been transformed into a state-of-the-art Fitness Suite, a Dance/Movement Studio, a Judoka and a Rowing Training Suite. These excellent and wide-ranging sporting facilities are complemented by male and female changing rooms (each with its own showers and toilets), a café area, a cafeteria which is serviced by a fullsize kitchen and which can seat over 100 people, and basement storage space which amply covers the sporting needs as well as helping to alleviate the overcrowding in both the Manoukian Music Centre and the Millicent Fawcett Hall. This superb addition has transformed the School’s sporting facilities and now offers a fantastic hub 24 | THE ELIZABETHAN NEWSLETTER | 2012/2013

from which Westminster’s Station, PE, LSA and boarding activities are benefitting immeasurably. In terms of Station usage, on Tuesdays and Thursdays, the fencers have exclusive use of the left alley in the main hall throughout the afternoon whilst the rock climbers have the same monopoly of the two walls in the right alley. Meanwhile, in the central part of the hall, there is indoor football (or sometimes Futsal) followed by badminton. Simultaneously, on the dais, there is the newly-formed table tennis Station taking place on the four tables situated there. Meanwhile on the first floor, in the Fitness Suite, there are two sessions back-to-back of Gym Fitness where pupils follow their own personal training programmes as compiled by the onsite specialist instructor. One floor up, there is another specialist instructor taking bodystep aerobics for the girls in the Dance/Movement Studio, and this is followed by Yoga which is again led by an external instructor. In the adjacent room to this, there takes place judo Station throughout the afternoon, and, on the top floor, there is the new triathlon training Station where pupils utilise the rowing ergos and watt/spin bikes as well as going for a timed run around Vincent Square. All of this activity, which was previously dotted around the School and various other venues in central London has now been brought together under the same roof giving the Sports Centre a real buzz and community atmosphere on Station afternoons. In addition, if there are football matches at Vincent Square, then the away teams will generally change in the new changing rooms thereby leaving the home teams to have exclusive use of the ones up

The wide-ranging LSA programme makes great use also of the Centre with activities such as land training (for rowers), team fitness training (for footballers), cricket, indoor football, basketball, fencing, badminton, climbing and table tennis. This all ties in with the Under School’s after-School Clubs programme which offers many of the same activities in the Sports Centre. Finally, there is the extensive Boarders’ Activities Programme which runs from Monday to Friday between 9–10 pm with the 5th Form and Lower Shell having exclusive use on Mondays and the Upper Shell, Sixth Form and Remove on the other nights. On each night there is supervised use of the Fitness Suite available as well as a selection comprising of 1st XI cricket nets, boxing fitness, circuits, table tennis, badminton and climbing amongst other things which all take place during the week. For those pupils aged 16 and over, there is the opportunity also to train unsupervised – but never alone – in the Fitness Suite between 4.30–7 pm on most evenings once they have completed a full induction process carried out by one of the four new, full-time Centre staff whose responsibility it is to set up and oversee all of the many activities taking place in the Sports Centre. All in all, as should be evident, there is a lot going on inside the School’s new Sports Centre and so much more so (in both breadth and depth) than was possible when Westminster was dependent previously upon hiring external facilities. It is a unique and wonderful space which the School is taking every opportunity to utilise to the full. Cricket It was a case of ‘wet, wet, wet’ for the cricket season with innumerable matches lost to the weather particularly in the first half of the term. Nevertheless, when play was possible, a very young 1st XI enjoyed a promising season, winning as many as they lost, starting with the successful pre-season tour to La Manga where the 1st XI Player of the Year,

Milo Johnson (DD, Remove) scored the first of his two centuries, and, the U15 spinner and the 1st XI’s Most Improved Player, Kavi Amin (RR, Upper Shell) took the first two of his four 5-wicket hauls for the year. Indeed, Amin was to take 30 wickets during the season, making him one of the season’s leading schoolboy wicket-takers nationwide. Elsewhere, the U15s provided arguably the highlight in reaching the final of the London Schools’ U15 Cup before losing out to a very strong Dulwich side, and, they were well led by Eugene Daley (CC, Upper Shell) who was the top performer with both bat and ball. The U14s showed plenty of promise for the future too with Barnaby Graff (QS, Lower Shell) an outstanding all-round prospect. Cross Country The highlight of the season came at the London Schools’ Cross Country Championships where Westminster was overall the top-performing London School for an amazing ninth year in a row. This was achieved by the Senior Boys and Senior Girls winning their sections and the Inters and Juniors finishing third in their respective sections. Individually, there was success as well with Nicola Mason (PP, 2010–12) winning the bronze medal in Senior Girls, Sammy Skipper (DD, 2007–12) 6th in Senior Boys and Mo Barry-Wilson (MM, Lower Shell) 9th/100 in the Juniors. Following on from this, five Westminster pupils were selected to represent London at the English Schools Cross Country Championships in Taunton, Somerset. This is the greatest number of Westminsters that have been selected simultaneously in living memory and the pupils (all Seniors) were: GIRLS – Nicola Mason; Lucile Pannetier (CC, 2010–12) and Gabrielle Michotte (CC, Remove) BOYS – Sammy Skipper and Su-Min Lee (MM, 2007–12). Also, there were excellent performances at the King’s Trophy, where Westminster’s A team finished 4th out of 23 teams and the B team were the highest-placed B squad, and, at the Grim Challenge, where Westminster dominated the men’s team event finishing in 1st, 2nd, 4th and 6th places. Fives There were plenty of victories across all the age groups during the year but the season’s main event was the Schools’ National Championships at Eton. All the pupils involved were great ambassadors for the School and there were some excellent results with arguably the outstanding performance coming from the top pair, James Alster (DD, Remove) and >> THE ELIZABETHAN NEWSLETTER | 2012/2013 | 25


Fields. After the matches – whether in the Square or the Centre itself – hot teas are now at last provided in the cafeteria area with tea and sandwiches for spectators and staff in the café. All PE lessons at the Great School are now double lessons – with 5th formers taking PE now on alternate weeks – and take place in the wonderful space available inside the Sports Centre with a variety of programmed activities on offer, including volleyball, basketball, handball and basic fitness training.

Westminster Station

Station Report 2011/12 J D Kershen Master i/c Station For all the Westminster exploits described below in the numerous competitions and on the various fields of play throughout 2012, the School’s sporting highlight of the year was undoubtedly the acquisition, planning and delivering (on time!) of the Sports Centre, housed in the former RHS Lawrence Hall just a matter of yards away from Vincent Square. This magnificent 6000 squaremetre, art-deco structure is now home to a number of Westminster sporting pursuits (including use by the Under School as well), and is a hive of activity throughout the week but especially on Tuesday and Thursday afternoons. The Sports Centre provides sporting facilities in its main hall for rock climbing (two separate walls), fencing, badminton (5 courts), cricket (6 nets), volleyball, basketball, 5-a-side football, netball and handball, as well as offering 4 table tennis tables on the raised dais. In addition, the front of the building offers three floors of what were previously conference rooms which have now been transformed into a state-of-the-art Fitness Suite, a Dance/Movement Studio, a Judoka and a Rowing Training Suite. These excellent and wide-ranging sporting facilities are complemented by male and female changing rooms (each with its own showers and toilets), a café area, a cafeteria which is serviced by a fullsize kitchen and which can seat over 100 people, and basement storage space which amply covers the sporting needs as well as helping to alleviate the overcrowding in both the Manoukian Music Centre and the Millicent Fawcett Hall. This superb addition has transformed the School’s sporting facilities and now offers a fantastic hub 24 | THE ELIZABETHAN NEWSLETTER | 2012/2013

from which Westminster’s Station, PE, LSA and boarding activities are benefitting immeasurably. In terms of Station usage, on Tuesdays and Thursdays, the fencers have exclusive use of the left alley in the main hall throughout the afternoon whilst the rock climbers have the same monopoly of the two walls in the right alley. Meanwhile, in the central part of the hall, there is indoor football (or sometimes Futsal) followed by badminton. Simultaneously, on the dais, there is the newly-formed table tennis Station taking place on the four tables situated there. Meanwhile on the first floor, in the Fitness Suite, there are two sessions back-to-back of Gym Fitness where pupils follow their own personal training programmes as compiled by the onsite specialist instructor. One floor up, there is another specialist instructor taking bodystep aerobics for the girls in the Dance/Movement Studio, and this is followed by Yoga which is again led by an external instructor. In the adjacent room to this, there takes place judo Station throughout the afternoon, and, on the top floor, there is the new triathlon training Station where pupils utilise the rowing ergos and watt/spin bikes as well as going for a timed run around Vincent Square. All of this activity, which was previously dotted around the School and various other venues in central London has now been brought together under the same roof giving the Sports Centre a real buzz and community atmosphere on Station afternoons. In addition, if there are football matches at Vincent Square, then the away teams will generally change in the new changing rooms thereby leaving the home teams to have exclusive use of the ones up

The wide-ranging LSA programme makes great use also of the Centre with activities such as land training (for rowers), team fitness training (for footballers), cricket, indoor football, basketball, fencing, badminton, climbing and table tennis. This all ties in with the Under School’s after-School Clubs programme which offers many of the same activities in the Sports Centre. Finally, there is the extensive Boarders’ Activities Programme which runs from Monday to Friday between 9–10 pm with the 5th Form and Lower Shell having exclusive use on Mondays and the Upper Shell, Sixth Form and Remove on the other nights. On each night there is supervised use of the Fitness Suite available as well as a selection comprising of 1st XI cricket nets, boxing fitness, circuits, table tennis, badminton and climbing amongst other things which all take place during the week. For those pupils aged 16 and over, there is the opportunity also to train unsupervised – but never alone – in the Fitness Suite between 4.30–7 pm on most evenings once they have completed a full induction process carried out by one of the four new, full-time Centre staff whose responsibility it is to set up and oversee all of the many activities taking place in the Sports Centre. All in all, as should be evident, there is a lot going on inside the School’s new Sports Centre and so much more so (in both breadth and depth) than was possible when Westminster was dependent previously upon hiring external facilities. It is a unique and wonderful space which the School is taking every opportunity to utilise to the full. Cricket It was a case of ‘wet, wet, wet’ for the cricket season with innumerable matches lost to the weather particularly in the first half of the term. Nevertheless, when play was possible, a very young 1st XI enjoyed a promising season, winning as many as they lost, starting with the successful pre-season tour to La Manga where the 1st XI Player of the Year,

Milo Johnson (DD, Remove) scored the first of his two centuries, and, the U15 spinner and the 1st XI’s Most Improved Player, Kavi Amin (RR, Upper Shell) took the first two of his four 5-wicket hauls for the year. Indeed, Amin was to take 30 wickets during the season, making him one of the season’s leading schoolboy wicket-takers nationwide. Elsewhere, the U15s provided arguably the highlight in reaching the final of the London Schools’ U15 Cup before losing out to a very strong Dulwich side, and, they were well led by Eugene Daley (CC, Upper Shell) who was the top performer with both bat and ball. The U14s showed plenty of promise for the future too with Barnaby Graff (QS, Lower Shell) an outstanding all-round prospect. Cross Country The highlight of the season came at the London Schools’ Cross Country Championships where Westminster was overall the top-performing London School for an amazing ninth year in a row. This was achieved by the Senior Boys and Senior Girls winning their sections and the Inters and Juniors finishing third in their respective sections. Individually, there was success as well with Nicola Mason (PP, 2010–12) winning the bronze medal in Senior Girls, Sammy Skipper (DD, 2007–12) 6th in Senior Boys and Mo Barry-Wilson (MM, Lower Shell) 9th/100 in the Juniors. Following on from this, five Westminster pupils were selected to represent London at the English Schools Cross Country Championships in Taunton, Somerset. This is the greatest number of Westminsters that have been selected simultaneously in living memory and the pupils (all Seniors) were: GIRLS – Nicola Mason; Lucile Pannetier (CC, 2010–12) and Gabrielle Michotte (CC, Remove) BOYS – Sammy Skipper and Su-Min Lee (MM, 2007–12). Also, there were excellent performances at the King’s Trophy, where Westminster’s A team finished 4th out of 23 teams and the B team were the highest-placed B squad, and, at the Grim Challenge, where Westminster dominated the men’s team event finishing in 1st, 2nd, 4th and 6th places. Fives There were plenty of victories across all the age groups during the year but the season’s main event was the Schools’ National Championships at Eton. All the pupils involved were great ambassadors for the School and there were some excellent results with arguably the outstanding performance coming from the top pair, James Alster (DD, Remove) and >> THE ELIZABETHAN NEWSLETTER | 2012/2013 | 25


>>

tion in 2012 as for the fourth year in a row, Westminster won the Best Overall Team Trophy and, in addition, they were the Best Junior Team, Best Junior and Senior Bouldering Team and Best Junior Lead team. The Westminster team in full was: Seniors – Dom Smith (DD, 2007–12 Captain), Marshall Bradley (GG, 2007–12), Henry WilsonSmith (MM, 2007–12) Juniors – Jed Thompson (AHH, VI), Pip Woolley (BB, 2009–12), Neirin Gray Desai (WW, Upper Shell).

Leo Nelson-Jones (RR, Remove) who won all their group matches and another two knockout games before bowing out in the quarter-finals to the top seeds and eventual winners. Also in the Seniors, the third pair of James Sherwood (DD, Remove) and Fred Tomlinson (DD, Remove) were runners-up in the plate competition, as were Tom Ashton (CC, Upper Shell) and Lewis Bixer (LL, Upper Shell) in the U15s section. In addition, the top U15 pair of Ismail Salim (RR, Upper Shell) and Matthew Lewin (DD, Upper Shell) won all their group matches and progressed to the quarter-finals before losing out. Football The 2012–13 season is well underway and the 1st XI, in spite of being ravaged by injuries, have recorded some excellent victories including defeating Charterhouse and Latymer Upper in the same week, as well as a fine win over Brentwood earlier in the term. The U15s have done well also and reached the last 16 of the ISFA U15 Cup for the second year running before losing out to the tournament favourites, Whitgift. Looking back though, it was a momentous 2011–12 season for the 1st XI who showed that they could compete and win against the very best on the Independent Schools’ circuit. The team equalled the ‘living memory’ record for the most wins in a 1st XI season (15), as well as losing only two of their last twenty matches and remaining undefeated by another school side for the last four months of the season. Also, they were unbeaten and finished close runners-up in the Northern Division of the Southern Independent Schools’ League, and, reached the last 16 of both the ISFA Sixes and Boodles ISFA U18 Cup, agonisingly losing out on penalties having been seconds away from 1–0 wins in both games. There were so many highlights that it is hard to single any out but the 2–1 defeat of Hampton on their home soil was arguably the most complete performance of the season, coming as it did against the team who were to go on to win the ISFA U18 Cup. Individually, Forrest Clancy (HH, 2007–12) and Ollie Iselin (BB, VI) were selected for the Full ISFA U18 & U16 England Independent Schools’ squads respectively – the first time that Westminster has had representatives in both of these sides simultaneously – whilst Sammy Skipper (DD, 2007–12), in defence, and Ben Cooke (DD, 2007–12, 23 goals), in attack, were outstanding as well. Elsewhere, all of the other 8 School teams put in excellent performances during the course of the

26 | THE ELIZABETHAN NEWSLETTER | 2012/2013

season with the U16s and U14s showing particular promise whilst the U15s enjoyed success in the ISFA cup as they reached the last 16 before losing away to the might of Millfield. Girls’ Football This Station continued to flourish and grow throughout 2012 and the Olympic Year provided another historic moment for Westminster sport as the first ever win for a Westminster girls’ football team was registered over no less an opponent than the ‘auld enemy’, Charterhouse. Golf There was Old Westminster golfing success at Cambridge for recent leavers as Oliver Flynn (RR, 2003–08) played in the Varsity Match and Carl Rietschel (GG, 2009–11) was the first reserve.  This was a rare feat to say the least for OWW golfers as the last one to be selected for the Varsity Match was in 1975. Hockey The 1st XI enjoyed a very successful 2011–12 season, registering numerous victories and losing only a couple throughout the year, and, special mention should go to Angus Mylne (RR, VI) who was selected as goalkeeper for the Middlesex U17 Hockey squad. Netball The Westminster A side have started the 2012–13 season strongly with wins over Highgate, South Hamsptead and Godolphin & Latymer as well as finishing runners-up in the Ibstock Place tournament. This has built upon the success enjoyed in the second half of the 2011–12 season which saw them win several games including against Notting Hill & Ealing HS as well as the might of the Common Room. Rock Climbing It was a tale of triumph once again for Westminster at the Independent Schools’ Climbing Competi-

In the individual competitions, Thompson picked up an excellent second place in the Juniors.  Swimming There was exciting news concerning recent Old Westminster swimmers as Philip Cohen (AHH, 2006–11), Joe Northover (AHH, 2004–09) and Antonia Millard (WW, 2008–10) were part of the Oxford University Swimming team who were victorious in the Varsity Match against Cambridge. It is likely that this is either the first time ever or the first time for a very long while that three OWW have appeared in the same Varsity swimming team simultaneously. Tennis As with cricket Station, the rain played havoc with tennis fixtures throughout the Election term, but when fixtures did get underway there were successes in the matches against Haileybury, Winchester and Merchant Taylor’s. At the end of the term, the 1st IV – Gabriel Cagan (DD, 2007–12), Alex Rafter (AHH, 2007–12), Johnny Church (LL, 2007–12) and Alex Ho (GG, 2007–12) – competed in the Youll Cup (the Independent Schools’ Cup Competition) and secured an excellent 2–0 victory over Whitgift in the 1st round before losing out 2–1 in a deciding set of singles play against Canford School in the 2nd round.

Water The Lent term saw the Schools’ Head of the River and National Junior Sculling Head Competitions on consecutive days. In keeping with recent times, there was plenty of Westminster success as the School picked up a win and two second places at the Sculling Head followed by three victories and a third place at the Schools’ Head. It was the J18 Quad of George Matthews (GG, 2007–12), Ivan Karpov (GG, 2007–12), George Bradbury (BB, 2007–12) and Nicholas Scott (AHH, Remove) that was triumphant at the former, and their win was backed up by second place (and 4th overall) for the J17 Quad whilst the J15 Quad were second in their event. At the Schools’ Head, there was another win for James Gunn (QS, Remove), Scott, Daniel Kim (MM, Remove) and Will Ripley (HH, Remove) in the Junior Coxless Fours whilst Matthews, Karpov and the Bradbury brothers were coxed to victory by Nicola Mason in the Junior Coxed Fours event.  The third Westminster win of the event came in the J15 Coxed Fours as Tim Wu (AHH, Upper Shell), Sam Meijer (HH, Upper Shell), Conrad Thomas (MM, Upper Shell) and Alex Balgarnie (HH, Upper Shell) were guided to glory by cox, Nishant Lahoti (HH, Upper Shell), and there was a third place also for the J15 Four. The Election Term was another successful and busy one for Water, although it was one that upon reflection didn’t quite deliver the National Schools and Henley success that was hoped for. At the former, there was still a gold medal for the J16 Eight as well as an excellent silver for George Bradbury in the Championship Single Sculls and another for the J15 Coxed Fours. Hopes were high in the Championship Quadruple Sculls but Westminster was left somewhat disappointed by a bronze medal. At Henley, the top Quad of Matthews, Karpov, Scott and G. Bradbury were optimistic of repeating the success of three years ago in the Fawley Challenge Cup. All looked good after a comfortable win over a strong Melbourne Grammar crew but it was to go awry in the next round against Marlow R.C. where Westminster made too many mistakes and slipped to defeat by 1 length. In spite of this disappointment though, there was still much success to celebrate elsewhere throughout the term with numerous wins at the Reading, Nottingham City, Wallingford, Kingston and Gravelines Regattas. THE ELIZABETHAN NEWSLETTER | 2012/2013 | 27


>>

tion in 2012 as for the fourth year in a row, Westminster won the Best Overall Team Trophy and, in addition, they were the Best Junior Team, Best Junior and Senior Bouldering Team and Best Junior Lead team. The Westminster team in full was: Seniors – Dom Smith (DD, 2007–12 Captain), Marshall Bradley (GG, 2007–12), Henry WilsonSmith (MM, 2007–12) Juniors – Jed Thompson (AHH, VI), Pip Woolley (BB, 2009–12), Neirin Gray Desai (WW, Upper Shell).

Leo Nelson-Jones (RR, Remove) who won all their group matches and another two knockout games before bowing out in the quarter-finals to the top seeds and eventual winners. Also in the Seniors, the third pair of James Sherwood (DD, Remove) and Fred Tomlinson (DD, Remove) were runners-up in the plate competition, as were Tom Ashton (CC, Upper Shell) and Lewis Bixer (LL, Upper Shell) in the U15s section. In addition, the top U15 pair of Ismail Salim (RR, Upper Shell) and Matthew Lewin (DD, Upper Shell) won all their group matches and progressed to the quarter-finals before losing out. Football The 2012–13 season is well underway and the 1st XI, in spite of being ravaged by injuries, have recorded some excellent victories including defeating Charterhouse and Latymer Upper in the same week, as well as a fine win over Brentwood earlier in the term. The U15s have done well also and reached the last 16 of the ISFA U15 Cup for the second year running before losing out to the tournament favourites, Whitgift. Looking back though, it was a momentous 2011–12 season for the 1st XI who showed that they could compete and win against the very best on the Independent Schools’ circuit. The team equalled the ‘living memory’ record for the most wins in a 1st XI season (15), as well as losing only two of their last twenty matches and remaining undefeated by another school side for the last four months of the season. Also, they were unbeaten and finished close runners-up in the Northern Division of the Southern Independent Schools’ League, and, reached the last 16 of both the ISFA Sixes and Boodles ISFA U18 Cup, agonisingly losing out on penalties having been seconds away from 1–0 wins in both games. There were so many highlights that it is hard to single any out but the 2–1 defeat of Hampton on their home soil was arguably the most complete performance of the season, coming as it did against the team who were to go on to win the ISFA U18 Cup. Individually, Forrest Clancy (HH, 2007–12) and Ollie Iselin (BB, VI) were selected for the Full ISFA U18 & U16 England Independent Schools’ squads respectively – the first time that Westminster has had representatives in both of these sides simultaneously – whilst Sammy Skipper (DD, 2007–12), in defence, and Ben Cooke (DD, 2007–12, 23 goals), in attack, were outstanding as well. Elsewhere, all of the other 8 School teams put in excellent performances during the course of the

26 | THE ELIZABETHAN NEWSLETTER | 2012/2013

season with the U16s and U14s showing particular promise whilst the U15s enjoyed success in the ISFA cup as they reached the last 16 before losing away to the might of Millfield. Girls’ Football This Station continued to flourish and grow throughout 2012 and the Olympic Year provided another historic moment for Westminster sport as the first ever win for a Westminster girls’ football team was registered over no less an opponent than the ‘auld enemy’, Charterhouse. Golf There was Old Westminster golfing success at Cambridge for recent leavers as Oliver Flynn (RR, 2003–08) played in the Varsity Match and Carl Rietschel (GG, 2009–11) was the first reserve.  This was a rare feat to say the least for OWW golfers as the last one to be selected for the Varsity Match was in 1975. Hockey The 1st XI enjoyed a very successful 2011–12 season, registering numerous victories and losing only a couple throughout the year, and, special mention should go to Angus Mylne (RR, VI) who was selected as goalkeeper for the Middlesex U17 Hockey squad. Netball The Westminster A side have started the 2012–13 season strongly with wins over Highgate, South Hamsptead and Godolphin & Latymer as well as finishing runners-up in the Ibstock Place tournament. This has built upon the success enjoyed in the second half of the 2011–12 season which saw them win several games including against Notting Hill & Ealing HS as well as the might of the Common Room. Rock Climbing It was a tale of triumph once again for Westminster at the Independent Schools’ Climbing Competi-

In the individual competitions, Thompson picked up an excellent second place in the Juniors.  Swimming There was exciting news concerning recent Old Westminster swimmers as Philip Cohen (AHH, 2006–11), Joe Northover (AHH, 2004–09) and Antonia Millard (WW, 2008–10) were part of the Oxford University Swimming team who were victorious in the Varsity Match against Cambridge. It is likely that this is either the first time ever or the first time for a very long while that three OWW have appeared in the same Varsity swimming team simultaneously. Tennis As with cricket Station, the rain played havoc with tennis fixtures throughout the Election term, but when fixtures did get underway there were successes in the matches against Haileybury, Winchester and Merchant Taylor’s. At the end of the term, the 1st IV – Gabriel Cagan (DD, 2007–12), Alex Rafter (AHH, 2007–12), Johnny Church (LL, 2007–12) and Alex Ho (GG, 2007–12) – competed in the Youll Cup (the Independent Schools’ Cup Competition) and secured an excellent 2–0 victory over Whitgift in the 1st round before losing out 2–1 in a deciding set of singles play against Canford School in the 2nd round.

Water The Lent term saw the Schools’ Head of the River and National Junior Sculling Head Competitions on consecutive days. In keeping with recent times, there was plenty of Westminster success as the School picked up a win and two second places at the Sculling Head followed by three victories and a third place at the Schools’ Head. It was the J18 Quad of George Matthews (GG, 2007–12), Ivan Karpov (GG, 2007–12), George Bradbury (BB, 2007–12) and Nicholas Scott (AHH, Remove) that was triumphant at the former, and their win was backed up by second place (and 4th overall) for the J17 Quad whilst the J15 Quad were second in their event. At the Schools’ Head, there was another win for James Gunn (QS, Remove), Scott, Daniel Kim (MM, Remove) and Will Ripley (HH, Remove) in the Junior Coxless Fours whilst Matthews, Karpov and the Bradbury brothers were coxed to victory by Nicola Mason in the Junior Coxed Fours event.  The third Westminster win of the event came in the J15 Coxed Fours as Tim Wu (AHH, Upper Shell), Sam Meijer (HH, Upper Shell), Conrad Thomas (MM, Upper Shell) and Alex Balgarnie (HH, Upper Shell) were guided to glory by cox, Nishant Lahoti (HH, Upper Shell), and there was a third place also for the J15 Four. The Election Term was another successful and busy one for Water, although it was one that upon reflection didn’t quite deliver the National Schools and Henley success that was hoped for. At the former, there was still a gold medal for the J16 Eight as well as an excellent silver for George Bradbury in the Championship Single Sculls and another for the J15 Coxed Fours. Hopes were high in the Championship Quadruple Sculls but Westminster was left somewhat disappointed by a bronze medal. At Henley, the top Quad of Matthews, Karpov, Scott and G. Bradbury were optimistic of repeating the success of three years ago in the Fawley Challenge Cup. All looked good after a comfortable win over a strong Melbourne Grammar crew but it was to go awry in the next round against Marlow R.C. where Westminster made too many mistakes and slipped to defeat by 1 length. In spite of this disappointment though, there was still much success to celebrate elsewhere throughout the term with numerous wins at the Reading, Nottingham City, Wallingford, Kingston and Gravelines Regattas. THE ELIZABETHAN NEWSLETTER | 2012/2013 | 27


Below: James Kershen (WW, 1981–86 and Master i/c Station), Meg Trainor (HH, 2008–10) and Niamh Tupman (HH, 2008–10)

OW SOCIAL Elizabethan Club Committee Members • David Neuberger (WW, 1961–65) President

• Caroline Lewis (GG, 1980–82) caroline.f.lewis@btinternet.com

• Tim Brocklebank-Fowler (RR, 1976–80) Chairman tim@brocklebank.biz

• Tarun Mathur (AHH, 1988–93) tarun.mathur@barcap.com

• Nicholas Brown (RR, 1968–73) Hon. Secretary NicholasBrown@bdb-law.co.uk • Artin Basirov (GG, 1989–94) Treasurer abasirov@sdcglobal.net • Jonathan Carey (GG, 1964–69) jonathan_carey@hotmail.co.uk • Jessica Chichester (GG, 2000–02) OW Sports Representative jessie_cc@hotmail.com

Above: Eleanor Turner-Moss (PP, 2005–07), Guy Hopkins (Housemaster of Hakluyt's and Master of Music) and Genevieve Turner-Moss (PP, 2008–10)

• Gavin Griffiths (WW, 1967–72) gavin.griffiths@westminster.org.uk

• Darius Norell (BB, 1985–90) darius@realworldmagazine.com • David Roy (AHH, 1955–61) daroy@btinternet.com • Graham Walker (RR, 1963–67) House Societies Representative gajwalker@sky.com • Matthew Webb (BB, 1999–2004) mwebb@gmail.com • Zara Carey (HH, 2005–07) Young OW Representative zaracarey@googlemail.com • James Kershen (WW, 1981–86 and Master i/c Station) Common Room james.kershen@westminster.org


Below: James Kershen (WW, 1981–86 and Master i/c Station), Meg Trainor (HH, 2008–10) and Niamh Tupman (HH, 2008–10)

OW SOCIAL Elizabethan Club Committee Members • David Neuberger (WW, 1961–65) President

• Caroline Lewis (GG, 1980–82) caroline.f.lewis@btinternet.com

• Tim Brocklebank-Fowler (RR, 1976–80) Chairman tim@brocklebank.biz

• Tarun Mathur (AHH, 1988–93) tarun.mathur@barcap.com

• Nicholas Brown (RR, 1968–73) Hon. Secretary NicholasBrown@bdb-law.co.uk • Artin Basirov (GG, 1989–94) Treasurer abasirov@sdcglobal.net • Jonathan Carey (GG, 1964–69) jonathan_carey@hotmail.co.uk • Jessica Chichester (GG, 2000–02) OW Sports Representative jessie_cc@hotmail.com

Above: Eleanor Turner-Moss (PP, 2005–07), Guy Hopkins (Housemaster of Hakluyt's and Master of Music) and Genevieve Turner-Moss (PP, 2008–10)

• Gavin Griffiths (WW, 1967–72) gavin.griffiths@westminster.org.uk

• Darius Norell (BB, 1985–90) darius@realworldmagazine.com • David Roy (AHH, 1955–61) daroy@btinternet.com • Graham Walker (RR, 1963–67) House Societies Representative gajwalker@sky.com • Matthew Webb (BB, 1999–2004) mwebb@gmail.com • Zara Carey (HH, 2005–07) Young OW Representative zaracarey@googlemail.com • James Kershen (WW, 1981–86 and Master i/c Station) Common Room james.kershen@westminster.org


Left (top): Wren's Housemaster Simon Wurr and a current pupil at the Wren’s Society Dinner Left (bottom): Tamsin Cox (guest), Alasdair Donaldson (MM, 1994–99), Thomas Munby (MM, 1994–99) and a current pupil at the Milne’s Society Drinks.

these two events biennial in future. The Ben Jonson Drinks will go ahead in 2013 and the Business Drinks will next be held in 2014. A 1960s Decade Gaudy was very well supported. This was the first time this format had been tried and the feedback was generally positive. There were university drinks parties hosted at Edinburgh, Oxford and Cambridge, all of which were appreciated by the attendees. The Club also hosted a wine tasting at the Carlton Club and sponsored a drinks party during the tea break on the Saturday of the Henley Regatta. This attracted a number of past and present rowers, pupils, parents and staff.

2011–2012

Elizabethan Club Annual Report Tim Brocklebank-Fowler (RR, 1976–80) As presented to the AGM on Thursday, 20th September 2012 by the Chairman, Tim Brocklebank-Fowler.

Above (top): Tim Buchanan (GG 1984–89) and Nicola Bunting (AHH 1978–80) at the Business Drinks Above (bottom): Joseph Thomas (guest) and Rebecca Greenhalgh (guest) at the Medics’ Dinner Above (right): Ralf Ackermann (guest) and Thea Darricote (PP, 1997–99) at the Purcell’s Society Drinks

‘

The Groucho Club proved to be an attractive and glamorous venue which was much enjoyed by all who attended.

30 | THE ELIZABETHAN NEWSLETTER | 2012/2013

The Club has continued its efforts to attract a more diverse group of Old Westminsters and particularly to appeal to the young and female members of our constituency, as well as those who have been supporting events for many years. To this end a women’s networking group has been established and a recent female OW has been proposed for the committee to be the first to hold a rolling one year position, to help keep in touch with our most recent Leavers. Dinners At the 2011 annual dinner we were truly delighted and privileged to welcome Tom Hooper (HH, 1988–90) who won an Oscar for directing The King’s Speech earlier that year. Tom spoke eloquently about his journey from Westminster to Oscar winner and gave us some fascinating and amusing insights into the workings of the film industry and the challenges involved with cooperating with and managing some of the characters. The event was attended by one third female and one half young OWW (under 36). This is the highest proportion in

memory of these two categories of OWW to an annual dinner. Other dinners this year have included the Lawyers’ Dinner on Shrove Tuesday, Wren’s and Busby House Society dinners and a Medics’ Dinner in College Hall. At the 2012 annual dinner we will welcome Henry Winter (WW, 1976–80) who is Chief Football Correspondent for The Telegraph. Drinks The Ben Jonson Drinks were held in June at the Groucho Club which proved to be an attractive and glamorous venue which was much enjoyed by all who attended. The Business Drinks which were held at the School in 2011, moved to the Royal Exchange which encouraged a good gathering of those working in the City and Canary Wharf. These two annual parties in particular are usually better attended away from the School which, of course, means a higher cost including a substantial room hire charge and wider margins on drinks and canapés. In order to provide the best venues, high quality hospitality and have well attended events the Committee has decided to make

Other The Club held its first OW Women’s Network Mentoring event which was described as being “rather like speed dating, but seeking useful contacts rather than dates”! The ever popular Abbey Tours were reintroduced after their absence in the busy 2010 calendar. House Societies House Society events have been an increasing part of the OW calendar for a few years now. In fact, the activation of new societies has presented problems of congestion in the list of events, particularly those seeking dinners in College Hall. It has therefore been decided that each House Society will hold an event each year with a drinks party one year and a dinner the next. This should ensure that dinners are well attended, as well as easing the demand on College Hall. Sports The OW sports teams remain at the heart of what the Club does and we continue to finance all the major stations, enabling OWW to keep in touch and to continue to play their chosen sport. The Club remains indebted to the School for the use of many of its facilities. The footballers have had a particularly successful >> THE ELIZABETHAN NEWSLETTER | 2012/2013 | 31


Left (top): Wren's Housemaster Simon Wurr and a current pupil at the Wren’s Society Dinner Left (bottom): Tamsin Cox (guest), Alasdair Donaldson (MM, 1994–99), Thomas Munby (MM, 1994–99) and a current pupil at the Milne’s Society Drinks.

these two events biennial in future. The Ben Jonson Drinks will go ahead in 2013 and the Business Drinks will next be held in 2014. A 1960s Decade Gaudy was very well supported. This was the first time this format had been tried and the feedback was generally positive. There were university drinks parties hosted at Edinburgh, Oxford and Cambridge, all of which were appreciated by the attendees. The Club also hosted a wine tasting at the Carlton Club and sponsored a drinks party during the tea break on the Saturday of the Henley Regatta. This attracted a number of past and present rowers, pupils, parents and staff.

2011–2012

Elizabethan Club Annual Report Tim Brocklebank-Fowler (RR, 1976–80) As presented to the AGM on Thursday, 20th September 2012 by the Chairman, Tim Brocklebank-Fowler.

Above (top): Tim Buchanan (GG 1984–89) and Nicola Bunting (AHH 1978–80) at the Business Drinks Above (bottom): Joseph Thomas (guest) and Rebecca Greenhalgh (guest) at the Medics’ Dinner Above (right): Ralf Ackermann (guest) and Thea Darricote (PP, 1997–99) at the Purcell’s Society Drinks

‘

The Groucho Club proved to be an attractive and glamorous venue which was much enjoyed by all who attended.

30 | THE ELIZABETHAN NEWSLETTER | 2012/2013

The Club has continued its efforts to attract a more diverse group of Old Westminsters and particularly to appeal to the young and female members of our constituency, as well as those who have been supporting events for many years. To this end a women’s networking group has been established and a recent female OW has been proposed for the committee to be the first to hold a rolling one year position, to help keep in touch with our most recent Leavers. Dinners At the 2011 annual dinner we were truly delighted and privileged to welcome Tom Hooper (HH, 1988–90) who won an Oscar for directing The King’s Speech earlier that year. Tom spoke eloquently about his journey from Westminster to Oscar winner and gave us some fascinating and amusing insights into the workings of the film industry and the challenges involved with cooperating with and managing some of the characters. The event was attended by one third female and one half young OWW (under 36). This is the highest proportion in

memory of these two categories of OWW to an annual dinner. Other dinners this year have included the Lawyers’ Dinner on Shrove Tuesday, Wren’s and Busby House Society dinners and a Medics’ Dinner in College Hall. At the 2012 annual dinner we will welcome Henry Winter (WW, 1976–80) who is Chief Football Correspondent for The Telegraph. Drinks The Ben Jonson Drinks were held in June at the Groucho Club which proved to be an attractive and glamorous venue which was much enjoyed by all who attended. The Business Drinks which were held at the School in 2011, moved to the Royal Exchange which encouraged a good gathering of those working in the City and Canary Wharf. These two annual parties in particular are usually better attended away from the School which, of course, means a higher cost including a substantial room hire charge and wider margins on drinks and canapés. In order to provide the best venues, high quality hospitality and have well attended events the Committee has decided to make

Other The Club held its first OW Women’s Network Mentoring event which was described as being “rather like speed dating, but seeking useful contacts rather than dates”! The ever popular Abbey Tours were reintroduced after their absence in the busy 2010 calendar. House Societies House Society events have been an increasing part of the OW calendar for a few years now. In fact, the activation of new societies has presented problems of congestion in the list of events, particularly those seeking dinners in College Hall. It has therefore been decided that each House Society will hold an event each year with a drinks party one year and a dinner the next. This should ensure that dinners are well attended, as well as easing the demand on College Hall. Sports The OW sports teams remain at the heart of what the Club does and we continue to finance all the major stations, enabling OWW to keep in touch and to continue to play their chosen sport. The Club remains indebted to the School for the use of many of its facilities. The footballers have had a particularly successful >> THE ELIZABETHAN NEWSLETTER | 2012/2013 | 31


>> year,

but other stations including cricket, golf, tennis, water, fives and athletics continue to encourage OWW to get together for some exercise and a sociable time with old friends. Most of those required to have CRB checks in order to continue to use School facilities chose to go along with this requirement, rather than give up their sport and this is to be applauded. Finance The finances of the Club are in reasonable health despite volatile markets. It is the Committee’s intention to continue to grow the assets of the Club in order that we can do more to preserve the association between Old Westminsters and the School and further the interests and prosperity of the School and its pupils, in accordance with the rules of the Club. The index linking of pupils’ subscriptions has now been agreed and will be calculated annually in future. Travel/Cultural Bursary I am pleased to announce that Harry Winter (GG, 2007–12) was chosen as this year’s winner of the Neville Walton Travel Award. He had planned an interesting tour of China with a view to comparing Chinese society to those he has studied as a classicist. The Development Office I have been very fortunate to have a full strength, stable and energetic Development Office to assist me throughout my first year as Chairman. I am most grateful to Angie Garvich, the Director of Development, Katharine Robinson, Head of Alumni Relations, Cleo Jordan and Danielle Shaw for all their help and advice over the year. We are all trying to operate in the best interests of the Westminster Community and endeavour to do so within the inevitable constraints of a substantial and responsibly run charitable organisation, whilst retaining sufficient flexibility to sustain the ethos of Westminster School. Future Plans The major new event which is being introduced in 2013 is ‘Old Westminsters At Home’ in College Garden on Thursday, 11th July. The Dean

32 | THE ELIZABETHAN NEWSLETTER | 2012/2013

Above: Howard Gooding (MM, 1993–98) and Thomas Munby (MM, 1994–99)

‘

I feel honoured to have been asked to serve as Chairman of the Elizabethan Club and pleased to have completed my first year without too many mishaps.

and Head Master very kindly offered us this date, following the success of the pre-dinner drinks at the 2010 Ball. We will have privileged access to the Abbey, drinks in College Garden and Latin Prayers.

