Page 1

Baseball team unbeaten in 10 games

Best by the beaches Arts&Living. Page 6

Sports. Page 12

Rustlers run in ‘Beach Classic’

Gas pains from rising prices Opinion. Page 5

Sports. Page 11

Volume 41, Number 10 n Golden West College n March 7-21, 2012 n www.westernsun.us

GWC aims for ‘green’ honor from the state By Dale Lendrum Western Sun staff writer

Golden West College is bidding to be honored as one of the most energy-efficient colleges in the state. The California Community College Board of Governors is accepting campus nominations for the Energy and Sustainability Awards. Nominations must be submitted by March 16, 2012 and awards will be given in three categories according to a press release from the California Community Colleges Chancellor’s Office. The three awards that will recognize excellence in various aspects of sustainability are the District Leadership Award, the Facilities and Operations Award, and the Faculty/Student Initiatives Award. Golden West College Director of Maintenance and Operations Joe Dowling said, “the biggest thing the campus

has done was build the central plant and upgrade/replace most of the HVAC (heating, ventilation, air-conditioning) units on campus,” as well as installing an energy management system. Last year the student body voted to create a sustainability commissioner position on the Student Council and a Student Sustainability Committee was formed last semester. It has been active in increasing the campus recycling programs, in addition to crafting a sustainable roadmap for the future. GWC Sustainability Commissioner Daniel Tierney and his committee work with various departments and programs on campus as well as working with the Sustainability Advisory Committee to promote sustainable practices. The winners of the Energy and Sustainability Awards will be invited to the Board of Continued on page 2

Applications for posts in ASGWC due March 16 By Dale Lendrum Western Sun staff writer

The Associated Students of Golden West College will be holding Student Council elections for the 2012-2013 school year, from April 1012, 2012. Student Council positions include president,

vice-president, student advocate, activities, publicity, finance, and sustainability commissioners, as well as club consultant. The Student Council serves as the governing body of the Associated Students of Golden West College. It plans

Western Sun photo by Cory Gaudaur

GOLDEN WEST COLLEGE nursing students practice their skills.

Careers in specialized fields are on the rise Medical, scientific and technical skills are in demand By Cory Gaudaur Western Sun news editor

With the country’s unstable economy and ever-changing job market, it can be difficult for many to predict what qualifies as a “good” career choice, as a job that is popular and readily available now may not be in five years time.  According to a recent study conducted by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, a majority of the jobs that are currently in demand and will continue to see growth in the coming years are part of the health care industry, or are scientific or technical in nature.

Continued on page 2

www.westernsun.us

The choices that Golden West College students are making career-wise seem to agree with the research found by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, seeing as “the most popular majors on campus are nursing, human services, biology, and chemistry,” said GWC Career Center student assistant Michelle Nguyen. Some recent trends in the job market support the results found in that study as well, as many of the careers that made the list of 2011’s best jobs, such as software engineer, dental hygienist, and mathematician, all require knowledge of math, science, and technology. These types of careers with special-

Continued on page 2


2 MARCH 7-21, 2012/THE WESTERN SUN

Careers in specialized fields rising

Applications Continued from page 1

and publicizes ASGWC events, lobbies on behalf of students at the local, district, and state levels, oversees the ASGWC budget, acts as a consultant to campus clubs, promotes sustainability, and much more. In addition to the physical polling place, normally located across from the Student Center Patio, students will also be able to cast their votes for candidates online for the first time BESTLearn. JOBS throughTEN Blackboard Software engineer In an1.effort to increase voter turnout and2.promote sustainability, Mathematician the current 3. Student Council voted in faActuary vor of implementing an electronic 4. Statistician component to the election process. Voter turnout in recent years has been 5. Computer systems about 2analyst percent of the total students enrolled, and estimates gathered from Meteorologist various 6. community colleges and universities7. who have implemented elecBiologist tronic voting have realized an increase 8. Historian in voter turnout by nearly 40 percent The 9. ideaAudiologist to add an electronic component 10. was Dental brought hygienist forth by GWC student n student Phillip Queschke. Rankings are based on  Applications are available in the wages, stress, danger Student Activities Office locatedand on future the second floorjob of market. the Student Center and will be due on March 16.

Continued from page 1

TEN BEST JOBS

1. Software engineer 2. Mathematician 3. Actuary 4. Statistician 5. Computer systems analyst 6. Meteorologist 7. Biologist 8. Historian 9. Audiologist 10. Dental hygienist

n Rankings are based on wages, stress, danger and future job market. Western Sun graphic. Source: CareerCast.com

ized skills will continue to see growth in the next few years if these projections are correct. Further support for the growing health care industry can be seen in the rapidly growing nursing program at Golden West College, which has doubled in size in the last eight years. Lani French, program coordinator at the GWC School of Nursing, said “we’ve seen ongoing growth, as we support all pre-med programs and there’s a need for nursing.” The goal for the program in the coming years is to expand even further with a BSM program in which, “students will come out with a bachelor’s degree in three to three and a half years,” French said. While careers in medical and scientific fields are on the rise, agricultural, production, and administrative support occupations are just a few that are steadily declining as they are being outsourced or eliminated. 

TEN WORST JOBS

1. Roustabout 2. Iron worker 3. Lumberjack 4. Roofer 5. Taxi driver 6. Emergency medical technician 7. Welder 8. Painter 9. Meter reader 10. Construction worker n Rankings are based on wages, stress, danger and future job market. Western Sun graphic. Source: CareerCast.com

Western Sun graphic. Source: CareerCast.com

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Campus & Community

Cory Gaudaur, news editor

GWC hosts annual Science Olympiad By Alexander Strada Western Sun opinion editor High school students packed Golden West College’s Forum 1 last Friday, March 2, to participate in a lightning round science trivia event that concluded the 15th annual Science Olympiad held at Golden West College under the direction of now-retired GWC Chemistry professor Carol Grimes, mother to two former Science Olympians. The Science Olympiad is a national competition of nearly 6,200 teams that aims to elevate student, teacher and parent enthusiasm for academic pursuits to the level normally reserved for varsity sports teams. The energy in Forum 1 was electric. Tense silence filled the room as opposing pairs of teams were asked questions like, “Which one of the following is associated with Newton’s Laws of Physics?” When a point was scored, an eruption of cheers shattered the silence only briefly, hushed by a terse “Quiet, please” from the host.  Trivia was followed by an award ceremony where individual students

were awarded medals for their achievements in a wide variety of different science-themed competitions. Such competitions included the Sound of Music event, where each student designed and built a functional musical instrument from scratch, then played a song on it and explained the scientific principles underlying its function. Many students refused photographs of their designs for certain events, citing rumors of parents from other regions allegedly stealing ideas for their kids. “There are a lot of kids whose talents lie in the academic arenas rather than in sports arenas, and they don’t usually get huge cheers and medals,” said Grimes. “We have the Oscars, we have the Superbowl. We need something for academics as well.” During the awards ceremony, a mom from Canyon High School told her neighbor, “Now I’m really worried, we might not make state because of that stupid astronomy thing.” When Canyon placed, she added, “I can’t believe we got third!”

Western Sun photo by Alexander Strada

DAVID BRADY (left) and Nick Null of Pacifica High School in the tower competition. If the parents’ reactions are any in- tainly achieved its goal of recognizing dication of the success of the compe- outstanding achievements in academtition, the Science Olympiad has cer- ics.

G.I. Bill helps veterans to go to college other student veterans are attending college tuition free through the Post9/11 G.I. Bill. While the bill covers tuition, due to modifications made last summer, the housing allowance only applies to months when school is in session. As a result, during the summer and winter breaks, students must be self-sufficient. Before finding his current job at a baseball training facility, Brinkman recalled having to take out loans just to pay rent. “The allowance only covers rent, so we’re told to apply for food stamps (for groceries and utilities),” Brinkman said. He and his wife of four years moved into her parents’ home to save money. Despite financial hardships, Brinkman is enrolled in 10 units this semester and plans to transfer to California State University, Fullerton next year to pursue a career in sports journalism.

By Ashley Charles Western Sun staff writer

As of January 2012, the unemployment rate of returning troops had surpassed 13 percent. While the nation’s unemployment rate finally begins to decrease, the rate among veterans swells.  Returning home with limited marketable job skills, many vets opt to head back to school. Army Corporal Mike Brinkman, a sophomore communications major at Golden West College, said he went back to school, “to go down a new avenue since no one was hiring.”  Veterans at GWC receive counseling and support through the Student Veterans Center and the on-campus Student Veterans Organization, “to help them transition,” Veteran Resource Center Coordinator Cheryl Tittle said. Each GWC administrative office is jointly connected with the Student Veterans Center to provide a variety of services, including tutoring, priority registration, and a quiet study room. According to Tittle, the center is “a place they can come and be who they truly are; the biggest advantage is interacting with veterans on a veteran’s

MORE VETERANS are attending college. level.” About 1,000 military veterans are enrolled at Golden West, said Tittle, although not all of them use the services

of the center. After serving two tours of duty in Iraq connecting servers for communication among bases, Brinkman and

‘Green’ Continued from page 1

Governors meeting May 7-8 in Sacramento to be recognized for their contributions to energy savings and sustainability.


4 MARCH 7-21, 2012/THE WESTERN SUN

Opinion

Alexander Strada, opinion editor

Are the memories worth the mob? By Krystal Lynn Mutschler Western Sun associate editor When it comes to events that are expected to have large crowds, it seems that no matter how exciting the event may be, the question bears asking whether the crowds and stress are worth it? In honor of leap day, Disneyland decided to extend their operating hours on Feb. 29 to remain open for 24 hours, 6 a.m. to 6 a.m. the following day, coining it “One More Disney Day.” According to the L.A. Times, more than 3,000 guests lined up 10 hours before the gates opened in eager anticipation. The daytime was modest with more than reasonable wait times for rides and room to walk the park comfortably. However, in the twilight hours Disney finally saw recording-breaking crowds responding to the event to the point at which the park’s capacity was reached at 9:30 p.m. The entrance did not reopen until 1 a.m. Streets and freeways were clogged with traffic, while inside the park wait times topped two hours for rides, 30

Western Sun photo by Alexander Strada

COACHELLA FESTIVAL sells out so fast they now host two duplicate events a year back to back. minute waits for food carts, and unreasonably long wait times for sit-down restaurants. The troubles however, pailed in comparison to just being able to be part of an event where so many people were enjoying the same thing. As with music festivals and sport-

ing events, the memories you make are worth the stress of the mob. Being around diverse people who are brought together for a mutual love is always uplifting, with your shared common ground giving you a sense of peaceful serenity.

In the end, more than anything else, it is refreshing to see such large collective groups of people sharing and enjoying the same experiences together, and being able to just enjoy the memories that last much longer than the wait times.

Go your own way while you have the chance Since the end of last year, I have worked hard extra hours towards a team lead promotion opportunity that was presented at my part-time food service job. When my boss approached me and asked if I was interested, my answer was an emphatic yes. After all, who turns down promotions? “You can’t always love your job,” said a stern, Alexander Red Foremanesque voice in Strada my head, “Take

what you can get. You’ve gotta do what my job I began to experience a deep you’ve gotta do, dumb ass!” sense of emotional detachment. My When the semester began, bring- writing suffered, as did my social relaing a familiar sense of satisfaction that, tionships. How many people rush into shockingly, was much more profound jobs or careers because they feel it is than what I felt after pressuring strang- their only choice, or the most logical, ers into buying overthen suffer impotent priced junk food, my “How many people rush remorse at the end of work hours affected into jobs or careers betheir lives? my studies, and I cause they feel it is their According to a quickly realized what only choice, then suffer GuardianNews.com I had always known impotent remorse at the article, a nurse who to be true: I hate my end of their lives?” spent several years job very deeply and caring for patients in have no desire to sink the last 12 weeks of into that comfortable trap. I told my their lives recorded their dying epiphaboss I had changed my mind to focus nies and published them in a book. on school, and put in my two-week’s Among the top five is “I wish I hadn’t notice. worked so hard.” In the months I devoted myself to “All of the men I nursed deeply

regretted spending so much of their lives on the treadmill of a work existence,” she says. And the top regret of the dying? “I wish I’d had the courage to live a life true to myself, not the life others expected of me.” The nurse explains that when dying patients look back, “it is easy to see how many dreams have gone unfulfilled. Most people had not honoured even half of their dreams and had to die knowing that it was due to choices they had made.” My greatest fear is to look back on my life with these regrets. It should be yours, too. Take a look at your life, and ask yourself, “Am I really living for myself, or am I living for someone else?”

EXECUTIVE EDITOR: Adam Stites MANAGING EDITOR: Emilee Maciel NEWS EDITOR: Cory Gaudaur OPINION EDITOR: Alexander Strada ARTS&LIVING: Emilee Maciel SPORTS EDITOR: Adam Stites ADVISOR: Jim Tortolano ADVERTISING DIRECTOR & WEBMASTER: Katie Cumper STAFF WRITERS AND PHOTOGRAPHERS: Krystal Lynn Mutschler, Andre McCleese, Ashleigh Ford, Ashley Saunders, Beatrice Zamora, Candace Finley, Cindy Kaufinger, Dale Lendrum, Danny Baker, Heidi Kaufinger, James Gomez, Javier Silva, Jayme Bommerito, Jose Garcia, Katarzyna Jarek, Leo Gomon, Lourdes Rebaza, Monica Dekany, Sarah Martinez, Shainnen Somerville, Taylor Goodall, Teresa Do, Tiffany Pham, Travon Nesbit THE WESTERN SUN is published biweekly on Wednesdays by the newspaper production classes of Golden West College. Opinions expressed in The Sun, unless otherwise indicated, are those of the individual writer or artist and do not necessarily reflect those of the college, district, or any other organization or agency. The Sun is a member of the Journalism Association of Community Colleges and the California Newspaper Publishers’ Assn. Offices are at 15744 Goldenwest St., Huntington Beach, CA 92647 in the Fine Arts building, room 138. Phones: 714-895-8786 (news), 895-8256 (advertising), 895-8795 (fax). E-mail: gwcwesternsun@gmail.com


THE WESTERN SUN/MARCH 7-21, 2012 5

Rihanna’s missed cause By Travon Nesbit Western Sun staff writer

Western Sun photo by Alexander Strada

SOCAL gas prices are now within 30 cents of their all-time record.

