Page 1

Cover Slide

1


What Is TASC? A previous presentation to the CAG explained that TASC is a national EPA program  that provides technical assistance services to communities. The program’s goal is to help people understand complex environmental issues and  ensure meaningful community involvement in environmental decision‐making. The TASC program provides services through a national EPA contract. Under the  contract, independent contractor Skeo Solutions provides scientists, engineers and  other professionals to review and explain information to communities throughout the  United States and U.S. territories.

2


Outline

3


Site Information The fact sheet provides a brief summary of the site, its history and current status. For  more detailed site information, EPA and MDNR websites are great resources. 

4


Fact Sheet – Page 1 This map provides an overview of the site’s two operable units. EPA often divides  Superfund sites into these units, or OUs, to develop cleanup plans for different site  areas and varied conditions. At the site, OU1 contains radiologically impacted materials (RIMs). OU2 consists of  three closed landfill areas. A subsurface smoldering event is currently ongoing at the  Bridgeton Landfill. 

5


Fact Sheet – Page 2 EPA has regulatory authority over Superfund sites. EPA follows a series of steps when  investigating and cleaning up these sites.  This illustration shows the major steps of the Superfund process, which are discussed  on Page 2 of the fact sheet. Page 2 is meant to familiarize people with the Superfund  process and the site’s current status and progress.  EPA has issued Records of Decision (RODs) for both of the site’s operable units,  selecting cleanup plans for the site. For OU1, a supplemental feasibility study has also  been completed; additional ground water sampling is underway. Based on this work,  EPA may update the cleanup plan for OU1. This update is called a ROD Amendment.

6


The Superfund Process

7


Fact Sheet – Page 3 Page 3 provides basic information about radioactive decay products – alpha and beta  particles and gamma radiation – and their potential health effects. 

8


Fact Sheet – Page 3 (cont.) Page 3 also explains how people can avoid exposure to radiation. Since radioactive decay is ongoing and cannot be stopped, protection from exposure  to radiation involves three principles – time, distance and shielding.  Spending less time in a radiation field (the area affected by a radiation source) will  reduce your exposure to radiation. Creating greater distance between the radiation  source and yourself will dramatically reduce exposure to harmful radiation from a  radiation source. Using a material to stop or reduce the amount of radiation that  travels through air is called shielding. Shielding reduces exposure to a radiation  source.

9


Fact Sheet – Page 3  Although there is no evidence that radon emanating from the West Lake Landfill is  affecting nearby buildings, radon gas is known to naturally occur and to build up in  enclosed spaces, such as basements. It is wise in this area to have your home tested  for radon. My own home is affected by radon gas and I have installed a mitigation  system.

10


Fact Sheet – Page 4 Page 4 of the fact sheet briefly discusses the science of radioactivity. The picture on  this slide, while not included in the fact sheet, illustrates radioactive decay, as  discussed on page 4. 

11


TASC Contact Information

12

West Lake Landfill CAG Meeting Presentation - 2 24 2014 - Discussion of TASC Fact Sheet #1  
West Lake Landfill CAG Meeting Presentation - 2 24 2014 - Discussion of TASC Fact Sheet #1  
Advertisement