The Elizabethan Club

Notes to the accounts 31st December 2011

(1) Investments The accounting policy has been changed to recognise unrealised gains or losses made in the year. Therefore the Club’s investments are now stated at market value. The Club’s investment policy continues to be to hold balanced and medium risk investments. (2) Club Funds Capital Fund Income Fund

OW Bequest Fund

Details of this and all other events in 2013 will be available on the website and I urge you to keep in touch and use our online booking system to reserve and pay for tickets online if possible.

At 1st January 2011 20% of annual subscriptions Excess income over expenditure Loss on disposal of investment Unrealised gains on investments

342937.11 88782.03 14490 0 0 38049.17 0 0 -9091.02

7879.75 0 0 0

The Committee I feel honoured to have been asked to serve as Chairman of the Elizabethan Club and pleased to have completed my first year without too many mishaps. My predecessor, Tim Woods, left me a ship in very good shape and I am very grateful to him for all his hard work. I would also like to express my thanks to the Committee for all their support and for selflessly giving their time to the Club. Finally, and on behalf of the Committee, I would like to thank all the other Old Westminsters who give their time to the House Societies and sports teams and enable us to be a vibrant and modern organisation, connected to a School with a long and important history. Floreat.

At 31st December 2011

348336.09

7879.75

126831.2

The OW Bequest Fund was established with the generous bequests of two eminent old Westminster sportsmen, Wilfred Attwood and John Stocker (RR, 1932–37). Report of the honorary examiner to members of the Club I have examined the accounts set out above which have been prepared under the historical cost convention. In my opinion the accounts give a true and fair view of the state of affairs of the Club at 31st December 2011 and of the income and expenditure for the year ended on that date. I M W Latham (LL, 1958–62) FCA Honorary Examiner 7th September 2012

THE ELIZABETHAN NEWSLETTER | 2012/2013 | 33


>> year,

but other stations including cricket, golf, tennis, water, fives and athletics continue to encourage OWW to get together for some exercise and a sociable time with old friends. Most of those required to have CRB checks in order to continue to use School facilities chose to go along with this requirement, rather than give up their sport and this is to be applauded. Finance The finances of the Club are in reasonable health despite volatile markets. It is the Committee’s intention to continue to grow the assets of the Club in order that we can do more to preserve the association between Old Westminsters and the School and further the interests and prosperity of the School and its pupils, in accordance with the rules of the Club. The index linking of pupils’ subscriptions has now been agreed and will be calculated annually in future. Travel/Cultural Bursary I am pleased to announce that Harry Winter (GG, 2007–12) was chosen as this year’s winner of the Neville Walton Travel Award. He had planned an interesting tour of China with a view to comparing Chinese society to those he has studied as a classicist. The Development Office I have been very fortunate to have a full strength, stable and energetic Development Office to assist me throughout my first year as Chairman. I am most grateful to Angie Garvich, the Director of Development, Katharine Robinson, Head of Alumni Relations, Cleo Jordan and Danielle Shaw for all their help and advice over the year. We are all trying to operate in the best interests of the Westminster Community and endeavour to do so within the inevitable constraints of a substantial and responsibly run charitable organisation, whilst retaining sufficient flexibility to sustain the ethos of Westminster School. Future Plans The major new event which is being introduced in 2013 is ‘Old Westminsters At Home’ in College Garden on Thursday, 11th July. The Dean

32 | THE ELIZABETHAN NEWSLETTER | 2012/2013

Above: Howard Gooding (MM, 1993–98) and Thomas Munby (MM, 1994–99)

‘

I feel honoured to have been asked to serve as Chairman of the Elizabethan Club and pleased to have completed my first year without too many mishaps.

and Head Master very kindly offered us this date, following the success of the pre-dinner drinks at the 2010 Ball. We will have privileged access to the Abbey, drinks in College Garden and Latin Prayers.

The Elizabethan Club

Notes to the accounts 31st December 2011

(1) Investments The accounting policy has been changed to recognise unrealised gains or losses made in the year. Therefore the Club’s investments are now stated at market value. The Club’s investment policy continues to be to hold balanced and medium risk investments. (2) Club Funds Capital Fund Income Fund

OW Bequest Fund

Details of this and all other events in 2013 will be available on the website and I urge you to keep in touch and use our online booking system to reserve and pay for tickets online if possible.

At 1st January 2011 20% of annual subscriptions Excess income over expenditure Loss on disposal of investment Unrealised gains on investments

342937.11 88782.03 14490 0 0 38049.17 0 0 -9091.02

7879.75 0 0 0

The Committee I feel honoured to have been asked to serve as Chairman of the Elizabethan Club and pleased to have completed my first year without too many mishaps. My predecessor, Tim Woods, left me a ship in very good shape and I am very grateful to him for all his hard work. I would also like to express my thanks to the Committee for all their support and for selflessly giving their time to the Club. Finally, and on behalf of the Committee, I would like to thank all the other Old Westminsters who give their time to the House Societies and sports teams and enable us to be a vibrant and modern organisation, connected to a School with a long and important history. Floreat.

At 31st December 2011

348336.09

7879.75

126831.2

The OW Bequest Fund was established with the generous bequests of two eminent old Westminster sportsmen, Wilfred Attwood and John Stocker (RR, 1932–37). Report of the honorary examiner to members of the Club I have examined the accounts set out above which have been prepared under the historical cost convention. In my opinion the accounts give a true and fair view of the state of affairs of the Club at 31st December 2011 and of the income and expenditure for the year ended on that date. I M W Latham (LL, 1958–62) FCA Honorary Examiner 7th September 2012

THE ELIZABETHAN NEWSLETTER | 2012/2013 | 33


Coming Soon: Old Westminsters at Home An evening in Westminster Abbey and College Garden for OWW and guests Event date: Thursday, 11th July 2013 Booking opens: 11th March 2013

As a very special gift from Westminster Abbey we are delighted to extend an invitation, on behalf of the Dean and Chapter, for OWW and guests to visit the Abbey and enjoy drinks in College Garden this summer. Access of this kind is an immense privilege, for which we are extremely grateful. Programme of activities OWW and guests will have the opportunity to explore the Abbey in the quiet of a light summer’s evening, after the crowds have departed for the day. Guests will be welcome to attend Evensong at 5 pm and to stay on, or to be greeted by the Dean and Chapter from 6.30 pm at the West Cloister Door and invited to absorb the treasures of the Abbey on a self-guided tour, before walking through the cloisters to College Garden for drinks (cash bar). Latin Prayers at 8.30 pm or so will round off the evening in traditional Westminster style! 34 | THE ELIZABETHAN NEWSLETTER | 2012/2013

Tickets Tickets to this very special event are free and will be allocated on a first-come, first-served basis. Booking opens on Monday, 11th March 2013 at www.oldwestminster.org.uk/oldwestminstersathome2013. If you do not have internet access and wish to book by post please send a note with your name, house and years, the name of your guest and any special access requirements (if applicable) to ‘Old Westminsters at Home Administrator, Development Office, Westminster School, 17a Dean’s Yard, London SW1P 3PB’.

On behalf of the Elizabethan Club Committee we look forward to seeing many of you at what promises to be the event of the summer! Tim Brocklebank-Fowler (RR, 1976–80), Elizabethan Club Chairman, and the Elizabethan Club Committee

THE ELIZABETHAN NEWSLETTER | 2012/2013 | 35


Coming Soon: Old Westminsters at Home An evening in Westminster Abbey and College Garden for OWW and guests Event date: Thursday, 11th July 2013 Booking opens: 11th March 2013

As a very special gift from Westminster Abbey we are delighted to extend an invitation, on behalf of the Dean and Chapter, for OWW and guests to visit the Abbey and enjoy drinks in College Garden this summer. Access of this kind is an immense privilege, for which we are extremely grateful. Programme of activities OWW and guests will have the opportunity to explore the Abbey in the quiet of a light summer’s evening, after the crowds have departed for the day. Guests will be welcome to attend Evensong at 5 pm and to stay on, or to be greeted by the Dean and Chapter from 6.30 pm at the West Cloister Door and invited to absorb the treasures of the Abbey on a self-guided tour, before walking through the cloisters to College Garden for drinks (cash bar). Latin Prayers at 8.30 pm or so will round off the evening in traditional Westminster style! 34 | THE ELIZABETHAN NEWSLETTER | 2012/2013

Tickets Tickets to this very special event are free and will be allocated on a first-come, first-served basis. Booking opens on Monday, 11th March 2013 at www.oldwestminster.org.uk/oldwestminstersathome2013. If you do not have internet access and wish to book by post please send a note with your name, house and years, the name of your guest and any special access requirements (if applicable) to ‘Old Westminsters at Home Administrator, Development Office, Westminster School, 17a Dean’s Yard, London SW1P 3PB’.

On behalf of the Elizabethan Club Committee we look forward to seeing many of you at what promises to be the event of the summer! Tim Brocklebank-Fowler (RR, 1976–80), Elizabethan Club Chairman, and the Elizabethan Club Committee

THE ELIZABETHAN NEWSLETTER | 2012/2013 | 35


7th March 2012 Exeter College, Oxford 13th December 2011 Scottish Arts Club, Edinburgh

School Society Report Michael Rugman (GG, 1955–60) The School Society continues to provide support for bursaries and music scholarships and activities such as School concerts.   The Tizard Lecture, which again received our sponsorship, was given by Professor Sir Richard Sykes FRS, formerly Rector of Imperial College, London on “Microbes v Man: the Power of Evolution”. The 2012 Lecture was the 50th in the series. We also made grants for travel by pupils.   Our work with the School to identify further opportunities for co-operation on new initiatives continues and we look forward to working on these projects over the rest of the 2012/13 academic year.

36 | THE ELIZABETHAN NEWSLETTER | 2012/2013

Edinburgh Christmas Drinks Edinburgh set a beautiful scene for our Christmas gathering which took place at the Scottish Arts Club on Tuesday, 13th December 2011. The warm Scottish welcome we received more than made up for the wet and windy night and it was great to see such a mix of ages chatting about their time at the School over a glass or two of wine! Tim Brocklebank-Fowler (RR, 1976–80), Chairman of the Elizabethan Club, and Gavin Griffiths (WW, 1967–72), former President of the Common Room, spoke about forthcoming OW events and the news from the School and commented on what a pleasure it was to be in the city for such a great event. Our thanks to all who attended for making it such a special evening. Above: George Griffiths (BB, 2003–08), Gavin Griffiths (WW, 1967–72), Anna Marris (guest), Ted Roy (AHH, 1996–2001) and Richard Jones (GG, 1961–65)

OW Oxford Drinks Party By Sarah Lack (BB, 1992–94) A merry time was had by all on 7th March in the refined but intimate Rector’s Drawing Room at Exeter College. A bubbly crowd of current OW Oxford undergraduates took the opportunity to catch up with each other, squashing up on grand settees or clustering over trays of wine and mouth-watering canapés. Many OWW from earlier generations gathered here too, to share anecdotes about Little Dean’s Yard and to postulate about what is bestowed by the Westminster School experience. Perhaps my imagination, but the arrival of Tristram Jones-Parry (former Head Master and WW, 1960–64) brought a momentary hush amongst the crowd, until he took up a glass of wine and genial conversation with a fellow guest. Tim Brocklebank-Fowler (RR, 1976–80), Chairman of the Elizabethan Club, welcomed us and expressed his delight to see so many in attendance at an Oxford event. Following this, James Kershen (Master i/c Station and WW, 1981–86) spoke buoyantly about the new Sports Centre near Vincent Square and invited us all to visit for a tour.

Above (top): Fiona Reid (AHH, 1980–82), Edwin Richards (AHH, 1977–81) and Tristram Jones-Parry (former Head Master and WW, 1960–64) Above (middle): Flora Easton (HH, 2006–08) and Eliza Easton (HH, 2008–10) Above (bottom): Rohan Sakhrani (AHH, 2007–09) and Louise Moss (LL, 2007–09)

THE ELIZABETHAN NEWSLETTER | 2012/2013 | 37


7th March 2012 Exeter College, Oxford 13th December 2011 Scottish Arts Club, Edinburgh

School Society Report Michael Rugman (GG, 1955–60) The School Society continues to provide support for bursaries and music scholarships and activities such as School concerts.   The Tizard Lecture, which again received our sponsorship, was given by Professor Sir Richard Sykes FRS, formerly Rector of Imperial College, London on “Microbes v Man: the Power of Evolution”. The 2012 Lecture was the 50th in the series. We also made grants for travel by pupils.   Our work with the School to identify further opportunities for co-operation on new initiatives continues and we look forward to working on these projects over the rest of the 2012/13 academic year.

36 | THE ELIZABETHAN NEWSLETTER | 2012/2013

Edinburgh Christmas Drinks Edinburgh set a beautiful scene for our Christmas gathering which took place at the Scottish Arts Club on Tuesday, 13th December 2011. The warm Scottish welcome we received more than made up for the wet and windy night and it was great to see such a mix of ages chatting about their time at the School over a glass or two of wine! Tim Brocklebank-Fowler (RR, 1976–80), Chairman of the Elizabethan Club, and Gavin Griffiths (WW, 1967–72), former President of the Common Room, spoke about forthcoming OW events and the news from the School and commented on what a pleasure it was to be in the city for such a great event. Our thanks to all who attended for making it such a special evening. Above: George Griffiths (BB, 2003–08), Gavin Griffiths (WW, 1967–72), Anna Marris (guest), Ted Roy (AHH, 1996–2001) and Richard Jones (GG, 1961–65)

OW Oxford Drinks Party By Sarah Lack (BB, 1992–94) A merry time was had by all on 7th March in the refined but intimate Rector’s Drawing Room at Exeter College. A bubbly crowd of current OW Oxford undergraduates took the opportunity to catch up with each other, squashing up on grand settees or clustering over trays of wine and mouth-watering canapés. Many OWW from earlier generations gathered here too, to share anecdotes about Little Dean’s Yard and to postulate about what is bestowed by the Westminster School experience. Perhaps my imagination, but the arrival of Tristram Jones-Parry (former Head Master and WW, 1960–64) brought a momentary hush amongst the crowd, until he took up a glass of wine and genial conversation with a fellow guest. Tim Brocklebank-Fowler (RR, 1976–80), Chairman of the Elizabethan Club, welcomed us and expressed his delight to see so many in attendance at an Oxford event. Following this, James Kershen (Master i/c Station and WW, 1981–86) spoke buoyantly about the new Sports Centre near Vincent Square and invited us all to visit for a tour.

Above (top): Fiona Reid (AHH, 1980–82), Edwin Richards (AHH, 1977–81) and Tristram Jones-Parry (former Head Master and WW, 1960–64) Above (middle): Flora Easton (HH, 2006–08) and Eliza Easton (HH, 2008–10) Above (bottom): Rohan Sakhrani (AHH, 2007–09) and Louise Moss (LL, 2007–09)

THE ELIZABETHAN NEWSLETTER | 2012/2013 | 37


Wednesday, 14th March 2012 Lecture Room

OW Women’s Network Mentoring Evening

2nd December 2011 Camden Room and Westminster Abbey

The first OW Women’s Network Mentoring Evening was a resounding success with around forty OW mentees and mentors filling the Lecture Room. Conversations were in-depth and proved extremely useful with the vast majority of attendees commenting on how valuable they found the contacts they made and the advice they received. Many of the mentors also mentioned how pleased they were to have the opportunity to ‘give back’ to the School in such a rewarding way.

OW Abbey Tour We were delighted to welcome back OWW for a special tour of Westminster Abbey on Friday, 2nd December. Led by our guides John Curtis (Registrar) and Tom Edlin (Master of History and DD, 1993–98), guests were given the unique opportunity to view the many highlights of the Abbey in an intimate setting. For many attendees, highlights of the Tour included the Shrine of St Edward the Confessor, the Lady Chapel and Poet’s Corner. Do keep an eye on the website for details of future Abbey Tours.

Jessica Chichester (GG, 2000–02) addressed the group on behalf of the Elizabethan Club Committee, mentioning how delighted she was to see such a big crowd, especially following the enthusiasm for mentoring events expressed at the launch of the OW Women’s Network in November. Jessica also mentioned the forthcoming launch of the School’s Capital Campaign at the RHS Lawrence Hall, the site of the long-awaited Westminster Sports Centre, and outlined all of the exciting Campaign projects.

Above (top): Eddie Appathurai (guest), Louise Stanway (guest), Chaz Stanway (LL, 1990–95) and Bala Balaguru (LL, 1990–95) Above (top): Krystyna Kosciuszko (PP, 2005–07) and Fenella Welsh (DD, 1984–86)

Above (bottom): Niall Quinn (guest) and Lucy Morgan (WW, 1982–84)

Above (middle): Petra Kwan (MM, 2001–03) and Jessica Chichester (GG, 2000–02) Above (bottom): Roxy Rezvany (AHH, 2008–10) and Rachel Holt (PP, 2005–07)

38 | THE ELIZABETHAN NEWSLETTER | 2012/2013

THE ELIZABETHAN NEWSLETTER | 2012/2013 | 39


Wednesday, 14th March 2012 Lecture Room

OW Women’s Network Mentoring Evening

2nd December 2011 Camden Room and Westminster Abbey

The first OW Women’s Network Mentoring Evening was a resounding success with around forty OW mentees and mentors filling the Lecture Room. Conversations were in-depth and proved extremely useful with the vast majority of attendees commenting on how valuable they found the contacts they made and the advice they received. Many of the mentors also mentioned how pleased they were to have the opportunity to ‘give back’ to the School in such a rewarding way.

OW Abbey Tour We were delighted to welcome back OWW for a special tour of Westminster Abbey on Friday, 2nd December. Led by our guides John Curtis (Registrar) and Tom Edlin (Master of History and DD, 1993–98), guests were given the unique opportunity to view the many highlights of the Abbey in an intimate setting. For many attendees, highlights of the Tour included the Shrine of St Edward the Confessor, the Lady Chapel and Poet’s Corner. Do keep an eye on the website for details of future Abbey Tours.

Jessica Chichester (GG, 2000–02) addressed the group on behalf of the Elizabethan Club Committee, mentioning how delighted she was to see such a big crowd, especially following the enthusiasm for mentoring events expressed at the launch of the OW Women’s Network in November. Jessica also mentioned the forthcoming launch of the School’s Capital Campaign at the RHS Lawrence Hall, the site of the long-awaited Westminster Sports Centre, and outlined all of the exciting Campaign projects.

Above (top): Eddie Appathurai (guest), Louise Stanway (guest), Chaz Stanway (LL, 1990–95) and Bala Balaguru (LL, 1990–95) Above (top): Krystyna Kosciuszko (PP, 2005–07) and Fenella Welsh (DD, 1984–86)

Above (bottom): Niall Quinn (guest) and Lucy Morgan (WW, 1982–84)

Above (middle): Petra Kwan (MM, 2001–03) and Jessica Chichester (GG, 2000–02) Above (bottom): Roxy Rezvany (AHH, 2008–10) and Rachel Holt (PP, 2005–07)

38 | THE ELIZABETHAN NEWSLETTER | 2012/2013

THE ELIZABETHAN NEWSLETTER | 2012/2013 | 39


10th May 2012 The Camden Room

1960s Decade Gaudy

16th May 2012 Trinity College Cambridge

By David Roy (AHH, 1955–61)

OW Cambridge Drinks

I probably return to Westminster more than most (due to my role on the Elizabethan Club Committee and various other sporting commitments) but on the occasion of the 1960s Decade Gaudy the School felt completely different – Little Dean’s Yard had been taken over by the 1960s cohort! The event was a sell-out and it was wonderful to see the Camden Room (the former dining room in Ashburnham House – an unfamiliar title to many of us from the ’60s) packed to the rafters with Old Boys. Archive materials dug out of the stores were compiled for a display which reminded us all of lessons attended, station played and group photos posed for – as well as old teachers and absent friends. I took on the task of addressing the crowds – updating my peers on plans to repave Yard and the opportunity to name one of the new stones which sparked some interest.

Above (top): Sarah Lyne-Pirkis (guest), Susan Newman (guest) and David Newman (RR, 1968–73) Above (middle): David FitzSimons (LL, 1960–62) and Simon Brew (RR, 1958–62) Above (bottom): Simon Mortimore (GG, 1963–67) and James Wilson (AHH, 1961–66)

40 | THE ELIZABETHAN NEWSLETTER | 2012/2013

Towards the end of the event guests were spilling out into the warm evening. Overlooked by the Abbey, the new statue of Elizabeth I and the old familiar landmarks the atmosphere was truly special. I hope we’ll have the opportunity to organise something similar again soon and, in the meantime, I wish the 1990s OWW all the best for their Gaudy in March and challenge them to have as much fun as we had!

By Charlie Walker-Arnott (QS, 2003–08)

Above (top): Vir Bannerjee-Bulchandani (QS, 2006–11), Charles Walker-Arnott (QS, 2003–08), Laura Ashforth (DD, 2008–10) and George Illingworth (GG, 2003–08) Above (bottom): Anne Powles with Richard Powles (WW, 1959–64)

For the soon-to-be graduate quaking at the imminence of Real Life, a gathering of some several dozen OWW in the grandiose Master’s Lodge at Trinity, proved a welcome tonic, and a gentle reminder that life does in fact continue outside the cradle of education. What a pleasure it was to meet a QS from some 50 years ago, whose stint at the old place must have been so immeasurably different from anything experienced today; and how reassuring to hear from familiar characters in younger years that, though the School is developing apace, the general tenor of the alma mater remains much the same. With levels of nostalgia increasing in inverse proportion to the wine stock, all were delighted to see, once again, the ever eloquent Dr Spurr taking the floor to report that the School’s affairs are flourishing apace. Repairing with some of the guests to the Trinity bar later that evening, the soon-to-be graduate reflected, however one’s relationship to the School may have been at the time, what an enormous privilege it is to have be given the best start possible.

THE ELIZABETHAN NEWSLETTER | 2012/2013 | 41


10th May 2012 The Camden Room

1960s Decade Gaudy

16th May 2012 Trinity College Cambridge

By David Roy (AHH, 1955–61)

OW Cambridge Drinks

I probably return to Westminster more than most (due to my role on the Elizabethan Club Committee and various other sporting commitments) but on the occasion of the 1960s Decade Gaudy the School felt completely different – Little Dean’s Yard had been taken over by the 1960s cohort! The event was a sell-out and it was wonderful to see the Camden Room (the former dining room in Ashburnham House – an unfamiliar title to many of us from the ’60s) packed to the rafters with Old Boys. Archive materials dug out of the stores were compiled for a display which reminded us all of lessons attended, station played and group photos posed for – as well as old teachers and absent friends. I took on the task of addressing the crowds – updating my peers on plans to repave Yard and the opportunity to name one of the new stones which sparked some interest.

Above (top): Sarah Lyne-Pirkis (guest), Susan Newman (guest) and David Newman (RR, 1968–73) Above (middle): David FitzSimons (LL, 1960–62) and Simon Brew (RR, 1958–62) Above (bottom): Simon Mortimore (GG, 1963–67) and James Wilson (AHH, 1961–66)

40 | THE ELIZABETHAN NEWSLETTER | 2012/2013

Towards the end of the event guests were spilling out into the warm evening. Overlooked by the Abbey, the new statue of Elizabeth I and the old familiar landmarks the atmosphere was truly special. I hope we’ll have the opportunity to organise something similar again soon and, in the meantime, I wish the 1990s OWW all the best for their Gaudy in March and challenge them to have as much fun as we had!

By Charlie Walker-Arnott (QS, 2003–08)

Above (top): Vir Bannerjee-Bulchandani (QS, 2006–11), Charles Walker-Arnott (QS, 2003–08), Laura Ashforth (DD, 2008–10) and George Illingworth (GG, 2003–08) Above (bottom): Anne Powles with Richard Powles (WW, 1959–64)

For the soon-to-be graduate quaking at the imminence of Real Life, a gathering of some several dozen OWW in the grandiose Master’s Lodge at Trinity, proved a welcome tonic, and a gentle reminder that life does in fact continue outside the cradle of education. What a pleasure it was to meet a QS from some 50 years ago, whose stint at the old place must have been so immeasurably different from anything experienced today; and how reassuring to hear from familiar characters in younger years that, though the School is developing apace, the general tenor of the alma mater remains much the same. With levels of nostalgia increasing in inverse proportion to the wine stock, all were delighted to see, once again, the ever eloquent Dr Spurr taking the floor to report that the School’s affairs are flourishing apace. Repairing with some of the guests to the Trinity bar later that evening, the soon-to-be graduate reflected, however one’s relationship to the School may have been at the time, what an enormous privilege it is to have be given the best start possible.

THE ELIZABETHAN NEWSLETTER | 2012/2013 | 41


Wednesday, 6th June 2012 The Carlton Club

OW Wine Society Event The OW Wine Society excelled itself in June with a ‘wine challenge’ tasting event that stretched even the most knowledgeable connoisseurs in the group! Indeed, Miles MacInnes (BB, 1999–2001) of Jascots Wine Merchants devised aspects of the ‘Wine Challenge’ specifically with OWW in mind after a previous Westminster event where attendees had deduced multiple choice answers before they had even tasted the wine! Different generations of OWW were split into teams which mixed up the group nicely and allowed complete beginners to learn from experts and everyone to enjoy the spirit of friendly competition. Our thanks to John East (RR, 1962–67) and Miles MacInnes for a wonderful evening. Above (top): Rupert Williams (guest) with Sujay Chandran (BB, 1994–99) and Rachel Oakeshott (WW, 1998–2000) Above right (middle): Sam Scheuringer (DD, 1997–2002) and Zara Morton (guest) Above right (bottom): John East (RR, 1962–67) and Seb Rosin (RR, 1940–44)

42 | THE ELIZABETHAN NEWSLETTER | 2012/2013

12th June 2012 The Royal Exchange, London

OW Business Drinks By Sam Wilkin (QS, 2001–06) Curiosity was the dominant emotion as I jogged up the rather grand steps leading to the Royal Exchange, the site for the 2012 OW Business Drinks. What, I wondered, becomes of OWW when ejected from the happy Westminster bubble and thrust unceremoniously up Real World? The event’s location, in the rarefied heart of London’s financial district, reminded me of the wry adage that OWW all end up reading a pink paper of one sort or another, and indeed the financial sector was well represented. But so were others: the Business Drinks brought together a fascinating mix of people, each putting a distinctive OW stamp on the wide variety of worlds in which they worked, as conversation and drinks flowed effortlessly through the evening. My early fear of being the youngest attendee quickly evaporated, as the event drew a number of young guns in their early 20s, along with one venerable gentleman in his 80s and everything in between. Katharine and the Development Office deserve our warm thanks for planning and delivering such a memorable evening.

Above (top): Eduardo Musciacco (AHH, 2002–07) and Bertie Milward (WW, 2003–08) Above (middle): Lucy Wolley Dod (RR, 1980–82) with Michelle Doughty (RR, 1980–82) and Anita De (GG, 1985–87) Above (bottom): Charles Gorman (AHH, 1988–93) and David Weinstein-Linder (HH, 1998–2003) THE ELIZABETHAN NEWSLETTER | 2012/2013 | 43


Wednesday, 6th June 2012 The Carlton Club

OW Wine Society Event The OW Wine Society excelled itself in June with a ‘wine challenge’ tasting event that stretched even the most knowledgeable connoisseurs in the group! Indeed, Miles MacInnes (BB, 1999–2001) of Jascots Wine Merchants devised aspects of the ‘Wine Challenge’ specifically with OWW in mind after a previous Westminster event where attendees had deduced multiple choice answers before they had even tasted the wine! Different generations of OWW were split into teams which mixed up the group nicely and allowed complete beginners to learn from experts and everyone to enjoy the spirit of friendly competition. Our thanks to John East (RR, 1962–67) and Miles MacInnes for a wonderful evening. Above (top): Rupert Williams (guest) with Sujay Chandran (BB, 1994–99) and Rachel Oakeshott (WW, 1998–2000) Above right (middle): Sam Scheuringer (DD, 1997–2002) and Zara Morton (guest) Above right (bottom): John East (RR, 1962–67) and Seb Rosin (RR, 1940–44)

42 | THE ELIZABETHAN NEWSLETTER | 2012/2013

12th June 2012 The Royal Exchange, London

OW Business Drinks By Sam Wilkin (QS, 2001–06) Curiosity was the dominant emotion as I jogged up the rather grand steps leading to the Royal Exchange, the site for the 2012 OW Business Drinks. What, I wondered, becomes of OWW when ejected from the happy Westminster bubble and thrust unceremoniously up Real World? The event’s location, in the rarefied heart of London’s financial district, reminded me of the wry adage that OWW all end up reading a pink paper of one sort or another, and indeed the financial sector was well represented. But so were others: the Business Drinks brought together a fascinating mix of people, each putting a distinctive OW stamp on the wide variety of worlds in which they worked, as conversation and drinks flowed effortlessly through the evening. My early fear of being the youngest attendee quickly evaporated, as the event drew a number of young guns in their early 20s, along with one venerable gentleman in his 80s and everything in between. Katharine and the Development Office deserve our warm thanks for planning and delivering such a memorable evening.

Above (top): Eduardo Musciacco (AHH, 2002–07) and Bertie Milward (WW, 2003–08) Above (middle): Lucy Wolley Dod (RR, 1980–82) with Michelle Doughty (RR, 1980–82) and Anita De (GG, 1985–87) Above (bottom): Charles Gorman (AHH, 1988–93) and David Weinstein-Linder (HH, 1998–2003) THE ELIZABETHAN NEWSLETTER | 2012/2013 | 43


21st June 2012 College Hall

OW Medics’ Dinner By Johnny Lewin (WW, 2001–06) Tuesday, 19th June 2012 The Groucho Club, London

Ben Jonson Drinks The Groucho Club, London’s “approved watering hole for the creative industries”, provided a highly appropriate venue for the re-launched Ben Jonson Drinks in June. The evening saw OWW working in the Arts and creative industries come together to catch-up and meet new people and there was a great atmosphere in the packed private room where the event was held. Above (top): Ally Rowell (RR, 2004–06) and Tom Hoare (RR, 2001–06) Above (middle): William Brittain-Catlin (GG, 1980–84) and Michael Hunt (RR, 1980–84) Left: Richard White (WW, 1951–56) and Richard Franklin (BB, 1949–53)

44 | THE ELIZABETHAN NEWSLETTER | 2012/2013

When I was an aspiring medical student in the Sixth Form up Wren’s, I remember how fantastic the OW Medics’ Dinner was. All echelons of the medical world attended, from undergraduate students, junior doctors and young trainees through to world-class academics and clinical leaders, all gathered in College Hall where we, like them, had eaten dinner from the age of thirteen. Coming back 7 years later as a final year student, it was great to feel a part of this diverse group of medical professionals who shared the wonderful experience of growing up in the shadow of the Abbey.   The evening started with drinks in the Camden Room, where I was reunited with fellow students from my time at the School, many of whom I had not seen since leaving. A meeting with Mr Smith and Dr Hargreaves in Little Dean’s Yard was unavoidable, as was their asking after our family members who were all named with a display of characteristically impeccable memory (which luckily did not seem to extend to our misdemeanours). The dinner itself was a lovely opportunity to impart what knowledge we had of applications to the three Sixth Formers present, and to

Above (top): Johnny Lewin (WW, 2001–06), Camilla Clark (MM, 1999–2001), Jason Ho (GG, 2001–03), Oscar Mitchell (MM, 2002–07) and Oliver Hamilton (MM, 2002–07) Above (bottom): Clive Coen (AHH, 1964–67) with current pupils

talk to young doctors and medical veterans alike. The evening concluded with a trip to one of our old haunts close to St James’s for some reminiscing over a pint. Thanks to the School for organising a great evening, I look forward to attending the next one as an actual doctor (finally)! THE ELIZABETHAN NEWSLETTER | 2012/2013 | 45


21st June 2012 College Hall

OW Medics’ Dinner By Johnny Lewin (WW, 2001–06) Tuesday, 19th June 2012 The Groucho Club, London

Ben Jonson Drinks The Groucho Club, London’s “approved watering hole for the creative industries”, provided a highly appropriate venue for the re-launched Ben Jonson Drinks in June. The evening saw OWW working in the Arts and creative industries come together to catch-up and meet new people and there was a great atmosphere in the packed private room where the event was held. Above (top): Ally Rowell (RR, 2004–06) and Tom Hoare (RR, 2001–06) Above (middle): William Brittain-Catlin (GG, 1980–84) and Michael Hunt (RR, 1980–84) Left: Richard White (WW, 1951–56) and Richard Franklin (BB, 1949–53)

44 | THE ELIZABETHAN NEWSLETTER | 2012/2013

When I was an aspiring medical student in the Sixth Form up Wren’s, I remember how fantastic the OW Medics’ Dinner was. All echelons of the medical world attended, from undergraduate students, junior doctors and young trainees through to world-class academics and clinical leaders, all gathered in College Hall where we, like them, had eaten dinner from the age of thirteen. Coming back 7 years later as a final year student, it was great to feel a part of this diverse group of medical professionals who shared the wonderful experience of growing up in the shadow of the Abbey.   The evening started with drinks in the Camden Room, where I was reunited with fellow students from my time at the School, many of whom I had not seen since leaving. A meeting with Mr Smith and Dr Hargreaves in Little Dean’s Yard was unavoidable, as was their asking after our family members who were all named with a display of characteristically impeccable memory (which luckily did not seem to extend to our misdemeanours). The dinner itself was a lovely opportunity to impart what knowledge we had of applications to the three Sixth Formers present, and to

Above (top): Johnny Lewin (WW, 2001–06), Camilla Clark (MM, 1999–2001), Jason Ho (GG, 2001–03), Oscar Mitchell (MM, 2002–07) and Oliver Hamilton (MM, 2002–07) Above (bottom): Clive Coen (AHH, 1964–67) with current pupils

talk to young doctors and medical veterans alike. The evening concluded with a trip to one of our old haunts close to St James’s for some reminiscing over a pint. Thanks to the School for organising a great evening, I look forward to attending the next one as an actual doctor (finally)! THE ELIZABETHAN NEWSLETTER | 2012/2013 | 45


Thursday, 27th September 2012 Up School

Young Gaudy The last ten years’ Leavers turned out in force for the 2012 Young Gaudy. The number of attendees was more than double that of 2011 with a particularly strong turn-out from the youngest year-group represented (2011 Leavers). OWW and teachers mingled over drinks and canapés up School and the traditional display of old School photos garnered much interest. If you weren’t there and you left 2001– 2011 make sure we have your email address so we can tell you about the 2013 event – it’s not to be missed!

Above (top): Jared Isaacs (MM, 2006–11), Alexander Petrenco (GG, 2006–11), Sophie Roche (GG, 2009–11) and Gavin Griffiths (WW, 1967–72) Left (top): Rob Runge (DD, 2000–05) and Jenny Ellis Logan (PP, 2003–05) Left (middle): Roxy Rezvany (AHH, 2008–10) and Sharon Ragaz, Housemaster of Ashburnham and Master of English Left (bottom): Verity Myers (DD, 2009–11) and Arav Gupta (MM, 2006–11)

1st November 2012 Up School and College Hall

The Elizabethan Club Dinner By James Cross (BB, 1997–2002) Our evening commenced up School with drinks and fine musical accompaniment. We then set off through the cloisters to College Hall, where we enjoyed a delicious dinner, after which all eyes turned to the guest speaker. As one of the country’s foremost football writers, Henry Winter (WW, 1976–80) had many enlightening tales to share with us about, for example, Gazza the Intellectual, Frank Lampard the Latinist and Steven Gerrard the Author. Henry is a gifted speaker, and he had everyone – from the youngest attendee at 17 to the oldest at 80 – in fits of laughter. We were all warmed on a frigid night by seeing old friends, and by making new ones too. The port might have also helped. Our sincere thanks go to Henry, the Elizabethan Club, Katharine Robinson and the Development Office, as well as to the catering staff and the musicians, for making it such a wonderful evening. Above (top): Henry Winter (WW, 1976–80) speaks at the 2012 Elizabethan Club Dinner Left (top): Lottie Kirk (HH, 2005–07) Henrietta Southby (BB, 2005–07) Left (middle): Oliver Gillie (QS, 1953–58), David Roy (AHH, 1955–61) and David Drew (BB, 1965–70) Left (bottom): Simon Craft (RR, 1978–82) and Ros Marston (RR, 1978–80)

46 | THE ELIZABETHAN NEWSLETTER | 2012/2013

THE ELIZABETHAN NEWSLETTER | 2012/2013 | 47


Thursday, 27th September 2012 Up School

Young Gaudy The last ten years’ Leavers turned out in force for the 2012 Young Gaudy. The number of attendees was more than double that of 2011 with a particularly strong turn-out from the youngest year-group represented (2011 Leavers). OWW and teachers mingled over drinks and canapés up School and the traditional display of old School photos garnered much interest. If you weren’t there and you left 2001– 2011 make sure we have your email address so we can tell you about the 2013 event – it’s not to be missed!

Above (top): Jared Isaacs (MM, 2006–11), Alexander Petrenco (GG, 2006–11), Sophie Roche (GG, 2009–11) and Gavin Griffiths (WW, 1967–72) Left (top): Rob Runge (DD, 2000–05) and Jenny Ellis Logan (PP, 2003–05) Left (middle): Roxy Rezvany (AHH, 2008–10) and Sharon Ragaz, Housemaster of Ashburnham and Master of English Left (bottom): Verity Myers (DD, 2009–11) and Arav Gupta (MM, 2006–11)

1st November 2012 Up School and College Hall

The Elizabethan Club Dinner By James Cross (BB, 1997–2002) Our evening commenced up School with drinks and fine musical accompaniment. We then set off through the cloisters to College Hall, where we enjoyed a delicious dinner, after which all eyes turned to the guest speaker. As one of the country’s foremost football writers, Henry Winter (WW, 1976–80) had many enlightening tales to share with us about, for example, Gazza the Intellectual, Frank Lampard the Latinist and Steven Gerrard the Author. Henry is a gifted speaker, and he had everyone – from the youngest attendee at 17 to the oldest at 80 – in fits of laughter. We were all warmed on a frigid night by seeing old friends, and by making new ones too. The port might have also helped. Our sincere thanks go to Henry, the Elizabethan Club, Katharine Robinson and the Development Office, as well as to the catering staff and the musicians, for making it such a wonderful evening. Above (top): Henry Winter (WW, 1976–80) speaks at the 2012 Elizabethan Club Dinner Left (top): Lottie Kirk (HH, 2005–07) Henrietta Southby (BB, 2005–07) Left (middle): Oliver Gillie (QS, 1953–58), David Roy (AHH, 1955–61) and David Drew (BB, 1965–70) Left (bottom): Simon Craft (RR, 1978–82) and Ros Marston (RR, 1978–80)

46 | THE ELIZABETHAN NEWSLETTER | 2012/2013

THE ELIZABETHAN NEWSLETTER | 2012/2013 | 47


Below: CW Commem Worldwide (Hong Kong): Nicola Ho (PP, 2009–11), Reynold Chan (BB, 1976–80), James Fulton (QS, 1987–92) and Elita Lai (PP, 2006–08).

16th November 2012 Westminster Abbey and 11 locations worldwide

The Commemoration of Benefactors and Commem Worldwide

Above: Commem Worldwide (New York) Front row: Gaurav Golechha (RR, 1993–98), Olga Polunina (QS, 2004–06), Will Leavitt (MM, 2000–01) Back row: Richard Fassam-Wright (WW, 1964–70), James Southward (DD, 1978–82), Craig Jenks (GG, 1965–69), Cecilia Mortimore (BB, 1995–97), Cyrus Sadiq (AHH, 1993–98), Adam Alfandary (RR, 2000–05), Ben Doeh (DD, 2000–05)

On the same day as the Westminster Community in London gathered to attend the Service for the Commemoration of Benefactors nearly 100 OWW were gathering in 11 locations across the globe for our very first ‘Commem Worldwide’.