Wallets wail as gas prices peak again

By Taylor Goodall Western Sun staff writer

are set to climb ever higher. Domestic supply is way up, which should cause fuel prices to fall, while Gas prices are once again on the domestic demand is the lowest in derise, and while some may think Middle cades, which should cause prices to fall Eastern conflict responsible, or that even further, yet prices still going up. OPEC just wants more money, the re- It’s about record profits and greed. Energy companies have ingeniousality is a little more complicated. ly found a way to byAccording to an pass the law of supply NPR.org article, domes- “If we export more and demand. They are tic production of refined gasoline than we exporting our fuel for gasoline and diesel fuels import, why are we is at an eight year high, importing any at all?” almost double the price. As an added bonus, this due mainly to controversial new drilling techniques. The U.S. also creates an “artificial shortage” of has a surplus of cheap gas, but we’re domestic fuel, which is a main factor in what is to blame for the increase in not seeing it at the pump. American energy companies have fuel prices. America is now a net exporter of found they can make much more money exporting refined fuel to European gasoline. If we export more gasoline countries where gas prices are near than we import, why are we importing double ours. With Iran’s recent embar- any at all? Don’t we want to end our go of France and Britain, their prices dependence on foreign oil?

Bachelor of paying debt The Wall St. Journal compiled a list of ten majors with the lowest unemployment rates; all of which were engineering, science, medicine or enSince graduating with a bachelor’s vironmentally based, with the highest degree in literature, the dreaded post- rate at 2.2%. The same study states the college job hunt has consumed my average worker one of said degrees life. I assumed that companies would will make over 300 percent more in be flocking towards a recent graduate their lifetime. to write for them about who knows In the past having a degree providwhat – but this was not ed a head start for future the case. Other than a “Most graduates are security. Now, unless few odd jobs and some forced to settle on you studied science, freelance work, finding what can pay the bills, mathematics, physics, employment has been leading to a completely medicine, or law, you’d tough. different career path.” better have a family I’m not alone; peomember with a business ple with degrees in art, that is willing to employ you. sociology, psychology and other fields Although the current economy and are finding themselves massively in the exponentially rising cost of educadebt and without jobs. Their only op- tion are to blame, and this is a more tions are to go back to school and build recent development, higher education more debt, or find a retail job that re- simply does not have the same value it quires experience they don’t have after once did. Evaluate your options, save spending years in school. Most gradu- your money, consider going to a trade ates are forced to settle on what can school, and do not pile up loans assumpay the bills, leading to a completely ing things will work out in the end. different career path.

By Leo Gomon Western Sun staff writer

Just three years ago Chris Brown was charged with a felony for brutally assaulting then girlfriend Rihanna in a highly publicized domestic violence case. It was uncertain if Brown’s career would survive, but this year has brought him a multi-platinum record, a Grammy, and two collaborations with none other than his ex, Rihanna. According to the Domestic Violence Resource Center, one in four women experience domestic abuse in their lifetime. Rihanna had a chance to become a powerful figure and educator against abuse, but instead released songs like “S&M”, with allusions to dominatrixes and the theme of pain as pleasure. RIHANNA performing on tour. To this day, Rihanna’s music conThe collaborations may be Rihantinues to reflect dark themes of sexual domination, and now the dust between na’s way of showing that growth and the ex-couple has finally started to healing are possible after such trauma, which is respectable, or settle enough that they have released two new “Rihanna had a chance perhaps it’s an attempt to use shock to sell resongs, “Turn Up The to become a powerful cords. Music” and “Birthday figure and educator As today’s number Cake.” against abuse.” one pop star who has The first is a harmmany times graced the less club track, but the second feacovers of magazines such as Seventeen tures sadomasochistic themes again in its’ lyrics telling Brown to “come and and Teen Vogue one has to wonder if put [his] name on it” while he sings “I Rihanna realizes the influence she has wanna give it to her in the worst way.” on young girls.

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6 MARCH 7-21, 2012/THE WESTERN SUN

Arts&Living

Emilee Maciel, arts & living editor

The Battle of the Beaches: HB vs. LB

HUNTINGTON BEACH MAIN STREET

THE PIKE IN LONG BEACH

Western Sun photos by Emilee Maciel

Huntington Beach has ‘Surf City’, but Long Beach offers a greater diversity By Emilee Maciel Western Sun arts&living editor and Krystal Lynn Mutschler Western Sun associate editor What do Huntington Beach, and Long Beach have incommon besides being near the ocean? They have exciting and fun-filled daytime activities and a nightlife, located on each location’s main street, that is suitable for anyone. The Western Sun has compiled your guide for these beach-front venues. n Huntington Beach Main Street Deemed “Surf City USA,” how can you not visit Huntington’s 100 year-old street? With restaurants catering to any type of taste-bud,  from pizza to tacos to sushi, it’s not hard to satisfy your craving. q Popular Restaurants BJ’s Pizza&Grill: A familiar favorite for those who take comfort in  the foods they know. Sugar Shack: A local hotspot that’s serves up diner foods that will  make any beach-bum happy. Fred’s Mexican Café&Cantina: Looking over Main Street, Fred’s is the perfect place for Taco Tuesday. q Popular Bars

Sharkeez Sports Grill: Come cheer for your favorite sports team at this high-energy bar. Hurricane’s Bar&Grill: Be ready to get swept away on the dance floor  or to enjoy the fresh ocean breeze at this second level oasis. Gallagher’s Pub&Grill: You don’t have to have the luck of the Irish  to have a great time at this pub. q Events/ Activities Surf City Nights: Every Tuesday evening from 5 p.m. to 9 p.m., Main  Street is transformed into a seven-block street fair. SCN consists of entertainment that’s fun for the whole family, a farmers market, and shopping bungalows. Huntington Beach Art Center: With free admission, the art center  regularly hosts exhibits and concerts in one of their three galleries or multi-purpose room. The only downside to HB Main Street is that the atmosphere on a really busy night can get pretty hectic. If you’re a laid-back type of person, you might feel out of your element, because the hustle and bustle of the nightlife is very lively.

n The Pike in Long Beach The Pike, is the one-stop area in Long Beach that hosts all sorts of fun. With restaurants, a movie theater, and a breathtaking view of the Pacific Ocean, it’s both romantic and convenient. q Popular Restaurants Bubba Gump Shrimp Co.: A great place for all those shrimp lovers who love their shrimp prepared any-way they like. Sharky’s Woodfired Mexican Grill: A Mexican restaurant dedicated to using only fresh ingredients, like those in their “world famous tempura battered fish tacos.”  Boston’s The Gourmet Pizza: This pizza parlor doubles as a sports bar, and cooks up 18 varieties of pizza-pies. q Popular Bars Sgt. Pepper’s Dueling Pianos: This indoor and outdoor bar will bring out your musical spirit as you celebrate any occasion.

Auld Dubliner Irish Pub and Restaurant: Closer than Ireland, come drink traditional Irish spirits without ever using your passport. Mai Tai Bar: One out of only three locations, this exciting, yet relaxing bar is all about the classic mai tai cocktail. q Events/Activities The Laugh Factory: You’ll literally be laughing out loud as this comedy club boasts some of today’s funniest comedians. Happy Hour at The Pike: Six participating restaurants are offering enticing deals on mixed drinks and appetizers. While Long Beach has a big-city feel and a diverse group of people, it also has big-city-like streets, most of them being one-way. If you’re not familiar with the area, it’s easy to get twisted around trying to look for parking (which is sparse). 


THE WESTERN SUN/MARCH 7-21, 2012 7

GWC students show off their campus style By Lourdes Rebaza Western Sun staff writer Street-wear has become a fashion entity all on it’s own, prompting styleguide books and blogs. The Western Sun has taken it from the streets to the campus, asking fellow Golden West College students where they shop, where they get their inspiration from, and what brands they’re sporting. From her Steve Madden “Troopa” boots, to a knitted beanie, Brianna Rivas is all about fashion. She usually shops at Buffalo Exchange and Forever 21 and her inspiration for her daily outfits all come from whatever mood she’s in. “I don’t necessarily care for name brands as long as it looks good,” said Candy Jakstis, 21, who chooses Marshall’s and Ross as her top places to shop. Transparent blouses are her number one item, as it presents a sexy, yet classy look. Shoedazzle.com and Forever 21 helped this fashionista find the jewelry she used to complete her look. Stores like Zumiez, Active, and PacSun are where Anthony Jimenez buys the majority of his wardrobe. Wearing denim RVCA jeans and accessorizing with a white, G-Shock watch, is what makes this trendy outfit look like it took no time to assemble.

Western Sun photos by Lourdes Rebaza

CANDY JAKSTIS (above), Anthony Jimenez (upper right) and Brianna Rivas show their style.

Nostalgia helps to keep us young Nostalgia is defined as that sentimental feeling you get when reminiscing about a beloved memory. Thanks to the technology of today, now nostalgia is easy and fun to accomplish with an app or a T-shirt. People can now feel young again with just the use of their cell phone with apps that convert any captured picture on your phone into a retro-looking, Polaroid-like photo, that will take you back to a time where actual Polaroid film still existed. Even in the fashion-world, there are constant revivals of past styles that seem to pop back up. When you turn on the television, Nineties kids will find that the sitcoms and cartoons they grew up watching are now back on the air for their viewing pleasure. These type of things pull on the heart-strings of sentimental hearts, those yearning to feel the same way they did 10 or more years ago. People are longing to to feel that youthful spark they once had. Emilee Maciel In 1979, Ellen Langer, a Harvard University psychologist, explains everything performed a study where she told elderly men in their seventies and eighties to reminisce about the year 1959. Props were used to help them feel like they were in that era again, like music and newspapers. The results were that these men actually improved on their hearing, memory, and strength, just by remembering what it was like to feel 20 years younger. People also seem to want to feel nostalgic because they can’t stand the time they live in now. It seems that every generation hates or at least has a little bit of animosity for the generation after theirs. As decades pass, so do trends and beliefs, and I believe that some people still want to hold onto those. From beatniks to hippies to hipsters, the new generations to come are morphing into things we can’t control. Like the “blankie” we’ll never throw out, at least we have this new technology to remember what makes us feel good.


8 MARCH 7-21, 2012/THE WESTERN SUN

Orange County’s best burgers Tired of eating fast-food burgers that are quick to make, without much thought or originality? The Western Sun has hand-picked three burger spots, ranging from casual to finedine that will tempt your taste-buds. n TK Burger Located directly across from the beach on 110 Pacific Coast Highway, their humble, but signature taste will have you coming back whether you visit the beach or not. With prices that are great for any beach bum, from $5 to $6, and a hang-loose atmosphere, TK Burger is a surf city classic. -Emilee Maciel

Conjuring up past to expand the future By Leo Gomon Western Sun staff writer Every once in a while, a band comes along and releases an album that restores my faith in American rock n’ roll bands. While The Black Keys and The Foo Fighters dominate the charts, Howlin’ Rain remain under the radar, silently keeping the tradition of bluessoaked, gospel-inspired and gritty, yet soulful rock alive. “The Russian Wilds,” their fourth release, encompasses the dense history of rock n’ roll, paying homage to the pioneers of the genre. Howlin’ Rain is able to synthesize an original, refreshing blend of sounds and moods from past and present. Lead singer/guitarist Ethan Miller and keyboardist/vocalist Joel Robinow deliver a chilling performance, offering a variety of three-part vocal harmonies, intricate guitar work, and classic organ solos and accompaniments. The dynamic combination and variation of rhythms, tempos, and timbres is what truly drives this album home. Bassist Cyrus Comiskey and drummer Raj Ojha are as tight knit as a rhythm section can get, with constant variation and shape shifting of song structures

without going overboard. “Phantom in the Valley” and “Strange Thunder” are long, epic tunes with shifting frameworks that dwell into the progressive genre. While “Cherokee Werewolf” is more traditional, with a verse-chorus-verse format along with gospel backup vocals, “Dark Side” shows off their pop sensibilities. “The Russian Wilds” is a truly timeless album with lyrics that are beautiful, true, and emotive. Those who appreciate a truly eclectic band with songs for everyone will love this inspiring album for all the right reasons.