California OW Rep: Simon Thornton (RR, 1978–81) Location: Simon’s home in Los Gatos, CA “It was a small, but perfectly formed group, and I think we all had a fun evening. Many thanks for your help in getting the event set-up and I look forward to working on the next one.” Simon Thornton (RR, 1978–81)

The number of OWW living and working overseas has increased significantly in recent years and we were keen to offer an opportunity for OWW to gather together wherever they are in the world to celebrate their connection with the School. Simultaneous gatherings on the night of Commem meant that even locations with just a small number of OWW could feel part of something bigger. The response was incredible and we are so grateful to all of the volunteers for coordinating events which ranged from dinner in Cipriani in Monaco to drinks overlooking the Sydney skyline. All of the events are listed below along with photographs and reports from the various locations. We hope to build on the success of the gatherings throughout the 2012/13 academic year and if you would like to be involved either by attending or organising an event in your city please contact alumni@westminster.org.uk – we’d be delighted to hear from you! 48 | THE ELIZABETHAN NEWSLETTER | 2012/2013

‘

Simultaneous gatherings meant that even locations with just a small number of OWW could feel part of something bigger. The response was incredible and events ranged from dinner in Cipriani in Monaco to drinks overlooking the Sydney skyline.

USA: New York OW Reps: Will Leavitt (MM, 2000–01) and Olga Polunina (CC, 2004–06) Location: Salute, 270 Madison Avenue, New York, NY 10016 “It was a terrific event and the first alumni outing for many in attendance. We all had a great time meeting lots of new people and reminiscing about our glory days at the School. It was wonderful to be able to bring together OWW from so many generations and we hope that the high turnout will inspire many future New York gatherings”. Will Leavitt (MM, 2000–01) and Olga Polunina (CC, 2004–06)

Above: Commem Worldwide (California) Simon Thornton (RR, 1978–81), Scott Donohoe (DD, 1978–82), Guy Francis (RR, 1950–55) and Roger Lazarus (CC, 1971–75)

Above: Commem Worldwide (Toronto) Robert Jekyll (WW, 1948–51) and John McCleary (QS, 1953–58)

Canada: Toronto OW Rep: Robert Jekyll (WW, 1948–51) Location: Robert’s home in downtown Toronto “Here in Toronto John McCleary (QS, 1953–58) and myself (WW, 1948–51) spent a very pleasant two hours discussing our various experiences at the School. As we were there at slightly different but adjacent periods, we were able to fill in “before and after” gaps. With a history that reaches as far back in time as does Westminster’s there was rarely a pause in our accounting of it. Of course our reminiscences were facilitated by some excellent Beaujolais paired with a choice selection of cheeses. Even though there were only two of us, I think we generated the enthusiasm of more. Certainly we are keen on continuing our discussions in future such events. We are also committed to sharing the experience with all OWW living in our “neighbourhood”. Having a fixed date in the late autumn is going to help considerably. Now to the photograph (above). We decided to include two of my framed prints of the School to compensate for the lack of bodies. The upper one is “Little Dean’s Yard – Facing the South” while the lower is “The School Room”. Neither is dated or attributed. We also included the crest for context.” >> THE ELIZABETHAN NEWSLETTER | 2012/2013 | 49


Below: CW Commem Worldwide (Hong Kong): Nicola Ho (PP, 2009–11), Reynold Chan (BB, 1976–80), James Fulton (QS, 1987–92) and Elita Lai (PP, 2006–08).

16th November 2012 Westminster Abbey and 11 locations worldwide

The Commemoration of Benefactors and Commem Worldwide

Above: Commem Worldwide (New York) Front row: Gaurav Golechha (RR, 1993–98), Olga Polunina (QS, 2004–06), Will Leavitt (MM, 2000–01) Back row: Richard Fassam-Wright (WW, 1964–70), James Southward (DD, 1978–82), Craig Jenks (GG, 1965–69), Cecilia Mortimore (BB, 1995–97), Cyrus Sadiq (AHH, 1993–98), Adam Alfandary (RR, 2000–05), Ben Doeh (DD, 2000–05)

On the same day as the Westminster Community in London gathered to attend the Service for the Commemoration of Benefactors nearly 100 OWW were gathering in 11 locations across the globe for our very first ‘Commem Worldwide’.

California OW Rep: Simon Thornton (RR, 1978–81) Location: Simon’s home in Los Gatos, CA “It was a small, but perfectly formed group, and I think we all had a fun evening. Many thanks for your help in getting the event set-up and I look forward to working on the next one.” Simon Thornton (RR, 1978–81)

The number of OWW living and working overseas has increased significantly in recent years and we were keen to offer an opportunity for OWW to gather together wherever they are in the world to celebrate their connection with the School. Simultaneous gatherings on the night of Commem meant that even locations with just a small number of OWW could feel part of something bigger. The response was incredible and we are so grateful to all of the volunteers for coordinating events which ranged from dinner in Cipriani in Monaco to drinks overlooking the Sydney skyline. All of the events are listed below along with photographs and reports from the various locations. We hope to build on the success of the gatherings throughout the 2012/13 academic year and if you would like to be involved either by attending or organising an event in your city please contact alumni@westminster.org.uk – we’d be delighted to hear from you! 48 | THE ELIZABETHAN NEWSLETTER | 2012/2013

‘

Simultaneous gatherings meant that even locations with just a small number of OWW could feel part of something bigger. The response was incredible and events ranged from dinner in Cipriani in Monaco to drinks overlooking the Sydney skyline.

USA: New York OW Reps: Will Leavitt (MM, 2000–01) and Olga Polunina (CC, 2004–06) Location: Salute, 270 Madison Avenue, New York, NY 10016 “It was a terrific event and the first alumni outing for many in attendance. We all had a great time meeting lots of new people and reminiscing about our glory days at the School. It was wonderful to be able to bring together OWW from so many generations and we hope that the high turnout will inspire many future New York gatherings”. Will Leavitt (MM, 2000–01) and Olga Polunina (CC, 2004–06)

Above: Commem Worldwide (California) Simon Thornton (RR, 1978–81), Scott Donohoe (DD, 1978–82), Guy Francis (RR, 1950–55) and Roger Lazarus (CC, 1971–75)

Above: Commem Worldwide (Toronto) Robert Jekyll (WW, 1948–51) and John McCleary (QS, 1953–58)

Canada: Toronto OW Rep: Robert Jekyll (WW, 1948–51) Location: Robert’s home in downtown Toronto “Here in Toronto John McCleary (QS, 1953–58) and myself (WW, 1948–51) spent a very pleasant two hours discussing our various experiences at the School. As we were there at slightly different but adjacent periods, we were able to fill in “before and after” gaps. With a history that reaches as far back in time as does Westminster’s there was rarely a pause in our accounting of it. Of course our reminiscences were facilitated by some excellent Beaujolais paired with a choice selection of cheeses. Even though there were only two of us, I think we generated the enthusiasm of more. Certainly we are keen on continuing our discussions in future such events. We are also committed to sharing the experience with all OWW living in our “neighbourhood”. Having a fixed date in the late autumn is going to help considerably. Now to the photograph (above). We decided to include two of my framed prints of the School to compensate for the lack of bodies. The upper one is “Little Dean’s Yard – Facing the South” while the lower is “The School Room”. Neither is dated or attributed. We also included the crest for context.” >> THE ELIZABETHAN NEWSLETTER | 2012/2013 | 49


Above: Commem Worldwide (Vancouver) Dave McArthur (GG, 1950–54), Mat Loup (LL, 1982–86), Adam Parry-Wingfield (LL, 1982–86), Pip White (LL, 1974–78), Kina Cavicchioli (AHH, 1986–88) and Michael Madsen (AHH, 1960–65)

Above: Commem Worldwide (Singapore) Standing: Abbas Rahimtoola (BB, 1980-84), Gautam Rampuria (BB, 1984-86), Greg Somerville (HH, 1989-94) Sitting: Byron Fiske-Harrison (RR, 1980-84), Simon Woods (GG, 1967-72)

Above: Commem Worldwide (Sydney)

Vancouver OW Rep: Michael Madsen (AHH, 1960–65) Location: The Royal Vancouver Yacht Club Included below are emails from attendees to Michael Madsen, the OW coordinator of the Vancouver event: “Thank you very much for organising the OW dinner. It was a most enjoyable and worthwhile trip. You were a great host and the company was very congenial. I gather there was some thought of having another one in Victoria sometime in the future, which would be nice. I would offer Lac La Biche but I don’t think it would attract too many of us!” Dave McArthur (GG, 1950–54)

Singapore OW Rep: Abbas Rahimtoola (BB, 1980-84). Location: OverEasy, #01–06 One Fullerton, 1 Fullerton Road 049213 “The evening was a great success – we all really enjoyed sharing our memories of Westminster and we hope to meet up again soon!” Abbas Rahimtoola (BB, 1980–84)

Australia: Sydney OW Rep: Alex Millar (MM, 1997–2002) Location: Alex’s home in Sydney “It went well – the only problem was the weather! Rearranged it and held it in the apartment as you’ll be able to tell from the photo of the group.” Alex Millar (MM, 1997–2002)

“Thanks for putting together Friday’s Commem Worldwide event in Vancouver; you couldn’t have picked a better location. It was great to meet everyone around the table. I was not sure what to expect, but it was a really interesting evening hearing from fellow OWW spanning so many different decades! It’s also always interesting to hear other stories of what brought people to this part of the world. Probably the most fun though was everyone’s memories of the teachers! Adam Parry-Wingfield (LL, 1982–86) “Thanks again for organising last Friday. It was great fun, and stirred some great memories. Do please let me know if you do another.” Mat Loup (LL, 1982–86

50 | THE ELIZABETHAN NEWSLETTER | 2012/2013

Above: Commem Worldwide (Hong Kong) Elita Lai (PP, 2006–08), Ronnie Potel (RR, 1988–93), Jason Scott-Lewis (RR, 1988–93), Bonnie Tse (PP, 2007–09) and Nicola Ho (PP, 2009–11)

Hong Kong OW Rep: Elita Lai (PP, 2006–08) Location: L16 Café & Bar at Hong Kong Park, 19 Cotton Tree Drive, Admiralty “The Hong Kong event went well, hope it was the same over in London!” Elita Lai (PP, 2006–08)

Australia: Melbourne OW Rep: Emma Poole (WW, 1989–91) Location: Pei Modern, Collins Place, 45 Collins Street, Melbourne “It was a really great night which stretched on a couple of hours longer than planned. We plan to stay in touch and there seemed to be general support for another event.” Emma Poole (WW, 1989–91) Monaco OW Rep: James Arnold (WW, 1988–93) Location: Cipriani Monte Carlo, 1 Avenue Princesse Grace 98000 Monaco “Thank you again for having impeccably organised the OW Commem reunion at Cipriani last night. I thoroughly enjoyed the evening’s company, delighted to have made new friends and to discover mutual ties to old ones. Best wishes and grazie, although the Westminster “Floreat” would be more appropriate!” Giuseppe Lipari (GG, 1986–89)

Above: Commem Worldwide (Monte Carlo) Saman Ahsani (QS, 1987–92), James Arnold (WW, 1988–93), Masa Pajkovic (RR, 1995–97), Giuseppe Lipari (GG, 1986–89), Jesse Marre (BB, 1998–2003)

Paris, France OW Rep: Guy Sainty (LL, 1964–68) Location: Guy’s home in Paris “Just to let you know that we had a lovely evening on Friday in Paris. Guy Sainty generously hosted the drinks party. There were only 4 of us but it was very interesting as we were spread across the generations so we all had our stories to tell which showed how much Westminster has changed in some ways but how many traditions continue.” Penny Noble (DD, 1983–85) Dubai, UAE OW Rep: James Elwen (BB, 1987–92) Location: Rivington Bar & Grill in Souk Madinat Jumeirah “We all met up and had a very pleasant evening. There were only a few of us – and Dany and Aly could only stay for an hour, but John and Andrew and respective wives and I had a very nice meal. Lots of – very positive I might add – reminiscing about the School and some familiar names and characters. A good evening and very good to have made contact with some fellow OWW. I suspect there must be more of us lurking around the region...!” James Elwen (BB, 1987–92)

THE ELIZABETHAN NEWSLETTER | 2012/2013 | 51


Above: Commem Worldwide (Vancouver) Dave McArthur (GG, 1950–54), Mat Loup (LL, 1982–86), Adam Parry-Wingfield (LL, 1982–86), Pip White (LL, 1974–78), Kina Cavicchioli (AHH, 1986–88) and Michael Madsen (AHH, 1960–65)

Above: Commem Worldwide (Singapore) Standing: Abbas Rahimtoola (BB, 1980-84), Gautam Rampuria (BB, 1984-86), Greg Somerville (HH, 1989-94) Sitting: Byron Fiske-Harrison (RR, 1980-84), Simon Woods (GG, 1967-72)

Above: Commem Worldwide (Sydney)

Vancouver OW Rep: Michael Madsen (AHH, 1960–65) Location: The Royal Vancouver Yacht Club Included below are emails from attendees to Michael Madsen, the OW coordinator of the Vancouver event: “Thank you very much for organising the OW dinner. It was a most enjoyable and worthwhile trip. You were a great host and the company was very congenial. I gather there was some thought of having another one in Victoria sometime in the future, which would be nice. I would offer Lac La Biche but I don’t think it would attract too many of us!” Dave McArthur (GG, 1950–54)

Singapore OW Rep: Abbas Rahimtoola (BB, 1980-84). Location: OverEasy, #01–06 One Fullerton, 1 Fullerton Road 049213 “The evening was a great success – we all really enjoyed sharing our memories of Westminster and we hope to meet up again soon!” Abbas Rahimtoola (BB, 1980–84)

Australia: Sydney OW Rep: Alex Millar (MM, 1997–2002) Location: Alex’s home in Sydney “It went well – the only problem was the weather! Rearranged it and held it in the apartment as you’ll be able to tell from the photo of the group.” Alex Millar (MM, 1997–2002)

“Thanks for putting together Friday’s Commem Worldwide event in Vancouver; you couldn’t have picked a better location. It was great to meet everyone around the table. I was not sure what to expect, but it was a really interesting evening hearing from fellow OWW spanning so many different decades! It’s also always interesting to hear other stories of what brought people to this part of the world. Probably the most fun though was everyone’s memories of the teachers! Adam Parry-Wingfield (LL, 1982–86) “Thanks again for organising last Friday. It was great fun, and stirred some great memories. Do please let me know if you do another.” Mat Loup (LL, 1982–86

50 | THE ELIZABETHAN NEWSLETTER | 2012/2013

Above: Commem Worldwide (Hong Kong) Elita Lai (PP, 2006–08), Ronnie Potel (RR, 1988–93), Jason Scott-Lewis (RR, 1988–93), Bonnie Tse (PP, 2007–09) and Nicola Ho (PP, 2009–11)

Hong Kong OW Rep: Elita Lai (PP, 2006–08) Location: L16 Café & Bar at Hong Kong Park, 19 Cotton Tree Drive, Admiralty “The Hong Kong event went well, hope it was the same over in London!” Elita Lai (PP, 2006–08)

Australia: Melbourne OW Rep: Emma Poole (WW, 1989–91) Location: Pei Modern, Collins Place, 45 Collins Street, Melbourne “It was a really great night which stretched on a couple of hours longer than planned. We plan to stay in touch and there seemed to be general support for another event.” Emma Poole (WW, 1989–91) Monaco OW Rep: James Arnold (WW, 1988–93) Location: Cipriani Monte Carlo, 1 Avenue Princesse Grace 98000 Monaco “Thank you again for having impeccably organised the OW Commem reunion at Cipriani last night. I thoroughly enjoyed the evening’s company, delighted to have made new friends and to discover mutual ties to old ones. Best wishes and grazie, although the Westminster “Floreat” would be more appropriate!” Giuseppe Lipari (GG, 1986–89)

Above: Commem Worldwide (Monte Carlo) Saman Ahsani (QS, 1987–92), James Arnold (WW, 1988–93), Masa Pajkovic (RR, 1995–97), Giuseppe Lipari (GG, 1986–89), Jesse Marre (BB, 1998–2003)

Paris, France OW Rep: Guy Sainty (LL, 1964–68) Location: Guy’s home in Paris “Just to let you know that we had a lovely evening on Friday in Paris. Guy Sainty generously hosted the drinks party. There were only 4 of us but it was very interesting as we were spread across the generations so we all had our stories to tell which showed how much Westminster has changed in some ways but how many traditions continue.” Penny Noble (DD, 1983–85) Dubai, UAE OW Rep: James Elwen (BB, 1987–92) Location: Rivington Bar & Grill in Souk Madinat Jumeirah “We all met up and had a very pleasant evening. There were only a few of us – and Dany and Aly could only stay for an hour, but John and Andrew and respective wives and I had a very nice meal. Lots of – very positive I might add – reminiscing about the School and some familiar names and characters. A good evening and very good to have made contact with some fellow OWW. I suspect there must be more of us lurking around the region...!” James Elwen (BB, 1987–92)

THE ELIZABETHAN NEWSLETTER | 2012/2013 | 51


Below: Krystyna Kosciuszko (PP, 2005–07) and Rebecca King (PP, 2005–07) at the 2012 Purcell’s Society Drinks

HOUSE SOCIETIES ASHBURNHAM SOCIETY • Angus Roy (AHH, 1993–98) a  droy@btinternet.com 01923 842538 BUSBY SOCIETY • Julian Lyne-Pirkis (BB, 1969–73) julianlynepirkis@hotmail.com • Matthew Webb (BB, 1999–2004) mrhwebb@gmail.com 07771 825746 COLLEGE SOCIETY • Duncan Matthews (QS, 1974–79) dmatthews@20essexst.com • For membership details (£10 a year): Charles Low (QS, 1967–72) charles.low@westminster.org.uk DRYDEN’S SOCIETY • Aqib Aslam (DD, 1994–99) aqib.aslam@gmail.com • Leo Xenakis (DD, 1994–99) leo.xenakis@gmail.com HAKLUYT’S SOCIETY • Nick Poole (HH, 1987–92) nick@collectionstrust.org.uk

LIDDELL’S SOCIETY • David Eaton Turner (LL, 1974–79) det@newsquarechambers.co.uk • Tom Weisselberg (LL, 1984–89) tomweisselberg@blackstonechambers.com MILNE’S SOCIETY • Alasdair Donaldson (MM, 1994–99) alasdair.donaldson@new-oxford.com • Neil Fisher (MM, 1994–99) newfisher@gmail.com • Thomas Munby (MM, 1994–99) TMunby@maitlandchambers.com OLD GRANTITE CLUB • Peter Cole (GG, 1993–98) pdcole7@hotmail.com PURCELL’S SOCIETY • Krystyna Kosciuszko (PP, 2005–07) kmhkosciuszko@gmail.com RIGAUD’S SOCIETY • Matthew Rhodes (RR, 1987–91) matthew@rollonfriday.com WREN’S SOCIETY • Dean Chatterjee (WW, 1997–2002) deanchatterjee@hotmail.com


Below: Krystyna Kosciuszko (PP, 2005–07) and Rebecca King (PP, 2005–07) at the 2012 Purcell’s Society Drinks

HOUSE SOCIETIES ASHBURNHAM SOCIETY • Angus Roy (AHH, 1993–98) a  droy@btinternet.com 01923 842538 BUSBY SOCIETY • Julian Lyne-Pirkis (BB, 1969–73) julianlynepirkis@hotmail.com • Matthew Webb (BB, 1999–2004) mrhwebb@gmail.com 07771 825746 COLLEGE SOCIETY • Duncan Matthews (QS, 1974–79) dmatthews@20essexst.com • For membership details (£10 a year): Charles Low (QS, 1967–72) charles.low@westminster.org.uk DRYDEN’S SOCIETY • Aqib Aslam (DD, 1994–99) aqib.aslam@gmail.com • Leo Xenakis (DD, 1994–99) leo.xenakis@gmail.com HAKLUYT’S SOCIETY • Nick Poole (HH, 1987–92) nick@collectionstrust.org.uk

LIDDELL’S SOCIETY • David Eaton Turner (LL, 1974–79) det@newsquarechambers.co.uk • Tom Weisselberg (LL, 1984–89) tomweisselberg@blackstonechambers.com MILNE’S SOCIETY • Alasdair Donaldson (MM, 1994–99) alasdair.donaldson@new-oxford.com • Neil Fisher (MM, 1994–99) newfisher@gmail.com • Thomas Munby (MM, 1994–99) TMunby@maitlandchambers.com OLD GRANTITE CLUB • Peter Cole (GG, 1993–98) pdcole7@hotmail.com PURCELL’S SOCIETY • Krystyna Kosciuszko (PP, 2005–07) kmhkosciuszko@gmail.com RIGAUD’S SOCIETY • Matthew Rhodes (RR, 1987–91) matthew@rollonfriday.com WREN’S SOCIETY • Dean Chatterjee (WW, 1997–2002) deanchatterjee@hotmail.com


issue of The College Street Clarion. The Society continues to publish The Clarion annually and copies are available to all Old Busbites who attend the Society’s social events.

Ashburnham Society

The Pite Scholarship is awarded annually to current Busbites or recent Leavers who are undertaking a live dramatic performance. The Society would like to encourage current and former members of the House to apply for the Scholarship and for further details please contact Matthew Webb.

by Angus Roy (AHH, 1993–98) The Society had a relatively quiet year during 2011 as it encouraged its members to come along to events organised by the School and in particular Chris Clarke’s retirement drinks party. However, in addition to our own activities this year, the Society helped the House re-launch its magazine, The Ashtree. From what we can gather The Ashtree started back in the 1940s but disappeared at some point in the 1970s. It is great to see it back in action and it is hoped that future editions will be available to download from the OW website. The Society also sponsored the House’s annual photographic competition. In November 2012, the Society held a magnificent black tie dinner in College Hall to celebrate Ashburnham’s 130th Birthday. Our guest speaker for the evening was Sir David Cooksey (AHH, 1953–58) who enlightened us on his working life in the City since leaving Westminster School. Past pupils, former Housemasters and House Tutors as well as the current Housemaster, House Tutors and Remove pupils gathered to enjoy a wonderful evening. A few years ago, the Society was pleased to announce that it was able to offer an annual bursary of up to £500 to Ashburnhamites in their final two years at School and in the first few years after they left. We hope that this bursary will be able to be used by the selected pupil towards a project (whether travel, music, arts or otherwise) which they would, without the bursary, not have been able to do. The Society would like to build on the success of this year’s events and expand its activities. We have had some ideas already but please do get in touch with the Development Office if there is something in particular you would like to attend. In this regard, the Society is trying to expand its committee, and if anyone is 54 | THE ELIZABETHAN NEWSLETTER | 2012/2013

Above: Winning entry in the AHH Society Photography Competition – Jamie Griffiths (VI)

interested in joining or simply helping as a link to their contemporaries, then please let Angus Roy or Katharine Robinson know. We look forward to a successful year in 2013.

Busby Society

by Matthew Webb (BB, 1999–2004)

2012 started on a strong note for the Busby Society with the AGM and biennial dinner taking place in College Hall on Thursday, 22nd March. The evening proved to be one of the most memorable and enjoyable of recent years thanks to an unforgettable speech by Michael Harrison (BB, 1948–53), who vividly recalled his time up Busby’s and, in particular, his recollection of The Queen’s coronation from a Westminster schoolboy’s perspective. A stunning musical performance by Betty Makharinsky (BB, 2010–12) and Alex Ho (GG, 2007–12) provided the perfect end to the evening. The next dinner will be held in 2014. The Society has continued to work closely with Paul Botton, Busby’s Housemaster, in order to benefit both current and former members of the House. In particular Paul deserves thanks, together with George Swainston (Remove), John Morse (Remove) and a team of current Busbites, for producing another outstanding

Special thanks go to Julian Lyne-Pirkis (BB, 1969–73) (Hon. Chairman), Christian Wells (BB, 1968–73) (Hon. Treasurer), James Nunns (BB, 1967–72), Adrian Lloyd-Thomas (BB, 1967–72), Peter Gysin (BB, 1967–72) and Wilf Hashimi (BB, 1971–75) for their continued support and guidance. As ever I would like to remind all Old Busbites that the Society exists to maintain and foster connections between old friends and contacts and should you have any ideas for future events or wish to be put back in contact with anyone please do not hesitate to contact the Hon. Secretary. Similarly, if any former member of the House would be interested in joining the Busby Society Committee please do get in touch.

College Society

We plan to hold the next lecture in spring 2013, details to follow. I am pleased to say that we will be holding a dinner in College Hall, and AGM, on Thursday, 26th September 2013. We were saddened to learn of the death of one of our previous speakers, the eminent art historian Professor John House (QS, 1959–63). I would like to thank the Housemaster, Mark Feltham, for his continuing support of and enthusiasm for the Society which is much appreciated. I would also like to record the Society’s (and the Committee’s) huge debt of gratitude to my predecessor Jonathan Rawes (QS, 1963–68) who decided to hand over the baton at the AGM this year after a most distinguished period of office. He will be a hard act to follow and we are very fortunate that he has agreed to maintain close contact and participation going forward. If you would like to join the Society please contact the College Society Secretary, Charles Low (QS, 1967–72). If you have any ideas as to how the Society might extend its activities please do not hesitate to contact me or indeed any other member of the Committee (contact details on the website).

by Duncan Matthews (QS, 1974–79) The 2012 College Lecture was given in October by Dr Jonathan Katz, Master of the Queen’s Scholars 1987–2002 and principal founder of the Society, now teaching Classics and Sanskrit at Oxford. In a fascinating and thoughtful talk to an audience of around 75 he reflected on his time at Westminster and his own education and demonstrated the wide range of his talents, interests and achievements (a full report will follow in the College Newsletter). We combined the lecture with our AGM and, in the absence of a dinner in College Hall, we adjourned to the Camden Room for drinks and canapés. Many then made their way onto an Italian restaurant in Victoria for a very convivial dinner afterwards.

Dryden’s Society by Aqib Aslam (DD, 1994–99) and Leo Xenakis (DD, 1994–99) The Dryden’s Society continues, somewhat quietly since its inception, to look boldly to the future. Despite a quiet 2012, the Society will be hosting its annual drinks event on 22nd May 2013, and looks forward to welcoming Drydenites, old and new, back to the School. As well as being a chance to catch up, we are planning a tour/talk covering, amongst other things, the numerous recent developments at the School and along our beloved corridor. We hope to see you all next year and are keen to solicit suggestions, feedback or offers of help >> THE ELIZABETHAN NEWSLETTER | 2012/2013 | 55


issue of The College Street Clarion. The Society continues to publish The Clarion annually and copies are available to all Old Busbites who attend the Society’s social events.

Ashburnham Society

The Pite Scholarship is awarded annually to current Busbites or recent Leavers who are undertaking a live dramatic performance. The Society would like to encourage current and former members of the House to apply for the Scholarship and for further details please contact Matthew Webb.

by Angus Roy (AHH, 1993–98) The Society had a relatively quiet year during 2011 as it encouraged its members to come along to events organised by the School and in particular Chris Clarke’s retirement drinks party. However, in addition to our own activities this year, the Society helped the House re-launch its magazine, The Ashtree. From what we can gather The Ashtree started back in the 1940s but disappeared at some point in the 1970s. It is great to see it back in action and it is hoped that future editions will be available to download from the OW website. The Society also sponsored the House’s annual photographic competition. In November 2012, the Society held a magnificent black tie dinner in College Hall to celebrate Ashburnham’s 130th Birthday. Our guest speaker for the evening was Sir David Cooksey (AHH, 1953–58) who enlightened us on his working life in the City since leaving Westminster School. Past pupils, former Housemasters and House Tutors as well as the current Housemaster, House Tutors and Remove pupils gathered to enjoy a wonderful evening. A few years ago, the Society was pleased to announce that it was able to offer an annual bursary of up to £500 to Ashburnhamites in their final two years at School and in the first few years after they left. We hope that this bursary will be able to be used by the selected pupil towards a project (whether travel, music, arts or otherwise) which they would, without the bursary, not have been able to do. The Society would like to build on the success of this year’s events and expand its activities. We have had some ideas already but please do get in touch with the Development Office if there is something in particular you would like to attend. In this regard, the Society is trying to expand its committee, and if anyone is 54 | THE ELIZABETHAN NEWSLETTER | 2012/2013

Above: Winning entry in the AHH Society Photography Competition – Jamie Griffiths (VI)

interested in joining or simply helping as a link to their contemporaries, then please let Angus Roy or Katharine Robinson know. We look forward to a successful year in 2013.

Busby Society

by Matthew Webb (BB, 1999–2004)

2012 started on a strong note for the Busby Society with the AGM and biennial dinner taking place in College Hall on Thursday, 22nd March. The evening proved to be one of the most memorable and enjoyable of recent years thanks to an unforgettable speech by Michael Harrison (BB, 1948–53), who vividly recalled his time up Busby’s and, in particular, his recollection of The Queen’s coronation from a Westminster schoolboy’s perspective. A stunning musical performance by Betty Makharinsky (BB, 2010–12) and Alex Ho (GG, 2007–12) provided the perfect end to the evening. The next dinner will be held in 2014. The Society has continued to work closely with Paul Botton, Busby’s Housemaster, in order to benefit both current and former members of the House. In particular Paul deserves thanks, together with George Swainston (Remove), John Morse (Remove) and a team of current Busbites, for producing another outstanding

Special thanks go to Julian Lyne-Pirkis (BB, 1969–73) (Hon. Chairman), Christian Wells (BB, 1968–73) (Hon. Treasurer), James Nunns (BB, 1967–72), Adrian Lloyd-Thomas (BB, 1967–72), Peter Gysin (BB, 1967–72) and Wilf Hashimi (BB, 1971–75) for their continued support and guidance. As ever I would like to remind all Old Busbites that the Society exists to maintain and foster connections between old friends and contacts and should you have any ideas for future events or wish to be put back in contact with anyone please do not hesitate to contact the Hon. Secretary. Similarly, if any former member of the House would be interested in joining the Busby Society Committee please do get in touch.

College Society

We plan to hold the next lecture in spring 2013, details to follow. I am pleased to say that we will be holding a dinner in College Hall, and AGM, on Thursday, 26th September 2013. We were saddened to learn of the death of one of our previous speakers, the eminent art historian Professor John House (QS, 1959–63). I would like to thank the Housemaster, Mark Feltham, for his continuing support of and enthusiasm for the Society which is much appreciated. I would also like to record the Society’s (and the Committee’s) huge debt of gratitude to my predecessor Jonathan Rawes (QS, 1963–68) who decided to hand over the baton at the AGM this year after a most distinguished period of office. He will be a hard act to follow and we are very fortunate that he has agreed to maintain close contact and participation going forward. If you would like to join the Society please contact the College Society Secretary, Charles Low (QS, 1967–72). If you have any ideas as to how the Society might extend its activities please do not hesitate to contact me or indeed any other member of the Committee (contact details on the website).

by Duncan Matthews (QS, 1974–79) The 2012 College Lecture was given in October by Dr Jonathan Katz, Master of the Queen’s Scholars 1987–2002 and principal founder of the Society, now teaching Classics and Sanskrit at Oxford. In a fascinating and thoughtful talk to an audience of around 75 he reflected on his time at Westminster and his own education and demonstrated the wide range of his talents, interests and achievements (a full report will follow in the College Newsletter). We combined the lecture with our AGM and, in the absence of a dinner in College Hall, we adjourned to the Camden Room for drinks and canapés. Many then made their way onto an Italian restaurant in Victoria for a very convivial dinner afterwards.

Dryden’s Society by Aqib Aslam (DD, 1994–99) and Leo Xenakis (DD, 1994–99) The Dryden’s Society continues, somewhat quietly since its inception, to look boldly to the future. Despite a quiet 2012, the Society will be hosting its annual drinks event on 22nd May 2013, and looks forward to welcoming Drydenites, old and new, back to the School. As well as being a chance to catch up, we are planning a tour/talk covering, amongst other things, the numerous recent developments at the School and along our beloved corridor. We hope to see you all next year and are keen to solicit suggestions, feedback or offers of help >> THE ELIZABETHAN NEWSLETTER | 2012/2013 | 55


>>

regarding future events, which can be directed to Aqib Aslam or Leo Xenakis.

Grantites, and to this end we are thankful for the support and input of both David Hargreaves, Grant’s Housemaster, and the Development Office. To make the Club fit for purpose, however, we need to hear from our members of all ages and to understand what is expected from us.

Hakluyt’s Society by Nick Poole (HH, 1987–92)

Following our Hakluyt’s Dinner back in November 2011 we are keen to build on the support of OWW by holding another event in the 2012/13 academic year. It is thought that this might be a fairly casual gathering – perhaps in a pub close to the School – details to follow soon. We look forward to seeing many of you then!

Above: Jamie Stoker (MM, 1997–2002) and Daniel Stoker (MM, 1998–2003)

Liddell’s Society

Old Grantite Club

The Society continues under the direction of David Eaton Turner and Tom Weisselberg with the Liddell’s Society Committee and Housemaster Teehan Page. The Society is looking to organise a drinks event over the course of the 2012/13 academic year so do keep an eye on the OW website for details.

Being a ‘fallow’ year in terms of events, 2012 was relatively quiet for the Club. A number of smaller events were still arranged, however, the first being a drinks and canapés evening for 2012 Leavers held in May. This annual event provides an opportunity for those leaving the House in the summer to be introduced to the Old Grantite Club and to meet the Committee.

by David Eaton Turner (LL, 1974–79) and Tom Weisselberg (LL, 1984–89)

Milne’s Society

by Alasdair Donaldson (MM, 1994–99) The brand new Old Poohs’ Society held its first meeting in April this year to celebrate the 15th birthday of Milne’s. Housemasters old and new were in full attendance and flow. They were joined by a generous smattering of Milnites from every era, including a promising crop from the 2011/12 Remove. Despite the limited number of ex-Milnites given the House’s youth (or perhaps we should now say adolescence), the catering department noted with some awe that the Old Poohs managed to blow through their budget by consuming more bottles of wine at a single event than any other House Society that they were aware of since their records began. We are pleased that the House continues to uphold its reputation. A dinner is being planned.

56 | THE ELIZABETHAN NEWSLETTER | 2012/2013

Please do contact us if you have any suggestions as to potential future speakers at Old Grantite Club Dinners. We would also like to hear from any Old Grantite who feels that they can help develop the future of the Club by playing some role within the Committee.

by Peter Cole (GG, 1993–98)

The 2012 AGM, held on 4th October, had an unusually solid attendance and went off well. Following the AGM, drinks and canapés were served in the Camden Room. Although 2012 may have been quiet in terms of events, this does not mean that the Committee was not busy beavering away to arrange a landmark Old Grantite event for 2013. With the help of Dominic Grieve QC MP (GG, 1969–74), the Committee is arranging a drinks evening on the House of Commons Terrace to take place on 9th July 2013.

To contact the Club or to gain more information on its activities please contact the Chairman, Peter Cole.

by Matthew Rhodes (RR, 1986–91) The Rigaud’s Society continues to maintain an active and close involvement with the House. A travel bursary was awarded to a pupil leaving the Remove and a donation was made towards the House Play (A Comedy of Errors). After the success of our last dinner, the Society will be subsidising another black tie dinner in College Hall on 13th June 2013. All RR OWW and their guests are encouraged to attend and further details will be given in good time. Ipsu Rasu!

Purcell’s Society

by Krystyna Kosciuszko (PP, 2005–07) The Purcell’s Society was launched last May, with Housemasters and matrons past and present in attendance. I say ‘launched’, but essentially we had a great gossip over wine, reminiscing about the School and discussing the new changes taking place in the House. It was a lovely evening and a promising start to many more Purcell’s events and future collaboration between the old girls and the School. On 20th November 2012, we showcased the new Purcell’s at the Open House Evening, marking a new chapter in the history of the House (including the introduction of boys!). Dr Ward-Smith, the current Housemaster, has promised the roof terrace will be put to good use – cocktails anyone? Look out for details soon! If any Purcell’s girls have ideas for future events or would like to be involved in any way, please get in touch with Krystyna Kosciuszko.

A ‘save the date’ for this event has already been circulated by the Development Office, but in case it escaped your attention, please do put it in your diary. Tickets will be on sale in early 2013. Partners will be invited. It just remains to say that the Committee is determined to continue its work in communicating with and arranging events for all Old

Rigaud’s Society

Above: Georgina White (PP Matron) and Ann Tucker (former PP Matron)

Above: George Shillam (WW, 2006–11) and Raaid Sahabdeen (WW, 2006–11)

Wren’s Society

  Dean Chatterjee (WW, 1997–2002) by The Wren’s Society continues to flourish each year. The biennial Wren’s Society dinner was held on 15th March 2012. There was a good turnout especially from recent Leavers who enjoyed mingling with previous generations of Wren’s OWW. The Wren’s Society drinks will be held on 18th April 2013 and we look forward to this event. Dean Chatterjee (WW, 1997–2002) continues to run the Wren’s Society but new committee members are actively being sought so please contact him if you would like to be involved. All former Wrenites are automatically considered to be members of the Society and are not required to pay an annual subscription fee. The possibility of holding additional social events throughout the year is still being explored – please contact alumni@westminster.org.uk to register your interest. THE ELIZABETHAN NEWSLETTER | 2012/2013 | 57


>>

regarding future events, which can be directed to Aqib Aslam or Leo Xenakis.

Grantites, and to this end we are thankful for the support and input of both David Hargreaves, Grant’s Housemaster, and the Development Office. To make the Club fit for purpose, however, we need to hear from our members of all ages and to understand what is expected from us.

Hakluyt’s Society by Nick Poole (HH, 1987–92)

Following our Hakluyt’s Dinner back in November 2011 we are keen to build on the support of OWW by holding another event in the 2012/13 academic year. It is thought that this might be a fairly casual gathering – perhaps in a pub close to the School – details to follow soon. We look forward to seeing many of you then!

Above: Jamie Stoker (MM, 1997–2002) and Daniel Stoker (MM, 1998–2003)

Liddell’s Society

Old Grantite Club

The Society continues under the direction of David Eaton Turner and Tom Weisselberg with the Liddell’s Society Committee and Housemaster Teehan Page. The Society is looking to organise a drinks event over the course of the 2012/13 academic year so do keep an eye on the OW website for details.

Being a ‘fallow’ year in terms of events, 2012 was relatively quiet for the Club. A number of smaller events were still arranged, however, the first being a drinks and canapés evening for 2012 Leavers held in May. This annual event provides an opportunity for those leaving the House in the summer to be introduced to the Old Grantite Club and to meet the Committee.

by David Eaton Turner (LL, 1974–79) and Tom Weisselberg (LL, 1984–89)

Milne’s Society

by Alasdair Donaldson (MM, 1994–99) The brand new Old Poohs’ Society held its first meeting in April this year to celebrate the 15th birthday of Milne’s. Housemasters old and new were in full attendance and flow. They were joined by a generous smattering of Milnites from every era, including a promising crop from the 2011/12 Remove. Despite the limited number of ex-Milnites given the House’s youth (or perhaps we should now say adolescence), the catering department noted with some awe that the Old Poohs managed to blow through their budget by consuming more bottles of wine at a single event than any other House Society that they were aware of since their records began. We are pleased that the House continues to uphold its reputation. A dinner is being planned.

56 | THE ELIZABETHAN NEWSLETTER | 2012/2013

Please do contact us if you have any suggestions as to potential future speakers at Old Grantite Club Dinners. We would also like to hear from any Old Grantite who feels that they can help develop the future of the Club by playing some role within the Committee.

by Peter Cole (GG, 1993–98)

The 2012 AGM, held on 4th October, had an unusually solid attendance and went off well. Following the AGM, drinks and canapés were served in the Camden Room. Although 2012 may have been quiet in terms of events, this does not mean that the Committee was not busy beavering away to arrange a landmark Old Grantite event for 2013. With the help of Dominic Grieve QC MP (GG, 1969–74), the Committee is arranging a drinks evening on the House of Commons Terrace to take place on 9th July 2013.

To contact the Club or to gain more information on its activities please contact the Chairman, Peter Cole.

by Matthew Rhodes (RR, 1986–91) The Rigaud’s Society continues to maintain an active and close involvement with the House. A travel bursary was awarded to a pupil leaving the Remove and a donation was made towards the House Play (A Comedy of Errors). After the success of our last dinner, the Society will be subsidising another black tie dinner in College Hall on 13th June 2013. All RR OWW and their guests are encouraged to attend and further details will be given in good time. Ipsu Rasu!

Purcell’s Society

by Krystyna Kosciuszko (PP, 2005–07) The Purcell’s Society was launched last May, with Housemasters and matrons past and present in attendance. I say ‘launched’, but essentially we had a great gossip over wine, reminiscing about the School and discussing the new changes taking place in the House. It was a lovely evening and a promising start to many more Purcell’s events and future collaboration between the old girls and the School. On 20th November 2012, we showcased the new Purcell’s at the Open House Evening, marking a new chapter in the history of the House (including the introduction of boys!). Dr Ward-Smith, the current Housemaster, has promised the roof terrace will be put to good use – cocktails anyone? Look out for details soon! If any Purcell’s girls have ideas for future events or would like to be involved in any way, please get in touch with Krystyna Kosciuszko.

A ‘save the date’ for this event has already been circulated by the Development Office, but in case it escaped your attention, please do put it in your diary. Tickets will be on sale in early 2013. Partners will be invited. It just remains to say that the Committee is determined to continue its work in communicating with and arranging events for all Old

Rigaud’s Society

Above: Georgina White (PP Matron) and Ann Tucker (former PP Matron)

Above: George Shillam (WW, 2006–11) and Raaid Sahabdeen (WW, 2006–11)

Wren’s Society

  Dean Chatterjee (WW, 1997–2002) by The Wren’s Society continues to flourish each year. The biennial Wren’s Society dinner was held on 15th March 2012. There was a good turnout especially from recent Leavers who enjoyed mingling with previous generations of Wren’s OWW. The Wren’s Society drinks will be held on 18th April 2013 and we look forward to this event. Dean Chatterjee (WW, 1997–2002) continues to run the Wren’s Society but new committee members are actively being sought so please contact him if you would like to be involved. All former Wrenites are automatically considered to be members of the Society and are not required to pay an annual subscription fee. The possibility of holding additional social events throughout the year is still being explored – please contact alumni@westminster.org.uk to register your interest. THE ELIZABETHAN NEWSLETTER | 2012/2013 | 57


OW SPORTS ANGLING • Chris Manderson (GG, 1957–62) chris.manderson@comituk.com ATHLETICS • John Goodbody (LL, 1956–61) john@jbgoodbody.co.uk 48 Rowan Road, Brook Green London W6 7DU

GOLF SOCIETY • David Roy (AHH, 1955–61) daroy@btinternet.com 7 Sandy Lodge Lane, Moor Park Northwood HA6 2JA NETBALL • Anne Rogers (RR, 2005–07) anne.rogers18@gmail.com

CRICKET • Jake Robson (AHH, 2001–06) jnarobson@googlemail.com T: 07764 181366 • Alexander Asher (LL, 2001–06) alexanderasher@gmail.com T: 07795 364694

REAL TENNIS • Simon Marshall (DD, 1990–95) simarsha@hotmail.com T: 0033676090126 T: 07985 604042 • Edwin Richards (AHH, 1977–81) edwin@alienor.biz

FIVES • Chris Watts (DD, 1985–89) cdjwatts@hotmail.com

TENNIS • Tristan Vanhegan (HH, 1994–99) tristanvanhegan@hotmail.com T: 07977 993193

FOOTBALL: 1ST XI • Hugo Braddick (QS, 1989–94) hb@meadowcroftgriffin.co.uk • David Weinstein-Linder (HH, 1998–2003) davidw-linder@hotmail.co.uk FOOTBALL: 2ND XI • Daniel Cavanagh (RR, 1993–98) daniel.cavanagh@gipartners.co.uk

WATER • Sam Scheuringer (DD, 1997–2002) sam@scheuringer.co.uk T: 07958 765205 • J ack Holborn (LL, 1997–2002) jack.holborn@hotmail.co.uk T: 07909 962576


OW SPORTS ANGLING • Chris Manderson (GG, 1957–62) chris.manderson@comituk.com ATHLETICS • John Goodbody (LL, 1956–61) john@jbgoodbody.co.uk 48 Rowan Road, Brook Green London W6 7DU

GOLF SOCIETY • David Roy (AHH, 1955–61) daroy@btinternet.com 7 Sandy Lodge Lane, Moor Park Northwood HA6 2JA NETBALL • Anne Rogers (RR, 2005–07) anne.rogers18@gmail.com

CRICKET • Jake Robson (AHH, 2001–06) jnarobson@googlemail.com T: 07764 181366 • Alexander Asher (LL, 2001–06) alexanderasher@gmail.com T: 07795 364694

REAL TENNIS • Simon Marshall (DD, 1990–95) simarsha@hotmail.com T: 0033676090126 T: 07985 604042 • Edwin Richards (AHH, 1977–81) edwin@alienor.biz

FIVES • Chris Watts (DD, 1985–89) cdjwatts@hotmail.com

TENNIS • Tristan Vanhegan (HH, 1994–99) tristanvanhegan@hotmail.com T: 07977 993193

FOOTBALL: 1ST XI • Hugo Braddick (QS, 1989–94) hb@meadowcroftgriffin.co.uk • David Weinstein-Linder (HH, 1998–2003) davidw-linder@hotmail.co.uk FOOTBALL: 2ND XI • Daniel Cavanagh (RR, 1993–98) daniel.cavanagh@gipartners.co.uk

WATER • Sam Scheuringer (DD, 1997–2002) sam@scheuringer.co.uk T: 07958 765205 • J ack Holborn (LL, 1997–2002) jack.holborn@hotmail.co.uk T: 07909 962576


the national over 70s sprint triathlon title by the huge margin of eight minutes. This was the 11th national title in the sport by someone who has been a stalwart of the athletics squad for 50 years and still holds several School swimming records. The next event for the OWW is the annual Inter-Old Boys race on Wimbledon Common on Saturday, 15th December, organised by Thames Hare and Hounds. The OWW will be defending the over 60s trophy they won last year and there will be strong representatives in all the other age-groups. Anyone wishing to participate in OW Athletics should contact Jim Forrest.

Cricket

Angling

by Jake Robson (AHH, 2001–06)

by Chris Manderson (GG, 1957–62) Members of the Elizabethan Angling Society met in May to fish the Leckord Estate Water on the River Test. There were plenty of Hawthorne around and one or two Mayfly. Richard Beeston (RR, 1976–80) impressed everyone by landing a 9lb trout. Tom Manderson (GG, 1983–88) landed a 21lb salmon at Knockando when members of the Society fished the River Spey in August. Further details of the Society are available from Chris Manderson.

Athletics

by John Goodbody (LL, 1956–61) The OWW won the annual Towpath Cup in a desperately close finish against the School on the traditional 3.3 mile course from Barnes to the Boat House in Putney. In total, 27 runners took part in the event on Sunday, 23rd September with both the OWW and the School totalling 18 points with the old boys winning because they had a faster third runner. The race was won by Richard Kowenicki, who led the Common Room team home in third 60 | THE ELIZABETHAN NEWSLETTER | 2012/2013

Above: Richard Beeston, (RR, 1976–80)

place. He clocked 17 minutes 21 seconds, with the first OW being Mark Wainwright (WW, 2003–08) in 19 minutes 2 seconds, followed by the School’s Nicholas Clanchy (MM, US) in 19 minutes 17 seconds. Will Sweet (RR, 1997–2002) on 20 minutes 17 seconds and Matthew Neve (HH, 2000–05) on 20 minutes 29 seconds were the next highest placed runners for the OWW, with Graham Ball (RR, 1962–66), the cornerstone of the over 60s team, coming home in 22 minutes 42 seconds. It was pleasing to see Mary-Alice Davison (WW, VI) record the fastest ever time by a female pupil at the School with 21 minutes 4 seconds. Representatives of the Common Room, headed by Simon Wurr, the Master of Athletics, and also OWW did the officiating and everyone was entertained to sandwiches and drinks in the Boat House afterwards. Individually, the star performance by an OW athlete this year was the overwhelming victory by Charles Doxat (AHH, 1955–59) who took

The 2012 season began with the OWWCC being overcome by the youthful skill and enthusiasm of the School XI in the Jim Cogan Cup; no break from the tradition of previous years then. However, there was a break from tradition, as Oxford fielded not one, but two OWW in their side for the Varsity Match: many congratulations to Alex Scott (LL, 2003–08) and Fred Johnson (AHH, 2003–08). June saw the visit of the MCC, with whom we contested a very exciting draw, falling short of the victory target by a mere two runs despite good innings from Alex Campbell (WW, 1989–94) (58), Alex Scott (70*) and Charlie Cooke (LL, 2000–05) (40). Later in the month, OWWCC played against the Pink Elephants at Vincent Square. The game was in memory of Simon Massey, who had coached at the School for a number of years, and sadly passed away in December 2011. We were made to wait by the weather until after tea, but did manage to play an enjoyable and competitive 20/20 game that was ultimately won by the Pink Elephants in the last over. It was a great tribute to Simon that so many OWW who had been coached by him, and staff who had worked with him, were at the

Square to remember him. It was also fitting that his wife, parents and brother were all there; we look forward to making the Simon Massey Memorial Match a regular fixture against the Pink Elephants. On an unseasonably cold and wet day at the start of July, OWWCC travelled north to play against Denstone Wanderers in the first round of the Cricketer Trophy. After a long journey frustrated by shut sections of the M1, OWWCC won the toss and put Denstone into bat on a damp pitch. Excellent opening spells from Charlie Cooke (3–30) and Debashish Biswas (AHH, 1996–2001) (2–24) left Denstone reeling at 64/6, however they were able to recover to 175/9 from their 40 overs. Unfortunately, having competed well for the first 70% of the match, we were unable to convert a good platform into a successful chase. As it turned out that the awful weather was to remain with us for the remainder of the summer, every match in Cricket Week was washed out, leaving OWWCC with only one game left in the season: our inaugural trip to the HAC. Thanks to sterling performances from Dan Brodie (WW, 2001–06) (33), Fred Spoliar (GG, 2006–11) (57) and Olly Wood (MM, 2005–10) (80*), we were able to declare on 229/5 after 39 overs. After Fred Johnson (4–10), ably supported by Tom Fitzsimons (RR, 2005–10) (3–46), ripped out their top order, the HAC shut up shop and fought hard to secure a draw with just a single wicket in hand. Nonetheless, this was a very enjoyable day and we look forward to returning to the HAC next season. Thanks as always to Franklin Barrett for his role in preparing Vincent Square and his enthusiasm and to Gloria for her cooking. Finally, OWWCC would like to thank the School and the Elizabethan Club, without whose kind help OWW cricket could not function. Any OWW wishing to join OWWCC should contact Jake Robson or Alexander Asher.

THE ELIZABETHAN NEWSLETTER | 2012/2013 | 61


the national over 70s sprint triathlon title by the huge margin of eight minutes. This was the 11th national title in the sport by someone who has been a stalwart of the athletics squad for 50 years and still holds several School swimming records. The next event for the OWW is the annual Inter-Old Boys race on Wimbledon Common on Saturday, 15th December, organised by Thames Hare and Hounds. The OWW will be defending the over 60s trophy they won last year and there will be strong representatives in all the other age-groups. Anyone wishing to participate in OW Athletics should contact Jim Forrest.

Cricket

Angling

by Jake Robson (AHH, 2001–06)

by Chris Manderson (GG, 1957–62) Members of the Elizabethan Angling Society met in May to fish the Leckord Estate Water on the River Test. There were plenty of Hawthorne around and one or two Mayfly. Richard Beeston (RR, 1976–80) impressed everyone by landing a 9lb trout. Tom Manderson (GG, 1983–88) landed a 21lb salmon at Knockando when members of the Society fished the River Spey in August. Further details of the Society are available from Chris Manderson.

Athletics

by John Goodbody (LL, 1956–61) The OWW won the annual Towpath Cup in a desperately close finish against the School on the traditional 3.3 mile course from Barnes to the Boat House in Putney. In total, 27 runners took part in the event on Sunday, 23rd September with both the OWW and the School totalling 18 points with the old boys winning because they had a faster third runner. The race was won by Richard Kowenicki, who led the Common Room team home in third 60 | THE ELIZABETHAN NEWSLETTER | 2012/2013

Above: Richard Beeston, (RR, 1976–80)

place. He clocked 17 minutes 21 seconds, with the first OW being Mark Wainwright (WW, 2003–08) in 19 minutes 2 seconds, followed by the School’s Nicholas Clanchy (MM, US) in 19 minutes 17 seconds. Will Sweet (RR, 1997–2002) on 20 minutes 17 seconds and Matthew Neve (HH, 2000–05) on 20 minutes 29 seconds were the next highest placed runners for the OWW, with Graham Ball (RR, 1962–66), the cornerstone of the over 60s team, coming home in 22 minutes 42 seconds. It was pleasing to see Mary-Alice Davison (WW, VI) record the fastest ever time by a female pupil at the School with 21 minutes 4 seconds. Representatives of the Common Room, headed by Simon Wurr, the Master of Athletics, and also OWW did the officiating and everyone was entertained to sandwiches and drinks in the Boat House afterwards. Individually, the star performance by an OW athlete this year was the overwhelming victory by Charles Doxat (AHH, 1955–59) who took

The 2012 season began with the OWWCC being overcome by the youthful skill and enthusiasm of the School XI in the Jim Cogan Cup; no break from the tradition of previous years then. However, there was a break from tradition, as Oxford fielded not one, but two OWW in their side for the Varsity Match: many congratulations to Alex Scott (LL, 2003–08) and Fred Johnson (AHH, 2003–08). June saw the visit of the MCC, with whom we contested a very exciting draw, falling short of the victory target by a mere two runs despite good innings from Alex Campbell (WW, 1989–94) (58), Alex Scott (70*) and Charlie Cooke (LL, 2000–05) (40). Later in the month, OWWCC played against the Pink Elephants at Vincent Square. The game was in memory of Simon Massey, who had coached at the School for a number of years, and sadly passed away in December 2011. We were made to wait by the weather until after tea, but did manage to play an enjoyable and competitive 20/20 game that was ultimately won by the Pink Elephants in the last over. It was a great tribute to Simon that so many OWW who had been coached by him, and staff who had worked with him, were at the

Square to remember him. It was also fitting that his wife, parents and brother were all there; we look forward to making the Simon Massey Memorial Match a regular fixture against the Pink Elephants. On an unseasonably cold and wet day at the start of July, OWWCC travelled north to play against Denstone Wanderers in the first round of the Cricketer Trophy. After a long journey frustrated by shut sections of the M1, OWWCC won the toss and put Denstone into bat on a damp pitch. Excellent opening spells from Charlie Cooke (3–30) and Debashish Biswas (AHH, 1996–2001) (2–24) left Denstone reeling at 64/6, however they were able to recover to 175/9 from their 40 overs. Unfortunately, having competed well for the first 70% of the match, we were unable to convert a good platform into a successful chase. As it turned out that the awful weather was to remain with us for the remainder of the summer, every match in Cricket Week was washed out, leaving OWWCC with only one game left in the season: our inaugural trip to the HAC. Thanks to sterling performances from Dan Brodie (WW, 2001–06) (33), Fred Spoliar (GG, 2006–11) (57) and Olly Wood (MM, 2005–10) (80*), we were able to declare on 229/5 after 39 overs. After Fred Johnson (4–10), ably supported by Tom Fitzsimons (RR, 2005–10) (3–46), ripped out their top order, the HAC shut up shop and fought hard to secure a draw with just a single wicket in hand. Nonetheless, this was a very enjoyable day and we look forward to returning to the HAC next season. Thanks as always to Franklin Barrett for his role in preparing Vincent Square and his enthusiasm and to Gloria for her cooking. Finally, OWWCC would like to thank the School and the Elizabethan Club, without whose kind help OWW cricket could not function. Any OWW wishing to join OWWCC should contact Jake Robson or Alexander Asher.

THE ELIZABETHAN NEWSLETTER | 2012/2013 | 61


Below: 2012 OWW vs Pupils Football Match

Football 1st XI by David Weinstein-Linder (HH, 1998–2003)

At the beginning of the 2012–13 season, Birmingham City’s Jack Butland became the youngest goalkeeper to be capped by England. The man he replaced? Billy Moon (GG, 1883–85) – who was 19 years old when first capped in 1888. As a former School 1st XI captain and the current OW 1st skipper, I’m not ashamed to admit the swell of boyish pride that I felt at learning this fact. 

Fives by Andrew Aitken (WW, 1967–71) Despite the hefty spanner tossed into the smooth-running Westminster Fives machine by the new child protection requirements at the School courts, the 2011/12 season turned out to be one of the most successful in recent years for the OWW. The access problem resulted in frantic fixture re-scheduling, Division One home games moved to Highgate, a mass CRB check of OWW and finally a post-Christmas resumption of something akin to normal service, though with the proviso that visiting players were to be escorted to and from the courts. The Highgate base certainly did OWW I no harm as they finished second in the First Division, whilst OWW II overcame the operating difficulties to end up bang in the middle of Division Two. It was encouraging also to see the Abbey Club (essentially the School) runners-up in Division Three. Much credit is due to all involved in this League performance, from teenagers to old 62 | THE ELIZABETHAN NEWSLETTER | 2012/2013

Above: The winning Old Westminster Veterans team

stagers, with some bravura match management from Edward Levy (QS, 1977–81), Chris Watts (DD, 1985–89), Freddie Krespi (DD, 2000–05), Laurie Brock (BB, 2003–08) and John Reynolds (guest player), which enabled the Hon. Secretary to relax on the administrative sofa. As a season finale, the Very Old Westminsters – four of the six School contemporaries from c.1970 – beat the Very Old Ipswichians to take a 2–1 lead in the highly competitive series of over-50s matches. At the other end of the age scale, Season 2012/13 (just a few games in as this goes to press) has seen an influx of young players which should help keep the oldies on their toes…

Our league results for the 1st XI this season have been excellent. Until our last league game, the 1st XI sat on top of the Arthurian League Division 1, with a record of 3 wins from 3 games. We then went 1–0 up away at Winchester, only for a hamstring to go a few seconds before half time. As we had no substitutes this condemned us to 10 men and an eventual 3–1 defeat. The Club’s vibrant social scene continues, with younger members jostling for the right to organise nights out for Christmas and the AGM. Despite these great results for the 1sts, the OWFC as a club has struggled this academic year due to a lack of regular players, particularly the 2nd XI. We’ve got a great pool of ‘occasionals’, maybe 40–50 players who represent the two sides in an average season, as well as a Veterans’ Cup team, but it is the regular players that commit every week that make the sides work and produce the good results. Our weekly training sessions are generally well attended; however of the

16 or so who turn up regularly, not all can play in matches. Because of the problem with numbers for the 2nds, currently exacerbated by a long injury list, we are concerned that a 150 year old institution could end up becoming extinct without the help of new OWW willing to commit on a regular basis. I appreciate that a lot has changed over the last 150 years. A smaller proportion of us now work 5 days a week for a large employer. Many entrepreneurial OWW have founded their own firms, meaning those few hours at the weekend cannot be routinely given up to soccer. There’s also more football on the television – 12.45 and 5.30 kick-offs mean players may have to give up watching the side they support, or just a big game, in order to play themselves. I would be very happy to hear any suggestions about how we can improve the current situation, but more than anything else I just want to make it clear that there is a danger to the future of the Club as a whole if numbers are allowed to dwindle. Westminster has a great footballing history, and a long tradition of occasionally overenthusiastic attacking football (I’m thinking of Yard football here!). So if you feel like you could come down and support the team by playing for either side on a regular basis or if you know someone else that would be interested, please email the Club Captain, David Weinstein-Linder. THE ELIZABETHAN NEWSLETTER | 2012/2013 | 63


Below: 2012 OWW vs Pupils Football Match

Football 1st XI by David Weinstein-Linder (HH, 1998–2003)

At the beginning of the 2012–13 season, Birmingham City’s Jack Butland became the youngest goalkeeper to be capped by England. The man he replaced? Billy Moon (GG, 1883–85) – who was 19 years old when first capped in 1888. As a former School 1st XI captain and the current OW 1st skipper, I’m not ashamed to admit the swell of boyish pride that I felt at learning this fact. 

Fives by Andrew Aitken (WW, 1967–71) Despite the hefty spanner tossed into the smooth-running Westminster Fives machine by the new child protection requirements at the School courts, the 2011/12 season turned out to be one of the most successful in recent years for the OWW. The access problem resulted in frantic fixture re-scheduling, Division One home games moved to Highgate, a mass CRB check of OWW and finally a post-Christmas resumption of something akin to normal service, though with the proviso that visiting players were to be escorted to and from the courts. The Highgate base certainly did OWW I no harm as they finished second in the First Division, whilst OWW II overcame the operating difficulties to end up bang in the middle of Division Two. It was encouraging also to see the Abbey Club (essentially the School) runners-up in Division Three. Much credit is due to all involved in this League performance, from teenagers to old 62 | THE ELIZABETHAN NEWSLETTER | 2012/2013

Above: The winning Old Westminster Veterans team

stagers, with some bravura match management from Edward Levy (QS, 1977–81), Chris Watts (DD, 1985–89), Freddie Krespi (DD, 2000–05), Laurie Brock (BB, 2003–08) and John Reynolds (guest player), which enabled the Hon. Secretary to relax on the administrative sofa. As a season finale, the Very Old Westminsters – four of the six School contemporaries from c.1970 – beat the Very Old Ipswichians to take a 2–1 lead in the highly competitive series of over-50s matches. At the other end of the age scale, Season 2012/13 (just a few games in as this goes to press) has seen an influx of young players which should help keep the oldies on their toes…

Our league results for the 1st XI this season have been excellent. Until our last league game, the 1st XI sat on top of the Arthurian League Division 1, with a record of 3 wins from 3 games. We then went 1–0 up away at Winchester, only for a hamstring to go a few seconds before half time. As we had no substitutes this condemned us to 10 men and an eventual 3–1 defeat. The Club’s vibrant social scene continues, with younger members jostling for the right to organise nights out for Christmas and the AGM. Despite these great results for the 1sts, the OWFC as a club has struggled this academic year due to a lack of regular players, particularly the 2nd XI. We’ve got a great pool of ‘occasionals’, maybe 40–50 players who represent the two sides in an average season, as well as a Veterans’ Cup team, but it is the regular players that commit every week that make the sides work and produce the good results. Our weekly training sessions are generally well attended; however of the

16 or so who turn up regularly, not all can play in matches. Because of the problem with numbers for the 2nds, currently exacerbated by a long injury list, we are concerned that a 150 year old institution could end up becoming extinct without the help of new OWW willing to commit on a regular basis. I appreciate that a lot has changed over the last 150 years. A smaller proportion of us now work 5 days a week for a large employer. Many entrepreneurial OWW have founded their own firms, meaning those few hours at the weekend cannot be routinely given up to soccer. There’s also more football on the television – 12.45 and 5.30 kick-offs mean players may have to give up watching the side they support, or just a big game, in order to play themselves. I would be very happy to hear any suggestions about how we can improve the current situation, but more than anything else I just want to make it clear that there is a danger to the future of the Club as a whole if numbers are allowed to dwindle. Westminster has a great footballing history, and a long tradition of occasionally overenthusiastic attacking football (I’m thinking of Yard football here!). So if you feel like you could come down and support the team by playing for either side on a regular basis or if you know someone else that would be interested, please email the Club Captain, David Weinstein-Linder. THE ELIZABETHAN NEWSLETTER | 2012/2013 | 63


Netball by Anne Rogers (RR, 2005–07) • Rob McHugh (RR, 1991–96) and C J Morrell (GG, 1979–84) Lost 2&1 • Oli Flynn (RR, 2003–08) and Henry Kingsbury (HH, 1991–96) Lost 1 dn • Jerome Kamm (LL, 2006–11) and Richard Neville-Rolfe (QS, 1972–75) Lost 7&6 • Tom Smith (DD, 1998–2003) and David Weinstein-Linder (HH, 1998–2003) Won 2 up In the Grafton Morrish we qualified for the knock-out stage with 82 pts, coming 3rd out of 18 sides, the scores were: • Oli Flynn and Jerome Kamm 28 pts • Henry Kingsbury and Tom Tredinnick (GG, 2002–07) 24 pts • Edward Cartwright and Johnny Woolf 30 pts

Football 2nd XI

In the Finals we lost 1–2 to Oakham at Hunstanton the matches were as follows:

by Daniel Cavanagh (RR, 1993–98) The 2011/12 season was a frustrating and ultimately unsuccessful one for the 2nd XI. A slow start resulted in no points on the board until mid-November, but this was then followed by a run of 4 wins in 5 matches including memorable victories away at Eton, and at home against the ultimately promoted Salopians. This should have proved to be a spring board for a solid mid-table finish however the side failed to shake their Christmas hangovers and were dragged back into a relegation dog fight which we failed to survive. Despite the disappointment, thanks should go to the efforts of regulars: Robin Mcpherson (RR, 2002–07), Archie Mckay (HH, 1991–96), Hugo Braddick (QS, 1989–94), Howard Gregory (HH, 1987–88), Freddie Johansson (LL, 1990–95), Johannes Gunnell (AHH, 1993–98) and Ben Golden (RR, 2004–06). The 2012/13 year is proving to be one of transition, with a new captain, Robin Mcpherson (RR, 2002–07), taking the helm and hopefully ushering in a new era accompanied by some fresh faces who have replaced a number of the seasoned campaigners who have elected to put themselves out to pasture.

64 | THE ELIZABETHAN NEWSLETTER | 2012/2013

• Edward Cartwright and Oli Flynn Won 4&3 • Henry Kingsbury and Tom Tredinnick Lost 1 dn • Tom Smith and David Weinstein-Linder Lost 5&4 In the Bernard Darwin we lost ½ – 2 ½ to Winchester. In the Senior Darwin we lost 0–3 to Wellington.

Above: 2012 OWW vs Pupils Football Match

Golf by David Roy (AHH, 1955–61) The Club played in five old boys’ golf competitions during the year. In the Halford Hewitt Westminster lost 2–3 to Mill Hill. The scores of the individual matches were as follows: •E  dward Cartwright (DD, 1979–83) and Johnny Woolf (LL, 2003–08) Won 7&6

In the Old Boys’ Putting Competition at Royal Wimbledon we reached the final where we finished fourth. This year the Society has played nine inter-old boys’ matches where we won four, halved one and lost four. The Society defeated the Senior Old Uppinghamians, Old Wykehamists, Old Paulines and Old Reptonians and we halved with the Old Carthusians. The Society played the School at Royal Mid Surrey in March and won 3 ½ – ½. The three Society meetings were well attended.

The OW Netball Club had its inaugural meeting on 6th October 2012. Our objectives are two-fold. In the first instance, we all want to have fun and get a bit fitter in the process. In the second instance, it’s a great opportunity to meet up with old friends. The first session had a relaxed and friendly atmosphere and our intention is to keep it that way. We are looking to establish a regular event that caters to the preferences of its members. In due course, for example, we may introduce coaching. In the meantime, we have established a forum for members to choose the time and day that best suits them. If you would like to get involved please contact Anne Rogers.

Real Tennis by Simon Marshall (DD, 1990–95) This year matches were played against Oxford and, for the first time, Radley College, both captained impeccably by Edwin Richards (AHH, 1977–81). Against Radley in February unfortunately the team slipped to a 2/4 defeat. In the Oxford fixture in May, however, and for the second year running, the OWW were triumphant by the opposite score, winning 4 matches to 2 – this despite the presence of a renegade half-Blue in the Unicorns side! Edwin Richards and Jamie Ross (WW, 1978–82) represented the School at the annual Brigand’s Peripatetic tournament at Holyport Grange in September. Although they bowed out in the group stage after a valiant fight, an excellent and convivial time was assured. For the first time since 1996 regular play has been re-established at the School, with twice weekly sessions led by John Woodman at the Queen’s Club. The future of OW Real Tennis, it can be safely said, now looks considerably brighter than it has for many a day. Please don’t hesitate to contact either myself or Edwin if you are interested in playing for the team in future. THE ELIZABETHAN NEWSLETTER | 2012/2013 | 65


Netball by Anne Rogers (RR, 2005–07) • Rob McHugh (RR, 1991–96) and C J Morrell (GG, 1979–84) Lost 2&1 • Oli Flynn (RR, 2003–08) and Henry Kingsbury (HH, 1991–96) Lost 1 dn • Jerome Kamm (LL, 2006–11) and Richard Neville-Rolfe (QS, 1972–75) Lost 7&6 • Tom Smith (DD, 1998–2003) and David Weinstein-Linder (HH, 1998–2003) Won 2 up In the Grafton Morrish we qualified for the knock-out stage with 82 pts, coming 3rd out of 18 sides, the scores were: • Oli Flynn and Jerome Kamm 28 pts • Henry Kingsbury and Tom Tredinnick (GG, 2002–07) 24 pts • Edward Cartwright and Johnny Woolf 30 pts

Football 2nd XI

In the Finals we lost 1–2 to Oakham at Hunstanton the matches were as follows:

by Daniel Cavanagh (RR, 1993–98) The 2011/12 season was a frustrating and ultimately unsuccessful one for the 2nd XI. A slow start resulted in no points on the board until mid-November, but this was then followed by a run of 4 wins in 5 matches including memorable victories away at Eton, and at home against the ultimately promoted Salopians. This should have proved to be a spring board for a solid mid-table finish however the side failed to shake their Christmas hangovers and were dragged back into a relegation dog fight which we failed to survive. Despite the disappointment, thanks should go to the efforts of regulars: Robin Mcpherson (RR, 2002–07), Archie Mckay (HH, 1991–96), Hugo Braddick (QS, 1989–94), Howard Gregory (HH, 1987–88), Freddie Johansson (LL, 1990–95), Johannes Gunnell (AHH, 1993–98) and Ben Golden (RR, 2004–06). The 2012/13 year is proving to be one of transition, with a new captain, Robin Mcpherson (RR, 2002–07), taking the helm and hopefully ushering in a new era accompanied by some fresh faces who have replaced a number of the seasoned campaigners who have elected to put themselves out to pasture.

64 | THE ELIZABETHAN NEWSLETTER | 2012/2013

• Edward Cartwright and Oli Flynn Won 4&3 • Henry Kingsbury and Tom Tredinnick Lost 1 dn • Tom Smith and David Weinstein-Linder Lost 5&4 In the Bernard Darwin we lost ½ – 2 ½ to Winchester. In the Senior Darwin we lost 0–3 to Wellington.

Above: 2012 OWW vs Pupils Football Match

Golf by David Roy (AHH, 1955–61) The Club played in five old boys’ golf competitions during the year. In the Halford Hewitt Westminster lost 2–3 to Mill Hill. The scores of the individual matches were as follows: •E  dward Cartwright (DD, 1979–83) and Johnny Woolf (LL, 2003–08) Won 7&6

In the Old Boys’ Putting Competition at Royal Wimbledon we reached the final where we finished fourth. This year the Society has played nine inter-old boys’ matches where we won four, halved one and lost four. The Society defeated the Senior Old Uppinghamians, Old Wykehamists, Old Paulines and Old Reptonians and we halved with the Old Carthusians. The Society played the School at Royal Mid Surrey in March and won 3 ½ – ½. The three Society meetings were well attended.

The OW Netball Club had its inaugural meeting on 6th October 2012. Our objectives are two-fold. In the first instance, we all want to have fun and get a bit fitter in the process. In the second instance, it’s a great opportunity to meet up with old friends. The first session had a relaxed and friendly atmosphere and our intention is to keep it that way. We are looking to establish a regular event that caters to the preferences of its members. In due course, for example, we may introduce coaching. In the meantime, we have established a forum for members to choose the time and day that best suits them. If you would like to get involved please contact Anne Rogers.

Real Tennis by Simon Marshall (DD, 1990–95) This year matches were played against Oxford and, for the first time, Radley College, both captained impeccably by Edwin Richards (AHH, 1977–81). Against Radley in February unfortunately the team slipped to a 2/4 defeat. In the Oxford fixture in May, however, and for the second year running, the OWW were triumphant by the opposite score, winning 4 matches to 2 – this despite the presence of a renegade half-Blue in the Unicorns side! Edwin Richards and Jamie Ross (WW, 1978–82) represented the School at the annual Brigand’s Peripatetic tournament at Holyport Grange in September. Although they bowed out in the group stage after a valiant fight, an excellent and convivial time was assured. For the first time since 1996 regular play has been re-established at the School, with twice weekly sessions led by John Woodman at the Queen’s Club. The future of OW Real Tennis, it can be safely said, now looks considerably brighter than it has for many a day. Please don’t hesitate to contact either myself or Edwin if you are interested in playing for the team in future. THE ELIZABETHAN NEWSLETTER | 2012/2013 | 65


practices and matches throughout the season and has left the Club with surplus funds to be put to good use next season. The committee is seeing how the Club can use the funds to potentially contribute to the facilities, including current investigation into the possibility of a ball machine to help members practice. Thanks go to Tom Sooke (LL, 1958–63), Duncan Matthews (QS, 1974–79), Simon Clement-Davies, Tristan Vanhegan, Alex Perry and Matt Webb (BB, 1999–2004) for contributing. We are delighted to have welcomed a number of new members to the Club this season, including many recent leavers. All are very much encouraged to join us for a hit!

Tennis by Tristan Vanhegan (HH, 1994–99) This year saw wins for the OWLTC in a number of areas despite challenging weather throughout the season. On court we had one of our most successful D’Abernon Cup performances in recent memory. Chris Anguelov (GG, 2003–08) and Ed Roussel (LL, 1979–83) won every match in their round robin qualifier. They were joined by Marc Baghdadi (HH, 2001–06) and James Amott (WW, 1985–89) in a thrilling quarter final match against UCS Old Boys which they narrowly won five sets to three, with Marc and Chris clinching a crucial tie-break in the final set of the match, without which we would have lost. I stood in for Ed in the semi-final against KCS Wimbledon. Unfortunately we were outplayed in the best chance we’ve had to make the final in recent competitions. We seem to be going from strength to strength so fingers crossed for next year! The poor weather saw most of our usual schedule of friendly matches postponed to next season. Nonetheless, we secured a comfortable win against the School; we narrowly lost to the Old Etonians and were comfortably beaten by the Old Wykhamists. Thank you to all the players who took part in the friendlies, including Jimmy Notaras (LL, 1995–97), Simon Clement-Davies (WW, 1975–78), Giles Atkinson, Charlie Stevenson (GG, 1993–98), 66 | THE ELIZABETHAN NEWSLETTER | 2012/2013

Above: OW Tennis at Boisdale of Belgravia for their end of season dinner. Left to right: Giles Atkinson (guest), Jimmy Notaras (LL, 1995–97), Alex Perry (RR, 1996– 2001), Nick Perry (RR, 1964–67), Tristan Vanhegan (HH, 1994–99), Tom Sooke (LL, 1958–63), Matt Webb (BB, 1999–2004), Caspar Melville (guest), Simon Clement-Davies (RR, 1975–78), Alex Mackenzie (QS, 1996–2001), Duncan Matthews (QS, 1974–79)

William Stevenson (LL, 1998–2003), Harry de Quetteville (LL, 1988–93) and CJ Morrell (GG, 1979–84). This season saw the launch of coaching for members, courtesy of our own Chris Anguelov. This was extremely well-received and it is something we hope to build on significantly next season. On the social side, we held our ever-popular pre-season pizza and drinks in Covent Garden in March. A damp season was marked by plenty of drinks at the Barley Mow. Thanks again to Simon Clement-Davies for yet again organising this year’s end of season event at Boisdale. Special thanks go to Nick Perry (RR, 1964–67) and Alex Perry (RR, 1996–2001) for hosting a fantastic day at the Wimbledon Championships followed by an excellent dinner. A huge thank you to all members who gave generously to the Club’s voluntary donation scheme. This ensured a supply of new balls for

Finally, the Club has sorely missed the high spirits and companionship of our dear friend Alec Melville (RR, 1957–62) who we lost in tragic circumstances last year. In order to commemorate Alec, the OWLTC Committee will be arranging an annual club doubles tournament. The winners of the tournament will be awarded with the Alec Melville Cup and we hope you will be able to join us for the inaugural event next year. Further details will be circulated towards the start of next season. Saturday morning sessions at Vincent Square will continue as long as the weather permits, usually well into December. Please come along and we hope to see you on court soon!

Water by Oliver Cox (HH, 1997–2002) Elizabethan BC (EBC), the boat club for OWW, started the 2011–2012 season in fine style. Building on last season’s successful Henley campaign, EBC competed first at the annual inter-old boys Alleynian Regatta. EBC fielded not one but two full eights and “Elizabethan A”, which contained the entire Henleywinning quad from 2009, went on to win the event outright – beating crews from Dulwich, Latymer, Teddies and Hampton. Piran Tedbury (HH, 2004–09), George Bradbury (BB,

Left: Tom Fielder (DD, 2005–10) collects the Alleynian Challenge jCup on behalf of Elizabethan A

2007–12) George Matthews (GG, 2007–12), Jack Bannenberg (WW, 2006–11), Dan RixStanding (BB, 2004–09), Tom Fielder (DD, 2005–10), Pierre Thomas (HH, 2004–09) and Wilf Kimberley (WW, 2005–10) made up the crew. An Elizabethan coxless four made up of Ivo Tedbury (HH, 2006–11) and Jack Bannenburg, Tim Jones (LL, 1992–97) and Oliver Cox then raced the Fours Head in November, securing a solid 36th amidst the 60+ crews of the IM2 category. In March the pre-2002 element of the Club competed for the first time in the Veterans Head of the River Race – learning with a bruising 62nd place that the junior “Veteran” categories are just as competitive as the regular Head! Despite plans, day-to-day commitments and an injured coxswain meant there was no Elizabethan four at Henley Royal Regatta for the first time in four years. We hope to put that right this year, which marks the bicentenary of the Westminster School Boat Club. New members, spanning three decades, are now joining the Club; we will also be returning to the normal Head of the River Race in March, giving the younger members a chance to shine. For anyone who wants to get involved, male or female, see the sports page of the OW website. Off the water, it was a great pleasure to see so many Old Westminster rowers and their partners at the 2012 Henley Royal Regatta for the traditional tea-break drinks. We hope to see as many of you again this year, to help us celebrate this remarkable anniversary of our Club. THE ELIZABETHAN NEWSLETTER | 2012/2013 | 67


practices and matches throughout the season and has left the Club with surplus funds to be put to good use next season. The committee is seeing how the Club can use the funds to potentially contribute to the facilities, including current investigation into the possibility of a ball machine to help members practice. Thanks go to Tom Sooke (LL, 1958–63), Duncan Matthews (QS, 1974–79), Simon Clement-Davies, Tristan Vanhegan, Alex Perry and Matt Webb (BB, 1999–2004) for contributing. We are delighted to have welcomed a number of new members to the Club this season, including many recent leavers. All are very much encouraged to join us for a hit!