Album Review

HHHH

n The Counter Freedom of choice is what The Counter is all about, leaving the power of building-your-own burger in your hands. Located on 1104 Irvine Ave. in Newport Beach, instead of receiving a menu, you get a clipboard and check off your choice of patty, topping, and bun. A very unique burger experience for only $7 to $12. -Tiffany Pham n Café Beau Soleil Café Beau Soleil, located at Fashion Island, stands out because they offer burgers on a French cuisine menu. Prices are reasonable, from $12 to $15, for these fancy, juicy burgers. Red meat is not the only option as your burger; choose from salmon, veggie, or turkey. -Tiffany Pham

‘Wanderlust’ strays to your funny bone By Emilee Maciel Western Sun arts&living editor “Wanderlust,” directed by David Wain, is a part art-house, but mostly raunchy comedy that will have the audience rolling-in-their-chairs-laughing at all the crazy antics that play out. Uptight, New York couple, George and Linda (Paul Rudd and Jennifer Aniston), lose all their money after an avalanche of misfortune leading them to relocate to George’s annoying brother’s house in Atlanta, much to Linda’s dismay. However, along the way, the two venture off to a community known as Elysium, where onenight ends up turning into two weeks, in which the couple gets more than what they bargained for as they try to go along with the hippie lifestyles of their new neighbors. Aniston and Rudd exude such great chemistry as their character’s sarcastic punch lines play well off each other. It seems that most of lines were improvised, which must have been hard for the actors and crew to try and keep a straight-face, because those scenes were the most humorous. Rudd has a

PAUL RUDD stars in “Wanderlust.” line that’s similar to his “slappin’ da base” line in “I Love You, Man” that had everyone in the theater roaring with laughter. The raunchy part is due to the fact that this film uses a good amount of full-frontal nudity, making you cringe at those selected scenes. Also, the familiar faces of the other actors, creContinued on page 9


THE WESTERN SUN/MARCH 7-21, 2012 9

WHAT’S UP March 7-22 Emilee Maciel & Teresa Do Come to the Long Beach Playhouse Theater and experience a night dedicated to Sherlock Holmes lovers as Steven’s Dietz directs “Sherlock Holmes: The Final Adventure.” Full of danger, love, and sharp wits, this performance will have you on the edge of your seat. Open Thursday to Saturday and running till March 24, with tickets ranging from $14 to $24. Peter Frampton’s 2011 “Frampton Comes Alive 35 Tour,” has been extended. Fans will enjoy this three-hour performance of his multiplatinum, live album “Frampton Come Alive!” Performing at the Long Beach Terrace Theatre on March 14 at 8 p.m. and tickets are $35 to $70. St. Patrick’s Day at Longboard Pub, on Main Street in Huntington Beach, will have you seeing green- as they serve-up green champagne and green beer, on March 17. Enjoy the live entertainment provided by Mahoney, Wild Irish Musician, while you snack on corned-beef tacos.

“Canvas, Paint, and Wine, Oh My!” is fun group event that mixes painting and drinking that results in masterpieces. No experience is necessary for these classes hosted by Luggatti’s Italian Grill on 210 Fifth St. in Huntington Beach. The evening starts at 7:30 p.m. and goes till 9 p.m. and is $59 per class.

‘Wanderlust’ Continued from page 8

ates the vibe of the movie. The story was slightly predictable, and had do-whatevermakes-you feel-happy themes. Towards the end however, it got a little cheesy with the unnecessary jokes here and there.  Visually, the movie is easy on the eyes, with flourishing flowers and forests of the Elysium location. Also, the costumes, which looked like they were bought at a Buffalo Exchange, fit the characters well, giving them that current-hippie look.  Overall, “Wanderlust” was good for a few laughs, even with its lewd comedy, but not either Rudd’s or Aniston’s close to best work. 

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PhotoPoll

“What do you think about illegal immigrants having access to a driver’s license?”

Brooke Austin 19, Seal Beach Business “I do not think illegal immigrants should have access to driving licenses. They should first become an American citizen just like the rest of us, but if they do, they should pay their fair share. Taxes.”

Glenn Smith 35, Seal Beach Business “It is a great way to track illegal aliens in America. I think they should verify their information, charge them a tax, issue them a picture license, and subject them to the same laws regarding liability and insurance that legal citizens follow.”

Robyn Downey 20, Huntington Beach Teaching “I think they should be allowed to access a driving license because most of them drive anyway. It does us no harm, so why not? Just as long as they know the laws and follow them.”

Jeremiah Hazel 22, Garden Grove Business management “I think it is fine as long as they follow the same procedures as we do, follow the laws and abide by them.”

Sasha Hild 19, Westminster Music “I think that they should be allowed to get a driver’s license, but instead of creating a law that allows illegal immigrants to have only certain rights, they should make it easier for them to become a legal citizen.”

Photos and interviews by Jocelyn Huerta

Start your morning off right with ‘Breakfast’

‘Two Masters’ will open on Main Stage

By Adam Stites Western Sun executive editor

Based on Venetian playwright Carlo Goldoni’s original 1743 comedy as adapted by Jeffrey Hatcher and Paolo Emilio Landi, “The Servant of Two Masters” is about a servant who gets caught in the middle of his masters’ shenanigans, and is coming to Golden West College’s Main Stage Theater. Truffaldino, is the servant (unbeknownst to each other) to a pair of lovers, Beatrice and Florindo, tries to balance his masters’ orders, some of which he’s not even sure which master it’s coming from. Throughout the trials and tribulations, poor, starving Tuffaldino goes on a comedic journey, slaving away to help his enamored employers. Directed by GWC’s own, Tom Amen, this two-hour production, will run starting from March 16 to 25. mission, and can be purchased either Tickets are $10 for GWC students online, on the GWC performing arts and seniors and $25 for general ad- website or on campus at the box office.

Between a Guinness World Recordbreaking nine hour, 18 minute freestyle rap and their 2010 single, “Opposite of Adults” that has drawn millions of hits on Youtube, Philadelphia hip-hop duo, Chiddy Bang, has already built up a significant following on the internet. Now with their debut studio album, “Breakfast” (released Feb. 21), Chidera “Chiddy” Anamege and Noah “Xaphoon Jones” Beresin are looking to break out from the underground ranks, and into the limelight of the mainstream. The duo wastes no time recapturing the same light-hearted magic that brought them critical acclaim with “Mind Your Manners” and “Ray Charles,” tracks four and five, respectively. Both songs carry Xaphoon Jones’s signature, indie/electronica sounds mixed with classic hip hop-style beats, while Chiddy lays over with inventive and smooth lyrics. On tracks like “Baby Roulette,”

By Emilee Maciel Western Sun arts & living editor

sounds from classic, 8-bit video games can be heard in the background and add an extra touch that somehow fits perfectly with the high-energy vibe set down by early tracks. The album will surely impress Chiddy  Bang  fans and casual music-listeners alike; however, with the exception of “Mind Your Manners,” the album lacks individual singles that can stand alone. In a now, single-driven industry, particularly in the hip-hop genre, that may not bode well for Chiddy Bang in their pursuit of stardom. Regardless, “Breakfast” is an album that is best described as fun and will appeal to any casual fan of pop and hip hop music. 

Album Review

HHHH

Visit www.westernsun.us for current news and back issues of The Western Sun.


THE WESTERN SUN/MARCH 7-21 2012 11

Bounties cross the line As if there was any question that football is the most popular sport in America, the Neilsen ratings for the latest Super Bowl came in at a recordbreaking 111.3 million viewers, making the game the most watched television program in history. With so many fans and so many viewers, it’s easy to see why there would be public resistance to any changes that go against the nature of the game. Any rule change to diminish the violence that has made the game so popular is met with backlash. It’s now becoming clear though, that a fundamental change in the culture of the sport is necessary. On March 2 came news that former defensive coordinator of the New Orleans Adam Stites Saints, Gregg Williams, had a “bounty” program that provided monetary incentives for defensive players to intentionally injure star players on opposing teams. In the hours following the breaking news came reports that Williams had similar programs during his time as a coach with the Washington Redskins, Buffalo Bills and Tennessee Titans. One former Bills safety, Coy Wire, told Buffalo News that he was “showered with praise” from Williams for ending the career of Detroit Lions running back James Stewart. Respect for an opponent amidst the violence of competition is what makes the sport such a beautiful and popular one. Figures like Williams cross that line and are indicative of a trend that is troubling and needs to be addressed starting with youth football leagues. Fining, suspending or even banning Williams is not going to solve the bigger issue for the NFL. The culture of football needs to be fundamentally changed if it hopes to continue to be America’s favorite game.

FOOTBALL needs a culture change.

Caldwell stars for GWC in the Beach Classic at CSULB Rustlers one of 28 teams competing in track and field event By Candace Finley and Adam Stites Western Sun staff writer and executive editor The Rustlers were one of 28 track and field teams, including Division I athletic programs like USC, Long Beach State, Cal State Fullerton and Loyola Marymount, that competed in the 2012 Beach Classic at Cerritos College on March 2-3. The two-day invitational hosted by Long Beach State featured many of the top collegiate athletes in Southern California, including several Golden West athletes that finished in the top 10 in their respective events. Freshman Natasha Caldwell earned the highest place of any GWC athlete with a 38.18 meter heave in the women’s javelin throw that was bested by only three other athletes and earned her a fourth-place finish. Two Rustlers finished in the top 10 for the women’s pole vault with Hawaii-bound Juli Powell finishing seventh with a 3.28 meter vault and Kaylie Higa finishing tenth with 3.13 meters. While the Rustlers men didn’t have as strong a showing as their women counterparts, three athletes finished in the top 10 of their events including sophomore DeAngelo Bonner, who finished tenth in the men’s high jump with a 1.87 meter jump. The Rustlers will next travel to Cal State Fullerton on March 9-10 to participate in the Ben Brown Invitational, a prestigious event that will also feature several Division I programs in competition.

GWC softball snaps 4-game losing streak The Golden West softball team snapped a four game winning streak with a 12-4 victory over Santa Monica on Saturday, March 3 to close out the 35th annual GWC Invitational. The tournament, hosted by the Rustlers on March 2-3, crowned Santa Barbara City as champions of the 12-team field after defeating Southwestern 8-4 in the finals. The hosts instead lost two consecutive games on the opening day of the tournament, but bounced back with a win to round out the weekend. With the victory, the Rustlers improved to 5-11 overall and carry a 2-3 conference record into a stretch of nine consecutive conference games starting with a trip to play Cypress on the road on March 7 (today) at 3 p.m.

Western Sun photo by Candace Finley

HOLLY ANTHONY (left), Kristi Perrotta and Joseph Lee were among the GWC athletes who competed in the Beach Classic.

Scores & Schedules n Baseball Results: March 3 – GWC 1, Irvine Valley 0 Upcoming: March 8 – GWC at Riverside, 2 p.m. March 10 - OCC at GWC, 12 p.m. March 13 - Cypress at GWC, 2 p.m. n Softball Results: March 3 – GWC 12, Santa Monica 4 Upcoming: March 7 - GWC at Cypress, 3 p.m. March 9 - Santa Ana at GWC, 2 p.m. March 12 - Saddleback at GWC, 6 p.m. n Men’s Volleyball Results: March 2 - GWC 3, SD Mesa 0 Upcoming: March 9 - OCC at GWC, 6 p.m. March 14 - GWC at SD City, 6 p.m. March 16 - Palomar at GWC. 6 p.m.


12 MARCH 7-21, 2012/THE WESTERN SUN

Sports

Adam Stites, executive and sports editor

Unbeaten streak of 10 games for Rustler baseball GWC tied for first in Orange Empire Conference race By Sarah Martinez Western Sun staff writer The Golden West baseball team hasn’t lost a game since Feb. 10 and continued that streak on March 3 when the Rustlers hosted the Irvine Valley, and held them off to earn a win, 1-0.  The only run of the game came during the second inning after William Shaw started off the inning with a single. Shaw later stole second base allowing Josh Cunningham to hit an RBI single and bring Shaw home.  The true hero of the game, though, was pitcher Jason Deitrich who pitched the entire game, and along with the defense, was able to shut out the opposition. “He pitched a great game, the pitch

Standings

Orange Empire Conference records

Team Conference Overall 2-0 15-1-1 Orange Coast 2-0 10-4-1 Golden West 1-1 12-3 Santa Ana 1-1 11-3 Cypress 1-1 7-8 Irvine Valley 1-1 6-9 Riverside 0-2 5-7 Saddleback 0-2 5-9-1 Fullerton

Top Batters

Leading Rustler batting averages

1. Blake Cooper 2. Alex Hernandez 3. Bobby Webb 4. Chase Harrison 5t. Donald Sneed 5t. Daniel DeWolf

.417 .389 .367 .351 .333 .333

Standings as of March 5

count was fine, that’s why we didn’t take him out of the game. He has proven he could go nine ininings before,” said Rustlers head coach Bert Villarreal. In the fourth inning, Irvine Valley threatened to tie, loading the bases with two outs, but Deitrich was able to force Dan Jimenez into a grounder that turned into an out at first base. “Jason [Deitrich] is doing heck of a job right now. He kept them off balance the entire game, and got them out

Western Sun photos by Sarah Martinez

KYLE JONES reached base three times against Irvine Valley on Saturday, getting two hits and one walk. of jams when he needed to,” Villarreal said. On March 6, Golden West traveled to play Saddleback. The Rustlers will

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next play on the road against Riverside at 2 p.m. on Thursday, March 8 and host Orange Coast at 12 p.m. on Saturday, March 10.

Men’s v-ball wins PCAC opening game By Jose Garcia and Adam Stites Western Sun staff writer and executive editor The Golden West men’s volleyball team kicked off conference play in the right direction, beating Irvine Valley College in three consecutive sets on Wednesday, Feb. 29. With a team-leading 11 kills from sophomore Aaron Girardi, 10 kills from freshman Phil Lopez and nine kills from freshman Jack Terry, the Rustlers were able to swamp the opposition 25-22, 25-23, 25-23. Golden West next traveled to San Diego Mesa for another Pacific Coast Athletic Conference game that they won 25-12, 25-22, 25-23. The Rustlers will next play host for Orange Coast in the Golden West gym on Friday, March 9 at 6 p.m and will again travel to San Diego, this time to compete against San Diego City College on Wednesday, March 14.