Tennis by Tristan Vanhegan (HH, 1994–99) This year saw wins for the OWLTC in a number of areas despite challenging weather throughout the season. On court we had one of our most successful D’Abernon Cup performances in recent memory. Chris Anguelov (GG, 2003–08) and Ed Roussel (LL, 1979–83) won every match in their round robin qualifier. They were joined by Marc Baghdadi (HH, 2001–06) and James Amott (WW, 1985–89) in a thrilling quarter final match against UCS Old Boys which they narrowly won five sets to three, with Marc and Chris clinching a crucial tie-break in the final set of the match, without which we would have lost. I stood in for Ed in the semi-final against KCS Wimbledon. Unfortunately we were outplayed in the best chance we’ve had to make the final in recent competitions. We seem to be going from strength to strength so fingers crossed for next year! The poor weather saw most of our usual schedule of friendly matches postponed to next season. Nonetheless, we secured a comfortable win against the School; we narrowly lost to the Old Etonians and were comfortably beaten by the Old Wykhamists. Thank you to all the players who took part in the friendlies, including Jimmy Notaras (LL, 1995–97), Simon Clement-Davies (WW, 1975–78), Giles Atkinson, Charlie Stevenson (GG, 1993–98), 66 | THE ELIZABETHAN NEWSLETTER | 2012/2013

Above: OW Tennis at Boisdale of Belgravia for their end of season dinner. Left to right: Giles Atkinson (guest), Jimmy Notaras (LL, 1995–97), Alex Perry (RR, 1996– 2001), Nick Perry (RR, 1964–67), Tristan Vanhegan (HH, 1994–99), Tom Sooke (LL, 1958–63), Matt Webb (BB, 1999–2004), Caspar Melville (guest), Simon Clement-Davies (RR, 1975–78), Alex Mackenzie (QS, 1996–2001), Duncan Matthews (QS, 1974–79)

William Stevenson (LL, 1998–2003), Harry de Quetteville (LL, 1988–93) and CJ Morrell (GG, 1979–84). This season saw the launch of coaching for members, courtesy of our own Chris Anguelov. This was extremely well-received and it is something we hope to build on significantly next season. On the social side, we held our ever-popular pre-season pizza and drinks in Covent Garden in March. A damp season was marked by plenty of drinks at the Barley Mow. Thanks again to Simon Clement-Davies for yet again organising this year’s end of season event at Boisdale. Special thanks go to Nick Perry (RR, 1964–67) and Alex Perry (RR, 1996–2001) for hosting a fantastic day at the Wimbledon Championships followed by an excellent dinner. A huge thank you to all members who gave generously to the Club’s voluntary donation scheme. This ensured a supply of new balls for

Finally, the Club has sorely missed the high spirits and companionship of our dear friend Alec Melville (RR, 1957–62) who we lost in tragic circumstances last year. In order to commemorate Alec, the OWLTC Committee will be arranging an annual club doubles tournament. The winners of the tournament will be awarded with the Alec Melville Cup and we hope you will be able to join us for the inaugural event next year. Further details will be circulated towards the start of next season. Saturday morning sessions at Vincent Square will continue as long as the weather permits, usually well into December. Please come along and we hope to see you on court soon!

Water by Oliver Cox (HH, 1997–2002) Elizabethan BC (EBC), the boat club for OWW, started the 2011–2012 season in fine style. Building on last season’s successful Henley campaign, EBC competed first at the annual inter-old boys Alleynian Regatta. EBC fielded not one but two full eights and “Elizabethan A”, which contained the entire Henleywinning quad from 2009, went on to win the event outright – beating crews from Dulwich, Latymer, Teddies and Hampton. Piran Tedbury (HH, 2004–09), George Bradbury (BB,

Left: Tom Fielder (DD, 2005–10) collects the Alleynian Challenge jCup on behalf of Elizabethan A

2007–12) George Matthews (GG, 2007–12), Jack Bannenberg (WW, 2006–11), Dan RixStanding (BB, 2004–09), Tom Fielder (DD, 2005–10), Pierre Thomas (HH, 2004–09) and Wilf Kimberley (WW, 2005–10) made up the crew. An Elizabethan coxless four made up of Ivo Tedbury (HH, 2006–11) and Jack Bannenburg, Tim Jones (LL, 1992–97) and Oliver Cox then raced the Fours Head in November, securing a solid 36th amidst the 60+ crews of the IM2 category. In March the pre-2002 element of the Club competed for the first time in the Veterans Head of the River Race – learning with a bruising 62nd place that the junior “Veteran” categories are just as competitive as the regular Head! Despite plans, day-to-day commitments and an injured coxswain meant there was no Elizabethan four at Henley Royal Regatta for the first time in four years. We hope to put that right this year, which marks the bicentenary of the Westminster School Boat Club. New members, spanning three decades, are now joining the Club; we will also be returning to the normal Head of the River Race in March, giving the younger members a chance to shine. For anyone who wants to get involved, male or female, see the sports page of the OW website. Off the water, it was a great pleasure to see so many Old Westminster rowers and their partners at the 2012 Henley Royal Regatta for the traditional tea-break drinks. We hope to see as many of you again this year, to help us celebrate this remarkable anniversary of our Club. THE ELIZABETHAN NEWSLETTER | 2012/2013 | 67


OW ARTICLES Get in touch If you would like to submit an article for inclusion in the next issue of the Elizabethan Newsletter, please send details to the Editor: The Elizabethan Newsletter The Development Office 17a Dean’s Yard, London SW1P 3PB E: alumni@westminster.org.uk T: 020 7963 1115


OW ARTICLES Get in touch If you would like to submit an article for inclusion in the next issue of the Elizabethan Newsletter, please send details to the Editor: The Elizabethan Newsletter The Development Office 17a Dean’s Yard, London SW1P 3PB E: alumni@westminster.org.uk T: 020 7963 1115


Prag Award Winner’s Report

The Royal Museum of Central Africa (Tervuren, Belgium) by Mayowa Sofekun (AHH, Remove) Though the building is more reminiscent of Classical Rome with the central dome articulated with a rounded arch and ionic capitals, the Royal Museum of Central Africa (RMCA) located in Tervuren, Belgium houses works from another great empire that flourished during the 5th century BC. The Nok culture was a highly advanced ancient social system that is considered to be the earliest sub-Saharan producer of life-sized Terracotta sculptures. Encased within a Perspex box, the head of Lajuwa from Nok in south-eastern Nigeria appears to hover between flesh and stone as the slightly parted lips signify a speaking motion. The surface of the skin is sensitive to facial features, as the crevice in the corner of the eyes gives the impression that the figure has just blinked. Even the textured hair surface contributes to rendering an accurate degree of naturalism that is redolent of Michelangelo’s David. The head of Lajuwa is just one example of the delicate artworks on display at the RMCA. The Royal Museum of Central Africa has the reputation of being one of the world’s most impressive museums devoted to the collection and preservation of both ancient and modern African artworks. For a continent that has largely been left out in the history of art, the rising status of African artworks has become increasingly important; particularly since the rediscovery of various ancient treasures like the Benin Bronzes. The RMCA displays artworks from a highly complex and diverse continent, 70 | THE ELIZABETHAN NEWSLETTER | 2012/2013

Above: Pendu Mask

dating from the 5th century BC right up to the present day. Unlike other western countries Britain does not have a museum or gallery solely dedicated to the collection of African art, so it was particularly rewarding to be able to travel to Belgium and discover Ife – a medieval city state that flourished from the 12th to 15th centuries in Africa. It is believed that the Kingdom of Ife, located in modern day southern Nigeria, evolved out of the Nok culture as stylistic similarities are evident within the artworks – most notably in the adoption of the head as a popular motif to sculpt. The Head of Ife is a little smaller than life-size, and made of brass, which has now darkened with age. The shape of the face is an elegant oval, covered with finely incised vertical lines, but it’s a facial scarring so perfectly symmetrical that it contains rather than disturbs the features. It has been compared to the finest naturalism of Verrocchio and is so unlike the ‘primitive’ artworks that European artists had stumbled across in the early part of the 20th century as the Pendu Mask seen within Picasso’s Les Demoiselles D’Avignon.

Although the primary purpose of my trip was to visit the RMCA, I took advantage of being in Brussels during the biennial Flower Carpet held at the Grand Place. It was very topical given that this year’s display was inspired by patterns found on African clothing, in particular patterns from Congo, Botswana, Ethiopia and Nigeria. The artistic skill and expertise required to produce the display was outstanding – a parallel to the sculptures on display at the museum. The sophisticated craftsmanship required to produce the sculptures of Ife was once considered to be impossible to have been at the hands of African artists and it was thought that the artworks were the product of

Greek sculptors, providing evidence for the lost island of Atlantis which had sunk off the coast of Nigeria! From an overnight coach in Victoria into the heart of a great diverse city, my visit to the Royal Museum of Central Africa was an enlightening experience into the depths of a highly complex and interesting continent. Whilst enjoying some of the sights of Brussels I could not help but indulge in the delicacies of Belgian cuisine such as frites in a cone and a strawberry and cream waffle. I had never experienced so much culture in a period of twenty-four hours!

‘

Encased within a Perspex box, the head of Lajuwa from Nok in south-eastern Nigeria appears to hover between flesh and stone.

Left: Belgian Waffles

THE ELIZABETHAN NEWSLETTER | 2012/2013 | 71


Prag Award Winner’s Report

The Royal Museum of Central Africa (Tervuren, Belgium) by Mayowa Sofekun (AHH, Remove) Though the building is more reminiscent of Classical Rome with the central dome articulated with a rounded arch and ionic capitals, the Royal Museum of Central Africa (RMCA) located in Tervuren, Belgium houses works from another great empire that flourished during the 5th century BC. The Nok culture was a highly advanced ancient social system that is considered to be the earliest sub-Saharan producer of life-sized Terracotta sculptures. Encased within a Perspex box, the head of Lajuwa from Nok in south-eastern Nigeria appears to hover between flesh and stone as the slightly parted lips signify a speaking motion. The surface of the skin is sensitive to facial features, as the crevice in the corner of the eyes gives the impression that the figure has just blinked. Even the textured hair surface contributes to rendering an accurate degree of naturalism that is redolent of Michelangelo’s David. The head of Lajuwa is just one example of the delicate artworks on display at the RMCA. The Royal Museum of Central Africa has the reputation of being one of the world’s most impressive museums devoted to the collection and preservation of both ancient and modern African artworks. For a continent that has largely been left out in the history of art, the rising status of African artworks has become increasingly important; particularly since the rediscovery of various ancient treasures like the Benin Bronzes. The RMCA displays artworks from a highly complex and diverse continent, 70 | THE ELIZABETHAN NEWSLETTER | 2012/2013

Above: Pendu Mask

dating from the 5th century BC right up to the present day. Unlike other western countries Britain does not have a museum or gallery solely dedicated to the collection of African art, so it was particularly rewarding to be able to travel to Belgium and discover Ife – a medieval city state that flourished from the 12th to 15th centuries in Africa. It is believed that the Kingdom of Ife, located in modern day southern Nigeria, evolved out of the Nok culture as stylistic similarities are evident within the artworks – most notably in the adoption of the head as a popular motif to sculpt. The Head of Ife is a little smaller than life-size, and made of brass, which has now darkened with age. The shape of the face is an elegant oval, covered with finely incised vertical lines, but it’s a facial scarring so perfectly symmetrical that it contains rather than disturbs the features. It has been compared to the finest naturalism of Verrocchio and is so unlike the ‘primitive’ artworks that European artists had stumbled across in the early part of the 20th century as the Pendu Mask seen within Picasso’s Les Demoiselles D’Avignon.

Although the primary purpose of my trip was to visit the RMCA, I took advantage of being in Brussels during the biennial Flower Carpet held at the Grand Place. It was very topical given that this year’s display was inspired by patterns found on African clothing, in particular patterns from Congo, Botswana, Ethiopia and Nigeria. The artistic skill and expertise required to produce the display was outstanding – a parallel to the sculptures on display at the museum. The sophisticated craftsmanship required to produce the sculptures of Ife was once considered to be impossible to have been at the hands of African artists and it was thought that the artworks were the product of

Greek sculptors, providing evidence for the lost island of Atlantis which had sunk off the coast of Nigeria! From an overnight coach in Victoria into the heart of a great diverse city, my visit to the Royal Museum of Central Africa was an enlightening experience into the depths of a highly complex and interesting continent. Whilst enjoying some of the sights of Brussels I could not help but indulge in the delicacies of Belgian cuisine such as frites in a cone and a strawberry and cream waffle. I had never experienced so much culture in a period of twenty-four hours!

‘

Encased within a Perspex box, the head of Lajuwa from Nok in south-eastern Nigeria appears to hover between flesh and stone.

Left: Belgian Waffles

THE ELIZABETHAN NEWSLETTER | 2012/2013 | 71


‘

Shanghai itself is a throbbing metropolis, with the people completely obsessed with gaining wealth, understandably given the poverty of the slums.

Neville Walton Travel / Cultural Award Winner’s Report

Beijing, Hong Kong, Shanghai and Areas beyond Normal Tourism

look Indian, replete with fearsome expressions and multiple arms. Yonghe temple (built in the 17th century) in Beijing, the largest in China outside of Tibet, shows temples were used to try to unify different cultures within the country, as inscriptions are pointedly made in four languages, Mandarin, Manchu, Mongolian and Tibetan.

by Harry Winter (GG, 2007–12) China and its growing international assertiveness is a theme frequently written about by columnists and authors. Intrigued by this nation of which many westerners and, certainly, I had little detailed information or experience, I set out last August trying to move beyond my vague conception of oriental mystery and economic strength. With this in mind, I planned a trip to China’s three main cities, Beijing, Hong Kong, and Shanghai and also to areas beyond normal tourism. I found a country that centres on cities, but has a quintessentially rural mindset stemming from the fact that almost every family has parents or grandparents originating beyond the metropolis. Outside the cities, I found limited interest or knowledge in the outside world, with China, somewhat understandably given its size, still comprising the totality of most people’s world-view. Travelling in the countryside and looking over the small houses and fields one feels little has changed for hundreds of years, and there is some truth in this: China’s development has left many behind, causing growing resentment. I wanted to have a look at the level of foreign influence on Chinese culture, whilst also trying to get some insights into what it is that unites a billion people. At a basic level, to most Chinese their nationality is defined by their Han race, with Mongolians and Tibetans crammed in on the side, a conception very different to ours. For example, the son of an Englishman and 72 | THE ELIZABETHAN NEWSLETTER | 2012/2013

Above: Hong Kong skyline

Chinese girl who had lived in China all his life and spoke fluent Chinese would not be considered Chinese. City-dwellers who have exposure to foreign culture embrace it ostensibly, frequenting western restaurants, watching western films, and for those who are rich enough, striving for western education, but simultaneously always considering such things to be non-Chinese. Hong Kong is the most foreign-influenced city in the country. One cannot but see the western luxury-goods shops on every big street, there are white faces everywhere, and materialism seems to be the predominant order of the day. Looking out from the Victoria Peak, a hill on Hong Kong Island, the towering sky-scrappers reflect the city’s status as one of the world’s financial hubs, an ever-present reminder to its people of the rewards of Mammon. I found it strange that the atmosphere was no more British than American, but it was certainly very different to the mainland. Obviously, the Cantonese language and culture is distinct from Mandarin, but there is a greater awareness of

what is happening beyond the oceans, as well as in China as a whole. Hong Kong is the only place in China where the victims of Tienanmen Square are officially remembered and lamented. Despite all this, Hong Kong shares winding back-alleys, street-food, and road-stalls with the rest of China, and there is Chinese religion in abundance. Incense fills the street from the Man Mo temple, and on Lantau, one of the outlying islands, a magnificent 90 foot bronze Buddha sits serenely atop a mountain, drawing thousands of idol-worshippers. Chinese religion itself is a mix of indigenous and foreign. Native ancestor worship, Confucianism and Taoism co-exist with foreign Buddhism in a remarkably tolerant (considering the history of religion in the West) and interlinked fashion. Incense features in all temples as offerings, and there is a common thread of civic tranquillity. All the Buddhist temples I visited were heavily Tibetan, with prayer wheels and Sanskrit lettering in abundance, a great example of foreign influences which is made even more obvious by the statues of gods which

My next stop was Shanghai, mainland China’s own Hong Kong. This was reached after a 20 hour train journey, a cultural experience in itself. People were very surprised to see foreigners using such a ‘pedestrian’ mode of transport, believing for the most part all westerners to be wildly rich and thus given to flying everywhere, but were delighted to converse in a mix of Chinese and English, and even shared their food. Getting to know and like people so far from home felt really special. I learnt that trains are very important in the Chinese psyche, standing as a symbol of their modernisation and industrialisation, with people regularly travelling vast distances to visit family. Shanghai itself is a throbbing metropolis, with the people completely obsessed with gaining wealth, understandably given the poverty of the slums. It contains fewer sites of traditional Chinese cultural interest than other places I visited, but features the beautiful French Concession, full of boutiques and colonial architecture, and the iconic Bund, the old banking centre on the waterfront. However, the financial heart of the city has moved over the river to the Pudong District where the fourth highest sky-scrapper in the world, the World Financial Centre proudly stands, symbolising China’s determination to compete financially and industrially with the West. In Shanghai as a whole however, there is little cultural competition with >> THE ELIZABETHAN NEWSLETTER | 2012/2013 | 73


‘

Shanghai itself is a throbbing metropolis, with the people completely obsessed with gaining wealth, understandably given the poverty of the slums.

Neville Walton Travel / Cultural Award Winner’s Report

Beijing, Hong Kong, Shanghai and Areas beyond Normal Tourism

look Indian, replete with fearsome expressions and multiple arms. Yonghe temple (built in the 17th century) in Beijing, the largest in China outside of Tibet, shows temples were used to try to unify different cultures within the country, as inscriptions are pointedly made in four languages, Mandarin, Manchu, Mongolian and Tibetan.

by Harry Winter (GG, 2007–12) China and its growing international assertiveness is a theme frequently written about by columnists and authors. Intrigued by this nation of which many westerners and, certainly, I had little detailed information or experience, I set out last August trying to move beyond my vague conception of oriental mystery and economic strength. With this in mind, I planned a trip to China’s three main cities, Beijing, Hong Kong, and Shanghai and also to areas beyond normal tourism. I found a country that centres on cities, but has a quintessentially rural mindset stemming from the fact that almost every family has parents or grandparents originating beyond the metropolis. Outside the cities, I found limited interest or knowledge in the outside world, with China, somewhat understandably given its size, still comprising the totality of most people’s world-view. Travelling in the countryside and looking over the small houses and fields one feels little has changed for hundreds of years, and there is some truth in this: China’s development has left many behind, causing growing resentment. I wanted to have a look at the level of foreign influence on Chinese culture, whilst also trying to get some insights into what it is that unites a billion people. At a basic level, to most Chinese their nationality is defined by their Han race, with Mongolians and Tibetans crammed in on the side, a conception very different to ours. For example, the son of an Englishman and 72 | THE ELIZABETHAN NEWSLETTER | 2012/2013

Above: Hong Kong skyline

Chinese girl who had lived in China all his life and spoke fluent Chinese would not be considered Chinese. City-dwellers who have exposure to foreign culture embrace it ostensibly, frequenting western restaurants, watching western films, and for those who are rich enough, striving for western education, but simultaneously always considering such things to be non-Chinese. Hong Kong is the most foreign-influenced city in the country. One cannot but see the western luxury-goods shops on every big street, there are white faces everywhere, and materialism seems to be the predominant order of the day. Looking out from the Victoria Peak, a hill on Hong Kong Island, the towering sky-scrappers reflect the city’s status as one of the world’s financial hubs, an ever-present reminder to its people of the rewards of Mammon. I found it strange that the atmosphere was no more British than American, but it was certainly very different to the mainland. Obviously, the Cantonese language and culture is distinct from Mandarin, but there is a greater awareness of

what is happening beyond the oceans, as well as in China as a whole. Hong Kong is the only place in China where the victims of Tienanmen Square are officially remembered and lamented. Despite all this, Hong Kong shares winding back-alleys, street-food, and road-stalls with the rest of China, and there is Chinese religion in abundance. Incense fills the street from the Man Mo temple, and on Lantau, one of the outlying islands, a magnificent 90 foot bronze Buddha sits serenely atop a mountain, drawing thousands of idol-worshippers. Chinese religion itself is a mix of indigenous and foreign. Native ancestor worship, Confucianism and Taoism co-exist with foreign Buddhism in a remarkably tolerant (considering the history of religion in the West) and interlinked fashion. Incense features in all temples as offerings, and there is a common thread of civic tranquillity. All the Buddhist temples I visited were heavily Tibetan, with prayer wheels and Sanskrit lettering in abundance, a great example of foreign influences which is made even more obvious by the statues of gods which

My next stop was Shanghai, mainland China’s own Hong Kong. This was reached after a 20 hour train journey, a cultural experience in itself. People were very surprised to see foreigners using such a ‘pedestrian’ mode of transport, believing for the most part all westerners to be wildly rich and thus given to flying everywhere, but were delighted to converse in a mix of Chinese and English, and even shared their food. Getting to know and like people so far from home felt really special. I learnt that trains are very important in the Chinese psyche, standing as a symbol of their modernisation and industrialisation, with people regularly travelling vast distances to visit family. Shanghai itself is a throbbing metropolis, with the people completely obsessed with gaining wealth, understandably given the poverty of the slums. It contains fewer sites of traditional Chinese cultural interest than other places I visited, but features the beautiful French Concession, full of boutiques and colonial architecture, and the iconic Bund, the old banking centre on the waterfront. However, the financial heart of the city has moved over the river to the Pudong District where the fourth highest sky-scrapper in the world, the World Financial Centre proudly stands, symbolising China’s determination to compete financially and industrially with the West. In Shanghai as a whole however, there is little cultural competition with >> THE ELIZABETHAN NEWSLETTER | 2012/2013 | 73


Above: Mongol Plains

>> the West,

with western art galleries and music predominating. The principal difference with America in the materialistic culture would seem to be that in Shanghai the rich are even richer and the poor are even poorer – there is a local proverb that the city is ‘heaven for the rich, hell for the poor’, which is a rather nice aphorism for the much-vaunted “Capitalism with Chinese Characteristics”. Leaving Shanghai, I proceeded north-west, into the province of Gansu, which is over a thousand kilometres inland, and used to form part of the Silk Road. Here I found a true taste of rural Chinese life and culture. What surprised me most was the fact that every small town had a huge construction site just outside where hundreds of new flats were being built: I had expected to find this in the metropoleis, but it was a shock to realise the extent of China’s construction boom. In the small towns of this province, meals could be had for ten pence, and once or twice I was even invited in for food from friendly locals! People were generally happy to talk, but expressed little interest in the world beyond their borders, considering the presence of a foreigner an amusing novelty rather than an opportunity to learn. When questioned about democracy, China’s increasingly belligerent territorial claims in the South China Sea, and corruption, I soon realised that few were well-informed on these matters and

74 | THE ELIZABETHAN NEWSLETTER | 2012/2013

even fewer were willing to talk about it. One particularly strange feature of Chinese life to a western perspective is the mass organised exercise, with compulsory morning exercise (jumping up and down a bit, nothing truly taxing) in schools, and early morning Tai Chi being practised in small squares. The views and rights of the individual, prized by our societies, are comparatively less important, and the penchant for uniformity enshrines this. I likewise saw some elements of uniformity in Han culture, which although being very rich, nevertheless feels quite uniform over vast geographical distances. Hohhot, my next destination and the provincial capital of Inner Mongolia, was very different. Mongolian rather than Chinese could be heard in the street, and life felt more relaxed than in hectic Shanghai. Islam was in evidence, but with a Chinese twist; the Great Mosque had Chinese style roofs, even on the minaret! I was intrigued to learn that Genghis Khan was venerated almost as a god, but I suppose that chimes with seeing the enormous Mausoleum to Mao in Beijing. A real highlight of the whole trip was going out to the Steppe, a few hours’ bus journey beyond the city. The flatness strikes one, but it is the vast blue sky that really takes the breath away. The enormity of it is incredible, and it explains the traditional Mongol belief in the god Munkh Khukh

Above: Summer Palace

‘

It is the vast blue sky that really takes the breath away. The enormity of it is incredible, and it explains the traditional Mongol belief in the god Munkh Khukh Tengri, or Eternal Blue Sky.

Tengri, or Eternal Blue Sky. I was lucky enough to be able to go riding across the grassland and learnt about a few differences in Mongolian equestrianism, such as their horses having variant gaits and riders wearing special boots and socks to allow them to fall off without risking breaking their ankles. Some people lament the government-mandated loss of the nomadic way of life, but are understandably reluctant to talk about separatism given the government’s distinct lack of a sense of humour regarding such matters. I only managed to skim the surface of the Mongolian area, but it was a fascinating counterpart to Han culture – the lamb kebabs were amazing too! At last I arrived in Beijing, whose very name signifies its importance, meaning as it does Northern Capital. Here I found an inspiring mix of grandeur and local atmosphere, with a plethora of historic sites. My favourite was the Summer Palace, with an unforgettable vista

over the Kunming Lake to the hills, where the Imperial Court would be held when the centre of Beijing became too stifling. However, the most magnificent site of all was the Forbidden City, an enormous palace complex lying just beyond Tienanmen Square. To walk where emperors trod for hundreds of years, see their thrones, and admire the classical architecture (all red, as the colour signifies happiness and success which is rather helpful for the Communist Party), was a great experience. Of course, one cannot go to Beijing without travelling up to the Great Wall, but, determined to avoid the restoration and tourist-friendly spots, I opted to stay overnight at a tiny village called Xiangshuihu, which had an almost deserted and untouched section of wall very near it. Though the Wall is spectacular, it was not hugely successful – as Genghis Khan remarked “the strength of a wall depends on the bravery of those who defend it”. Overall this trip really opened up my eyes to a culture that no longer feels so alien. The different threads of classical Chinese culture and religion, the minorities on its borders, and centuries of western influence come together to create a fascinating whole with which I have been privileged to become slightly acquainted. I should like to thank the Elizabethan Club and the Walton family for allowing me to have this wonderful opportunity. THE ELIZABETHAN NEWSLETTER | 2012/2013 | 75


Above: Mongol Plains

>> the West,

with western art galleries and music predominating. The principal difference with America in the materialistic culture would seem to be that in Shanghai the rich are even richer and the poor are even poorer – there is a local proverb that the city is ‘heaven for the rich, hell for the poor’, which is a rather nice aphorism for the much-vaunted “Capitalism with Chinese Characteristics”. Leaving Shanghai, I proceeded north-west, into the province of Gansu, which is over a thousand kilometres inland, and used to form part of the Silk Road. Here I found a true taste of rural Chinese life and culture. What surprised me most was the fact that every small town had a huge construction site just outside where hundreds of new flats were being built: I had expected to find this in the metropoleis, but it was a shock to realise the extent of China’s construction boom. In the small towns of this province, meals could be had for ten pence, and once or twice I was even invited in for food from friendly locals! People were generally happy to talk, but expressed little interest in the world beyond their borders, considering the presence of a foreigner an amusing novelty rather than an opportunity to learn. When questioned about democracy, China’s increasingly belligerent territorial claims in the South China Sea, and corruption, I soon realised that few were well-informed on these matters and

74 | THE ELIZABETHAN NEWSLETTER | 2012/2013

even fewer were willing to talk about it. One particularly strange feature of Chinese life to a western perspective is the mass organised exercise, with compulsory morning exercise (jumping up and down a bit, nothing truly taxing) in schools, and early morning Tai Chi being practised in small squares. The views and rights of the individual, prized by our societies, are comparatively less important, and the penchant for uniformity enshrines this. I likewise saw some elements of uniformity in Han culture, which although being very rich, nevertheless feels quite uniform over vast geographical distances. Hohhot, my next destination and the provincial capital of Inner Mongolia, was very different. Mongolian rather than Chinese could be heard in the street, and life felt more relaxed than in hectic Shanghai. Islam was in evidence, but with a Chinese twist; the Great Mosque had Chinese style roofs, even on the minaret! I was intrigued to learn that Genghis Khan was venerated almost as a god, but I suppose that chimes with seeing the enormous Mausoleum to Mao in Beijing. A real highlight of the whole trip was going out to the Steppe, a few hours’ bus journey beyond the city. The flatness strikes one, but it is the vast blue sky that really takes the breath away. The enormity of it is incredible, and it explains the traditional Mongol belief in the god Munkh Khukh

Above: Summer Palace

‘

It is the vast blue sky that really takes the breath away. The enormity of it is incredible, and it explains the traditional Mongol belief in the god Munkh Khukh Tengri, or Eternal Blue Sky.

Tengri, or Eternal Blue Sky. I was lucky enough to be able to go riding across the grassland and learnt about a few differences in Mongolian equestrianism, such as their horses having variant gaits and riders wearing special boots and socks to allow them to fall off without risking breaking their ankles. Some people lament the government-mandated loss of the nomadic way of life, but are understandably reluctant to talk about separatism given the government’s distinct lack of a sense of humour regarding such matters. I only managed to skim the surface of the Mongolian area, but it was a fascinating counterpart to Han culture – the lamb kebabs were amazing too! At last I arrived in Beijing, whose very name signifies its importance, meaning as it does Northern Capital. Here I found an inspiring mix of grandeur and local atmosphere, with a plethora of historic sites. My favourite was the Summer Palace, with an unforgettable vista

over the Kunming Lake to the hills, where the Imperial Court would be held when the centre of Beijing became too stifling. However, the most magnificent site of all was the Forbidden City, an enormous palace complex lying just beyond Tienanmen Square. To walk where emperors trod for hundreds of years, see their thrones, and admire the classical architecture (all red, as the colour signifies happiness and success which is rather helpful for the Communist Party), was a great experience. Of course, one cannot go to Beijing without travelling up to the Great Wall, but, determined to avoid the restoration and tourist-friendly spots, I opted to stay overnight at a tiny village called Xiangshuihu, which had an almost deserted and untouched section of wall very near it. Though the Wall is spectacular, it was not hugely successful – as Genghis Khan remarked “the strength of a wall depends on the bravery of those who defend it”. Overall this trip really opened up my eyes to a culture that no longer feels so alien. The different threads of classical Chinese culture and religion, the minorities on its borders, and centuries of western influence come together to create a fascinating whole with which I have been privileged to become slightly acquainted. I should like to thank the Elizabethan Club and the Walton family for allowing me to have this wonderful opportunity. THE ELIZABETHAN NEWSLETTER | 2012/2013 | 75


Left: Olympic display Below: Photograph, from The Elizabethan, 1948 of David Secker-Walker coxing the men’s pair

From the Archives by Elizabeth Wells Westminster School Archivist

has been displayed to pupils and at some OW events. David Secker-Walker (KS, 1945–50) sent in his recollections of coxing the men’s pair in the 1948 London Games. In the excerpt below he recalls encountering some difficulties following his selection:

Reel History

It is hard to believe that a year has passed since the Reel History Film Screening I organised at the School in November 2011. The event was a great success and I was delighted that we had such a diverse audience drawn from alumni, staff, pupils and the broader Westminster Community. There are still some films which require digitisation and plans are in train to hold another screening in 2013. Please keep an eye out for an announcement in the e:liz@ e-newsletter with more information. For those unable to attend the screening, all the films shown are now available to view online via the School’s YouTube Channel at http:// www.youtube.com/user/WestminsterSchoolUK Copies are also available to purchase on DVD at a cost of £5 per film. For more information or to receive an order form please contact the Archivist at the address below. Archives Online In my article last year I published some excerpts of a recent acquisition, Lawrence Tanner���s school boy journals from 1908–9. Following a well-received serialisation of the journal on the School’s intranet in 2011–2012, this year I have made the journal publically available in ‘blog’ format. If you have not yet had a chance to take a look, please visit ‘Journal of a Westminster School Boy’ http://tanner.westminster.org.uk. Another online initiative has been to publish sections of the Edward Lear and Charles Church Greek Diaries, described in my last article. The text, drawn from a typescript held in the School Archive, has been illustrated with some of Lear’s drawings and paintings made whilst travelling. These artworks, now scattered across the world in public and private collections, have been reunited, virtually, for the first time. To view the diary, images and learn more about the project visit: http://edwardlear.westminster.org.uk 76 | THE ELIZABETHAN NEWSLETTER | 2012/2013

Olympics

‘

Thank you to all those who have been in touch on the subject of OW Olympians. A small exhibition, including an OW Medal Table,

“Alarmingly, I began to grow. I had always been small for my age and particularly so in my teens, when others were growing. Hence the job as one of the Westminster School coxes. But this was the one moment when I needed to be small. Either the Olympic rules imposed a limit on the weight of coxes or my two fellows were anxious not to have to haul an extra ounce over the course. I can’t remember which. For my part, at a time when rationing was not yet finally ended, I suddenly had food galore (was there some dispensation for Olympic teams?) Anyhow I tucked in and began putting on weight and height. As a result, I was weighed each morning and told by my coach and crew to eat less.” >>

To view the journal visit: http://tanner.westminster.org.uk

>> THE ELIZABETHAN NEWSLETTER | 2012/2013 | 77


Left: Olympic display Below: Photograph, from The Elizabethan, 1948 of David Secker-Walker coxing the men’s pair

From the Archives by Elizabeth Wells Westminster School Archivist

has been displayed to pupils and at some OW events. David Secker-Walker (KS, 1945–50) sent in his recollections of coxing the men’s pair in the 1948 London Games. In the excerpt below he recalls encountering some difficulties following his selection:

Reel History

It is hard to believe that a year has passed since the Reel History Film Screening I organised at the School in November 2011. The event was a great success and I was delighted that we had such a diverse audience drawn from alumni, staff, pupils and the broader Westminster Community. There are still some films which require digitisation and plans are in train to hold another screening in 2013. Please keep an eye out for an announcement in the e:liz@ e-newsletter with more information. For those unable to attend the screening, all the films shown are now available to view online via the School’s YouTube Channel at http:// www.youtube.com/user/WestminsterSchoolUK Copies are also available to purchase on DVD at a cost of £5 per film. For more information or to receive an order form please contact the Archivist at the address below. Archives Online In my article last year I published some excerpts of a recent acquisition, Lawrence Tanner’s school boy journals from 1908–9. Following a well-received serialisation of the journal on the School’s intranet in 2011–2012, this year I have made the journal publically available in ‘blog’ format. If you have not yet had a chance to take a look, please visit ‘Journal of a Westminster School Boy’ http://tanner.westminster.org.uk. Another online initiative has been to publish sections of the Edward Lear and Charles Church Greek Diaries, described in my last article. The text, drawn from a typescript held in the School Archive, has been illustrated with some of Lear’s drawings and paintings made whilst travelling. These artworks, now scattered across the world in public and private collections, have been reunited, virtually, for the first time. To view the diary, images and learn more about the project visit: http://edwardlear.westminster.org.uk 76 | THE ELIZABETHAN NEWSLETTER | 2012/2013

Olympics

‘

Thank you to all those who have been in touch on the subject of OW Olympians. A small exhibition, including an OW Medal Table,

“Alarmingly, I began to grow. I had always been small for my age and particularly so in my teens, when others were growing. Hence the job as one of the Westminster School coxes. But this was the one moment when I needed to be small. Either the Olympic rules imposed a limit on the weight of coxes or my two fellows were anxious not to have to haul an extra ounce over the course. I can’t remember which. For my part, at a time when rationing was not yet finally ended, I suddenly had food galore (was there some dispensation for Olympic teams?) Anyhow I tucked in and began putting on weight and height. As a result, I was weighed each morning and told by my coach and crew to eat less.” >>

To view the journal visit: http://tanner.westminster.org.uk

>> THE ELIZABETHAN NEWSLETTER | 2012/2013 | 77


Above: Stephen Lushington, with Liddell’s House, 1961 Above: A selection of magazines from a generous donation by Alexander Carswell (RR, 1963–67)

Oral History

Left: Under School pupils enjoying an art lesson in the early 1960s

Oral History is a growing part of the School’s collections. Interviews with departing teachers and OWW, Gavin Griffiths (WW, 1967–72) and Andrew Johnson (LL, 1987–92) have recently been recorded. I also had the great privilege to interview Stephen Lushington at the beginning of the summer, shortly before his death at the age of 95. Many OWW will remember Lushington who taught English at Westminster between 1946–64 and was Housemaster of Wren’s and the newly created Liddell’s. The recording provides a fascinating insight into the life of a master at Westminster after the war, with particular focus on Lushington’s interest in directing School plays. Thanks to the positive response to my call for OW volunteers I now have a team of interviewers to undertake further recordings.

labelled. Seeing a photograph of an ancestor, or research subject, is often the highlight of a visit to the School Archives and it is frustrating when we are unable to identify the correct face in the crowd. In order to combat this problem we have teamed up with the Development Office to make a selection of these photographs available on www.oldwestminster.org.uk. Do log on and see if you can spot yourself, or your friends and contemporaries in any of the photographs. Every individual has been numbered so it will be easy to submit your notes to be added to our catalogues.

The Under School

2013 is an important year for the Under School as the anniversary of its formal foundation in 1943 and of PJ Campbell’s appointment as Master ten years later. Sadly, the Under School does not feature prominently in the School’s archival records. This lack of documentary evidence is probably largely due to the number of times the Under School has changed its accommodation; records are often lost or destroyed during a move. We are working to draw together what remains of the Under School’s Archive and ensure material is collected in the future. If you have any items from your time at the Under School which you would be happy 78 | THE ELIZABETHAN NEWSLETTER | 2012/2013

Thanks

to donate to the Archives please do not hesitate to get in touch. How you can help...

We received an excellent response to our request for names of the individuals in a photograph taken in Ashburnham Garden in 1963. Unfortunately, this image was the tip of the iceberg, as many of the School, House and team photographs in the collections have not been

‘

Seeing a photograph of an ancestor, or research subject, is often the highlight of a visit to the School Archives.

I would like to take this opportunity to thank all OWW who have donated time, reminiscences and archival material to the School over the past year. It is always a pleasure to receive something new to add to the collections, which are being used by increasing numbers of researchers both within and outside of the School. Please keep the donations coming! Elizabeth Wells, Archivist archives@westminster.org.uk 020 7963 1110 THE ELIZABETHAN NEWSLETTER | 2012/2013 | 79


Above: Stephen Lushington, with Liddell’s House, 1961 Above: A selection of magazines from a generous donation by Alexander Carswell (RR, 1963–67)

Oral History

Left: Under School pupils enjoying an art lesson in the early 1960s

Oral History is a growing part of the School’s collections. Interviews with departing teachers and OWW, Gavin Griffiths (WW, 1967–72) and Andrew Johnson (LL, 1987–92) have recently been recorded. I also had the great privilege to interview Stephen Lushington at the beginning of the summer, shortly before his death at the age of 95. Many OWW will remember Lushington who taught English at Westminster between 1946–64 and was Housemaster of Wren’s and the newly created Liddell’s. The recording provides a fascinating insight into the life of a master at Westminster after the war, with particular focus on Lushington’s interest in directing School plays. Thanks to the positive response to my call for OW volunteers I now have a team of interviewers to undertake further recordings.

labelled. Seeing a photograph of an ancestor, or research subject, is often the highlight of a visit to the School Archives and it is frustrating when we are unable to identify the correct face in the crowd. In order to combat this problem we have teamed up with the Development Office to make a selection of these photographs available on www.oldwestminster.org.uk. Do log on and see if you can spot yourself, or your friends and contemporaries in any of the photographs. Every individual has been numbered so it will be easy to submit your notes to be added to our catalogues.

The Under School

2013 is an important year for the Under School as the anniversary of its formal foundation in 1943 and of PJ Campbell’s appointment as Master ten years later. Sadly, the Under School does not feature prominently in the School’s archival records. This lack of documentary evidence is probably largely due to the number of times the Under School has changed its accommodation; records are often lost or destroyed during a move. We are working to draw together what remains of the Under School’s Archive and ensure material is collected in the future. If you have any items from your time at the Under School which you would be happy 78 | THE ELIZABETHAN NEWSLETTER | 2012/2013

Thanks

to donate to the Archives please do not hesitate to get in touch. How you can help...

We received an excellent response to our request for names of the individuals in a photograph taken in Ashburnham Garden in 1963. Unfortunately, this image was the tip of the iceberg, as many of the School, House and team photographs in the collections have not been

‘

Seeing a photograph of an ancestor, or research subject, is often the highlight of a visit to the School Archives.

I would like to take this opportunity to thank all OWW who have donated time, reminiscences and archival material to the School over the past year. It is always a pleasure to receive something new to add to the collections, which are being used by increasing numbers of researchers both within and outside of the School. Please keep the donations coming! Elizabeth Wells, Archivist archives@westminster.org.uk 020 7963 1110 THE ELIZABETHAN NEWSLETTER | 2012/2013 | 79


OW NEWS Get in touch If you have any news you would like to share with your contemporaries, please send details to the Editor: The Elizabethan Newsletter The Development Office 17a Dean’s Yard, London SW1P 3PB E: alumni@westminster.org.uk T: 020 7963 1115


OW NEWS Get in touch If you have any news you would like to share with your contemporaries, please send details to the Editor: The Elizabethan Newsletter The Development Office 17a Dean’s Yard, London SW1P 3PB E: alumni@westminster.org.uk T: 020 7963 1115


Left: The 2012 Young Gaudy. Photo by James Sakal (GG, 1997–2002)

Report from the Head of Alumni Relations Report by Katharine Robinson Head of Alumni Relations

Gaudy. We had more than double the number of attendees compared to the year before which was incredible. The 1960s Decade Gaudy was another highlight and reports of both these events may be found on pages 40 and 46. If you wanted to attend the Young Gaudy but couldn’t make it do have a look at page 87 to see who was there.