Let’s end the Lin-sensitivity Sports. Page 12

Gay images missing in the media

Extraordinary plein art on display

THE WESTERN

SUN

Opinion. Page 4

A&L. Page 8

Let your tastebuds play A&L. Page 9

Volume 41, Number 9 n Golden West College n Feb. 22-March 6, 2012 n www.westernsun.us

Task force reforms are approved

The Western Sun presents The Sunnies

By Cory Gaudaur Western Sun news editor After a year-long study conducted by the California Community College Student Success Task Force, the Board of Governors has unanimously voted and approved their critical reform plan that will aim to increase graduation, certificate achievement, and transfer rates at the 112 schools that are part of the system. The Board of Governors-appointed task force, made up of California Community College faculty, students, administrators, researchers, and staff, has taken the research collected in their study and established a list of 22 new guidelines that will encourage students to transfer quickly and increase the graduation, associate’s, and certificate attainment rate. Thao Tran, the transfer center coordinator at Golden West College said, “a majority of students will transfer within two years time and students will be encouraged to transfer into the Cal State Continued on page 2

Golden West students have voted

Western Sun photo

EMILEE MACIEL “hosts” the awards

With the 84th annual Academy Awards set to air this Sunday, Feb. 26, The Western Sun is proud to present the first annual “Sunny Awards.” With 100 votes from Golden West students, get excited to find out who will take home the first ever group of ‘Sunnies.’ Did your favorites walk away holding the sun in their hands? Hopefully the nominees packed their sunscreen. Turn to pages six and seven in the arts and living section to see the students’ favorite cinematic performances and pieces of 2011-2012.

Intercultural program expands horizons at GWC more diverse, the importance of a program such as this is invaluable to those students wishing to bridge the cultural The Intercultural Program at Gold- gap. The mission of the program “is to provide the campus community with en West College has recultural and social procently appointed a new grams that are accompacoordinator, Student “The light is on nied by an educational Activities staff member component,” said Orteand someone Lorena Ortega. “The ga. light is on and someone is home,” says According to Ortega is home” says Ortega of Ortega. “the single most imporopening the doors to the tant move that was made Intercultural Program was to allow the program office for the spring 2012 semester. to be staffed and open to the public on As Golden West College and its a continuous basis.” And staffed it is. surrounding communities become Although the program office was

By Dale Lendrum Western Sun staff writer

LORENA ORTEGA

closed in the fall 2011 semester for “retooling,” the program itself put on a number of events in collaboration with various clubs on campus such as G.L.A.S.A., Peace, Mind, and Body, Mi Casa, Puente, and EOPS/CARE/ EFY as well as community groups such as the AIDS Services Foundation. In addition to various events that will take place on campus during the spring 2012 semester, the Intercultural Program is planning field trips to the African-American Heritage Museum, Museum of Tolerance, as well as their annual trip to the Orange County Rescue Mission.


2 FEB. 22-MARCH 6, 2012/THE WESTERN SUN

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Task force reforms OK’d by Board of Governors 8 areas of focus with 22 recommendations

INCREASING graduation rates is a goal of the task force. Continued from page 1

system.” As an incentive for students to transfer or graduate, those who do not declare an area of study within three semesters will not be given priority when it comes time to register for classes. In addition to encouraging students to transfer quickly, the task force recommendations also aim to help better prepare new students to navigate the California Community College system. New students will be required to attend orientation, participate in a diagnostic assessment, and develop an education plan.

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Campus & Community

Cory Gaudaur, news editor

New Media Center puts more GWC

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classes online By Cory Gaudaur Western Sun news editor With 120 online classes offered at Golden West College this semester it is no wonder that the New Media Center, located in the brand new Learning Resource Center, is hard at work to revolutionize the way that students are able to interact with professors and students alike, in an online setting. While the new center offers state-of-the-art production equipment and a complete video production studio, it has taken five years to complete, and the move to the new building has left the New Media Center in a “limbo period for the last six months,” said John Hanna, the production facilitator at the New Media Center. Now that the center is up and running, Hanna and the rest of the staff are ready to change the way that students participate in an online class. “The goal is to record any campus activity or lecture that professors want, and upload them to iTunes U for students to view,” Hanna said. iTunes U, an all-new application from Apple, grants students the ability to access every aspect of a specific course in one place, from audio and video lectures, to textbooks and assignments. The New Media Center is able to assist GWC professors that teach online classes by providing them with the equipment and editing skills necessary to create lectures that can be broadcast to students via the Internet to computers, smartphones and tablet devices. Hanna said that through the use of video and sound, “we help them demonstrate something that would otherwise be difficult to do in an online class.” The use of online video lectures also “helps restore some of the human contact that can be missing from an online class,” said Hanna, as many online classes offer little to no interaction with professors or fellow classmates.

CUSTOMERS BROWSE the selections at the Golden West College swap meet.

Western Sun photo by Javier Silva

Swap meet brings GWC money Weekend event raises revenue for Golden West programs By Javier Silva Western Sun staff writer The Golden West Swap Meet is an excellent source for shopping and entertainment, and offers many vendors where one can find anything from phone accessories to furniture. The Golden West Swap Meet brings in weekly revenue for Golden West College of about $54,400.

According to Janet Houlihan, vice president of student life and administrative services at GWC, the money benefits the school in various ways. “The swap meet is self supporting and pays for all of its expenses. In addition, the college charges the swap meet rent to use the parking lot. These funds are put back into general funds and are utilized for instructional and student service support,” Houlihan said.

Students and citizens of Huntington Beach enjoy the swap meet as well. Jessica Seville, a student at Golden West College said, “I really enjoy the cheap good finds. I found a really nice gold framed mirror which I was expecting to find at a vintage store, you never really know what you are going to find here.” For more information, contact the Community Services Program .

Pell Grant program faces drastic cuts By Dale Lendrum Western Sun staff writer In an effort to reduce federal spending, severe changes have been made to the Federal Pell Grant Program that are sure to have a negative financial impact on Golden West College students in years to come. “The proposed changes are slated to take place in the fall of 2012,” said Steve Skille, financial aid director at Golden West College. Mandated by the Federal Omnibus Spending Bill of 2011, an automatic “0” Expected Family Contribution,

which automatically qualifies a student for the maximum award, now requires an income of less than $23,000. The change in qualification requirements is drastic, compared to the minimum required income of $32,000 only last year. “The number of semesters that a student can receive Pell Grants has also been reduced from 18 semesters to 12 semesters,” Skille said. In addition, those wishing to attend college without a high school diploma or the equivalent will no longer be eligible for Pell Grants. However, other proposed changes

in eligibility requirements, such as eliminating Pell grants for any but fulltime students, were rejected. Had this requirement not been struck down, there surely would have been a serious impact on financial aid students nationwide. In order to prepare for the changes ahead, Silke said students should be “encouraged to educate themselves more about financial aid.” The Financial Aid Office will provide updated information concerning these changes as they are finalized and implemented.


4 FEB. 22-MARCH 6, 2012/THE WESTERN SUN

Opinion

THE WESTERN SUN/FEB. 22-MARCH 6, 2012 5

Alexander Strada, opinion editor

No pity for Paterno had told him, “he had seen a ... mature person who was fondling, whatever you might call it – I’m not sure what People have defended Joe Paterno’s the term would be – a young boy,” gorole in the Jerry Sandusky case and de- ing on to explain the “mature person” cried his persecution for failing to re- had been Sandusky. While it is true he fulfilled his leport Sandusky’s alleged rapes of boys gal obligations, any adult knows that to the police since the story first broke. A New York Times article report- in America, law and morality are mere ed thousands of Penn State students distant cousins. Paterno’s own testimony damns him. took to rioting in Anyone with huthe streets after Pa- “Anyone with human deterno was relieved cency who hears of children man decency who of his coaching po- being ‘fondled’ has a duty to hears of children being “fondled” has sition, tearing down put an immediate stop to it a duty to put an imlight poles, breakmediate stop to it ing car windows, and seek justice.” and seek justice. Paoverturning a news terno swam through van, assaulting police with rocks and denial for nine years while Sandusky fireworks, and chanting “We are Penn racked up allegations, and is more than State.” One protester commented the me- deserving of any shame we can heap dia was responsible for “JoePa’s” ter- on him. Although the rioters’ behavior mination, adding he felt Paterno had fulfilled his moral and legal obligations clearly demonstrates how very enlightened they are, defending Paterno by notifying university authorities. In his grand jury report, Paterno is at best misguided, at worst flat-out stated subordinate Michael McQueary wrong.

By Alexander Strada Western Sun opinion editor

FIRE CONTROLMAN 2ND CLASS MARISSA GAETA, left, kisses her fiancé, Fire Controlman 3rd Class Citlalic Snell.

More gays in media

through such media we begin to acquire some of our culture’s social norms. The fact of the matter is there aren’t enough healthy gay relationships “I don’t mind gay people, so long as they don’t show their gayness around portrayed in the media. The Gay and me,” is the ignorant attitude often Lesbian Alliance Against Defamation held by well meaning heterosexuals. counted a mere 25 recurring LGBT Though surely offensive to any homo- (lesbian, gay, bisexual, or transgender) sexual person, perhaps it isn’t entirely characters on cable television in 2010, and numbers have fallen since then. their fault that they feel The more familiar this way. “Could it be that we as someone is with a topEven as a gay man ic or image the more myself, I’m caught off a society are just not guard when I see ho- accustomed to being ex- likely they are to feel mosexual couples af- posed to gay couples?” comfortable viewing and discussing it. Perfectionate in public, haps the answer lies and they definitely standout more than in showing more LGBT relationships heterosexual couples; but why is that? in the media so it’s not such an oddity Could it be that we as a society are just when encountered for the first time in not accustomed to being exposed to person. gay couples? As for the heterosexuals that quesThere’s no doubt television and tion why gays have to show their “gaymovies play important roles in the ness,” I suggest that you go a day or way that we learn about the world and the people around us as we grow up; two not showing your “straightness.”

By Travon Nesbit Western Sun Staff Writer

MEMORIAL VIGIL held at Penn State for Paterno after his death

EXECUTIVE EDITOR: Adam Stites MANAGING EDITOR: Emilee Maciel NEWS EDITOR: Cory Gaudaur OPINION EDITOR: Alexander Strada ARTS&LIVING: Emilee Maciel SPORTS EDITOR: Adam Stites ADVISOR: Jim Tortolano ADVERTISING DIRECTOR & WEBMASTER: Katie Cumper STAFF WRITERS AND PHOTOGRAPHERS: Krystal Lynn Mutschler, Andre McCleese, Ashleigh Ford, Ashley Saunders, Beatrice Zamora, Candace Finley, Cindy Kaufinger, Dale Lendrum, Danny Baker, Heidi Kaufinger, James Gomez, Javier Silva, Jayme Bommerito, Jose Garcia, Katarzyna Jarek, Leo Gomon, Lourdes Rebaza, Monica Dekany, Sarah Martinez, Shainnen Somerville, Taylor Goodall, Teresa Do, Tiffany Pham, Travon Nesbit THE WESTERN SUN is published biweekly on Wednesdays by the newspaper production classes of Golden West College. Opinions expressed in The Sun, unless otherwise indicated, are those of the individual writer or artist and do not necessarily reflect those of the college, district, or any other organization or agency. The Sun is a member of the Journalism Association of Community Colleges and the California Newspaper Publishers’ Assn. Offices are at 15744 Goldenwest St., Huntington Beach, CA 92647 in the Fine Arts building, room 138. Phones: 714-895-8786 (news), 895-8256 (advertising), 895-8795 (fax). E-mail: gwcwesternsun@gmail.com

News flash: beating kids is bad Remember watching Disney movies as a kid? Ever wonder why, in real life, good and evil are not so clearly defined? Where are the Jafars, the Ursulas, or the Scars? You could point to people like Osama Bin Laden, Bashar-Al Assad, or Muammar Gaddafi as candidates, but Assad and Gaddafi are terrors of far-off lands, who can’t bear the blame for the ills that befall us at home, and Osama’s death hardly brought us our “happily ever after.” Unfortunately, in real life, it is subtle evils, perpeAlexander trated by often well-intenStrada tioned people, that result in the most suffering. According to a Time.com article, a study published in the Canadian Medical Association Journal examined 20 years of published research and found that children who are physically punished get more aggressive over time, and that they are prone to lifelong depression, low self-esteem, lowered IQ, and anxiety. Why did we need 20 years of study to figure this out? Which part of beating children that love you and don’t know any better, of doing something most people aren’t comfortable doing to dogs, sounds like a dignified choice? In the article, Joan Durrant, head author of the study, explains that her 3-year-old son threw his dad’s toothbrush in the toilet: “Another parent might have yelled, but Durrant’s academic background helped her realize that he was just experimenting... ‘I explained what goes into toilets and then said, Do you think Daddy is going to want to put that toothbrush in his mouth now?’ Message transmitted with no yelling.” In other words, and brace yourself, because you might miss this one: Durrant explained what the child did wrong. With words. Did her son go mad? Did he run naked in the streets, amok with undisciplined power as his pushover mother quaked in fear at the terror her carelessness had wrought? Actually, her son never dropped anything sensitive into the toilet again. The horror!

“OCCUPY” PROTESTERS camping in masks. How productive is this really?

America’s been struck dumb By James Gomez Western Sun staff writer

Over the course of our history, Americans have rallied to causes that affected every citizen’s immediate well-being. We armed ourselves with knowledge and organized in massive numbers. Our blood has been spilled overseas to stop global expansion and fascism, and at home as we marched and protested against wars and fought for equal civil rights. America was strong, united, and aware. Now, it seems our country is facing a new problem: a loss of its voice.