It feels good to have a year at Westminster under my belt. The experience acquired from having seen most OW and School events happen is hugely valuable and trying to make improvements for the 2012/13 academic year knowing how the events went last time is an exciting prospect. As always, feedback is most welcome if you attended an event over 2011/12 (there are plenty of pictures on pages 29–51 to jog your memory if needed) or, if you didn’t attend an event please let us know why and what might tempt you to come back in future! As 2012 was a Big Commem year I can even say that I’ve seen this event. The atmosphere in the Abbey and afterwards was really special and it was great to catch up with the OWW who had been lucky enough to get tickets. Having now attended Commem I can add some experience of Westminster Latin to the list though I think it’ll take quite a few more Commems before I get to anywhere near an acceptable standard! As always, we make every effort to make sure as many OWW as possible are accommodated at School events like Big Commem and the Carol Service but, as I am sure you will understand, pupils and parents must take priority as they would have done when you were at the School. As it’s our aim to communicate with OWW in the most efficient way possible you’ll notice that we will start to advertise our most popular events in the e:liz@ e-newsletter only rather than sending out an additional email invitation. The e:liz@ will list the time and date booking opens then it’s up to those who want tickets to get on the website and book! If you do not have access to email, the events calendar on the inside front cover of this magazine gives you an idea of the year ahead so do contact us by post if special arrangements are needed. 82 | THE ELIZABETHAN NEWSLETTER | 2012/2013

‘

It was wonderful to see such a huge crowd of OWW at the Young Gaudy. We had more than double the number of attendees compared to the year before which was incredible.

In my last report I mentioned that I was keen to organise more events for OWW based overseas as increasing numbers of OWW relocate for family or work. I am thrilled to report that we held our first ‘Commem Worldwide’ event to coincide with Big Commem on 16th November 2012. Gatherings were organised in 11 locations and nearly 100 OWW signed-up to attend. Seeing the pictures of OWW meeting up overseas was one of my personal highlights of the year – we’ve printed these along with a report on page 34. Back in London it was wonderful to see such a huge crowd of OWW at the 2012 Young

The 2012 Young Gaudy also caused a surge of interest in our Careers and Mentoring programme which went from strength to strength over 2011/12 and continues to be extremely popular. Being in touch with mentors who have given up their time to help OWW – and being in touch with OWW at university and those seeking a career change has been hugely rewarding. A full report including comments from some of our mentors can be viewed on page 84–85. It was great to meet the 2012 Leavers at the reception after the Leavers’ Service back in June 2012. Leavers’ Packs were extremely popular and Leavers’ Forms enabled Leavers to update us with their email addresses and contribute to our special Leavers page in this magazine which may be viewed on page 86. Our Linked In group also continues to be a great way of promoting events without an extra email – it’s also where you can get in touch with other OWW, promote your own business news, find snippets from the archives and have access to other School publications that we cannot advertise to the larger OW email list. Do join up if you have not done so already – just search for the group ‘Westminster School – OWW Online’ on Linked In. It was a great pleasure to meet so many OWW at events over the 2011/12 academic year and I look forward to seeing many more of you over 2012/13! THE ELIZABETHAN NEWSLETTER | 2012/2013 | 83


Left: The 2012 Young Gaudy. Photo by James Sakal (GG, 1997–2002)

Report from the Head of Alumni Relations Report by Katharine Robinson Head of Alumni Relations

Gaudy. We had more than double the number of attendees compared to the year before which was incredible. The 1960s Decade Gaudy was another highlight and reports of both these events may be found on pages 40 and 46. If you wanted to attend the Young Gaudy but couldn’t make it do have a look at page 87 to see who was there.

It feels good to have a year at Westminster under my belt. The experience acquired from having seen most OW and School events happen is hugely valuable and trying to make improvements for the 2012/13 academic year knowing how the events went last time is an exciting prospect. As always, feedback is most welcome if you attended an event over 2011/12 (there are plenty of pictures on pages 29–51 to jog your memory if needed) or, if you didn’t attend an event please let us know why and what might tempt you to come back in future! As 2012 was a Big Commem year I can even say that I’ve seen this event. The atmosphere in the Abbey and afterwards was really special and it was great to catch up with the OWW who had been lucky enough to get tickets. Having now attended Commem I can add some experience of Westminster Latin to the list though I think it’ll take quite a few more Commems before I get to anywhere near an acceptable standard! As always, we make every effort to make sure as many OWW as possible are accommodated at School events like Big Commem and the Carol Service but, as I am sure you will understand, pupils and parents must take priority as they would have done when you were at the School. As it’s our aim to communicate with OWW in the most efficient way possible you’ll notice that we will start to advertise our most popular events in the e:liz@ e-newsletter only rather than sending out an additional email invitation. The e:liz@ will list the time and date booking opens then it’s up to those who want tickets to get on the website and book! If you do not have access to email, the events calendar on the inside front cover of this magazine gives you an idea of the year ahead so do contact us by post if special arrangements are needed. 82 | THE ELIZABETHAN NEWSLETTER | 2012/2013

‘

It was wonderful to see such a huge crowd of OWW at the Young Gaudy. We had more than double the number of attendees compared to the year before which was incredible.

In my last report I mentioned that I was keen to organise more events for OWW based overseas as increasing numbers of OWW relocate for family or work. I am thrilled to report that we held our first ‘Commem Worldwide’ event to coincide with Big Commem on 16th November 2012. Gatherings were organised in 11 locations and nearly 100 OWW signed-up to attend. Seeing the pictures of OWW meeting up overseas was one of my personal highlights of the year – we’ve printed these along with a report on page 34. Back in London it was wonderful to see such a huge crowd of OWW at the 2012 Young

The 2012 Young Gaudy also caused a surge of interest in our Careers and Mentoring programme which went from strength to strength over 2011/12 and continues to be extremely popular. Being in touch with mentors who have given up their time to help OWW – and being in touch with OWW at university and those seeking a career change has been hugely rewarding. A full report including comments from some of our mentors can be viewed on page 84–85. It was great to meet the 2012 Leavers at the reception after the Leavers’ Service back in June 2012. Leavers’ Packs were extremely popular and Leavers’ Forms enabled Leavers to update us with their email addresses and contribute to our special Leavers page in this magazine which may be viewed on page 86. Our Linked In group also continues to be a great way of promoting events without an extra email – it’s also where you can get in touch with other OWW, promote your own business news, find snippets from the archives and have access to other School publications that we cannot advertise to the larger OW email list. Do join up if you have not done so already – just search for the group ‘Westminster School – OWW Online’ on Linked In. It was a great pleasure to meet so many OWW at events over the 2011/12 academic year and I look forward to seeing many more of you over 2012/13! THE ELIZABETHAN NEWSLETTER | 2012/2013 | 83


Left: Alessia de Quincey (MM, 2005–07) and Martine Sobey (LL, 2002–04) at the 2012 OW Women’s Network Mentoring Evening

‘

I have benefitted from the variety in the OW network and the willingness of mentors to take time out to discuss plans for the future with fellow OWW.

OW Careers and Mentoring Report by Katharine Robinson Head of Alumni Relations The OW Careers and Mentoring Programme launched last year and, at last count, 105 OWW had volunteered their services to help recent Leavers and OWW seeking a career change. So far 70 mentors have been in touch with 40 ‘mentees’ (mentees are often matched with more than one mentor) and the feedback has been wonderful. A recent surge of interest from the Young Gaudy and the 2012 Leavers’ Forms have resulted in more OWW than ever before seeking and finding guidance on careers. A few OWW have been kind enough to write about their experiences below. We are always looking for new mentors so please email the Development Office if you would be willing to be involved. Anyone looking to find a mentor should also contact the Development Office – it would be great to see the numbers involved increase further over 2012/13.

‘

It is rejuvenating as well as rewarding to meet OWW who have left recently, not least the sheer variety of characters whom I meet... Every meeting leaves me glad to have volunteered.

Daniel de Lisle (BB, 2007–12) “I didn’t know if I’d be taking a Gap Year when I left School, and when I finally decided, the next thirteen months were worryingly blank. Filling out the Leavers’ Form and Katharine Robinson’s great work in putting me in touch with Westminster mentors was really helpful in giving my year out some direction, so I can go to university with a clearer idea of what I want to spend my 80,000 hour career actually doing. The advice I got was really well balanced, and however enthusiastic the OWW were for their professions, they could see that they weren’t for everyone. I even got the opportunity to try out a law mini-pupillage in January, so I’d say that OWW generosity more than matches their enthusiasm.” Christian Wells (BB, 1968–73) “Over the years I have been a mentor, I have met about a dozen OWW, more of them recently than at the start. I offered to be a men84 | THE ELIZABETHAN NEWSLETTER | 2012/2013

Above: Madalyn Brooks (WW, 1978–81) and Ophelia Field (LL, 1987–89) at the 2012 OW Women's Network Mentoring Evening

tor because, when I was leaving Westminster, I found the views and experience of older people helpful in making my mind up about a choice of career. While I am not sure how much benefit my own experiences and conclusions will be to those leaving School or university, I can at least act as a sounding board, free of family or (recent) school conditioning. It is rejuvenating as well as rewarding to meet OWW who have left recently, not least the sheer variety of characters whom I meet, though all seem formidably bright. Some have great plans but need a spark or two, others have great potential but need a harness for it, and some have a mixture of both – the spectrum is wide. Every meeting leaves me glad to have volunteered.” Jade Jackman (PP, 2010–12) “University is a strange hybrid between Westminster and ‘real’ life. Amidst the novelty of freedom lurks the dull pressure of adulthood, and with that the question of “what next” after education. But these concerns have been softened by the advice and support supplied by OW mentors. One may extrapolate from my chosen degree, law and anthropology, that my career prospects are fairly diverse. However, I have benefitted from the variety in the OW network and the willingness of mentors to take time out to discuss plans for the future with fellow OWW.”

Martin Sherwood (WW, 1957–62) “I have met about 8–10 OWW over the last year. What have they got out of it? An objective, fresh appraisal of them as a potential job candidate. How do they present (in writing, verbally, visually)? How well prepared? Would I hire them? If not, why not? I give them one hour and the chance to come back for another hour in 3 months on condition they have made progress in the meantime. The standard of OWW is incredibly high – I wish I had been that focused and “together” when I was that age!” Alex Leese (DD, 2002–07) “I chose to use the OW Mentoring Scheme when I was beginning to change my mind about my career path, as I felt that I could greatly benefit from the advice of people who had enjoyed successful careers. I met with several OWW over the course of a few months, all of whom worked in different areas, and all of whom provided different pieces of advice and guidance, ranging from offers of work experience to practical ways that I could improve my employability in my chosen field. It has been such a privilege to be able to speak to these people and I am so grateful for all their help.” Louis Florentin-Lee (HH, 1988–93) “I joined the mentoring programme this year and have thoroughly enjoyed it. The Old Westminsters I have met have come prepared to the best of their abilities as well as being openminded and enthusiastic in their approach to starting their careers. For me it has been an interesting challenge. Moreover it has allowed me to evaluate the characteristics that I would look for in hiring someone.” THE ELIZABETHAN NEWSLETTER | 2012/2013 | 85


Left: Alessia de Quincey (MM, 2005–07) and Martine Sobey (LL, 2002–04) at the 2012 OW Women’s Network Mentoring Evening

‘

I have benefitted from the variety in the OW network and the willingness of mentors to take time out to discuss plans for the future with fellow OWW.

OW Careers and Mentoring Report by Katharine Robinson Head of Alumni Relations The OW Careers and Mentoring Programme launched last year and, at last count, 105 OWW had volunteered their services to help recent Leavers and OWW seeking a career change. So far 70 mentors have been in touch with 40 ‘mentees’ (mentees are often matched with more than one mentor) and the feedback has been wonderful. A recent surge of interest from the Young Gaudy and the 2012 Leavers’ Forms have resulted in more OWW than ever before seeking and finding guidance on careers. A few OWW have been kind enough to write about their experiences below. We are always looking for new mentors so please email the Development Office if you would be willing to be involved. Anyone looking to find a mentor should also contact the Development Office – it would be great to see the numbers involved increase further over 2012/13.

‘

It is rejuvenating as well as rewarding to meet OWW who have left recently, not least the sheer variety of characters whom I meet... Every meeting leaves me glad to have volunteered.

Daniel de Lisle (BB, 2007–12) “I didn’t know if I’d be taking a Gap Year when I left School, and when I finally decided, the next thirteen months were worryingly blank. Filling out the Leavers’ Form and Katharine Robinson’s great work in putting me in touch with Westminster mentors was really helpful in giving my year out some direction, so I can go to university with a clearer idea of what I want to spend my 80,000 hour career actually doing. The advice I got was really well balanced, and however enthusiastic the OWW were for their professions, they could see that they weren’t for everyone. I even got the opportunity to try out a law mini-pupillage in January, so I’d say that OWW generosity more than matches their enthusiasm.” Christian Wells (BB, 1968–73) “Over the years I have been a mentor, I have met about a dozen OWW, more of them recently than at the start. I offered to be a men84 | THE ELIZABETHAN NEWSLETTER | 2012/2013

Above: Madalyn Brooks (WW, 1978–81) and Ophelia Field (LL, 1987–89) at the 2012 OW Women's Network Mentoring Evening

tor because, when I was leaving Westminster, I found the views and experience of older people helpful in making my mind up about a choice of career. While I am not sure how much benefit my own experiences and conclusions will be to those leaving School or university, I can at least act as a sounding board, free of family or (recent) school conditioning. It is rejuvenating as well as rewarding to meet OWW who have left recently, not least the sheer variety of characters whom I meet, though all seem formidably bright. Some have great plans but need a spark or two, others have great potential but need a harness for it, and some have a mixture of both – the spectrum is wide. Every meeting leaves me glad to have volunteered.” Jade Jackman (PP, 2010–12) “University is a strange hybrid between Westminster and ‘real’ life. Amidst the novelty of freedom lurks the dull pressure of adulthood, and with that the question of “what next” after education. But these concerns have been softened by the advice and support supplied by OW mentors. One may extrapolate from my chosen degree, law and anthropology, that my career prospects are fairly diverse. However, I have benefitted from the variety in the OW network and the willingness of mentors to take time out to discuss plans for the future with fellow OWW.”

Martin Sherwood (WW, 1957–62) “I have met about 8–10 OWW over the last year. What have they got out of it? An objective, fresh appraisal of them as a potential job candidate. How do they present (in writing, verbally, visually)? How well prepared? Would I hire them? If not, why not? I give them one hour and the chance to come back for another hour in 3 months on condition they have made progress in the meantime. The standard of OWW is incredibly high – I wish I had been that focused and “together” when I was that age!” Alex Leese (DD, 2002–07) “I chose to use the OW Mentoring Scheme when I was beginning to change my mind about my career path, as I felt that I could greatly benefit from the advice of people who had enjoyed successful careers. I met with several OWW over the course of a few months, all of whom worked in different areas, and all of whom provided different pieces of advice and guidance, ranging from offers of work experience to practical ways that I could improve my employability in my chosen field. It has been such a privilege to be able to speak to these people and I am so grateful for all their help.” Louis Florentin-Lee (HH, 1988–93) “I joined the mentoring programme this year and have thoroughly enjoyed it. The Old Westminsters I have met have come prepared to the best of their abilities as well as being openminded and enthusiastic in their approach to starting their careers. For me it has been an interesting challenge. Moreover it has allowed me to evaluate the characteristics that I would look for in hiring someone.” THE ELIZABETHAN NEWSLETTER | 2012/2013 | 85


2012 Leavers’ Westminster Memories

Naomi Curtis (Ashburnham, 2000–02)

Jazz concerts, Mr Bateman’s art department and weekly life drawing, beautiful and stimulating surroundings, bright people, intelligent debate.

We asked 2012 Leavers for their favourite School memory and best teacher and a selection of their answers, along with photos from the 2012 Leavers’ Service, are included below. We hope to see plenty of new OWW back at a School event soon. Ariane Moshiri (PP, 2010–12)

Best School memory: Singing Hey Jude in Latin Prayers with the whole School. Best teacher? The best teacher without a doubt is Dr Brown from the History Department because he never failed to inspire and to teach with a smile. Perhaps what made him best is also the fact it was evident that he truly cared about us as his students. Peter Hitchcock (QS, 2007–12)

Best School memory: Hey Jude at the Leavers’ Ball was sublime. Best teacher? Mr Ireland – constantly helpful interesting and fun to be around over 5 years. David Wong (QS, 2007–12)

Best School memory: Looking down into the Lady Chapel through a hole in the ceiling. Best teacher? Dr Katz – many things, including riveting lessons for 3 years, concerts and a choir trip. Sachin Gupta (WW, 2007–12)

Best teacher? Mr Ireland – one of the quirkiest teachers I’ve ever had the pleasure of being taught by.

86 | THE ELIZABETHAN NEWSLETTER | 2012/2013

Oliver Cox (Hakluyt’s, 1997–2002)

I miss the theatre and the hubbub of a crowded Yard. Bedlam. I loved it. Thomas Wrathmell (Dryden’s, 1997–2002)

Maximilian Wood (HH, 2010–12)

Best School memory: Attending Abbey twice a week. Best teacher? They were all so helpful, it would be difficult to choose one! Miranda Hall (AHH, 2010–12)

Best School memory: Singing Hey Jude in Latin Prayers. Best teacher? Mrs Cave-Bigley – incredibly supportive and passionate about English. Siddharth Amrat (AHH, 2010–12)

Best teacher? Dr Kalivas. He was funny, and went off-topic to more interesting maths a lot. Oliver Hanton (DD, 2007–12)

Best School memory: Winning National Schools’ Rowing Championships Best teacher? Dr Brown due to such a relaxed and effective teaching style and passion for history and caring about his students.

2001–2011 Leavers’ Notes We asked attendees at the 2012 Young Gaudy what they missed most about Westminster and what they are doing now. Their answers provide a snapshot of ten years’ worth of life at the School. To share your memories in the next issue of the Elizabethan Newsletter (once you’ve seen how they compare!) please email alumni@westminster.org.uk.

The fantastic people and opportunities.

Daniel Freyhan (Hakluyt’s, 1997–2002)

Football, friends, academic work with less reading! Charles Corn (Busby’s, 1998–2003)

The freedom!

William Gore-Randall (Ashburnham, 1999–2004)

Abbey access at quiet times.

Alyson Thompson (Rigaud’s, 2002–04)

What do you miss most about Westminster?

Valuing learning for its own sake, (not requiring boxes to be filled...).

Fabian Joseph (Wren’s, 1996–2001)

Sarah Alexander (Busby’s, 2003–05)

The beautiful setting which I took for granted Camilla Clark (Milne’s, 1999–2001)

The boys!

Matthew Sheldon (Wren’s, 1996–2001)

Bizarrely, lessons.

Ellie Chandler (née Seilern-Aspang) (Purcell’s, 1999–2001)

Being a carefree whippersnapper without the daily burden of real life.

Abbey, boarding, Big Ben, Busby’s, especially the view from the fire escape! Jenny Ellis Logan (Purcell’s, 2003–05)

The location and having some amazing teachers. Benjamin Shillito (Milne’s, 2000–05)

The collegiality of Little Dean’s Yard and the view of Victoria Tower at night. Frederick Krespi (Dryden’s, 2000–05)

Playing fives three times a week.

THE ELIZABETHAN NEWSLETTER | 2012/2013 | 87


2012 Leavers’ Westminster Memories

Naomi Curtis (Ashburnham, 2000–02)

Jazz concerts, Mr Bateman’s art department and weekly life drawing, beautiful and stimulating surroundings, bright people, intelligent debate.

We asked 2012 Leavers for their favourite School memory and best teacher and a selection of their answers, along with photos from the 2012 Leavers’ Service, are included below. We hope to see plenty of new OWW back at a School event soon. Ariane Moshiri (PP, 2010–12)

Best School memory: Singing Hey Jude in Latin Prayers with the whole School. Best teacher? The best teacher without a doubt is Dr Brown from the History Department because he never failed to inspire and to teach with a smile. Perhaps what made him best is also the fact it was evident that he truly cared about us as his students. Peter Hitchcock (QS, 2007–12)

Best School memory: Hey Jude at the Leavers’ Ball was sublime. Best teacher? Mr Ireland – constantly helpful interesting and fun to be around over 5 years. David Wong (QS, 2007–12)

Best School memory: Looking down into the Lady Chapel through a hole in the ceiling. Best teacher? Dr Katz – many things, including riveting lessons for 3 years, concerts and a choir trip. Sachin Gupta (WW, 2007–12)

Best teacher? Mr Ireland – one of the quirkiest teachers I’ve ever had the pleasure of being taught by.

86 | THE ELIZABETHAN NEWSLETTER | 2012/2013

Oliver Cox (Hakluyt’s, 1997–2002)

I miss the theatre and the hubbub of a crowded Yard. Bedlam. I loved it. Thomas Wrathmell (Dryden’s, 1997–2002)

Maximilian Wood (HH, 2010–12)

Best School memory: Attending Abbey twice a week. Best teacher? They were all so helpful, it would be difficult to choose one! Miranda Hall (AHH, 2010–12)

Best School memory: Singing Hey Jude in Latin Prayers. Best teacher? Mrs Cave-Bigley – incredibly supportive and passionate about English. Siddharth Amrat (AHH, 2010–12)

Best teacher? Dr Kalivas. He was funny, and went off-topic to more interesting maths a lot. Oliver Hanton (DD, 2007–12)

Best School memory: Winning National Schools’ Rowing Championships Best teacher? Dr Brown due to such a relaxed and effective teaching style and passion for history and caring about his students.

2001–2011 Leavers’ Notes We asked attendees at the 2012 Young Gaudy what they missed most about Westminster and what they are doing now. Their answers provide a snapshot of ten years’ worth of life at the School. To share your memories in the next issue of the Elizabethan Newsletter (once you’ve seen how they compare!) please email alumni@westminster.org.uk.

The fantastic people and opportunities.

Daniel Freyhan (Hakluyt’s, 1997–2002)

Football, friends, academic work with less reading! Charles Corn (Busby’s, 1998–2003)

The freedom!

William Gore-Randall (Ashburnham, 1999–2004)

Abbey access at quiet times.

Alyson Thompson (Rigaud’s, 2002–04)

What do you miss most about Westminster?

Valuing learning for its own sake, (not requiring boxes to be filled...).

Fabian Joseph (Wren’s, 1996–2001)

Sarah Alexander (Busby’s, 2003–05)

The beautiful setting which I took for granted Camilla Clark (Milne’s, 1999–2001)

The boys!

Matthew Sheldon (Wren’s, 1996–2001)

Bizarrely, lessons.

Ellie Chandler (née Seilern-Aspang) (Purcell’s, 1999–2001)

Being a carefree whippersnapper without the daily burden of real life.

Abbey, boarding, Big Ben, Busby’s, especially the view from the fire escape! Jenny Ellis Logan (Purcell’s, 2003–05)

The location and having some amazing teachers. Benjamin Shillito (Milne’s, 2000–05)

The collegiality of Little Dean’s Yard and the view of Victoria Tower at night. Frederick Krespi (Dryden’s, 2000–05)

Playing fives three times a week.

THE ELIZABETHAN NEWSLETTER | 2012/2013 | 87


Engagements, Weddings and Family News Thanks to all those who have contributed their news. If you wish to submit a note for inclusion in the next issue of the Elizabethan Newsletter please email alumni@westminster.org.uk

Maya Shinozaki (Hakluyt’s, 2003–05)

Friends, Yard, Abbey…most things!

Robin Menzel (LL, 1980–85)

Robin is engaged to Phillippa (Pip) Howeson, eldest daughter of Captain and Mrs Charles Howeson.

Sam Smith (Hakluyt’s, 2000–05)

People looking after me without me realising it. Alexa Baden-Powell (Milne’s, 2004–06)

All the weird and wonderful traditions.

Peter Cole (GG, 1993–98)

Peter married Helen Smith on Saturday, 1st September in Marylebone Parish Church; the two best men were both OWW – Alex Livingstone (GG, 1996–98) and James St Clair (GG, 1993–98).

Freddy Lyon (Ashburnham, 2001–06)

Expeditions with great friends and teachers. Leyla Osman (Rigaud’s, 2004–06)

Being part of Westminster School, an historical entity within its own right. That, and the obvious thrill of Latin Prayers.

Joshua Harris-Kirkwood (Wren's, 2007–09)

Andrew Spyrou (Liddell’s, 2001–06)

Avalon Lee-Bacon (Grant's, 2007–09)

Greek classes in the Busby Library.

The John Locke lecture series.

“My (new!) fiancé’s name is Benedict Smith and we met at a mutual friend’s wedding in Australia (even though we were contemporaries at the same university, we never met!).”

Matilda Hay (Milne’s, 2005–07)

Hayley Chapman (Dryden's, 2008–10)

People watching in Yard and tea with chocolate spread at the end of every day.

Priceless history lessons with Mr Edlin and Mr Allnatt.

Emma Thompsell (HH, 2004–06)

Oliver Kember (Busby’s, 2002–07)

Thomas Sutton (Milne's, 2005–10)

The lunches...

Edmund Knox (Liddell’s, 2002–07)

Football on Green.

Emeric Monfront (Wren’s, 2005–07)

The library.

Harry Tayler (Hakluyt’s, 2002–07)

The free thinking approach to learning and abondment of the syllabus. Chris Anguelov (Grant’s, 2003–08)

The teachers!

Jo Shuttleworth (Rigaud’s, 2003–08)

The A level classes where we could properly discuss the material and really think about what we were learning. 88 | THE ELIZABETHAN NEWSLETTER | 2012/2013

Yard football; drama; the people.

Being able to have a second breakfast when I arrived at School. Rosie Carpenter (Liddell's, 2009–11)

People excited about their subject and interests. Soojean Choi (College, 2009–11)

Frees in College Garden.

Alexander Nikolov (Hakluyt's, 2006-11)

The way it instilled in you a need for intellectual pursuit, a strong work-ethic and a powerful sense of aspiration. Adam Smith (Grant's, 2006–11)

Cricket on Vincent Square.

Dakyung Kwon (Purcell's, 2009–11)

Everything.

Romilly Collins (GG, 1996–98)

Emma recently announced her engagement to Peter Cohen. The couple met playing handball and are currently busy planning their wedding which will take place at St Stephen’s Rochester Row.

Above: Alexandra married James Thomson on Friday 8th June at All Saints, Fulham and afterwards at Fulham Palace

rock band. Our ushers also wore Bermuda shorts – the picture above was taken by Thomas Giddings (WW, 1998–2003), now a professional photographer, and includes Tristan Summerscale (QS, 1998–2003) back row, second from left). We dined and danced under a see–through marquee in the Tudor courtyard of Fulham Palace, with many OWW ending up in the fountain!”

OW Updates and Publications 1940s

John Barrington-Ward (GG, 1942–46)

OW Olympian John Barrington–Ward (yachtsman, 1952 Olympics) was profiled in an article in the Isle of Wight County Press.

Nadya Wells (née Booth) (HH, 1987–89)

is delighted to announce the arrival of Albert William Weston Wells on 13th August 2012. He joins their large team of boys to the delight of his big brothers Theodore, Oscar and Benedict. Alexandra Jackson (PP, 2001–03)

“At our wedding in Fulham on 8th June, my husband wore Bermuda shorts, as is customary in Bermuda where he grew up. Later he changed into ‘evening wear’ – a white dinner jacket with black Bermuda shorts (and the long black socks of course)! The reception was a mix of English and Bermudian – we drank Dark n’ Stormies; we had a steel drum band and then an English

1950s

Michael Jones (BB, 1949–53)

Michael published Guy de Maupassant: The Rondoli Sisters and Other Selected Short Stories (Pen Press, 2011) THE ELIZABETHAN NEWSLETTER | 2012/2013 | 89


Engagements, Weddings and Family News Thanks to all those who have contributed their news. If you wish to submit a note for inclusion in the next issue of the Elizabethan Newsletter please email alumni@westminster.org.uk

Maya Shinozaki (Hakluyt’s, 2003–05)

Friends, Yard, Abbey…most things!

Robin Menzel (LL, 1980–85)

Robin is engaged to Phillippa (Pip) Howeson, eldest daughter of Captain and Mrs Charles Howeson.

Sam Smith (Hakluyt’s, 2000–05)

People looking after me without me realising it. Alexa Baden-Powell (Milne’s, 2004–06)

All the weird and wonderful traditions.

Peter Cole (GG, 1993–98)

Peter married Helen Smith on Saturday, 1st September in Marylebone Parish Church; the two best men were both OWW – Alex Livingstone (GG, 1996–98) and James St Clair (GG, 1993–98).

Freddy Lyon (Ashburnham, 2001–06)

Expeditions with great friends and teachers. Leyla Osman (Rigaud’s, 2004–06)

Being part of Westminster School, an historical entity within its own right. That, and the obvious thrill of Latin Prayers.

Joshua Harris-Kirkwood (Wren's, 2007–09)

Andrew Spyrou (Liddell’s, 2001–06)

Avalon Lee-Bacon (Grant's, 2007–09)

Greek classes in the Busby Library.

The John Locke lecture series.

“My (new!) fiancé’s name is Benedict Smith and we met at a mutual friend’s wedding in Australia (even though we were contemporaries at the same university, we never met!).”

Matilda Hay (Milne’s, 2005–07)

Hayley Chapman (Dryden's, 2008–10)

People watching in Yard and tea with chocolate spread at the end of every day.

Priceless history lessons with Mr Edlin and Mr Allnatt.

Emma Thompsell (HH, 2004–06)

Oliver Kember (Busby’s, 2002–07)

Thomas Sutton (Milne's, 2005–10)

The lunches...

Edmund Knox (Liddell’s, 2002–07)

Football on Green.

Emeric Monfront (Wren’s, 2005–07)

The library.

Harry Tayler (Hakluyt’s, 2002–07)

The free thinking approach to learning and abondment of the syllabus. Chris Anguelov (Grant’s, 2003–08)

The teachers!

Jo Shuttleworth (Rigaud’s, 2003–08)

The A level classes where we could properly discuss the material and really think about what we were learning. 88 | THE ELIZABETHAN NEWSLETTER | 2012/2013

Yard football; drama; the people.

Being able to have a second breakfast when I arrived at School. Rosie Carpenter (Liddell's, 2009–11)

People excited about their subject and interests. Soojean Choi (College, 2009–11)

Frees in College Garden.

Alexander Nikolov (Hakluyt's, 2006-11)

The way it instilled in you a need for intellectual pursuit, a strong work-ethic and a powerful sense of aspiration. Adam Smith (Grant's, 2006–11)

Cricket on Vincent Square.

Dakyung Kwon (Purcell's, 2009–11)

Everything.

Romilly Collins (GG, 1996–98)

Emma recently announced her engagement to Peter Cohen. The couple met playing handball and are currently busy planning their wedding which will take place at St Stephen’s Rochester Row.

Above: Alexandra married James Thomson on Friday 8th June at All Saints, Fulham and afterwards at Fulham Palace

rock band. Our ushers also wore Bermuda shorts – the picture above was taken by Thomas Giddings (WW, 1998–2003), now a professional photographer, and includes Tristan Summerscale (QS, 1998–2003) back row, second from left). We dined and danced under a see–through marquee in the Tudor courtyard of Fulham Palace, with many OWW ending up in the fountain!”

OW Updates and Publications 1940s

John Barrington-Ward (GG, 1942–46)

OW Olympian John Barrington–Ward (yachtsman, 1952 Olympics) was profiled in an article in the Isle of Wight County Press.

Nadya Wells (née Booth) (HH, 1987–89)

is delighted to announce the arrival of Albert William Weston Wells on 13th August 2012. He joins their large team of boys to the delight of his big brothers Theodore, Oscar and Benedict. Alexandra Jackson (PP, 2001–03)

“At our wedding in Fulham on 8th June, my husband wore Bermuda shorts, as is customary in Bermuda where he grew up. Later he changed into ‘evening wear’ – a white dinner jacket with black Bermuda shorts (and the long black socks of course)! The reception was a mix of English and Bermudian – we drank Dark n’ Stormies; we had a steel drum band and then an English

1950s

Michael Jones (BB, 1949–53)

Michael published Guy de Maupassant: The Rondoli Sisters and Other Selected Short Stories (Pen Press, 2011) THE ELIZABETHAN NEWSLETTER | 2012/2013 | 89


at the Institute of Development Studies (IDS) at the University of Sussex, and embarking on some work with UNICEF headquarters on “post–2015” planning, which focuses on what happens after the expiry of the Millennium Development Goals.”

Nicholas Low (BB, 1954–59)

“Professor Carey Curtis and I published Transforming Urban Transport: The Ethics, Politics and Practices of Sustainable Mobility in October. The publication explores systematically the barriers to transformative change to urban transport systems. Put simply, the earth will not avoid dangerous climate change unless there is a global transformation in methods of mobility and transport. With empirical research in three Australian metropolitan cities, this book demonstrates the nature of path dependencies standing in the way of change, and how they may be overcome. A second book is due to be published on 22nd November which goes further into the transformation required and the processes of socio–technical change.” 1960s

Julian Francis (AHH, 1958–62)

Julian was the subject of a cover story in the Dhaka Courier 30th March 2012.

Tara Swart (nee Banerji) (CC, 1989–91)

Tara has co–written An Attitude for Acting: How to Survive (and Thrive) as an Actor (Andrew Tidmarsh and Tara Swart) a ‘how to’ book for actors who want to develop a ‘can do’ attitude to their profession in the face of rejection and intense competition. Above: Ian Ridley

1970s

Ian Ridley (RR, 1976–80)

On the 25th May 2012 Ian summited Mount Everest, 8848m, at 6.28 am after 10 hours of continuous climbing through the night from Camp Four. This followed 7 weeks of acclimatisation on the mountain. Following a career as a Chartered Surveyor three years ago he decided to use his mountaineering qualifications and set up Mountain–skills.com, which offers courses both here in the UK and abroad. Andrew King (GG, 1976–81)

Andrew was appointed Professor of Neurosurgery at the Salford Royal Hospital in July 2012. E. Michael D. Scott (BB, 1960–65)

Michael was recently elected Chairman of the Board of Directors of the National Organization for Rare Disorders (NORD) in the USA. Lord Neuberger of Abbotsbury (WW, 1961–65) took up the position of presi-

dent of the UK Supreme Court on 1st October 2012 becoming the second-ever UK Supreme Court president after the court was launched in October 2009.

Christopher Catherwood (AHH, 1968–72)

Christopher recently published a new, officially endorsed, illustrated biography of Winston Churchill entitled Churchill: the Treasures of Winston Churchill, the Greatest Briton. 90 | THE ELIZABETHAN NEWSLETTER | 2012/2013

1980s

Charlotte Harland (BB, 1980–82)

“For the past two decades, I have had a long career in social development in Zambia, taking time out to do a PhD on politics, poverty and witchcraft. For most of that time, my husband Guy Scott has been an opposition politician. At the elections of September 2011, his party overcame the significant challenges of beating an incumbent, and won at their fourth attempt. Guy was appointed Vice–President of Zambia. Unfortunately this was perceived as a conflict of interest by UNICEF, where I had been working for the five years prior to the elections, and I resigned. I am now doing a great range of things around my new and very unexpected role as “Second Lady” of Zambia, which is an extraordinary opportunity and privilege, especially for a British woman. I am also a Visiting Fellow

1990s

Briony Marshall (CC, 1990–92)

“2012 has been a busy year so far. I started the year still on my one year residency in Kingsplace working hard towards my solo show with Pangolin London in 2013. The show is taking shape nicely: lots of work inspired by how 3-dimensionality forms in nature, and hence lots of Embryogenesis as well as my old favourite DNA. I have had my portrait taken by Simon Stanmore and have also been working with Tangent Films to document the creation of the works for my solo show. I will be finishing and releasing these films in the autumn. I have now moved back to my old smaller studio in Fulham and I am also settling in to a good routine with 4–5 days/week in the studio, and balancing this with Below: Briony Marshall (CC, 1990-92) in the Pangolin London Sculpture Studio. Photo by Simon Stanmore

bringing up two young boys – which is slightly easier now I’m closer to home.” William Stevens (GG, 1994–99)

William opened an exhibition of his large paintings at The Prince’s Drawing School in Shoreditch on Wednesday 21st November 2012. The exhibition was the first time alumni of the illustrious art school (founded by HRH Prince of Wales) had been invited back to show their work. William was therefore honoured to be one of only three painters displaying work in the large gallery. He is part of a new generation of post–Damien Hirst artists for whom drawing is an essential skill, and who are keen to reinstate figurative painting in the art world. The show, entitled Pretty Gritty City made London its primary subject. Aruna Arasu (PP, 1995–97)

“Still lawyering in Zurich, enjoying the skiing and trying to keep my shoes safe from our new Bernese mountain dog puppy!” Delia Burnham (PP, 1996–98)

“I have been living in Romania since 2003 and love the energy and vibrancy here. I am building my dream – a sustainable living community – and inspiring others to live free, and do this using an amazing Japanese total health concept. Come and visit!” William Prochaska (MM, 1996–2001)

“I currently run a social enterprise called Alive and Kicking that was established at Westminster by Jim Cogan OBE in 2004. Alive & Kicking makes top quality footballs (soccer balls), volleyballs, netballs, handballs, and rugby balls in Kenya, Zambia and Ghana. We are a charitable social enterprise – an organisation that uses business practices to pursue our charitable objectives. We create fair paid jobs in the manufacture of sports balls that are appropriate for typical African conditions, we ensure that schools that cannot afford to buy the balls are able to access them, and we invest in educating young people about HIV/AIDS.” THE ELIZABETHAN NEWSLETTER | 2012/2013 | 91


at the Institute of Development Studies (IDS) at the University of Sussex, and embarking on some work with UNICEF headquarters on “post–2015” planning, which focuses on what happens after the expiry of the Millennium Development Goals.”

Nicholas Low (BB, 1954–59)

“Professor Carey Curtis and I published Transforming Urban Transport: The Ethics, Politics and Practices of Sustainable Mobility in October. The publication explores systematically the barriers to transformative change to urban transport systems. Put simply, the earth will not avoid dangerous climate change unless there is a global transformation in methods of mobility and transport. With empirical research in three Australian metropolitan cities, this book demonstrates the nature of path dependencies standing in the way of change, and how they may be overcome. A second book is due to be published on 22nd November which goes further into the transformation required and the processes of socio–technical change.” 1960s

Julian Francis (AHH, 1958–62)

Julian was the subject of a cover story in the Dhaka Courier 30th March 2012.

Tara Swart (nee Banerji) (CC, 1989–91)

Tara has co–written An Attitude for Acting: How to Survive (and Thrive) as an Actor (Andrew Tidmarsh and Tara Swart) a ‘how to’ book for actors who want to develop a ‘can do’ attitude to their profession in the face of rejection and intense competition. Above: Ian Ridley

1970s

Ian Ridley (RR, 1976–80)

On the 25th May 2012 Ian summited Mount Everest, 8848m, at 6.28 am after 10 hours of continuous climbing through the night from Camp Four. This followed 7 weeks of acclimatisation on the mountain. Following a career as a Chartered Surveyor three years ago he decided to use his mountaineering qualifications and set up Mountain–skills.com, which offers courses both here in the UK and abroad. Andrew King (GG, 1976–81)

Andrew was appointed Professor of Neurosurgery at the Salford Royal Hospital in July 2012. E. Michael D. Scott (BB, 1960–65)

Michael was recently elected Chairman of the Board of Directors of the National Organization for Rare Disorders (NORD) in the USA. Lord Neuberger of Abbotsbury (WW, 1961–65) took up the position of presi-

dent of the UK Supreme Court on 1st October 2012 becoming the second-ever UK Supreme Court president after the court was launched in October 2009.