Concussions in football raise dilemma By Alexander Strada Western Sun Opinion Editor Yet another season of football has slipped by without anyone questioning the safety of 250-plus-pound men crashing into each other at full sprints. According to the New York Times, a 2000 study surveying 1,090 former players found over 60 percent had at least one concussion, 26 percent had three or more, with those suffering them reporting more problems with memory, concentration, speech impediments, headaches and other neurological issues than those who hadn’t. In 2009, a study commissioned by the NFL reported much higher incidence of Alzheimer’s and other memory-related diseases in former players, “including a rate of 19 times the normal rate for men ages 30-49.” It doesn’t seem surprising that using your head as an airbag should cause long-term harm, yet it is a question that, season after season, always manages to go unasked.

In recent years, the only incident that has moved us to take a stand dealt with corporations evading bankruptcy through government aid. Massive financial bail outs and frustration with politicians motivated the Tea Party and Occupy movements, the latter of which was almost four years late. Protesters in both movements were unorganized, and mostly comprised of the ill-informed. What’s worse, the initial Occupy Wall Street movement was initiated by

a Canadian organization, AdBusters, while the Tea Party was a fake grassroots movement drummed up by Fox News and conservative organization FreedomWorks. It’s not enough to stand in a crowd or sleep outside overnight, nor does worldwide media coverage matter when the people banded together don’t understand the cause they are fighting for. How can we take a stand for change when we have no voice to express ourselves?

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6 FEB. 22-MARCH 6, 2012/THE WESTERN SUN

THE WESTERN SUN/FEB. 22-MARCH 6, 2012 7

Arts&Living

H Best Director

Emilee Maciel, arts & living editor

Forget the Oscars – it’s The Sunnies Welcome to the first annual Sunnies Awards, presented by The Western Sun. Golden West College students were red-carpet-ready when asked to vote for their favorite 2012 Academy Awards nominee for the following categories: best picture, director, actor, actress, supporting actor, actress and best animated feature.

ASA BUTTERFIELD and Chloë Grace Moretz in Scorcese’s “Hugo.”

H Best Supporting Actor

H Best Picture

JONAH HILL in “Moneyball.”

EMMA STONE as Skeeter Phelan in “The Help.”

Kenneth Branagh (“My Week With Marilyn”), Jonah Hill (“Moneyball”), Nick Nolte (“Warrior”), Christopher Plummer (“Beginners”), Max von Sydow (“Extremely Loud & Incredibly Close”).

H Best Actor

GEORGE CLOONEY as Matt King in “The Descendants.”

MAX VON SYDOW in “Extremely Loud & Incredibly Close.”

H Best Supporting Actress

BRAD PITT in “Moneyball.”

MELISSA MCCARTHY as Megan in “Bridesmaids.”

H Best Actress

ROONEY MARA in “The Girl With The Dragon Tattoo.”

PENELOPE ANN MILLER and Jean Dujardin in “The Artist.”

OCTAVIA SPENCER in “The Help.”

H Best Animated Feature

MERYL STREEP as Margaret Thatcher in “The Iron Lady.”

JOHNNY DEPP voices “Rango.”

Data collection and content by Monica Dekany. Layout and design by Alexander Strada Western Sun staff writer and Sun opinion editor

ANTONIO BANDERAS voices “Puss in Boots.”


8 FEB. 22-MARCH 6, 2012/THE WESTERN SUN

THE WESTERN SUN/FEB. 22-MARCH 6, 2012 9

WHAT’S UP Feb. 22 - March 6/James Gomez As children, we all loved playing dodgeball and jumping on trampolines. Sky High Sports in Costa Mesa has combined the two for maximum enjoyment. For just $11 per player, your six-man team can fly through the air, evading projectiles like Spiderman, where the first place team brings home a prize.

In the velvet darkness of the blackest night, burning bright, there’s a guiding star leading fans of The Rocky Horror Picture Show to the Long Beach Art Theater. The Midnight Insanity troupe has rocked out audience participation shows for over 20 years, every Saturday at midnight. Tickets are $11 and purchasing in advance is highly suggested.

If you’re looking for a scene that’s a bit more mellow, then head on over to Santa Ana and grab a table at The Gypsy Den. This tasty vegan eatery started hosting an open-mic night this month and has already become a hot spot for local talent. For those wishing to express themselves the sign-ups begin at 6:30 p.m. and the show starts at 7 p.m.

Theatre Out (202 N. Broadway, Santa Ana) will be ending its run of the politically incorrect and wildly entertaining show, Avenue Q, this Saturday, Feb. 25. For those who still don’t know the joy of seeing puppets, singing about the dangers of STDs and subtle racism, there are still tickets available for $20-$25.

Nothing ‘Plein’ about fine arts exhibit By Monica Dekany Western Sun staff writer Golden West College Fine Arts Gallery is showcasing a style of art called “Plein Air painting” from Feb. 9 to March 1. This approach is from the same time period as French impressionists, around the early 1800’s, and a strong revival of the famous style occurred 15 years ago.  Plein air is a way of capturing a landscape, so the viewer feels as if they are really there.  Standing at a distance is necessary in order to understand the feelings and emotions depicted, however once you get close up, you can see the individual brushstrokes and details of the paint itself. GWC student Mary Ann Thompson said, “I love the colors and lighting the art uses and how the movement makes me feel like I am really there.” Over 200 plein artists in Southern California exhibit their work and 10 of them are on display at this event.  Greta Linwood transports the viewer to the lush forests of Oregon, while

Everything listeners have come to expect from The Fray is present in their latest album “Scars & Stories.” While they do branch out on the record, the band mostly stays true to the, now formulaic, sound of their previous releases refreshing, but familiar sounding collection of 12 songs to add to their repertoire. “Heartbeat” opens the LP with sounds so similar to the band’s sophomore, self-titled album “The Fray,” that it might as well have been a bonus track. It serves as the perfect bridge,

Western Sun photo by Leo Gomon

CHICKEN WINGS with Cilantro Aioli. By Leo Gomon Western Sun staff writer

Located on a convenient corner in the emergently hip, downtown Santa Ana district, The Playground is a confident, eclectic, and fun brick-and-mortar restaurant. Opened by Chef Jason Quinn, who may be remembered from his victorious run on the Food Network’s “The Great Food Truck Race” with The Lime Truck, The Playground has style and character, refusing to simply fit into the mold of generic, standardized menu, establishments. Before I get to the food, it’s worth mentioning that the beer selection is second to none in all of Orange County, with 15 beers always on tap. There’s also the extensive bottle list, which

requires its own separate menu, consisting of a vast selection of craft beers from breweries across the country, making experimentation fun. The cost of these exotic beers is the only drawback; the prices range from a reasonable $5, to a higher than desired, $35. The food menu is usually divided into three parts, each based on type of food and pricing. Vegetables, small meat, large meat and desert are the categories, with prices starting at $5 for the hand-cut fries served with “not ketchup” to $32 for the Wagyu New York Steak. The beautiful thing about The Playground is the diverse and ever changing selection of food to order, as Quinn often changes the selections based on what ingredients he is able to get his hands on, which are always fresh and cooked to perfection. Often, there are items that are not listed on the menu, but are available to order, such as the chicken wings with cilantro aioli. The atmosphere is dark, moody, yet lighthearted and energetic, with the menu written with chalk on the walls, along with quotes, pictures, and sayings. All food is prepared as is, with no compromise to change, which may anger some customers. The Playground knows what it’s all about, and knows that the customers understand how seriously Jason and his staff, take their craft.

New shoe style

HHHH

CHANGE YOUR FUTURE. TODAY.

By Lourdes Rebaza Western Sun staff writer

Western Sun photo by Monica Dekany

GWC STUDENT Shainnen Sommerville surveys the gallery. Rachel Uchizono captures Laguna Beach accurately. According to curator Daryl Ebert, “Creating the mood of the landscape is very important to all plein air artists and our event showcas-

es their amazing talent.” The gallery is open daily from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. where the public is welcome to peruse and experience this unique style of artistry.

reminding old fans of everything they love about the band while also thoroughly introducing newcomers to what they’ve missed and what to expect. Things pickup just a little bit on the somehow playvful, danceable “The Fighter,” that sings of a girl familiar with the feeling of loneliness. This is where The Fray really soars; their ability to discuss weighty, emotional subjects, but somehow sweep them up with bright, yet still appropriate melodies so neither the listener nor the message gets caught in a pool of

Music Review

HHHH

melancholy. The album differs from previous recordings in the sense that it’s more guitar focused and upbeat, but Slade makes up for this with two, pure piano ballads “I Can Barely Say” and “Be Still,” the latter calmly closing the disc. The Fray experiments just a bit in their latest work, but relish in their definitive sound that’s sure to always please and, more importantly, succeed on the charts.

Shoes are everything for a true trend-setter when it comes to his/her wardrobe, and the pair that’s on everyone’s wishlist is Jeffrey Campbell’s “Lita” shoes. Although they’ve been out for quite a while, everyone is still dying to get their hands on one of these pairs. The 11-year old brand has captivated the true meaning of vintage style and gives off an instant runway look. The line of shoes has created it own unique style that is recognizable all over the world. Celebrities like Jessica Alba, Demi Lovato, Lucy Hale, Dev, Kendall Jenner, Nicole “Snooki” Polizzi, and many more have been spotted wearing these shoes all over town. These platform, five-inch wood heels with twoinch sole make them comfortable to walk around all day or be out dancing at night. The now iconic heels come in many different designs, textures, materials, and colors, which makes it perfect for everyone’s taste. All the inspiration and designs behind the famous shoes comes from Jeffrey Campbell’s blogs and Tumblr accounts, and regular people like us that have passion for shoes nationwide. Although they may be pricey, ranging from $175 to $200 for each pair, you’ll never regret it.

You don’t have to be bad to be good

Food Review

JEFFREY Campbell’s new line.

The Fray will not leave you “Scarred” By Travon Nesbit Western Sun staff writer

A Playground of flavor

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Earlier this month, Whitney Houston, a pop-culture icon who touched so many hearts and souls through her music, passed away. Houston was found dead in her hotel bathroom, allegedly from mixing prescription drugs and alcohol, and not from drowning, as some originally thought. Houston’s downward spiral of drugs and personal torment, had taken a toll on her talent. During her rise to fame, she had a voice like none-other; however, in most of her recent performance footage, her Emilee Maciel one-of-a-kind voice sounded very raspy explains everything and hoarse. This extremely talented star’s sudden passing should be a warning to stars on the rise and future talents. Unlike Houston and many artists who died too soon, they should stay away from anything that might damage their talent. In today’s pop-culture, being bad seems to be a lot more interesting than being good or safe. Almost everywhere you look, there’s “sugar and spice” cultural stereotypes. Specifically in the music industry, several female artists, when just starting out often take a “good girl” image, then transition to a “bad girl” image. One is the girl-next-door type, then the other is a sex siren. However in some cases, the transition isn’t a smooth one, often involving drugs and excessive alcohol. Jean Kilbourne, author of “Can’t Buy Me Love: How Advertising Changes the Way We Think and Feel,” wrote that if a girl is identified as “bad” she is often, “Shunned for lacking the will or desire to conform and will flaunt her sexuality, seduce inappropriate partners, smoke, drink flamboyantly and use other drugs.” Britney Spears is an example of this; once a sweet innocent girl circa her “Baby One More Time” album, then turned bad girl, sex-pot. After shedding her good-girl image Spears was spotted smoking cigarettes, and doing outrageous, mediafrenzy spiels, that resulted in horrible music and a decline of fans. Rihanna, is a positive example of the good-girl-gone-bad changeover. When she first popped into the music scene, she was considered a Barbados dance princess, but nowadays she’s a hip-hop bombshell. Just by chopping off her long locks and wearing provocative outfits, she managed to morph into her current look, without her music suffering. The key is to not take up smoking, hard drugs, or drink too much because the outcome of this might damage your talent. A healthier way is to just sex-up your image, and give off the illusion that you are a “bad girl.” Your performer image doesn’t have to overlap with your real-life image.


THE WESTERN SUN/FEB. 22-MARCH 6, 2012 11

10 FEB. 22-MARCH 6, 2012/THE WESTERN SUN

PhotoPoll

“How do you feel about Prop. 8 being declared unconstitutional?”

Powell twins going their separate ways By Jose Garcia Western Sun staff writer

Jessie Cvetas 25, Huntington Beach Biology “Fantastic. I’m bisexual.”

Paige Tesmer 20, Signal Hill Communications “I think everyone is entitled to their opinions. I don’t think it should remain men and women only.”

Jesus Equihua 22, Costa Mesa Graphic design “I’m glad that they were able to come to that ruling. We live in a time that that shouldn’t even be questioned. People should be able to live their lives however they want.”

Photos and interviews by Krystal Lynn Mutschler

‘Ghost Rider 2’ is a soul-eating letdown By Jose Garcia Western Sun staff writer Nicolas Cage returns as Johnny Blaze in “Ghost Rider: Spirit of Vengeance,” once again battling to rid himself from being the devil’s bounty hunter. Directed by Mark Neveldine and Brian Taylor, and starting off as Marvel’s first movie of the year, this sequel is so disappointing that it will eat your soul away. Blaze, hiding deep within Eastern Europe and struggling to suppress his curse, is recruited by a religious group to take on the devil (Ciaran Hinds) who is out for his mortal son’s body, Danny (Fergus Riordan). As the Rider teams up with an alcoholic monk (Idris Elba) and the kid’s mother, GHOST RIDER: SPIRIT Nadya (Violante Placido), they risk every- OF VENGEANCE thing to keep the child Sequel to the story of a man turned into the devil’s bounty safe.  Maintaining the hunter. Starring Nicholas Cage. thrill of action, the Rated PG-13 HIII movie provides the Rider’s past, which may appear a bit of a joke in the viewer’s eyes. Although the film is shot (in parts) around beautiful Europe, you can’t escape from the confusing mess that is portrayed within the film; a story line that seemed more based on the scenes rather than the story itself.  Aside from the intense explosions and burning tires, which brings the excitement, Cage failed to feed the audience with the Rider’s true insanity. The film upholds itself to keep you laughing at least, and astonishes you with its graphics. Cage has lost the flame the Rider needs to keep the viewer on edge, resulting in mediocre acting. The movie can be considered more suitable for children under the age of 10 rather than average comic book reader.  