Christopher Catherwood (AHH, 1968–72)

Christopher recently published a new, officially endorsed, illustrated biography of Winston Churchill entitled Churchill: the Treasures of Winston Churchill, the Greatest Briton. 90 | THE ELIZABETHAN NEWSLETTER | 2012/2013

1980s

Charlotte Harland (BB, 1980–82)

“For the past two decades, I have had a long career in social development in Zambia, taking time out to do a PhD on politics, poverty and witchcraft. For most of that time, my husband Guy Scott has been an opposition politician. At the elections of September 2011, his party overcame the significant challenges of beating an incumbent, and won at their fourth attempt. Guy was appointed Vice–President of Zambia. Unfortunately this was perceived as a conflict of interest by UNICEF, where I had been working for the five years prior to the elections, and I resigned. I am now doing a great range of things around my new and very unexpected role as “Second Lady” of Zambia, which is an extraordinary opportunity and privilege, especially for a British woman. I am also a Visiting Fellow

1990s

Briony Marshall (CC, 1990–92)

“2012 has been a busy year so far. I started the year still on my one year residency in Kingsplace working hard towards my solo show with Pangolin London in 2013. The show is taking shape nicely: lots of work inspired by how 3-dimensionality forms in nature, and hence lots of Embryogenesis as well as my old favourite DNA. I have had my portrait taken by Simon Stanmore and have also been working with Tangent Films to document the creation of the works for my solo show. I will be finishing and releasing these films in the autumn. I have now moved back to my old smaller studio in Fulham and I am also settling in to a good routine with 4–5 days/week in the studio, and balancing this with Below: Briony Marshall (CC, 1990-92) in the Pangolin London Sculpture Studio. Photo by Simon Stanmore

bringing up two young boys – which is slightly easier now I’m closer to home.” William Stevens (GG, 1994–99)

William opened an exhibition of his large paintings at The Prince’s Drawing School in Shoreditch on Wednesday 21st November 2012. The exhibition was the first time alumni of the illustrious art school (founded by HRH Prince of Wales) had been invited back to show their work. William was therefore honoured to be one of only three painters displaying work in the large gallery. He is part of a new generation of post–Damien Hirst artists for whom drawing is an essential skill, and who are keen to reinstate figurative painting in the art world. The show, entitled Pretty Gritty City made London its primary subject. Aruna Arasu (PP, 1995–97)

“Still lawyering in Zurich, enjoying the skiing and trying to keep my shoes safe from our new Bernese mountain dog puppy!” Delia Burnham (PP, 1996–98)

“I have been living in Romania since 2003 and love the energy and vibrancy here. I am building my dream – a sustainable living community – and inspiring others to live free, and do this using an amazing Japanese total health concept. Come and visit!” William Prochaska (MM, 1996–2001)

“I currently run a social enterprise called Alive and Kicking that was established at Westminster by Jim Cogan OBE in 2004. Alive & Kicking makes top quality footballs (soccer balls), volleyballs, netballs, handballs, and rugby balls in Kenya, Zambia and Ghana. We are a charitable social enterprise – an organisation that uses business practices to pursue our charitable objectives. We create fair paid jobs in the manufacture of sports balls that are appropriate for typical African conditions, we ensure that schools that cannot afford to buy the balls are able to access them, and we invest in educating young people about HIV/AIDS.” THE ELIZABETHAN NEWSLETTER | 2012/2013 | 91


Letters to the Editor Alexander Campkin (WW, 1997–2002)

“This August, my opera Three to Midnight was produced by Future Opera and performed as part of Tete a Tete: The Opera Festival, at the Riverside Studios in London. I have been commissioned by the Royal Opera House to compose Awake in Chorus!. It will be performed in the Paul Hamlyn Hall, Royal Opera House Covent Garden, and The Backstage Centre of the National Skills Academy on High House Production Park, in October. I recently completed my fourth Mass setting; Missa Magister Bone commissioned by the Vokalkapelle Munich. It will be premiered in Munich, Germany in October.   Closing on a personal note, I am happy to announce that I am engaged to Stacey Kurtz. I organised a flashmob choir for the proposal when we were rowing on the lake in Regent’s Park. The Oxbridge Singers were hiding in boats behind the island, and started singing as they approached us. They threw flowers into our boat as I got down on one knee.” 2000s

Wilf Kimberley (WW, 2005–10)

Congratulations to Wilf Kimberley who came 4th in the final of the World U23 Rowing Championships (Lightweight Pair).

Please send letters to: The Development Office, Westminster School, 17a Dean’s Yard, London SW1P 3PB or email alumni@westminster.org.uk Andrew Kavchak (BB, 1976–77)

“In the last issue of the Elizabethan Newsletter you were kind enough to reproduce a part of an email that I previously sent you with some memories of my time at Westminster in 1976–77 (Busby’s).  You also indicated that I would welcome contact from any former classmates.  Even before I received my own copy of the Elizabethan Newsletter I received an email from my former classmate, Paul Castle (QS, 1976–80). It turns out that Paul lives in Basel, Switzerland, and was planning a visit to Ottawa in the following weeks.  Please see below a picture of us beside the Nobel Peace Prize medal that had been awarded to Lester B. Pearson, in the lobby of the Pearson Building, headquarters of the Canadian Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade.  If anyone ever expresses any doubt as to the Elizabethan Newsletter's powers to connect former students on a global scale, please use this photo as proof to the contrary!”

“I’m living in Beijing – currently working at Time Out here as the art editor and part time at the New York Times bureau, so quite busy.” Rachel Holt (PP, 2005–07)

“I’ve just completed my Graduate Diploma in Law and am about to start the Legal Practice Course in September.” Alice Godwin (PP, 2007–09)

92 | THE ELIZABETHAN NEWSLETTER | 2012/2013

“I was surprised – and touched – to read The Awesome Term by Jeremiah Newbury in the 2011/12 Elizabethan Newsletter, with his memories of his time at Westminster in 1951– he’s kind enough to mention me by name among his hosts. The account he gives of the range of activities in which he took part revives memories of some of the formal occasions in which we were both present, like the Bath Knights’ installation.” David Seddon (AHH, 1969–73)

Above: Paul Castle (QS, 1976–80) and Andrew Kavchak (BB, 1976–77)

Brand Inglis (GG, 1953–56)

“If you are in touch with Jeremiah Newbury (page 50 The Awesome Term), you might tell him how very much I enjoyed his reminiscences about his year in College and his fascinating account of meeting His Majesty.”

OW Recollections Clem Danin (AHH, 1950–55)

‘Glider Launch’ “It was a Field Day in about 1954 and the excitement was that, after several months of anticipation, the School had at last received delivery of a glider at Grove Park. This also seemed a lot better than crawling through bracken and ferns to defeat the enemy at Hadlow Down.

“Like Lawrence Tanner – whom I met when, as Keeper of the Muniments at Westminster Abbey he showed me the enormous swords and tiny suits of armour with which knights were once equipped, I recall walking the mantelpiece as a new boy in my first term. Tanner’s vivid description, and the accompanying photograph of the mantelpiece itself, brought it all back. I was a weekly boarder ‘up Grants’ from 1956 to 1961. I too was obliged to walk the mantelpiece as part of a wider initiation process, which also included having to memorise and regurgitate all of the distinctive Westminster terms – such as ‘up fields’, ‘up School’ and of course ‘up Grants’, as well as all of the ‘colours’ (including the special ties and scarves) awarded for sporting prowess. On 2nd October 1956, shortly after I had ‘gone up’ to Westminster, I wrote home to my mother, saying “Monday was a very exciting night. First we had to have our medical test, in which I was declared normal; then all the new boys had to walk the mantelpiece and jump off and try to knock the Head of House over. I nearly knocked him over. There is nothing else exciting that has happened”.

Clare Pennington (PP, 2003–05)

“I’ve just finished my time at Oxford doing my history of art degree and I am eagerly anticipating starting my MA at the Courtauld in October on the image of the body in 19th century British art. Over the summer I am interrailling around Europe and most likely visiting far too many art galleries along the way and boring my other half horrendously.”

Nicholas Deakin (KS, 1949–54)

The Head of House at that time was Corin Redgrave (GG, 1952–57), a superior being in every sense, he kept himself aloof from the mass of humanity that was the ordinary student body. Pale and serious, he exuded dignitas and gravitas (words with which I would soon become familiar through my Latin lessons with a series of Classics teachers, including ‘Jumbo’ Wilson, the Housemaster of Grant’s). Redgrave was already apparently acting, but I remember him as a distant and impressive figure, as Head of House – and as an accomplished fencer.”

Above: Clem Danin: "I had been attracted to the RAF Section of the Corps on the basis that Geoffrey Shepherd (the Air Marshall), who taught French, was not as enthusiastic about polished boots as was Major French, who taught English."

The moment had come; a beautiful day, a blue sky, a shining sun, and the monster in all its glory. The device was propelled by a catapult system with 5 or 6 heavers on each arm at the front and a man at the back with a long pole stuck through a socket in the glider into the ground. After a great deal of heaving at the front, the Air Marshall, having accurately pinpointed the optimum moment of elasticity, would give a technical command such as “Let go anchor!”, or “Now!”. The anchor man would struggle to yank the pole out of the ground and the glider would move forward in accordance with Newton’s 3rd law of motion. Since none of us had ever seen a glider before, let alone driven one, the instructions were that all the controls would be locked so that the glider would merely move along the ground to give the pilot a feel of the process. Certainly >> THE ELIZABETHAN NEWSLETTER | 2012/2013 | 93


Letters to the Editor Alexander Campkin (WW, 1997–2002)

“This August, my opera Three to Midnight was produced by Future Opera and performed as part of Tete a Tete: The Opera Festival, at the Riverside Studios in London. I have been commissioned by the Royal Opera House to compose Awake in Chorus!. It will be performed in the Paul Hamlyn Hall, Royal Opera House Covent Garden, and The Backstage Centre of the National Skills Academy on High House Production Park, in October. I recently completed my fourth Mass setting; Missa Magister Bone commissioned by the Vokalkapelle Munich. It will be premiered in Munich, Germany in October.   Closing on a personal note, I am happy to announce that I am engaged to Stacey Kurtz. I organised a flashmob choir for the proposal when we were rowing on the lake in Regent’s Park. The Oxbridge Singers were hiding in boats behind the island, and started singing as they approached us. They threw flowers into our boat as I got down on one knee.” 2000s

Wilf Kimberley (WW, 2005–10)

Congratulations to Wilf Kimberley who came 4th in the final of the World U23 Rowing Championships (Lightweight Pair).

Please send letters to: The Development Office, Westminster School, 17a Dean’s Yard, London SW1P 3PB or email alumni@westminster.org.uk Andrew Kavchak (BB, 1976–77)

“In the last issue of the Elizabethan Newsletter you were kind enough to reproduce a part of an email that I previously sent you with some memories of my time at Westminster in 1976–77 (Busby’s).  You also indicated that I would welcome contact from any former classmates.  Even before I received my own copy of the Elizabethan Newsletter I received an email from my former classmate, Paul Castle (QS, 1976–80). It turns out that Paul lives in Basel, Switzerland, and was planning a visit to Ottawa in the following weeks.  Please see below a picture of us beside the Nobel Peace Prize medal that had been awarded to Lester B. Pearson, in the lobby of the Pearson Building, headquarters of the Canadian Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade.  If anyone ever expresses any doubt as to the Elizabethan Newsletter's powers to connect former students on a global scale, please use this photo as proof to the contrary!”

“I’m living in Beijing – currently working at Time Out here as the art editor and part time at the New York Times bureau, so quite busy.” Rachel Holt (PP, 2005–07)

“I’ve just completed my Graduate Diploma in Law and am about to start the Legal Practice Course in September.” Alice Godwin (PP, 2007–09)

92 | THE ELIZABETHAN NEWSLETTER | 2012/2013

“I was surprised – and touched – to read The Awesome Term by Jeremiah Newbury in the 2011/12 Elizabethan Newsletter, with his memories of his time at Westminster in 1951– he’s kind enough to mention me by name among his hosts. The account he gives of the range of activities in which he took part revives memories of some of the formal occasions in which we were both present, like the Bath Knights’ installation.” David Seddon (AHH, 1969–73)

Above: Paul Castle (QS, 1976–80) and Andrew Kavchak (BB, 1976–77)

Brand Inglis (GG, 1953–56)

“If you are in touch with Jeremiah Newbury (page 50 The Awesome Term), you might tell him how very much I enjoyed his reminiscences about his year in College and his fascinating account of meeting His Majesty.”

OW Recollections Clem Danin (AHH, 1950–55)

‘Glider Launch’ “It was a Field Day in about 1954 and the excitement was that, after several months of anticipation, the School had at last received delivery of a glider at Grove Park. This also seemed a lot better than crawling through bracken and ferns to defeat the enemy at Hadlow Down.

“Like Lawrence Tanner – whom I met when, as Keeper of the Muniments at Westminster Abbey he showed me the enormous swords and tiny suits of armour with which knights were once equipped, I recall walking the mantelpiece as a new boy in my first term. Tanner’s vivid description, and the accompanying photograph of the mantelpiece itself, brought it all back. I was a weekly boarder ‘up Grants’ from 1956 to 1961. I too was obliged to walk the mantelpiece as part of a wider initiation process, which also included having to memorise and regurgitate all of the distinctive Westminster terms – such as ‘up fields’, ‘up School’ and of course ‘up Grants’, as well as all of the ‘colours’ (including the special ties and scarves) awarded for sporting prowess. On 2nd October 1956, shortly after I had ‘gone up’ to Westminster, I wrote home to my mother, saying “Monday was a very exciting night. First we had to have our medical test, in which I was declared normal; then all the new boys had to walk the mantelpiece and jump off and try to knock the Head of House over. I nearly knocked him over. There is nothing else exciting that has happened”.

Clare Pennington (PP, 2003–05)

“I’ve just finished my time at Oxford doing my history of art degree and I am eagerly anticipating starting my MA at the Courtauld in October on the image of the body in 19th century British art. Over the summer I am interrailling around Europe and most likely visiting far too many art galleries along the way and boring my other half horrendously.”

Nicholas Deakin (KS, 1949–54)

The Head of House at that time was Corin Redgrave (GG, 1952–57), a superior being in every sense, he kept himself aloof from the mass of humanity that was the ordinary student body. Pale and serious, he exuded dignitas and gravitas (words with which I would soon become familiar through my Latin lessons with a series of Classics teachers, including ‘Jumbo’ Wilson, the Housemaster of Grant’s). Redgrave was already apparently acting, but I remember him as a distant and impressive figure, as Head of House – and as an accomplished fencer.”

Above: Clem Danin: "I had been attracted to the RAF Section of the Corps on the basis that Geoffrey Shepherd (the Air Marshall), who taught French, was not as enthusiastic about polished boots as was Major French, who taught English."

The moment had come; a beautiful day, a blue sky, a shining sun, and the monster in all its glory. The device was propelled by a catapult system with 5 or 6 heavers on each arm at the front and a man at the back with a long pole stuck through a socket in the glider into the ground. After a great deal of heaving at the front, the Air Marshall, having accurately pinpointed the optimum moment of elasticity, would give a technical command such as “Let go anchor!”, or “Now!”. The anchor man would struggle to yank the pole out of the ground and the glider would move forward in accordance with Newton’s 3rd law of motion. Since none of us had ever seen a glider before, let alone driven one, the instructions were that all the controls would be locked so that the glider would merely move along the ground to give the pilot a feel of the process. Certainly >> THE ELIZABETHAN NEWSLETTER | 2012/2013 | 93


An update from the

Oli Bennett Charitable Trust 2012–13 By Kieron Connolly (GG, 1985–90) >>

at this stage, with an inexperienced pilot on board, it was not to be airborne; particularly as many of us had the idea of flying, Biggles-like, to nearby Biggin Hill.

After Oli Bennett (RR, 1985–90) was killed

It fell to me to be the first candidate ad astra.

always dreamt of starting a business of his

I sat upon the placid eagle (the design was not such that one could sit in it) with nonchalance and features, both rocky and suave, of the two Johns – Wayne and Mills. There followed the necessary pulling, stretching and anchoring until the great moment came. The Air Marshal cried “Go!” (Another military command); the anchor man lifted the pole and movement commenced. Nonchalance continued for a few seconds until the glider ignored page 16 of the handbook and decided to take to the air. Even if the controls had been unlocked I would have had no idea what to do. Inevitably another of Newton’s influences took command, ensuring that the glider and I took a plunge of about 6 feet to the solid ground. No ejector seat, no parachute but outwardly a picture of calmness itself. Consternation abounded. Glider grounded. Needless to say, there was much more interest in the damage to the glider than there was in my well being. Thus the Field Day ended at about 10.40 am, and Eiloart and I went to the pictures in Bromley. A good day. I was the first person to crash the School glider – probably the height of my career at Westminster – and Eiloart was thus inspired to attempt to cross the Atlantic in a balloon a few years later with a similar result; although he was in the air for a bit longer than I was.”

94 | THE ELIZABETHAN NEWSLETTER | 2012/2013

in the September 11th attacks in New York, his parents, Joy and Adrian (RR, 1954–59), established a charity in his name. As Oli had own, they decided the charity would support young people (between the ages of 18 and 30) in getting their new business ideas off the ground. As Adrian explains, “It’s about turning creativity into profitability”.

Most new businesses fold within the first few years of trade and many small charities fizzle out, but ten years after awarding its first grant, the Oli Bennett Charitable Trust is a well established small charity. Since 2002 it has awarded more than £84,000 and supported more than 65 young adults in setting up new businesses – from wood recycling to fashion design, from community radio to ceramics. Each year the charity holds a fundraiser at Westminster. At these the beneficiaries present their businesses to the guests (and offer their wares as raffle prizes), there are speeches (from the charity’s patrons Roger Graef and Nicholas Owen, among others), there’s usually some live music and there have been two outstanding art fairs with works ranging from current pupils to Peter Blake. And the even better news? We’ll be holding another art fair at 2013’s fundraiser on Friday, 21st June. For more information and tickets, contact: info@olibennett.org.uk www.olibennett.org.uk

Above: CCF Inspection up fields 1960

Obituaries Ron French (Former Master) Died on 20th September 2011 By Andrew Botterill (WW, 1957–62), Adrian Chitty (AHH, 1960–65) and David Benson (RR, 1957–62)

Ron’s main drive was to provide opportunities to boys to push themselves that bit further towards the edge of their comfort zone – it was an integral part of a broad education and something that could not be achieved through sport alone.

“Looking back from present times to this picture, one would be forgiven for thinking that Westminster was a military boot camp in those days. Friday afternoon square bashing of course thrilled no one but associated activities like the spring ‘Arduous Training Camps’ in the Scottish Cairngorm mountains, shooting (both .22 and .303 calibre), CCF night war games around the Home Countries and forays into the real military world in summer Army camps were good fun for those that wished to participate. The School expeditions to remoter regions which he started in 1962 were a natural extension to these activities.

He was considerably helped by being active at the School before the onset of cramping health and safety legislation. It is revealing that under his guidance there was not one serious injury during the activities he oversaw during my time at the School. Many learned a sense of selfreliance which served well in later life. Throughout all these activities he intentionally or otherwise often managed to concoct a rather heady mix of danger and fun. Everyone will have anecdotes. I remember the first ‘night op’ I went on with Ron popping up everywhere throwing thunder flashes. He was always

>>

THE ELIZABETHAN NEWSLETTER | 2012/2013 | 95


An update from the

Oli Bennett Charitable Trust 2012–13 By Kieron Connolly (GG, 1985–90) >>

at this stage, with an inexperienced pilot on board, it was not to be airborne; particularly as many of us had the idea of flying, Biggles-like, to nearby Biggin Hill.

After Oli Bennett (RR, 1985–90) was killed

It fell to me to be the first candidate ad astra.

always dreamt of starting a business of his

I sat upon the placid eagle (the design was not such that one could sit in it) with nonchalance and features, both rocky and suave, of the two Johns – Wayne and Mills. There followed the necessary pulling, stretching and anchoring until the great moment came. The Air Marshal cried “Go!” (Another military command); the anchor man lifted the pole and movement commenced. Nonchalance continued for a few seconds until the glider ignored page 16 of the handbook and decided to take to the air. Even if the controls had been unlocked I would have had no idea what to do. Inevitably another of Newton’s influences took command, ensuring that the glider and I took a plunge of about 6 feet to the solid ground. No ejector seat, no parachute but outwardly a picture of calmness itself. Consternation abounded. Glider grounded. Needless to say, there was much more interest in the damage to the glider than there was in my well being. Thus the Field Day ended at about 10.40 am, and Eiloart and I went to the pictures in Bromley. A good day. I was the first person to crash the School glider – probably the height of my career at Westminster – and Eiloart was thus inspired to attempt to cross the Atlantic in a balloon a few years later with a similar result; although he was in the air for a bit longer than I was.”

94 | THE ELIZABETHAN NEWSLETTER | 2012/2013

in the September 11th attacks in New York, his parents, Joy and Adrian (RR, 1954–59), established a charity in his name. As Oli had own, they decided the charity would support young people (between the ages of 18 and 30) in getting their new business ideas off the ground. As Adrian explains, “It’s about turning creativity into profitability”.

Most new businesses fold within the first few years of trade and many small charities fizzle out, but ten years after awarding its first grant, the Oli Bennett Charitable Trust is a well established small charity. Since 2002 it has awarded more than £84,000 and supported more than 65 young adults in setting up new businesses – from wood recycling to fashion design, from community radio to ceramics. Each year the charity holds a fundraiser at Westminster. At these the beneficiaries present their businesses to the guests (and offer their wares as raffle prizes), there are speeches (from the charity’s patrons Roger Graef and Nicholas Owen, among others), there’s usually some live music and there have been two outstanding art fairs with works ranging from current pupils to Peter Blake. And the even better news? We’ll be holding another art fair at 2013’s fundraiser on Friday, 21st June. For more information and tickets, contact: info@olibennett.org.uk www.olibennett.org.uk

Above: CCF Inspection up fields 1960

Obituaries Ron French (Former Master) Died on 20th September 2011 By Andrew Botterill (WW, 1957–62), Adrian Chitty (AHH, 1960–65) and David Benson (RR, 1957–62)

Ron’s main drive was to provide opportunities to boys to push themselves that bit further towards the edge of their comfort zone – it was an integral part of a broad education and something that could not be achieved through sport alone.

“Looking back from present times to this picture, one would be forgiven for thinking that Westminster was a military boot camp in those days. Friday afternoon square bashing of course thrilled no one but associated activities like the spring ‘Arduous Training Camps’ in the Scottish Cairngorm mountains, shooting (both .22 and .303 calibre), CCF night war games around the Home Countries and forays into the real military world in summer Army camps were good fun for those that wished to participate. The School expeditions to remoter regions which he started in 1962 were a natural extension to these activities.

He was considerably helped by being active at the School before the onset of cramping health and safety legislation. It is revealing that under his guidance there was not one serious injury during the activities he oversaw during my time at the School. Many learned a sense of selfreliance which served well in later life. Throughout all these activities he intentionally or otherwise often managed to concoct a rather heady mix of danger and fun. Everyone will have anecdotes. I remember the first ‘night op’ I went on with Ron popping up everywhere throwing thunder flashes. He was always

>>

THE ELIZABETHAN NEWSLETTER | 2012/2013 | 95


>> conscious

of unacceptable risk however. He and Denny once called off a live firing exercise to prevent the possibility of one group of boys mowing down another with machine gunfire. We were so disappointed and I can still hear the moans “oh Sir . . .”.

School and St John’s College, Oxford where he read history. While at Oxford he was received into the Roman Catholic Church by Fr Gervase Matthew, a Dominican, a Byzantine scholar and a member of the Inklings (Carpenter 2006).

He was a balanced and sensitive man. We got to know him again after his retirement in the 1990s when he would accompany us on summer climbing expeditions to Scotland. His reminiscences were delightful, informative and enlightening.

Early on in World War II (1941) my father was involved in an Italian prisoner of war camp. This was outside Northampton. He was officially the interpreter but had a fairly free hand in running the place. He is particularly proud that he was able to change the British army rations which were allocated to the prisoners. By swapping their meat ration for bigger flour rations the Italian prisoners were able to make larger quantities of pasta which was what they wished to eat.

His teaching career at Westminster must have been one of the longer ones. As I have already said, he was a mesmerising presence, his life was the School and the School was his life.” Andrew Botterill (WW, 1957–62) A version of this article was originally published in Issue 10 of the e:liz@ e-newsletter in May 2009. “I was saddened to read of the death of Ron French. He stayed with us in Auckland on at least two of his globetrotting tours, which must have been at least 20 to 30 years ago now. I like to think that we provided slightly better accommodation than the youth hostels he was used to – when he couldn’t find an OW to stay with! I hope the following anecdote is not considered disrespectful of his memory: On one of his trips to Auckland he had obviously been very well looked after by the airline staff; so well, in fact, that on arrival he breezed happily through customs and immigration without bothering to collect his baggage from the carousel...” Adrian Chitty (AHH, 1960–65) “I understand from my OW contemporaries that you may be preparing an article on Ron French, one of the more memorable members of staff at Westminster during my time 1957–62. Please see above a pic of “ERDF” in one of his more mischievous moments digging a hole in the gravel surface of the Arctic Highway in Norway during the 1962 Arctic Norway expedition. Perhaps he was searching for an IED ahead of his time!” David Benson (RR, 1957–62) 96 | THE ELIZABETHAN NEWSLETTER | 2012/2013

Above: Ron French on the 1962 Arctic Norway expedition

Memorial Service for Ronald French on Tuesday, 30th April 2013, 6 pm All those who remember Ron French with affection are invited to attend a memorial service in the new School Chapel on Tufton Street (opposite the South Gate entrance to Dean’s Yard). Partners and guests are also most welcome. The service will be followed by a glass of wine in the refectory below the Chapel or in the Camden Room depending on numbers. It is hoped that films will be shown of the Arduous Training Expeditions in 1962 and 1963 and the Annual Army Camp and the trip to the German Army (both 1963). It is anticipated that the evening will conclude at about 8 pm. If you wish to attend please notify Colin Brough (AHH, 1959–63) at colin@lighttheworld. org.uk (or telephone 01235 833041) letting him know the number of places required in order that the appropriate reception rooms and refreshment can be organised. John Anthony Benedict Vernon (BB, 1930–34) Died on 15th October 2011 By his son Gervase Vernon (BB, 1966–69) John Vernon, fourth child of Captain Sidney Vernon and Janet née Foster, was born in High Wycombe. His family had been land agents there for several generations, most notably to Disraeli. He was educated at Westminster

He crossed enemy lines in a Jeep about two weeks before the end of the war. At this point he was back with PWB. He was one of the first British Officers into the city of Turin. When the Allied armies arrived shortly afterwards he was able to help to negotiate between the Allied forces and the partisans who had taken control of the town. He remembers that the first Allied forces to arrive were Brazilian. They woke him up one morning wishing to accept the surrender of the city from him, which he refused to do. He pointed out that the partisans had liberated the city. He ensured that the Turin communists had equal air-time on the radio to the other political parties. He felt that they had done more than their share of fighting for the resistance during the war. This position was opposed by the other political parties, but made him popular with the Turin communists. A description of him in Turin at that time is published in Ada Gobetti’s Diario Partigiano. This book became a standard text in Italian schools and was made into a TV serial in the 1970s. Sometime later he was moved by the Army from Turin to Trieste where he remained until 1949. In 1946 he left the British Army but continued to work in the same or similar roles in Trieste for the Foreign Office. He was the Assistant British Political Advisor. His boss was the British Political Adviser Sir William Sullivan. They worked for the “Allied Military Government Free Territory of Trieste”. They had to negotiate with the communists within

the city and more particularly with Tito’s communists in Slovenia. In 1948 he and Sir William Sullivan were sent, as part of a British delegation, to the United Nations to negotiate the future of this area. While in New York he met up again with Susanna Wieniawa, his future wife, then working as an interpreter for the United Nations. In 1949 he left his job in Trieste and married Susanna while living at Grand Saconnex near Geneva. The only members of the congregation were her mother and Mme Éva Maramaldi, a friend of John’s. Because his wife was now working as an interpreter in Geneva for the United Nations, he found himself newly married and unemployed. He did get a job in Geneva for a few months with the United Nations High Commissioner for refugees. He was responsible for refugees from the Soviet Union in Korea and China. In 1952 he got a job as an international civil servant with NATO in Paris. He remained at NATO until he retired. On retirement in 1982 he received the OBE. He had three children, one of whom, Catherine, predeceased him. He devoted a good decade of his retirement to the care of his wife who died just two months before him. Alec Melville (RR, 1957–62) Died on 22nd October 2011 By Theresa Davies, taken from The Guardian, 6th January 2012 Alec Melville, who has died aged 67 of injuries sustained when he was knocked down by a bus near his office in Holborn, central London, was that rare and fortunate thing for a woman: a male friend who treats her – and is happy to be treated on – equal terms. We met in 1964 when he was training to be a solicitor in London and I was at secretarial college. We became instant and lifelong friends, although we never lived in the same city. The younger son of a British ambassador to the UN, Sir Eugene Melville, and his wife, Elizabeth, Alec went to Westminster before qualifying as a solicitor in 1970. He worked at Tucker Turner Kingsley Wood for more than 35 years, >> THE ELIZABETHAN NEWSLETTER | 2012/2013 | 97


>> conscious

of unacceptable risk however. He and Denny once called off a live firing exercise to prevent the possibility of one group of boys mowing down another with machine gunfire. We were so disappointed and I can still hear the moans “oh Sir . . .”.

School and St John’s College, Oxford where he read history. While at Oxford he was received into the Roman Catholic Church by Fr Gervase Matthew, a Dominican, a Byzantine scholar and a member of the Inklings (Carpenter 2006).

He was a balanced and sensitive man. We got to know him again after his retirement in the 1990s when he would accompany us on summer climbing expeditions to Scotland. His reminiscences were delightful, informative and enlightening.

Early on in World War II (1941) my father was involved in an Italian prisoner of war camp. This was outside Northampton. He was officially the interpreter but had a fairly free hand in running the place. He is particularly proud that he was able to change the British army rations which were allocated to the prisoners. By swapping their meat ration for bigger flour rations the Italian prisoners were able to make larger quantities of pasta which was what they wished to eat.

His teaching career at Westminster must have been one of the longer ones. As I have already said, he was a mesmerising presence, his life was the School and the School was his life.” Andrew Botterill (WW, 1957–62) A version of this article was originally published in Issue 10 of the e:liz@ e-newsletter in May 2009. “I was saddened to read of the death of Ron French. He stayed with us in Auckland on at least two of his globetrotting tours, which must have been at least 20 to 30 years ago now. I like to think that we provided slightly better accommodation than the youth hostels he was used to – when he couldn’t find an OW to stay with! I hope the following anecdote is not considered disrespectful of his memory: On one of his trips to Auckland he had obviously been very well looked after by the airline staff; so well, in fact, that on arrival he breezed happily through customs and immigration without bothering to collect his baggage from the carousel...” Adrian Chitty (AHH, 1960–65) “I understand from my OW contemporaries that you may be preparing an article on Ron French, one of the more memorable members of staff at Westminster during my time 1957–62. Please see above a pic of “ERDF” in one of his more mischievous moments digging a hole in the gravel surface of the Arctic Highway in Norway during the 1962 Arctic Norway expedition. Perhaps he was searching for an IED ahead of his time!” David Benson (RR, 1957–62) 96 | THE ELIZABETHAN NEWSLETTER | 2012/2013

Above: Ron French on the 1962 Arctic Norway expedition

Memorial Service for Ronald French on Tuesday, 30th April 2013, 6 pm All those who remember Ron French with affection are invited to attend a memorial service in the new School Chapel on Tufton Street (opposite the South Gate entrance to Dean’s Yard). Partners and guests are also most welcome. The service will be followed by a glass of wine in the refectory below the Chapel or in the Camden Room depending on numbers. It is hoped that films will be shown of the Arduous Training Expeditions in 1962 and 1963 and the Annual Army Camp and the trip to the German Army (both 1963). It is anticipated that the evening will conclude at about 8 pm. If you wish to attend please notify Colin Brough (AHH, 1959–63) at colin@lighttheworld. org.uk (or telephone 01235 833041) letting him know the number of places required in order that the appropriate reception rooms and refreshment can be organised. John Anthony Benedict Vernon (BB, 1930–34) Died on 15th October 2011 By his son Gervase Vernon (BB, 1966–69) John Vernon, fourth child of Captain Sidney Vernon and Janet née Foster, was born in High Wycombe. His family had been land agents there for several generations, most notably to Disraeli. He was educated at Westminster

He crossed enemy lines in a Jeep about two weeks before the end of the war. At this point he was back with PWB. He was one of the first British Officers into the city of Turin. When the Allied armies arrived shortly afterwards he was able to help to negotiate between the Allied forces and the partisans who had taken control of the town. He remembers that the first Allied forces to arrive were Brazilian. They woke him up one morning wishing to accept the surrender of the city from him, which he refused to do. He pointed out that the partisans had liberated the city. He ensured that the Turin communists had equal air-time on the radio to the other political parties. He felt that they had done more than their share of fighting for the resistance during the war. This position was opposed by the other political parties, but made him popular with the Turin communists. A description of him in Turin at that time is published in Ada Gobetti’s Diario Partigiano. This book became a standard text in Italian schools and was made into a TV serial in the 1970s. Sometime later he was moved by the Army from Turin to Trieste where he remained until 1949. In 1946 he left the British Army but continued to work in the same or similar roles in Trieste for the Foreign Office. He was the Assistant British Political Advisor. His boss was the British Political Adviser Sir William Sullivan. They worked for the “Allied Military Government Free Territory of Trieste”. They had to negotiate with the communists within

the city and more particularly with Tito’s communists in Slovenia. In 1948 he and Sir William Sullivan were sent, as part of a British delegation, to the United Nations to negotiate the future of this area. While in New York he met up again with Susanna Wieniawa, his future wife, then working as an interpreter for the United Nations. In 1949 he left his job in Trieste and married Susanna while living at Grand Saconnex near Geneva. The only members of the congregation were her mother and Mme Éva Maramaldi, a friend of John’s. Because his wife was now working as an interpreter in Geneva for the United Nations, he found himself newly married and unemployed. He did get a job in Geneva for a few months with the United Nations High Commissioner for refugees. He was responsible for refugees from the Soviet Union in Korea and China. In 1952 he got a job as an international civil servant with NATO in Paris. He remained at NATO until he retired. On retirement in 1982 he received the OBE. He had three children, one of whom, Catherine, predeceased him. He devoted a good decade of his retirement to the care of his wife who died just two months before him. Alec Melville (RR, 1957–62) Died on 22nd October 2011 By Theresa Davies, taken from The Guardian, 6th January 2012 Alec Melville, who has died aged 67 of injuries sustained when he was knocked down by a bus near his office in Holborn, central London, was that rare and fortunate thing for a woman: a male friend who treats her – and is happy to be treated on – equal terms. We met in 1964 when he was training to be a solicitor in London and I was at secretarial college. We became instant and lifelong friends, although we never lived in the same city. The younger son of a British ambassador to the UN, Sir Eugene Melville, and his wife, Elizabeth, Alec went to Westminster before qualifying as a solicitor in 1970. He worked at Tucker Turner Kingsley Wood for more than 35 years, >> THE ELIZABETHAN NEWSLETTER | 2012/2013 | 97


>>

where his colleagues thought highly of him as a practical, dependable lawyer and friend. Alec had a huge, boyish appetite for life. Eclectic and independent in his political views (he liked to tease me about my stubborn devotion to the Labour party), he loved debate, whether it was about politics, the economy, novels or films. In spite of his own educational background, he ensured that his own children benefited from the freer ambience of a state education. Alec played tennis regularly and loved cricket – he was delighted when I moved to Birmingham, because he could join our family trips to the Edgbaston ground. And it was there, with my husband and our eight-year-old son, on that now legendary Sunday afternoon in 1981, that he watched Ian Botham snatch an unlikely victory from the bemused Australian batsmen with an unforgettable spell of five wickets for one run. Alec had an easy rapport with the young. While still unmarried and childless himself, he came on several holidays with our family; a beloved honorary uncle, appreciated by the children for his unforced interest in what they were doing and his enthusiastic participation in family games, especially charades. In 1983 he married Lorna Jordan and started a family of his own – Alastair, Anna and Kate. We saw a little less of him as they, and a successful career as a commercial lawyer, absorbed his energy and devotion. But we saw enough to appreciate the enormous pride, satisfaction and happiness they brought him. And he still found time to introduce our own teenagers to the art of serious lunching, and to offer advice and sympathy when the parental hand lay too heavily. We loved going to the theatre together. I saw him last in April 2011 when he and Lorna came to Truro to see Derek Jacobi in King Lear. Alec is survived by his wife and children, his brother, Richard, and his sister, Andrea. David Owen Byrt (Former Master) Died on 15th December 2011 By Philip Crabtree (LL, 1973–76) With the recent death of David Byrt readers might be interested in the story of the “Owls”.

98 | THE ELIZABETHAN NEWSLETTER | 2012/2013

The three of us, Philip Crabtree, Anthony Delarue (WW, 1972–76) and Peter Wilson (LL, 1972–76) met up with David annually for every one of the 36 years from 1976 until 2011 inclusive. We thought it would be worth reflecting on those nearly 40 years of friendship since we first got to know David in 1974, as Director of Music. David (a.k.a. Dobby) had left Westminster earlier in 1976. The first occasion we all met up after this was at Christmas 1976 when we went to sing with him at his new school after leaving Westminster – the Dragon in Oxford. We contributed in our own special way to a unique rendering of Haydn’s Nelson Mass. Although this first visit was very much a Dragon School event, our annual meetings would invariably take the form of some food (often at the Cherwell Boathouse restaurant), punting on the Cherwell, before enthusiastic singing, and some excellent tea, cake and (even) jelly, provided at David’s house in Oxford by Cynthia, David’s second wife, whom he had met at the Dragon, where she had taught for many years. Pretentiously the three of us, with David, called ourselves the “Owls” which kept alive the name that David had invented for his evening singing group at Westminster, which met in his rooms in Great College Street. David also ran “Music Guild” in our years, and we went on several ‘improving’ jaunts with him on Wednesday afternoons, some only loosely connected to music (such as a barge-trip to Greenwich, where time forbade disembarking, so we simply stayed on board and came back!). The quality of the singing produced by the four of us was, alas, perhaps not of the quality that one might associate with real Owls, nor with many OWW. However what was lacking in quality was always made up for with enthusiasm, fuelled especially by David’s sherry. Each year he would select samples of his favourite music for us to sing. He seemed oblivious to the fact that that the noise thus emanating while we attempted to sing these pieces might well have caused discord with his neighbours, let alone to the long suffering aural capacity of Cynthia. It is noteworthy that she insisted his music-room windows be kept shut, even in August, to protect her reputation in north Oxford!