Movie Review

PAY OFF

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Michael Soto 18, Santa Ana Undecided “I feel like everybody can be their own way. Don’t judge by how they act or their preference.”

Twin sisters, Jacquelene “Jaci” Powell and Juliana “Juli” Powell, are perhaps the biggest two stars of the Golden West College track and field team, but soon they will be separating to begin their new lives apart from each other. Both twins participated in a first-ever letter of intent signing day event hosted by the GWC athletic department, where 32 GWC athletes, in addition to the Powell sisters, signed letters officially deciding which universities they will attend in the fall. Jaci will head north to compete for the California Golden Bears while Juli will head 3,000 miles further west to be a member of the Hawaii Warriors track and field team. “I think Hawaii is a perfect fit for my sister Juli, and that she is going “I am sad that she to love it. I am sad that she will be will be so far, but I so far, but I couldn’t be happier for couldn’t be happier her,” Jaci said who remains focused for her.” on her events in hopes to win a state title once again, and to score high enough to compete at the Olympic trials this summer. “I could not be happier for my sister Jaci, to be attending Cal in the fall. It’s been her dream school for a long time and I am so proud to see her reach her goals,” Juli said. Juli competes in pole vault, javelin, 4 x 100, 4 x 400, and the 100-meter dash. “I have reached personal bests in many events here at GWC,” Juliana said. Meanwhile, Jaci pushes herself in several events including the heptathlon, an event which includes the 100-meter dash, high jump, shot put, 200-meter dash, javelin, the 400-meter run, the JULIANA POWELL (left) and Jacqueline Powell. 800-meter run, the relays, and the triple jump. “I will miss the beautiful campus. It has been a little sanctuary for me at times,” said Juli, who also expressed gratitude to the teachers and coaches who have helped her along the way. The Powell twins will next compete on Friday, Feb. 24 at Golden West in the only home meet of the year against Santiago Canyon College, Orange Coast College and Fullerton College.

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12 FEB. 22-MARCH 6, 2012/THE WESTERN SUN

Sports

Adam Stites, executive and sports editor

Why all the racial Lin-sensitivity? The story of Knicks point guard Jeremy Lin has drawn a swarm of media coverage and justifiably so. The first American of Taiwanese descent to ever play in the NBA and the first Harvard alumnus to play in the NBA in 58 years has overcome tremendous odds and is worth all the attention he has received. However, with the attention and media coverage, an alarming trend has seemingly come to the forefront. Amidst the tired, but acceptable puns such as Lin-sanity, Lin-credible, Lin-spiring there have been a substantial amount of racial insensitivity, or dare I say, racial Lin-sensitivity. Alright that was corny, I know, but there’s nothing wrong with corniness. It would be nice if corniness was the worst of the national media jokes, but unfortunately, the corny puns have, at times, crossed the line and become nothing less than unacceptable jokes based on racial stereotypes. While racial stereotypes about African-Americans are generally avoided as much as possible by society, it seems the same

cannot be said about Asian-American stereotypes. In the two weeks since Lin has risen to prominence, there have been several instances of unacceptable jokes about Asian-American stereotypes including ESPN twice using a phrase that featured a racial slur and led to the firing of a writer and the suspension of an anchor. A sign held by a Knicks fan at Madison Square Garden during one game proudly displayed the joke: “Who Adam Stites says Asians can’t drive?” Take a second and imagine the backlash that particular fan would have received for holding up a sign with a joke of a similar nature about another race. Would they have even been allowed to bring the sign in to the arena? Perhaps the most valuable lesson that Lin-sanity has taught is that there is an alarming level of accepted racism occurring, often without consequence.

Baseball win streak extends to five Golden West wins 9-1 over L.A. Valley By Sarah Martinez Western Sun staff writer Despite a poor start to the season, including losses in four of its first five games, the Rustler baseball team has turned its season around and has pieced together a five game winning streak. The streak started Feb. 12 against Bakersfield and on Saturday, Feb. 18 the Rustlers picked up their fifth consecutive win with a lopsided 9-1 victory over the L.A. Valley Monarchs. The green-and-gold started off solid beginning with a leadoff double from Donald Sneed, shortly followed by an RBI single from Josh Palmer to bring Sneed home and give Golden West a 1-0 lead. The Rustlers never slowed down,

Top Batters

Leading Rustler batting averages

1. Blake Cooper 2. Alex Hernandez 3. Bobby Webb 4. Chase Harrison 5t. Donald Sneed 5t. Daniel DeWolf

.417 .389 .367 .351 .333 .333

scoring six runs in the second and third innings combined that put the competition far behind them with an early 7-0 lead. “We’ve been swinging the bats real well the last few games. We’ve won five in a row, and been getting great pitching, and playing good defense,” said head coach Bert Villarreal. It was the great pitching and good defense that made it impossible for L.A. Valley to keep up. The only run allowed by the Rustlers came in the eighth inning when some impressive base-running by Monarchs second baseman Casey Ryan, including two stolen bases, allowed him to cross home plate and cut the lead to 9-1, but it was far too little, too late. “We basically have our starting lineup, and we didn’t earlier in the season. The pitching staff is coming up when they need to, and so are the big hits. It wasn’t earlier in the season,” Villarreal said. “The defense is getting it done in games, as well as practice and that’s where it all starts.” The (6-4) Rustlers next hosted the (4-2) Canyons Cougars on Tuesday, Feb. 21 at 2 p.m., and will next travel to face the (2-4) Long Beach Vikings on Thursday, Feb. 23.

Top Batters

Leading Rustler batting averages

1. Blake Cooper 2. Alex Hernandez 3. Bobby Webb 4. Chase Harrison 5t. Donald Sneed 5t. Daniel DeWolf

.417 .389 .367 .351 .333 .333

Western Sun photos by Sarah Martinez

JASON DEITRICH pitches against L.A. Valley.

DANNY BAKER crosses home plate for the Rustlers.


Baseball team unbeaten in 10 games

Best by the beaches Arts&Living. Page 6

Sports. Page 12

Rustlers run in ‘Beach Classic’

Gas pains from rising prices Opinion. Page 5

Sports. Page 11

Volume 41, Number 10 n Golden West College n March 7-21, 2012 n www.westernsun.us

GWC aims for ‘green’ honor from the state By Dale Lendrum Western Sun staff writer

Golden West College is bidding to be honored as one of the most energy-efficient colleges in the state. The California Community College Board of Governors is accepting campus nominations for the Energy and Sustainability Awards. Nominations must be submitted by March 16, 2012 and awards will be given in three categories according to a press release from the California Community Colleges Chancellor’s Office. The three awards that will recognize excellence in various aspects of sustainability are the District Leadership Award, the Facilities and Operations Award, and the Faculty/Student Initiatives Award. Golden West College Director of Maintenance and Operations Joe Dowling said, “the biggest thing the campus

has done was build the central plant and upgrade/replace most of the HVAC (heating, ventilation, air-conditioning) units on campus,” as well as installing an energy management system. Last year the student body voted to create a sustainability commissioner position on the Student Council and a Student Sustainability Committee was formed last semester. It has been active in increasing the campus recycling programs, in addition to crafting a sustainable roadmap for the future. GWC Sustainability Commissioner Daniel Tierney and his committee work with various departments and programs on campus as well as working with the Sustainability Advisory Committee to promote sustainable practices. The winners of the Energy and Sustainability Awards will be invited to the Board of Continued on page 2

Applications for posts in ASGWC due March 16 By Dale Lendrum Western Sun staff writer

The Associated Students of Golden West College will be holding Student Council elections for the 2012-2013 school year, from April 10-12, 2012. Student Council positions include president, vice-

president, student advocate, activities, publicity, finance, and sustainability Commissioners, as well as Club Consultant. The Student Council serves as the governing body of the Associated Students of Golden West College. It plans

Western Sun photo by Cory Gaudaur

GOLDEN WEST COLLEGE nursing students practice their skills.

Careers in specialized fields are on the rise Medical, scientific and technical skills are in demand By Cory Gaudaur Western Sun news editor

With the country’s unstable economy and ever-changing job market, it can be difficult for many to predict what qualifies as a “good” career choice, as a job that is popular and readily available now may not be in five years time.  According to a recent study conducted by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, a majority of the jobs that are currently in demand and will continue to see growth in the coming years are part of the health care industry, or are scientific or technical in nature.

Continued on page 2

www.westernsun.us

The choices that Golden West College students are making career-wise seem to agree with the research found by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, seeing as “the most popular majors on campus are nursing, human services, biology, and chemistry,” said GWC Career Center student assistant Michelle Nguyen. Some recent trends in the job market support the results found in that study as well, as many of the careers that made the list of 2011’s best jobs, such as software engineer, dental hygienist, and mathematician, all require knowledge of math, science, and technology. These types of careers with special-

Continued on page 2


2 MARCH 7-21, 2012/THE WESTERN SUN

Careers in specialized fields rising

Applications Continued from page 1

and publicizes ASGWC events, lobbies on behalf of students at the local, district, and state levels, oversees the ASGWC budget, acts as a consultant to campus clubs, promotes sustainability, and much more. In addition to the physical polling place, normally located across from the Student Center Patio, students will also be able to cast their votes for candidates online for the first time BESTLearn. JOBS throughTEN Blackboard Software engineer In an1.effort to increase voter turnout and2.promote sustainability, Mathematician the current 3. Student Council voted in faActuary vor of implementing an electronic 4. Statistician component to the election process. Voter turnout in recent years has been 5. Computer systems about 2analyst percent of the total students enrolled, and estimates gathered from Meteorologist various 6. community colleges and universities7. who have implemented elecBiologist tronic voting have realized an increase 8. Historian in voter turnout by nearly 40 percent The 9. ideaAudiologist to add an electronic component 10. was Dental brought hygienist forth by GWC student n student Phillip Queschke. Rankings are based on  Applications are available in the wages, stress, danger Student Activities Office locatedand on future the second floorjob of market. the Student Center and will be due on March 16.

Continued from page 1

TEN BEST JOBS

1. Software engineer 2. Mathematician 3. Actuary 4. Statistician 5. Computer systems analyst 6. Meteorologist 7. Biologist 8. Historian 9. Audiologist 10. Dental hygienist

n Rankings are based on wages, stress, danger and future job market. Western Sun graphic. Source: CareerCast.com

ized skills will continue to see growth in the next few years if these projections are correct. Further support for the growing health care industry can be seen in the rapidly growing nursing program at Golden West College, which has doubled in size in the last eight years. Lani French, program coordinator at the GWC School of Nursing, said “we’ve seen ongoing growth, as we support all pre-med programs and there’s a need for nursing.” The goal for the program in the coming years is to expand even further with a BSM program in which, “students will come out with a bachelor’s degree in three to three and a half years,” French said. While careers in medical and scientific fields are on the rise, agricultural, production, and administrative support occupations are just a few that are steadily declining as they are being outsourced or eliminated. 

TEN WORST JOBS

1. Roustabout 2. Iron worker 3. Lumberjack 4. Roofer 5. Taxi driver 6. Emergency medical technician 7. Welder 8. Painter 9. Meter reader 10. Construction worker n Rankings are based on wages, stress, danger and future job market. Western Sun graphic. Source: CareerCast.com

Western Sun graphic. Source: CareerCast.com

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THE WESTERN SUN/MARCH 7-21, 2012 3

Campus & Community

Cory Gaudaur, news editor

GWC hosts annual Science Olympiad By Alexander Strada Western Sun opinion editor High school students packed Golden West College’s Forum 1 last Friday, March 2, to participate in a lightning round science trivia event that concluded the 15th annual Science Olympiad held at Golden West College under the direction of now-retired GWC Chemistry professor Carol Grimes, mother to two former Science Olympians. The Science Olympiad is a national competition of nearly 6,200 teams that aims to elevate student, teacher and parent enthusiasm for academic pursuits to the level normally reserved for varsity sports teams. The energy in Forum 1 was electric. Tense silence filled the room as opposing pairs of teams were asked questions like, “Which one of the following is associated with Newton’s Laws of Physics?” When a point was scored, an eruption of cheers shattered the silence only briefly, hushed by a terse “Quiet, please” from the host.  Trivia was followed by an award ceremony where individual students

were awarded medals for their achievements in a wide variety of different science-themed competitions. Such competitions included the Sound of Music event, where each student designed and built a functional musical instrument from scratch, then played a song on it and explained the scientific principles underlying its function. Many students refused photographs of their designs for certain events, citing rumors of parents from other regions allegedly stealing ideas for their kids. “There are a lot of kids whose talents lie in the academic arenas rather than in sports arenas, and they don’t usually get huge cheers and medals,” said Grimes. “We have the Oscars, we have the Superbowl. We need something for academics as well.” During the awards ceremony, a mom from Canyon High School told her neighbor, “Now I’m really worried, we might not make state because of that stupid astronomy thing.” When Canyon placed, she added, “I can’t believe we got third!”

Western Sun photo by Alexander Strada

DAVID BRADY (left) and Nick Null of Pacifica High School in the tower competition. If the parents’ reactions are any in- tainly achieved its goal of recognizing dication of the success of the compe- outstanding achievements in academtition, the Science Olympiad has cer- ics.

G.I. Bill helps veterans to go to college other student veterans are attending college tuition free through the Post9/11 G.I. Bill. While the bill covers tuition, due to modifications made last summer, the housing allowance only applies to months when school is in session. As a result, during the summer and winter breaks, students must be self-sufficient. Before finding his current job at a baseball training facility, Brinkman recalled having to take out loans just to pay rent. “The allowance only covers rent, so we’re told to apply for food stamps (for groceries and utilities),” Brinkman said. He and his wife of four years moved into her parents’ home to save money. Despite financial hardships, Brinkman is enrolled in 10 units this semester and plans to transfer to California State University, Fullerton next year to pursue a career in sports journalism.

By Ashley Charles Western Sun staff writer

As of January 2012, the unemployment rate of returning troops had surpassed 13 percent. While the nation’s unemployment rate finally begins to decrease, the rate among veterans swells.  Returning home with limited marketable job skills, many vets opt to head back to school. Army Corporal Mike Brinkman, a sophomore communications major at Golden West College, said he went back to school, “to go down a new avenue since no one was hiring.”  Veterans at GWC receive counseling and support through the Student Veterans Center and the on-campus Student Veterans Organization, “to help them transition,” Veteran Resource Center Coordinator Cheryl Tittle said. Each GWC administrative office is jointly connected with the Student Veterans Center to provide a variety of services, including tutoring, priority registration, and a quiet study room. According to Tittle, the center is “a place they can come and be who they truly are; the biggest advantage is interacting with veterans on a veteran’s

MORE VETERANS are attending college. level.” About 1,000 military veterans are enrolled at Golden West, said Tittle, although not all of them use the services

of the center. After serving two tours of duty in Iraq connecting servers for communication among bases, Brinkman and

‘Green’ Continued from page 1

Governors meeting May 7-8 in Sacramento to be recognized for their contributions to energy savings and sustainability.


4 MARCH 7-21, 2012/THE WESTERN SUN

Opinion

Alexander Strada, opinion editor

Are the memories worth the mob? By Krystal Lynn Mutschler Western Sun associate editor When it comes to events that are expected to have large crowds, it seems that no matter how exciting the event may be, the question bears asking whether the crowds and stress are worth it? In honor of leap day, Disneyland decided to extend their operating hours on Feb. 29 to remain open for 24 hours, 6 a.m. to 6 a.m. the following day, coining it “One More Disney Day.” According to the L.A. Times, more than 3,000 guests lined up 10 hours before the gates opened in eager anticipation. The daytime was modest with more than reasonable wait times for rides and room to walk the park comfortably. However, in the twilight hours Disney finally saw recording-breaking crowds responding to the event to the point at which the park’s capacity was reached at 9:30 p.m. The entrance did not reopen until 1 a.m. Streets and freeways were clogged with traffic, while inside the park wait times topped two hours for rides, 30

Western Sun photo by Alexander Strada

COACHELLA FESTIVAL sells out so fast they now host two duplicate events a year back to back. minute waits for food carts, and unreasonably long wait times for sit-down restaurants. The troubles however, pailed in comparison to just being able to be part of an event where so many people were enjoying the same thing. As with music festivals and sport-

ing events, the memories you make are worth the stress of the mob. Being around diverse people who are brought together for a mutual love is always uplifting, with your shared common ground giving you a sense of peaceful serenity.

In the end, more than anything else, it is refreshing to see such large collective groups of people sharing and enjoying the same experiences together, and being able to just enjoy the memories that last much longer than the wait times.

Go your own way while you have the chance Since the end of last year, I have worked hard extra hours towards a team lead promotion opportunity that was presented at my part-time food service job. When my boss approached me and asked if I was interested, my answer was an emphatic yes. After all, who turns down promotions? “You can’t always love your job,” said a stern, Alexander Red Foremanesque voice in Strada my head, “Take

what you can get. You’ve gotta do what my job I began to experience a deep you’ve gotta do, dumb ass!” sense of emotional detachment. My When the semester began, bring- writing suffered, as did my social relaing a familiar sense of satisfaction that, tionships. How many people rush into shockingly, was much more profound jobs or careers because they feel it is than what I felt after pressuring strang- their only choice, or the most logical, ers into buying overthen suffer impotent priced junk food, my “How many people rush remorse at the end of work hours affected into jobs or careers betheir lives? my studies, and I cause they feel it is their According to a quickly realized what only choice, then suffer GuardianNews.com I had always known impotent remorse at the article, a nurse who to be true: I hate my end of their lives?” spent several years job very deeply and caring for patients in have no desire to sink the last 12 weeks of into that comfortable trap. I told my their lives recorded their dying epiphaboss I had changed my mind to focus nies and published them in a book. on school, and put in my two-week’s Among the top five is “I wish I hadn’t notice. worked so hard.” In the months I devoted myself to “All of the men I nursed deeply

regretted spending so much of their lives on the treadmill of a work existence,” she says. And the top regret of the dying? “I wish I’d had the courage to live a life true to myself, not the life others expected of me.” The nurse explains that when dying patients look back, “it is easy to see how many dreams have gone unfulfilled. Most people had not honoured even half of their dreams and had to die knowing that it was due to choices they had made.” My greatest fear is to look back on my life with these regrets. It should be yours, too. Take a look at your life, and ask yourself, “Am I really living for myself, or am I living for someone else?”

EXECUTIVE EDITOR: Adam Stites MANAGING EDITOR: Emilee Maciel NEWS EDITOR: Cory Gaudaur OPINION EDITOR: Alexander Strada ARTS&LIVING: Emilee Maciel SPORTS EDITOR: Adam Stites ADVISOR: Jim Tortolano ADVERTISING DIRECTOR & WEBMASTER: Katie Cumper STAFF WRITERS AND PHOTOGRAPHERS: Krystal Lynn Mutschler, Andre McCleese, Ashleigh Ford, Ashley Saunders, Beatrice Zamora, Candace Finley, Cindy Kaufinger, Dale Lendrum, Danny Baker, Heidi Kaufinger, James Gomez, Javier Silva, Jayme Bommerito, Jose Garcia, Katarzyna Jarek, Leo Gomon, Lourdes Rebaza, Monica Dekany, Sarah Martinez, Shainnen Somerville, Taylor Goodall, Teresa Do, Tiffany Pham, Travon Nesbit THE WESTERN SUN is published biweekly on Wednesdays by the newspaper production classes of Golden West College. Opinions expressed in The Sun, unless otherwise indicated, are those of the individual writer or artist and do not necessarily reflect those of the college, district, or any other organization or agency. The Sun is a member of the Journalism Association of Community Colleges and the California Newspaper Publishers’ Assn. Offices are at 15744 Goldenwest St., Huntington Beach, CA 92647 in the Fine Arts building, room 138. Phones: 714-895-8786 (news), 895-8256 (advertising), 895-8795 (fax). E-mail: gwcwesternsun@gmail.com


THE WESTERN SUN/MARCH 7-21, 2012 5

Rihanna’s missed cause By Travon Nesbit Western Sun staff writer

Western Sun photo by Alexander Strada

SOCAL gas prices are now within 30 cents of their all-time record.

Wallets wail as gas prices peak again

By Taylor Gooddall Western Sun staff writer

are set to climb ever higher. Domestic supply is way up, which should cause fuel prices to fall, while Gas prices are once again on the domestic demand is the lowest in derise, and while some may think Middle cades, which should cause prices to fall Eastern conflict responsible, or that even further, yet prices still going up. OPEC just wants more money, the re- It’s about record profits and greed. Energy companies have ingeniousality is a little more complicated. ly found a way to byAccording to an pass the law of supply NPR.org article, domes- “If we export more and demand. They are tic production of refined gasoline than we exporting our fuel for gasoline and diesel fuels import, why are we is at an eight year high, importing any at all?” almost double the price. As an added bonus, this due mainly to controversial new drilling techniques. The U.S. also creates an “artificial shortage” of has a surplus of cheap gas, but we’re domestic fuel, which is a main factor in what is to blame for the increase in not seeing it at the pump. American energy companies have fuel prices. America is now a net exporter of found they can make much more money exporting refined fuel to European gasoline. If we export more gasoline countries where gas prices are near than we import, why are we importing double ours. With Iran’s recent embar- any at all? Don’t we want to end our go of France and Britain, their prices dependence on foreign oil?

Bachelor of paying debt The Wall St. Journal compiled a list of ten majors with the lowest unemployment rates; all of which were engineering, science, medicine or enSince graduating with a bachelor’s vironmentally based, with the highest degree in Literature, the dreaded post- rate at 2.2%. The same study states the college job hunt has consumed my average worker one of said degrees life. I assumed that companies would will make over 300 percent more in be flocking towards a recent graduate their lifetime. to write for them about who knows In the past having a degree providwhat – but this was not ed a head start for future the case. Other than a “Most graduates are security. Now, unless few odd jobs and some forced to settle on you studied science, freelance work, finding what can pay the bills, mathematics, physics, employment has been leading to a completely medicine, or law, you’d tough. different career path.” better have a family I’m not alone; peomember with a business ple with degrees in art, that is willing to employ you. sociology, psychology and other fields Although the current economy and are finding themselves massively in the exponentially rising cost of educadebt and without jobs. Their only op- tion are to blame, and this is a more tions are to go back to school and build recent development, higher education more debt, or find a retail job that re- simply does not have the same value it quires experience they don’t have after once did. Evaluate your options, save spending years in school. Most gradu- your money, consider going to a trade ates are forced to settle on what can school, and do not pile up loans assumpay the bills, leading to a completely ing things will work out in the end. different career path.

By Leo Gomon Western Sun staff writer

Just three years ago Chris Brown was charged with a felony for brutally assaulting then girlfriend Rihanna in a highly publicized domestic violence case. It was uncertain if Brown’s career would survive, but this year has brought him a multi-platinum record, a Grammy, and two collaborations with none other than ex Rihanna. According to the Domestic Violence Resource Center, one in four women experience domestic abuse in their lifetime. Rihanna had a chance to become a powerful figure and educator against abuse, but instead released songs like “S&M”, with allusions to dominatrixes and the theme of pain as pleasure. RIHANNA performing on tour. To this day, Rihanna’s music conThe collaborations may be Rihantinues to reflect dark themes of sexual domination, and now the dust between na’s way of showing that growth and the ex-couple has finally started to healing are possible after such trauma, which is respectable, or settle enough that they have released two new “Rihanna had a chance perhaps it’s an attempt to use shock to sell resongs, “Turn Up The to become a powerful cords. Music” and “Birthday figure and educator As today’s number Cake.” against abuse.” one pop star who has The first is a harmmany times graced the less club track, but the second feacovers of magazines such as Seventeen tures sadomasochistic themes again in its’ lyrics telling Brown to “come and and Teen Vogue one has to wonder if put [his] name on it” while he sings “I Rihanna realizes the influence she has wanna give it to her in the worst way.” on young girls.

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6 MARCH 7-21, 2012/THE WESTERN SUN

Arts&Living

Emilee Maciel, arts & living editor

The Battle of the Beaches: HB vs. LB

HUNTINGTON BEACH MAIN STREET

THE PIKE IN LONG BEACH

Western Sun photos by Emile Maciel

Huntington Beach has ‘Surf City’, but Long Beach offers a greater diversity By Emilee Maciel Western Sun arts&living editor and Krystal Lynn Mutschler Western Sun associate editor What do Huntington Beach, and Long Beach have incommon besides being near the ocean? They have exciting and fun-filled daytime activities and a nightlife, located on each location’s main street, that is suitable for anyone. The Western Sun has compiled your guide for these beach-front venues. n Huntington Beach Main Street Deemed “Surf City USA,” how can you not visit Huntington’s 100 year-old street? With restaurants catering to any type of taste-bud,  from pizza to tacos to sushi, it’s not hard to satisfy your craving. q Popular Restaurants BJ’s Pizza&Grill: A familiar favorite for those who take comfort in  the foods they know. Sugar Shack: A local hotspot that’s serves up diner foods that will  make any beach-bum happy. Fred’s Mexican Café&Cantina: Looking over Main Street, Fred’s is the perfect place for Taco Tuesday. q Popular Bars

Sharkeez Sports Grill: Come cheer for your favorite sports team at this high-energy bar. Hurricane’s Bar&Grill: Be ready to get swept away on the dance floor  or to enjoy the fresh ocean breeze at this second level oasis. Gallagher’s Pub&Grill: You don’t have to have the luck of the Irish  to have a great time at this pub. q Events/ Activities Surf City Nights: Every Tuesday evening from 5 p.m. to 9 p.m., Main  Street is transformed into a seven-block street fair. SCN consists of entertainment that’s fun for the whole family, a farmers market, and shopping bungalows. Huntington Beach Art Center: With free admission, the art center  regularly hosts exhibits and concerts in one of their three galleries or multi-purpose room. The only downside to HB Main Street is that the atmosphere on a really busy night can get pretty hectic. If you’re a laid-back type of person, you might feel out of your element, because the hustle and bustle of the nightlife is very lively.

n The Pike in Long Beach The Pike, is the one-stop area in Long Beach that hosts all sorts of fun. With restaurants, a movie theater, and a breathtaking view of the Pacific Ocean, it’s both romantic and convenient. q Popular Restaurants Bubba Gump Shrimp Co.: A great place for all those shrimp lovers who love their shrimp prepared any-way they like. Sharky’s Woodfired Mexican Grill: A Mexican restaurant dedicated to using only fresh ingredients, like those in their “world famous tempura battered fish tacos.”  Boston’s The Gourmet Pizza: This pizza parlor doubles as a sports bar, and cooks up 18 varieties of pizza-pies. q Popular Bars Sgt. Pepper’s Dueling Pianos: This indoor and outdoor bar will bring out your musical spirit as you celebrate any occasion.