David was a great Elgarian and nothing gave him greater pleasure than conducting, or listening to, great works such as The Dream of Gerontius or the Enigma Variations. Elgar had featured heavily in his School concerts at Westminster. He was always fond of the Boult recordings of these classics and we would always refer to him in his musical moods as “Sir Adrian Byrt”. From the earliest meetings David suggested that we should start a tradition of singing the school song (Carmen Feriale Westmonasteriensis, otherwise known as Domus Alma Floreat, music by Sir Frederick Bridge, organist of the Abbey). During his time at Westminster, David had always ended School concerts with the singing of the School song. Indeed we have been wondering in later years whether any current pupil or OW still sings it, or indeed even knows that there is a School song at all! We treasure the memories of our visits to Oxford. David was a kind and very modest man, a gifted musician and a very dear friend. The three of us hope to keep up the musical tradition that David started by continuing to meet up and croak out its immemorial verses, hopefully at least annually. Floreat! Simon Massey (Cricket Coach) Died on 27th December 2011 By Joseph Ireland (Master of Classics) and Simon’s widow Sue We are very sorry to announce that Simon Massey died quite suddenly over Christmas 2011. As some members of the community will be aware, he had suffered some illness during the last two cricket seasons. Simon began coaching cricket at Westminster in 1998 and his work at the Under School and the Great School was valued very highly by all the boys he coached. He prepared for these sessions thoroughly and he kept meticulous records of scores and coaching points on his charges. His enthusiasm, commitment and loyalty to the School were outstanding. Those boys who were coached by him will not have known that he had been a professional cricketer contracted to Hampshire from 1980 to 1984 and Worcestershire. He also played

grade cricket during this period for Manley C.C. in Sydney, Australia.  He was then signed by Berkshire and played Minor County Cricket from 1986–89. He captained the Berkshire League Representative XI from 1992–97 during which time he broke the league batting record with a score of 194. His coaching took him to many other schools and cricket clubs. For a while he was Head Coach at the Oval’s Ken Barrington Cricket Centre and he also worked for the Tasmania Cricket Association in Australia. He continued to play league cricket until 2010 and will be fondly remembered within the wider cricket community. Some may remember him switching from his specialist right-arm off-spin to bowling accurate left-arm spin in cricket practices. He also worked as a cricket commentator for Rapidline, Cricinfo and Lashings Cricket Club. On one coach journey back from Highgate he entertained the boys on the microphone with a comic routine which celebrated his enthusiasm for the game and the characters involved. His widow and family are currently setting up a way to donate to charity in Simon’s name. Robert Edward McNamara (AHH, 1939–42) Died on 28th December 2011 By RHG (Bob) Charles (QS, 1950–55) Robert Edward McNamara was born 7th March 1925. He attended the School 1939–42 before being accepted to Trinity College, Cambridge. He achieved the rank of Flight Lieutenant in the RAF and married Diana on 3rd September 1949. He then became a Chartered Engineer. He was Assistant Managing Director of Allied Polymer Group from 1972 until his retirement. He was initiated into the Lodge of Trinity College, Cambridge, where he served as Worshipful Master and, for many years, as Almoner. He also joined the Old Westminsters’ Lodge, where he also served as Worshipful Master. He was a kind man and much respected. He spent his last few years in a nursing home. He died Wednesday, 28th December 2011 of pneumonia. >> THE ELIZABETHAN NEWSLETTER | 2012/2013 | 99


>>

where his colleagues thought highly of him as a practical, dependable lawyer and friend. Alec had a huge, boyish appetite for life. Eclectic and independent in his political views (he liked to tease me about my stubborn devotion to the Labour party), he loved debate, whether it was about politics, the economy, novels or films. In spite of his own educational background, he ensured that his own children benefited from the freer ambience of a state education. Alec played tennis regularly and loved cricket – he was delighted when I moved to Birmingham, because he could join our family trips to the Edgbaston ground. And it was there, with my husband and our eight-year-old son, on that now legendary Sunday afternoon in 1981, that he watched Ian Botham snatch an unlikely victory from the bemused Australian batsmen with an unforgettable spell of five wickets for one run. Alec had an easy rapport with the young. While still unmarried and childless himself, he came on several holidays with our family; a beloved honorary uncle, appreciated by the children for his unforced interest in what they were doing and his enthusiastic participation in family games, especially charades. In 1983 he married Lorna Jordan and started a family of his own – Alastair, Anna and Kate. We saw a little less of him as they, and a successful career as a commercial lawyer, absorbed his energy and devotion. But we saw enough to appreciate the enormous pride, satisfaction and happiness they brought him. And he still found time to introduce our own teenagers to the art of serious lunching, and to offer advice and sympathy when the parental hand lay too heavily. We loved going to the theatre together. I saw him last in April 2011 when he and Lorna came to Truro to see Derek Jacobi in King Lear. Alec is survived by his wife and children, his brother, Richard, and his sister, Andrea. David Owen Byrt (Former Master) Died on 15th December 2011 By Philip Crabtree (LL, 1973–76) With the recent death of David Byrt readers might be interested in the story of the “Owls”.

98 | THE ELIZABETHAN NEWSLETTER | 2012/2013

The three of us, Philip Crabtree, Anthony Delarue (WW, 1972–76) and Peter Wilson (LL, 1972–76) met up with David annually for every one of the 36 years from 1976 until 2011 inclusive. We thought it would be worth reflecting on those nearly 40 years of friendship since we first got to know David in 1974, as Director of Music. David (a.k.a. Dobby) had left Westminster earlier in 1976. The first occasion we all met up after this was at Christmas 1976 when we went to sing with him at his new school after leaving Westminster – the Dragon in Oxford. We contributed in our own special way to a unique rendering of Haydn’s Nelson Mass. Although this first visit was very much a Dragon School event, our annual meetings would invariably take the form of some food (often at the Cherwell Boathouse restaurant), punting on the Cherwell, before enthusiastic singing, and some excellent tea, cake and (even) jelly, provided at David’s house in Oxford by Cynthia, David’s second wife, whom he had met at the Dragon, where she had taught for many years. Pretentiously the three of us, with David, called ourselves the “Owls” which kept alive the name that David had invented for his evening singing group at Westminster, which met in his rooms in Great College Street. David also ran “Music Guild” in our years, and we went on several ‘improving’ jaunts with him on Wednesday afternoons, some only loosely connected to music (such as a barge-trip to Greenwich, where time forbade disembarking, so we simply stayed on board and came back!). The quality of the singing produced by the four of us was, alas, perhaps not of the quality that one might associate with real Owls, nor with many OWW. However what was lacking in quality was always made up for with enthusiasm, fuelled especially by David’s sherry. Each year he would select samples of his favourite music for us to sing. He seemed oblivious to the fact that that the noise thus emanating while we attempted to sing these pieces might well have caused discord with his neighbours, let alone to the long suffering aural capacity of Cynthia. It is noteworthy that she insisted his music-room windows be kept shut, even in August, to protect her reputation in north Oxford!

David was a great Elgarian and nothing gave him greater pleasure than conducting, or listening to, great works such as The Dream of Gerontius or the Enigma Variations. Elgar had featured heavily in his School concerts at Westminster. He was always fond of the Boult recordings of these classics and we would always refer to him in his musical moods as “Sir Adrian Byrt”. From the earliest meetings David suggested that we should start a tradition of singing the school song (Carmen Feriale Westmonasteriensis, otherwise known as Domus Alma Floreat, music by Sir Frederick Bridge, organist of the Abbey). During his time at Westminster, David had always ended School concerts with the singing of the School song. Indeed we have been wondering in later years whether any current pupil or OW still sings it, or indeed even knows that there is a School song at all! We treasure the memories of our visits to Oxford. David was a kind and very modest man, a gifted musician and a very dear friend. The three of us hope to keep up the musical tradition that David started by continuing to meet up and croak out its immemorial verses, hopefully at least annually. Floreat! Simon Massey (Cricket Coach) Died on 27th December 2011 By Joseph Ireland (Master of Classics) and Simon’s widow Sue We are very sorry to announce that Simon Massey died quite suddenly over Christmas 2011. As some members of the community will be aware, he had suffered some illness during the last two cricket seasons. Simon began coaching cricket at Westminster in 1998 and his work at the Under School and the Great School was valued very highly by all the boys he coached. He prepared for these sessions thoroughly and he kept meticulous records of scores and coaching points on his charges. His enthusiasm, commitment and loyalty to the School were outstanding. Those boys who were coached by him will not have known that he had been a professional cricketer contracted to Hampshire from 1980 to 1984 and Worcestershire. He also played

grade cricket during this period for Manley C.C. in Sydney, Australia.  He was then signed by Berkshire and played Minor County Cricket from 1986–89. He captained the Berkshire League Representative XI from 1992–97 during which time he broke the league batting record with a score of 194. His coaching took him to many other schools and cricket clubs. For a while he was Head Coach at the Oval’s Ken Barrington Cricket Centre and he also worked for the Tasmania Cricket Association in Australia. He continued to play league cricket until 2010 and will be fondly remembered within the wider cricket community. Some may remember him switching from his specialist right-arm off-spin to bowling accurate left-arm spin in cricket practices. He also worked as a cricket commentator for Rapidline, Cricinfo and Lashings Cricket Club. On one coach journey back from Highgate he entertained the boys on the microphone with a comic routine which celebrated his enthusiasm for the game and the characters involved. His widow and family are currently setting up a way to donate to charity in Simon’s name. Robert Edward McNamara (AHH, 1939–42) Died on 28th December 2011 By RHG (Bob) Charles (QS, 1950–55) Robert Edward McNamara was born 7th March 1925. He attended the School 1939–42 before being accepted to Trinity College, Cambridge. He achieved the rank of Flight Lieutenant in the RAF and married Diana on 3rd September 1949. He then became a Chartered Engineer. He was Assistant Managing Director of Allied Polymer Group from 1972 until his retirement. He was initiated into the Lodge of Trinity College, Cambridge, where he served as Worshipful Master and, for many years, as Almoner. He also joined the Old Westminsters’ Lodge, where he also served as Worshipful Master. He was a kind man and much respected. He spent his last few years in a nursing home. He died Wednesday, 28th December 2011 of pneumonia. >> THE ELIZABETHAN NEWSLETTER | 2012/2013 | 99


William A Cooper (AHH, 1936–41) Died on 29th December 2011 By his son Ben Cooper (GG, 1973–78) “I am writing with some sad news to advise you of the death of my father William Cooper, who was at Westminster in the late 1930s and was evacuated with the School to Herefordshire at the start of the Second World War.  He gained a place at Corpus Christi College, Cambridge to study Engineering, but was subsequently enlisted into the Army (Royal Engineers) before finishing the degree, and was posted to India.  Whilst there he contracted Poliomyelitis, and was invalided out of the Army ultimately paralysed in one leg.  He returned to Cambridge, changing his degree to Geography, and trained to be a teacher.  He subsequently joined the staff of Cheltenham School, before moving to Sherborne School in the mid 1950s.  He became a long serving Housemaster in 1965 (serving for 15 years), and continued to teach thereafter (teaching several, now famous, individuals, such as Jeremy Irons!).  He was invited to be a School Governor soon after his retirement from teaching, and continued to support the School through his retirement.  There was an interesting time when I myself was at Westminster when he shared many experiences with the Head Master, John Rae, and my own Housemaster, David Hepburn-Scott, contrasting and sometimes comparing, the challenges of a boys’ school in central London, versus an all boarding school in Dorset, with certainly a few exchange visits occurring for staff between both schools.    Alongside his long teaching career, he had a passion for art, and became a well-known artist.  He particularly produced distinctive collages using cut pieces of wallpaper, along with oil paintings and latterly, watercolours. He was a member of the Royal West of England Academy, eventually being invited to be an Honorary Member, and had exhibitions in London, the UK, and beyond.    My father had a passion for sport, and I believe he played football and cricket to quite a high standard whilst at Westminster.  Sadly his ill100 | THE ELIZABETHAN NEWSLETTER | 2012/2013

ness almost certainly prevented him from winning a blue at Cambridge for cricket, although he continued to follow the sport closely, indeed he loved most sport.  He was never more proud than when his own House at Sherborne dominated the inter-House rugby tournaments, nor indeed much more recently when (although now confined to a wheelchair) we got him to Wembley to see his local football team, Yeovil Town, lose in a league 1 playoff final.    As indicated, his disabilities started to take their toll, although his mind was still active, and he spent the last 6 years of his life confined to a wheelchair, looked after by my devoted mother, and a team of fantastic carers.  In the end, his body caught up with him, and he died peacefully, at home, still living in Sherborne, on 29th December 2011.” Professor Richard Beard (BB, 1944–48) Died on 13th January 2012 Taken from The Telegraph, 29th January 2012 Professor Richard Beard, who has died aged 80, was Professor of Obstetrics and Gynaecology at St Mary’s Hospital, Paddington, and a champion of new approaches to the care of pregnant women and their children that are universally practised today. Beard was one of the pioneers in the development of fetal monitoring during labour. In his MD thesis, for example, he demonstrated that the pH balance of a foetus during labour is a good indicator of whether the unborn child is suffering metabolic or respiratory problems. Such “acid-base evaluation” continues to be routinely used.

qualified from St Bartholomew’s Hospital. He is survived by his wife and by three sons and a stepdaughter. Francis James Earle (GG, 1936–40) Died on 15th January 2012 By his son John Earle Having studied French in Geneva, Francis James Earle began a career in teaching at Aldro School in Surrey and then, from 1949 until his retirement in1982, the Hall School, Hampstead. He taught French, Latin, English and History and was Deputy Head under Paddy Heazell in his latter years at the Hall. All James’ sons attended the Hall School and two, Timothy (GG, 1966–71) and Stephen (GG, 1968–72), went on to study at Westminster. He worked for Hampstead Scouting Group for 35 years as Leader. He retired to Sherborne in Dorset with his wife Gladys in 1982. He is survived by his three sons, Timothy, Stephen and John and 9 grandchildren. Lord Carr of Hadley (GG, 1930–35 and Honorary Fellow) Died on 17th February 2012 Taken from The Telegraph 19th February 2012 Lord Carr of Hadley, who has died aged 95, was, as Robert Carr, a liberal Tory who served with credit as Employment Secretary, Leader of the House and Home Secretary under Edward Heath; having led the party briefly in 1975 as Margaret Thatcher was being elected, he left the Commons to chair the Prudential.

on the shop floor as foundry supervisor; when a miners’ MP later challenged the Tories to roll up their sleeves and work, Carr offered to spend a shift down the pit if his challenger would do his old job at Dale’s. Excused military service because of a collapsed lung, Carr worked in aircraft production, serving on the British Intelligence Objectives subcommittee which, after VE Day, investigated German light alloy foundries. He became Dale’s chief metallurgist and, in 1948, its Research and Development Director. Carr’s industrial experience ignited his interest in politics; he became a Conservative, he said, because he found it hard to be doctrinaire. He chaired Barnet Young Conservatives, and in 1950 became MP for Mitcham, defeating the Labour member Tom Braddock. He was one of a talented Tory intake whose leading lights — including Heath, Enoch Powell and Angus Maude — coalesced under Macleod to form the One Nation group, making headlines with a pamphlet advocating NHS charges. From the outset he was on the Left of the party, championing abortion law reform and abolition of the death penalty. Anthony Graham-Dixon (KS, 1943–48) Died on 13th March 2012 By Edward Enfield (RR, 1944–48)

In the late-1980s, working under Sir Stanley Clayton at King’s College Hospital, Beard’s work on the physiology and management of diabetes in pregnancy gained him international recognition. He demonstrated that poor control of maternal blood glucose levels during labour leads to fetal distress, a discovery that led to the use of intravenously administered insulin infusions for diabetic women in labour.

Leonard Robert Carr was born on 11th November 1916, the son of Ralph Carr, a north London businessman. He was educated at Norman Court, Potters Bar, and at Westminster, where hunger marchers converging on Parliament made a deep impression him. At Gonville and Caius College, Cambridge, he read Law, Economics and Natural Science, graduating in 1938. His ambition then was to become a tennis champion.

Ant Graham-Dixon was one of those boys who contrived to be better at most things than pretty well everyone, without the trouble of really trying. He sat at the top of the Classical Seventh for at least two years, which must have been tiresome for his elder brother Mike (KS, 1940–46), who was lower down. Impeccable Greek iambics and flawless Latin elegiacs came easily to him, and if he wrote an essay it was inevitably marked with an alpha. If you scoured the back numbers of The Elizabethan you would find that reviewers who had heard him sing expressed the hope that he would make singing his career, and those who had seen him act, that he would go on the stage.

Richard William Beard was born in Sussex on 4th May 1931 and educated at Westminster. He read Natural Sciences at Cambridge and

Carr went into the aluminium castings firm of John Dale, founded by his great-grandfather but no longer family-controlled, beginning

Mercifully he was no great shakes at football or cricket, so he took to water instead, and advanced from the Westminster second V111

>>

THE ELIZABETHAN NEWSLETTER | 2012/2013 | 101


William A Cooper (AHH, 1936–41) Died on 29th December 2011 By his son Ben Cooper (GG, 1973–78) “I am writing with some sad news to advise you of the death of my father William Cooper, who was at Westminster in the late 1930s and was evacuated with the School to Herefordshire at the start of the Second World War.  He gained a place at Corpus Christi College, Cambridge to study Engineering, but was subsequently enlisted into the Army (Royal Engineers) before finishing the degree, and was posted to India.  Whilst there he contracted Poliomyelitis, and was invalided out of the Army ultimately paralysed in one leg.  He returned to Cambridge, changing his degree to Geography, and trained to be a teacher.  He subsequently joined the staff of Cheltenham School, before moving to Sherborne School in the mid 1950s.  He became a long serving Housemaster in 1965 (serving for 15 years), and continued to teach thereafter (teaching several, now famous, individuals, such as Jeremy Irons!).  He was invited to be a School Governor soon after his retirement from teaching, and continued to support the School through his retirement.  There was an interesting time when I myself was at Westminster when he shared many experiences with the Head Master, John Rae, and my own Housemaster, David Hepburn-Scott, contrasting and sometimes comparing, the challenges of a boys’ school in central London, versus an all boarding school in Dorset, with certainly a few exchange visits occurring for staff between both schools.    Alongside his long teaching career, he had a passion for art, and became a well-known artist.  He particularly produced distinctive collages using cut pieces of wallpaper, along with oil paintings and latterly, watercolours. He was a member of the Royal West of England Academy, eventually being invited to be an Honorary Member, and had exhibitions in London, the UK, and beyond.    My father had a passion for sport, and I believe he played football and cricket to quite a high standard whilst at Westminster.  Sadly his ill100 | THE ELIZABETHAN NEWSLETTER | 2012/2013

ness almost certainly prevented him from winning a blue at Cambridge for cricket, although he continued to follow the sport closely, indeed he loved most sport.  He was never more proud than when his own House at Sherborne dominated the inter-House rugby tournaments, nor indeed much more recently when (although now confined to a wheelchair) we got him to Wembley to see his local football team, Yeovil Town, lose in a league 1 playoff final.    As indicated, his disabilities started to take their toll, although his mind was still active, and he spent the last 6 years of his life confined to a wheelchair, looked after by my devoted mother, and a team of fantastic carers.  In the end, his body caught up with him, and he died peacefully, at home, still living in Sherborne, on 29th December 2011.” Professor Richard Beard (BB, 1944–48) Died on 13th January 2012 Taken from The Telegraph, 29th January 2012 Professor Richard Beard, who has died aged 80, was Professor of Obstetrics and Gynaecology at St Mary’s Hospital, Paddington, and a champion of new approaches to the care of pregnant women and their children that are universally practised today. Beard was one of the pioneers in the development of fetal monitoring during labour. In his MD thesis, for example, he demonstrated that the pH balance of a foetus during labour is a good indicator of whether the unborn child is suffering metabolic or respiratory problems. Such “acid-base evaluation” continues to be routinely used.

qualified from St Bartholomew’s Hospital. He is survived by his wife and by three sons and a stepdaughter. Francis James Earle (GG, 1936–40) Died on 15th January 2012 By his son John Earle Having studied French in Geneva, Francis James Earle began a career in teaching at Aldro School in Surrey and then, from 1949 until his retirement in1982, the Hall School, Hampstead. He taught French, Latin, English and History and was Deputy Head under Paddy Heazell in his latter years at the Hall. All James’ sons attended the Hall School and two, Timothy (GG, 1966–71) and Stephen (GG, 1968–72), went on to study at Westminster. He worked for Hampstead Scouting Group for 35 years as Leader. He retired to Sherborne in Dorset with his wife Gladys in 1982. He is survived by his three sons, Timothy, Stephen and John and 9 grandchildren. Lord Carr of Hadley (GG, 1930–35 and Honorary Fellow) Died on 17th February 2012 Taken from The Telegraph 19th February 2012 Lord Carr of Hadley, who has died aged 95, was, as Robert Carr, a liberal Tory who served with credit as Employment Secretary, Leader of the House and Home Secretary under Edward Heath; having led the party briefly in 1975 as Margaret Thatcher was being elected, he left the Commons to chair the Prudential.

on the shop floor as foundry supervisor; when a miners’ MP later challenged the Tories to roll up their sleeves and work, Carr offered to spend a shift down the pit if his challenger would do his old job at Dale’s. Excused military service because of a collapsed lung, Carr worked in aircraft production, serving on the British Intelligence Objectives subcommittee which, after VE Day, investigated German light alloy foundries. He became Dale’s chief metallurgist and, in 1948, its Research and Development Director. Carr’s industrial experience ignited his interest in politics; he became a Conservative, he said, because he found it hard to be doctrinaire. He chaired Barnet Young Conservatives, and in 1950 became MP for Mitcham, defeating the Labour member Tom Braddock. He was one of a talented Tory intake whose leading lights — including Heath, Enoch Powell and Angus Maude — coalesced under Macleod to form the One Nation group, making headlines with a pamphlet advocating NHS charges. From the outset he was on the Left of the party, championing abortion law reform and abolition of the death penalty. Anthony Graham-Dixon (KS, 1943–48) Died on 13th March 2012 By Edward Enfield (RR, 1944–48)

In the late-1980s, working under Sir Stanley Clayton at King’s College Hospital, Beard’s work on the physiology and management of diabetes in pregnancy gained him international recognition. He demonstrated that poor control of maternal blood glucose levels during labour leads to fetal distress, a discovery that led to the use of intravenously administered insulin infusions for diabetic women in labour.

Leonard Robert Carr was born on 11th November 1916, the son of Ralph Carr, a north London businessman. He was educated at Norman Court, Potters Bar, and at Westminster, where hunger marchers converging on Parliament made a deep impression him. At Gonville and Caius College, Cambridge, he read Law, Economics and Natural Science, graduating in 1938. His ambition then was to become a tennis champion.

Ant Graham-Dixon was one of those boys who contrived to be better at most things than pretty well everyone, without the trouble of really trying. He sat at the top of the Classical Seventh for at least two years, which must have been tiresome for his elder brother Mike (KS, 1940–46), who was lower down. Impeccable Greek iambics and flawless Latin elegiacs came easily to him, and if he wrote an essay it was inevitably marked with an alpha. If you scoured the back numbers of The Elizabethan you would find that reviewers who had heard him sing expressed the hope that he would make singing his career, and those who had seen him act, that he would go on the stage.

Richard William Beard was born in Sussex on 4th May 1931 and educated at Westminster. He read Natural Sciences at Cambridge and

Carr went into the aluminium castings firm of John Dale, founded by his great-grandfather but no longer family-controlled, beginning

Mercifully he was no great shakes at football or cricket, so he took to water instead, and advanced from the Westminster second V111

>>

THE ELIZABETHAN NEWSLETTER | 2012/2013 | 101


>>

to the first V111 at Christchurch where, of course, he took a double first in Mods and Greats. Also, he found his match in the Westminster debating society, where Oleg Kerensky, Donald Allchin (KS, 1943–48) and I refused to acknowledge any superiority on his part. These human traits made him a good friend and an excellent Captain of the School. Robin Denniston (QS, 1940–45) Died on 6th April 2012 Taken from The Telegraph, 28th May 2012 Robin Denniston, who died aged 85, was an influential publisher who launched the careers of writers such as Erich Segal, John le Carré and Anthony Sampson; in 1995, however, he gave it all up to become a country priest.

appointment broke the tradition whereby the mastership alternates between a scientist and an arts man. Huxley was held in great affection by the Trinity fellows and remained Master until 1990. He was as proud of the college as it was of him, and liked to remind interviewers that Trinity had notched up more Nobel Prize winners than the whole of France. He was president of the British Association for the Advancement of Science (1976–77) and of the International Union of Physiological Sciences (1986–93). He was knighted in 1974 and appointed a member of the Order of Merit in 1983.

Denniston married, first in 1950, Anne Evans, who died of cancer in 1985. In 1987 he married the embryologist Rosa Beddington, FRS, who died, also of cancer, in 2001. He is survived by the son and two daughters of his first marriage.

Andrew Huxley married, in 1947, Jocelyn Richenda Pease, the daughter of the geneticist Michael Pease and his wife Helen Bowen Wedgwood, a daughter of the 1st Lord Wedgwood. She died in 2003; they had five daughters and a son.

Andrew Huxley (AHH, 1930–35) Died on 30th May 2012 Taken from The Telegraph, 6th June 2012

Stephen Lushington (Former Master) Died on 9th August 2012 By John Goodbody (LL, 1956–61)

Sir Andrew Huxley, the former Master of Trinity College, Cambridge, who died aged 94, was joint winner, with Sir Alan Hodgkin and Sir John Eccles, of the 1963 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for their analysis of the electrical and chemical processes involved in nerve impulses which control the action of muscles.

Stephen Lushington was a master, whose indelible contribution to one’s time at Westminster, was remembered by many of his pupils for years after they had left the School. This was not solely because of his distinctive personality but also because his influence, particularly in the teaching of English and direction of plays, infused one’s own attitudes and understanding of literature. Frequently the lessons of teachers subconsciously shape the character of their pupils throughout their later lives.

Andrew Fielding Huxley was born in Hampstead, north London, on 22nd November 1917 into a notable scientific and literary family. His grandfather was the 19th-century scientist and writer Thomas Henry Huxley, famously a champion of Darwin; Andrew’s father, Leonard, was for a time a Classics master at Charterhouse and later took up a literary career, writing biographies and editing the Cornhill magazine. He was elected Master of Trinity, Cambridge, in 1984, after the request of the previous master, Sir Alan Hodgkin, to be allowed to stay on after his 70th birthday had been narrowly and controversially rejected by the fellows. Huxley’s 102 | THE ELIZABETHAN NEWSLETTER | 2012/2013

Stephen, previously Housemaster of Wren’s, was the first Housemaster of Liddell’s when it was founded in 1956 and I was among the 28 boys who were enrolled that autumn term. He was also my form master in my first year and taught me English for several years. He was memorable for his commitment to the House, even shouting encouragement during cricket matches, sometimes from as far away as the tennis courts at Vincent Square, where he was master-in-charge of the station. His love

of tennis meant that during the Wimbledon fortnight, lunch in Liddell’s was consumed in about 17 minutes, sometimes interspersed by his cry of: “I hate custard. Take it away.” The speed of eating was motivated by his desire to be in time for the start of play at the All-England Club, began at 2 pm. Years later, he did admit that lunch “was a bit of a gobble.”

Jack Dribbell (RR, 1936–68) Died on 3rd October 2012 Taken from The Times, 9th October 2012

Liddell’s had a reputation in its early days of being unusually easy-going and liberal, even by Westminster’s prevailing ethos. This may have been true but Stephen had lines in behaviour, which pupils knew not to cross and were enforced by a volcanic temper that would suddenly erupt. It cowed everyone, even people outside the School. On one occasion, driving the Liddell’s monitors to dinner in Soho, he was obstructed by an overtaking car in Whitehall. Stephen wound down the window and shouted: “We are trying to get there too, you know !”. At which the other driver let us go ahead.

Andrew Murray (RR, 1939–44) Died on 7th November 2012 By Michael Partridge

Stephen was a most understanding Housemaster, always concerned with the welfare of his pupils, encouraging them in their studies and other activities. Under his guidance, Liddell’s quickly acquired a distinctive place at Westminster. Literature came alive in his lessons. In the reading of Macbeth, where he would often take the choicest roles and enthuse the class with his portrayal of the characters, he would pound the chalk-tin to convey the sound of thunder. He carefully drew out the responses of the pupils to the words of poems and plays, while memorably condemning much popular writing as being “five-star bosh de luxe”. With School having to be completely refurbished after the War, it took some time for drama to have a suitable stage. However, his production of King Lear was a memorable revival of Westminster’s acting tradition and gave him immense satisfaction, so that he could recall, even in old age, which boys played which parts. Stephen remained interested in the lives of his former pupils until the end of his long life, not perhaps fully aware of the considerable contribution that he had made to the development of their careers.

Jack died peacefully in hospital, aged 90, after a short illness. Loving husband of Giuliana, father of two sons David and Peter, grandfather of eleven. He will be sadly missed.

Andrew died on 7th November 2012 at the age of 86. He was educated at The Grange prep school in Eastbourne 1933–39 and during the war, at Westminster (evacuated to Herefordshire) 1939–44. Gaining an exhibition to Christ Church, Oxford, in 1944 he graduated with a degree in maths. After National Service with the Royal Army Educational Corps in Egypt and elsewhere, in 1950 he joined the Royal Greenwich Observatory, moving with them to Herstmonceux in the early fifties where he worked as an astronomer until his retirement in 1986. A fellow of the Royal Astronomical Society, he became Vice President in 1975–77. During his time he witnessed huge developments in his field of astronomy known as astrometry, the precise measurement of the movements and positions of stars and celestial bodies. Although officially retired, he remained deeply involved with the European Space Agency team responsible for the Hipparcos Space Telescope Mission that was launched from French Guiana in 1989.  In more recent years, pursuing a passion as an archivist and historian, Andrew researched and wrote about Eastbourne’s Victorian architecture, and he was very proud of the part that his grandfather, William Hay Murray, had played as the architect of Eastbourne College Big School, the Eastbourne College School House frontage, the original cricket pavilion and as the original designer of the Memorial Building, as well as many other fine buildings in the Saffrons and Dittons Road area of Eastbourne. Andrew is survived by his wife Mary and their three children, Simon, Jane and Richard.

THE ELIZABETHAN NEWSLETTER | 2012/2013 | 103


>>

to the first V111 at Christchurch where, of course, he took a double first in Mods and Greats. Also, he found his match in the Westminster debating society, where Oleg Kerensky, Donald Allchin (KS, 1943–48) and I refused to acknowledge any superiority on his part. These human traits made him a good friend and an excellent Captain of the School. Robin Denniston (QS, 1940–45) Died on 6th April 2012 Taken from The Telegraph, 28th May 2012 Robin Denniston, who died aged 85, was an influential publisher who launched the careers of writers such as Erich Segal, John le Carré and Anthony Sampson; in 1995, however, he gave it all up to become a country priest.

appointment broke the tradition whereby the mastership alternates between a scientist and an arts man. Huxley was held in great affection by the Trinity fellows and remained Master until 1990. He was as proud of the college as it was of him, and liked to remind interviewers that Trinity had notched up more Nobel Prize winners than the whole of France. He was president of the British Association for the Advancement of Science (1976–77) and of the International Union of Physiological Sciences (1986–93). He was knighted in 1974 and appointed a member of the Order of Merit in 1983.

Denniston married, first in 1950, Anne Evans, who died of cancer in 1985. In 1987 he married the embryologist Rosa Beddington, FRS, who died, also of cancer, in 2001. He is survived by the son and two daughters of his first marriage.

Andrew Huxley married, in 1947, Jocelyn Richenda Pease, the daughter of the geneticist Michael Pease and his wife Helen Bowen Wedgwood, a daughter of the 1st Lord Wedgwood. She died in 2003; they had five daughters and a son.

Andrew Huxley (AHH, 1930–35) Died on 30th May 2012 Taken from The Telegraph, 6th June 2012

Stephen Lushington (Former Master) Died on 9th August 2012 By John Goodbody (LL, 1956–61)

Sir Andrew Huxley, the former Master of Trinity College, Cambridge, who died aged 94, was joint winner, with Sir Alan Hodgkin and Sir John Eccles, of the 1963 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for their analysis of the electrical and chemical processes involved in nerve impulses which control the action of muscles.

Stephen Lushington was a master, whose indelible contribution to one’s time at Westminster, was remembered by many of his pupils for years after they had left the School. This was not solely because of his distinctive personality but also because his influence, particularly in the teaching of English and direction of plays, infused one’s own attitudes and understanding of literature. Frequently the lessons of teachers subconsciously shape the character of their pupils throughout their later lives.

Andrew Fielding Huxley was born in Hampstead, north London, on 22nd November 1917 into a notable scientific and literary family. His grandfather was the 19th-century scientist and writer Thomas Henry Huxley, famously a champion of Darwin; Andrew’s father, Leonard, was for a time a Classics master at Charterhouse and later took up a literary career, writing biographies and editing the Cornhill magazine. He was elected Master of Trinity, Cambridge, in 1984, after the request of the previous master, Sir Alan Hodgkin, to be allowed to stay on after his 70th birthday had been narrowly and controversially rejected by the fellows. Huxley’s 102 | THE ELIZABETHAN NEWSLETTER | 2012/2013

Stephen, previously Housemaster of Wren’s, was the first Housemaster of Liddell’s when it was founded in 1956 and I was among the 28 boys who were enrolled that autumn term. He was also my form master in my first year and taught me English for several years. He was memorable for his commitment to the House, even shouting encouragement during cricket matches, sometimes from as far away as the tennis courts at Vincent Square, where he was master-in-charge of the station. His love

of tennis meant that during the Wimbledon fortnight, lunch in Liddell’s was consumed in about 17 minutes, sometimes interspersed by his cry of: “I hate custard. Take it away.” The speed of eating was motivated by his desire to be in time for the start of play at the All-England Club, began at 2 pm. Years later, he did admit that lunch “was a bit of a gobble.”

Jack Dribbell (RR, 1936–68) Died on 3rd October 2012 Taken from The Times, 9th October 2012

Liddell’s had a reputation in its early days of being unusually easy-going and liberal, even by Westminster’s prevailing ethos. This may have been true but Stephen had lines in behaviour, which pupils knew not to cross and were enforced by a volcanic temper that would suddenly erupt. It cowed everyone, even people outside the School. On one occasion, driving the Liddell’s monitors to dinner in Soho, he was obstructed by an overtaking car in Whitehall. Stephen wound down the window and shouted: “We are trying to get there too, you know !”. At which the other driver let us go ahead.

Andrew Murray (RR, 1939–44) Died on 7th November 2012 By Michael Partridge

Stephen was a most understanding Housemaster, always concerned with the welfare of his pupils, encouraging them in their studies and other activities. Under his guidance, Liddell’s quickly acquired a distinctive place at Westminster. Literature came alive in his lessons. In the reading of Macbeth, where he would often take the choicest roles and enthuse the class with his portrayal of the characters, he would pound the chalk-tin to convey the sound of thunder. He carefully drew out the responses of the pupils to the words of poems and plays, while memorably condemning much popular writing as being “five-star bosh de luxe”. With School having to be completely refurbished after the War, it took some time for drama to have a suitable stage. However, his production of King Lear was a memorable revival of Westminster’s acting tradition and gave him immense satisfaction, so that he could recall, even in old age, which boys played which parts. Stephen remained interested in the lives of his former pupils until the end of his long life, not perhaps fully aware of the considerable contribution that he had made to the development of their careers.

Jack died peacefully in hospital, aged 90, after a short illness. Loving husband of Giuliana, father of two sons David and Peter, grandfather of eleven. He will be sadly missed.

Andrew died on 7th November 2012 at the age of 86. He was educated at The Grange prep school in Eastbourne 1933–39 and during the war, at Westminster (evacuated to Herefordshire) 1939–44. Gaining an exhibition to Christ Church, Oxford, in 1944 he graduated with a degree in maths. After National Service with the Royal Army Educational Corps in Egypt and elsewhere, in 1950 he joined the Royal Greenwich Observatory, moving with them to Herstmonceux in the early fifties where he worked as an astronomer until his retirement in 1986. A fellow of the Royal Astronomical Society, he became Vice President in 1975–77. During his time he witnessed huge developments in his field of astronomy known as astrometry, the precise measurement of the movements and positions of stars and celestial bodies. Although officially retired, he remained deeply involved with the European Space Agency team responsible for the Hipparcos Space Telescope Mission that was launched from French Guiana in 1989.  In more recent years, pursuing a passion as an archivist and historian, Andrew researched and wrote about Eastbourne’s Victorian architecture, and he was very proud of the part that his grandfather, William Hay Murray, had played as the architect of Eastbourne College Big School, the Eastbourne College School House frontage, the original cricket pavilion and as the original designer of the Memorial Building, as well as many other fine buildings in the Saffrons and Dittons Road area of Eastbourne. Andrew is survived by his wife Mary and their three children, Simon, Jane and Richard.

THE ELIZABETHAN NEWSLETTER | 2012/2013 | 103


Deaths Claes Edward Akerhielm College 1932–1936 27/2/1918 – 1/6/2012 Mervyn Talbot Archdale Rigaud’s 1939–1940 20/10/1924 – 9/1/2012 Richard William Beard Busby’s 1944–1948 4/5/1931 – 13/1/2012 Humphrey McCartie Buckler Busby’s 1943–1947 7/3/1929 – 16/8/2012 Charles Christopher Michael Buckmaster Ashburnham 1937–1942 21/12/1923 – 8/7/2012 Leonard Robert Carr of Hadley Grant’s 1930–1935 11/11/1916 – 17/1/2012 Desmond Nicholas Croft Grant’s 1945–1949 14/6/1931 – 7/9/2012 John Andrew Davidson Grant’s 1942–1947 22/12/1928 – 1/7/2012 Robin Alastair Denniston College 1940–1945 25/12/1926 – 6/4/2012

104 | THE ELIZABETHAN NEWSLETTER | 2012/2013

Jack Lodewyk Charles Dribbell Rigaud’s 1936–1938 30/7/1922 – 3/10/2012 Francis James Earle Grant’s 1936–1940 13/3/1922 – 15/1/2012 David Stuart Ellis Rigaud’s 1935–1940 17/11/1921 – 21/2/2012 Anthony Philip Graham–Dixon College 1943–1948 5/11/1929 – 4/7/1905 Brian Vivian Isitt Greenish Grant’s 1934–1939 11/10/1920 – 27/4/2012 John Peter Humphry House College 1958–1963 19/4/1945 – 8/2/2012 Andrew Fielding Huxley Ashburnham 1930–1935 22/11/1917 – 30/5/2012 William Stephen George Macmillan Grant’s 1936–1941 6/12/1922 – 4/7/1905

Colin Andrew Murray Rigaud’s 1939–1944 07/01/1926 – 08/11/2012 Alan Naylor–Smith Rigaud’s 1952–1957 14/1/1939 – 4/1/2012 Sidney John Vatcher Rigaud’s 1936–1937 25/4/1924 – 1/3/2012 Roger Fenwick Wilding Grant’s 1948–1952 13/2/1935 – 20/5/2012 Giles Colston Wintle Wren’s 1948–1952 27/2/1935 – 27/1/2012 Former members of staff Howard V Fox d. 10/1/2012 Stephen Lushington d. 9/8/2012 Louise Napier Johnson d. 25/9/2012


MARCH – MAY

OW Calendar 2013 We are pleased to provide advance notice of some events coming up in 2013 so do use this list to save the dates of those events you wish to attend. All dates are correct at the time of going to press and any changes will be published on www.oldwestminster.org.uk along with full details of the events and booking information. Certain events, like the Ben Jonson Drinks and Medics’ Drinks are for OWW who work in specific professional fields. To make sure that you receive an invitation to the events you wish to attend please send us your up-to-date business details by updating your profile on our website or emailing alumni@westminster.org.uk.

14th March 1st May 22nd May

1990s Decade Gaudy OW Abbey Tour Dryden’s Society Drinks

JUNE – JULY 6th June 11th June 13th June 20th June 9th July 11th July

Medics’ Drinks Women’s Network Mentoring Evening Rigaud’s Society Dinner Ben Jonson Drinks Old Grantite Club House of Commons Drinks Old Westminsters at Home (Westminster Abbey & College Garden)

SEPTEMBER – DECEMBER 12th September 26th September 7th November 21st November 9th December

Young Gaudy College Society Dinner Elizabethan Club Dinner OW Wine Society Tasting Event Carol Service

Above: Lottie Kirk (HH, 2005–07) and Henrietta Southby (BB, 2005–07) at the Elizabethan Club Dinner 2012 Above left (top): David FitzSimons (LL, 1960–62) and Simon Brew (RR, 1958–62) at the 1960s Decade Gaudy Above left (bottom): Eduardo Musciacco (AHH, 2002–07) and Bertie Milward (WW, 2003–08) at the OW Business Drinks


WESTMINSTER SCHOOL

THE ELIZABETHAN NEWSLETTER 2012/2013

THE ELIZABETHAN NEWSLETTER 2012/2013

The Elizabethan Newsletter is produced annually by the Development Office of Westminster School and is available to all OWW. Letters are positively encouraged and should be sent to: The Development Office Westminster School 17a Dean’s Yard, London SW1P 3PB T: +44 (0)20 7963 1115 F: +44 (0)20 7963 1064 E: developmentoffice@westminster.org.uk


Elizabethan Newsletter draft