Auld Dubliner Irish Pub and Restaurant: Closer than Ireland, come drink traditional Irish spirits without ever using your passport. Mai Tai Bar: One out of only three locations, this exciting, yet relaxing bar is all about the classic mai tai cocktail. q Events/Activities The Laugh Factory: You’ll literally be laughing out loud as this comedy club boasts some of today’s funniest comedians. Happy Hour at The Pike: Six participating restaurants are offering enticing deals on mixed drinks and appetizers. While Long Beach has a big-city feel and a diverse group of people, it also has big-city-like streets, most of them being one-way. If you’re not familiar with the area, it’s easy to get twisted around trying to look for parking (which is sparse). 


THE WESTERN SUN/MARCH 7-21, 2012 7

GWC students show off their campus style By Lourdes Rebaza Western Sun staff writer Street-wear has become a fashion entity all on it’s own, prompting styleguide books and blogs. The Western Sun has taken it from the streets to the campus, asking fellow Golden West College students where they shop, where they get their inspiration from, and what brands they’re sporting. From her Steve Madden “Troopa” boots, to a knitted beanie, Brianna Rivas is all about fashion. She usually shops at Buffalo Exchange and Forever 21 and her inspiration for her daily outfits all come from whatever mood she’s in. “I don’t necessarily care for name brands as long as it looks good,” said Candy Jakstis, 21, who chooses Marshall’s and Ross as her top places to shop. Transparent blouses are her number one item, as it presents a sexy, yet classy look. Shoedazzle.com and Forever 21 helped this fashionista find the jewelry she used to complete her look. Stores like Zumiez, Active, and PacSun are where Anthony Jimenez buys the majority of his wardrobe. Wearing denim RVCA jeans and accessorizing with a white, G-Shock watch, is what makes this trendy outfit look like it took no time to assemble.

Western Sun photos by Lourdes ReBaza

CANDY JAKSTIS (above), Anthony Jimenez (upper right) and Brianna Rivas show their style.

Nostalgia helps to keep us young Nostalgia is defined as that sentimental feeling you get when reminiscing about a beloved memory. Thanks to the technology of today, now nostalgia is easy and fun to accomplish with an app or a T-shirt. People can now feel young again with just the use of their cell phone with apps that convert any captured picture on your phone into a retro-looking, Polaroid-like photo, that will take you back to a time where actual Polaroid film still existed. Even in the fashion-world, there are constant revivals of past styles that seem to pop back up. When you turn on the television, Nineties kids will find that the sitcoms and cartoons they grew up watching are now back on the air for their viewing pleasure. These type of things pull on the heart-strings of sentimental hearts, those yearning to feel the same way they did 10 or more years ago. People are longing to to feel that youthful spark they once had. Emilee Maciel In 1979, Ellen Langer, a Harvard University psychologist, explains everything performed a study where she told elderly men in their seventies and eighties to reminisce about the year 1959. Props were used to help them feel like they were in that era again, like music and newspapers. The results were that these men actually improved on their hearing, memory, and strength, just by remembering what it was like to feel 20 years younger. People also seem to want to feel nostalgic because they can’t stand the time they live in now. It seems that every generation hates or at least has a little bit of animosity for the generation after theirs. As decades pass, so do trends and beliefs, and I believe that some people still want to hold onto those. From beatniks to hippies to hipsters, the new generations to come are morphing into things we can’t control. Like the “blankie” we’ll never throw out, at least we have this new technology to remember what makes us feel good.


8 MARCH 7-21, 2012/THE WESTERN SUN

Orange County’s best burgers Tired of eating fast-food burgers that are quick to make, without much thought or originality? The Western Sun has hand-picked three burger spots, ranging from casual to finedine that will tempt your taste-buds. n TK Burger Located directly across from the beach on 110 Pacific Coast Highway, their humble, but signature taste will have you coming back whether you visit the beach or not. With prices that are great for any beach bum, from $5 to $6, and a hang-loose atmosphere, TK Burger is a surf city classic. -Emilee Maciel

Conjuring up past to expand the future By Leo Gomon Western Sun staff writer Every once in a while, a band comes along and releases an album that restores my faith in American rock n’ roll bands. While The Black Keys and The Foo Fighters dominate the charts, Howlin’ Rain remain under the radar, silently keeping the tradition of bluessoaked, gospel-inspired and gritty, yet soulful rock alive. “The Russian Wilds,” their fourth release, encompasses the dense history of rock n’ roll, paying homage to the pioneers of the genre. Howlin’ Rain is able to synthesize an original, refreshing blend of sounds and moods from past and present. Lead singer/guitarist Ethan Miller and keyboardist/vocalist Joel Robinow deliver a chilling performance, offering a variety of three-part vocal harmonies, intricate guitar work, and classic organ solos and accompaniments. The dynamic combination and variation of rhythms, tempos, and timbres is what truly drives this album home. Bassist Cyrus Comiskey and drummer Raj Ojha are as tight knit as a rhythm section can get, with constant variation and shape shifting of song structures

without going overboard. “Phantom in the Valley” and “Strange Thunder” are long, epic tunes with shifting frameworks that dwell into the progressive genre. While “Cherokee Werewolf” is more traditional, with a verse-chorus-verse format along with gospel backup vocals, “Dark Side” shows off their pop sensibilities. “The Russian Wilds” is a truly timeless album with lyrics that are beautiful, true, and emotive. Those who appreciate a truly eclectic band with songs for everyone will love this inspiring album for all the right reasons.

Album Review

HHHH

n The Counter Freedom of choice is what The Counter is all about, leaving the power of building-your-own burger in your hands. Located on 1104 Irvine Ave. in Newport Beach, instead of receiving a menu, you get a clipboard and check off your choice of patty, topping, and bun. A very unique burger experience for only $7 to $12. -Tiffany Pham n Café Beau Soleil Café Beau Soleil, located at Fashion Island, stands out because they offer burgers on a French cuisine menu. Prices are reasonable, from $12 to $15, for these fancy, juicy burgers. Red meat is not the only option as your burger; choose from salmon, veggie, or turkey. -Tiffany Pham

‘Wanderlust’ strays to your funny bone By Emilee Maciel Western Sun arts&living editor “Wanderlust,” directed by David Wain, is a part art-house, but mostly raunchy comedy that will have the audience rolling-in-their-chairs-laughing at all the crazy antics that play out. Uptight, New York couple, George and Linda (Paul Rudd and Jennifer Aniston), lose all their money after an avalanche of misfortune leading them to relocate to George’s annoying brother’s house in Atlanta, much to Linda’s dismay. However, along the way, the two venture off to a community known as Elysium, where onenight ends up turning into two weeks, in which the couple gets more than what they bargained for as they try to go along with the hippie lifestyles of their new neighbors. Aniston and Rudd exude such great chemistry as their character’s sarcastic punch lines play well off each other. It seems that most of lines were improvised, which must have been hard for the actors and crew to try and keep a straight-face, because those scenes were the most humorous. Rudd has a

PAUL RUDD stars in “Wanderlust.” line that’s similar to his “slappin’ da base” line in “I Love You, Man” that had everyone in the theater roaring with laughter. The raunchy part is due to the fact that this film uses a good amount of full-frontal nudity, making you cringe at those selected scenes. Also, the familiar faces of the other actors, creContinued on page 9


THE WESTERN SUN/MARCH 7-21, 2012 9

WHAT’S UP March 7-22 Emilee Maciel & Teresa Do Come to the Long Beach Playhouse Theater and experience a night dedicated to Sherlock Holmes lovers as Steven’s Dietz directs “Sherlock Holmes: The Final Adventure.” Full of danger, love, and sharp wits, this performance will have you on the edge of your seat. Open Thursday to Saturday and running till March 24, with tickets ranging from $14 to $24. Peter Frampton’s 2011 “Frampton Comes Alive 35 Tour,” has been extended. Fans will enjoy this three-hour performance of his multiplatinum, live album “Frampton Come Alive!” Performing at the Long Beach Terrace Theatre on March 14 at 8 p.m. and tickets are $35 to $70. St. Patrick’s Day at Longboard Pub, on Main Street in Huntington Beach, will have you seeing green- as they serve-up green champagne and green beer, on March 17. Enjoy the live entertainment provided by Mahoney, Wild Irish Musician, while you snack on corned-beef tacos.

“Canvas, Paint, and Wine, Oh My!” is fun group event that mixes painting and drinking that results in masterpieces. No experience is necessary for these classes hosted by Luggatti’s Italian Grill on 210 Fifth St. in Huntington Beach. The evening starts at 7:30 p.m. and goes till 9 p.m. and is $59 per class.

‘Wanderlust’ Continued from page 8

ates the vibe of the movie. The story was slightly predictable, and had do-whatevermakes-you feel-happy themes. Towards the end however, it got a little cheesy with the unnecessary jokes here and there.  Visually, the movie is easy on the eyes, with flourishing flowers and forests of the Elysium location. Also, the costumes, which looked like they were bought at a Buffalo Exchange, fit the characters well, giving them that current-hippie look.  Overall, “Wanderlust” was good for a few laughs, even with its lewd comedy, but not either Rudd’s or Aniston’s close to best work. 

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10 MARCH 7-21, 2012/THE WESTERN SUN

PhotoPoll

“What do you think about illegal immigrants having access to a driver’s license?”

Brooke Austin 19, Seal Beach Business “I do not think illegal immigrants should have access to driving licenses. They should first become an American citizen just like the rest of us, but if they do, they should pay their fair share. Taxes.”

Glenn Smith 35, Seal Beach Business “It is a great way to track illegal aliens in America. I think they should verify their information, charge them a tax, issue them a picture license, and subject them to the same laws regarding liability and insurance that legal citizens follow.”

Robyn Downey 20, Huntington Beach Teaching “I think they should be allowed to access a driving license because most of them drive anyway. It does us no harm, so why not? Just as long as they know the laws and follow them.”

Jeremiah Hazel 22, Garden Grove Business management “I think it is fine as long as they follow the same procedures as we do, follow the laws and abide by them.”

Sasha Hild 19, Westminster Music “I think that they should be allowed to get a driver’s license, but instead of creating a law that allows illegal immigrants to have only certain rights, they should make it easier for them to become a legal citizen.”

Photos and interviews by Jocelyn Huerta

Start your morning off right with ‘Breakfast’

‘Two Masters’ will open on Main Stage

By Adam Stites Western Sun executive editor

Based on Venetian playwright Carlo Goldoni’s original 1743 comedy “The Servant of Two Masters,” and adapted by Jeffrey Hatcher and Paolo Emilio Landi, about a servant who gets caught in the middle of his masters’ shenanigans, is coming to Golden West College’s Main Stage Theater. Truffaldino, both servant (unbeknownst to each other) to a pair of lovers, Beatrice and Florindo, tries to balance his masters’ orders, some of which he’s not even sure which master it’s coming from. Throughout the trials and tribulations, poor, starving Tuffaldino goes on a comedic journey, slaving away to help his enamored employers. Directed by GWC’s own, Tom Amen, this two-hour production, will run starting from March 16 to 25. Tickets are $10 for GWC students and seniors and $25 for general admis-

Between a Guinness World Recordbreaking nine hour, 18 minute freestyle rap and their 2010 single, “Opposite of Adults” that has drawn millions of hits on Youtube, Philadelphia hip-hop duo, Chiddy Bang, has already built up a significant following on the internet. Now with their debut studio album, “Breakfast” (released Feb. 21), Chidera “Chiddy” Anamege and Noah “Xaphoon Jones” Beresin are looking to break out from the underground ranks, and into the limelight of the mainstream. The duo wastes no time recapturing the same light-hearted magic that brought them critical acclaim with “Mind Your Manners” and “Ray Charles,” tracks four and five, respectively. Both songs carry Xaphoon Jones’s signature, indie/electronica sounds mixed with classic hip hop-style beats, while Chiddy lays over with inventive and smooth lyrics. On tracks like “Baby Roulette,”

By Emilee Maciel Western Sun arts & living editor

sounds from classic, 8-bit video games can be heard in the background and add an extra touch that somehow fits perfectly with the high-energy vibe set down by early tracks. The album will surely impress Chiddy  Bang  fans and casual music-listeners alike; however, with the exception of “Mind Your Manners,” the album lacks individual singles that can stand alone. In a now, single-driven industry, particularly in the hip-hop genre, that may not bode well for Chiddy Bang in their pursuit of stardom. Regardless, “Breakfast” is an album that is best described as fun and will appeal to any casual fan of pop and hip hop music. 

Album Review

HHHH

sion, and can be purchased either online on the GWC performing arts website or on campus at the box office.

Visit www.westernsun.us for current news and back issues of The Western Sun.


THE WESTERN SUN/MARCH 7-21 2012 11

Bounties cross the line As if there was any question that football is the most popular sport in America, the Neilsen ratings for the latest Super Bowl came in at a recordbreaking 111.3 million viewers, making the game the most watched television program in history. With so many fans and so many viewers, it’s easy to see why there would be public resistance to any changes that go against the nature of the game. Any rule change to diminish the violence that has made the game so popular is met with backlash. It’s now becoming clear though, that a fundamental change in the culture of the sport is necessary. On March 2 came news that former defensive coordinator of the New Orleans Adam Stites Saints, Gregg Williams, had a “bounty” program that provided monetary incentives for defensive players to intentionally injure star players on opposing teams. In the hours following the breaking news came reports that Williams had similar programs during his time as a coach with the Washington Redskins, Buffalo Bills and Tennessee Titans. One former Bills safety, Coy Wire, told Buffalo News that he was “showered with praise” from Williams for ending the career of Detroit Lions running back James Stewart. Respect for an opponent amidst the violence of competition is what makes the sport such a beautiful and popular one. Figures like Williams cross that line and are indicative of a trend that is troubling and needs to be addressed starting with youth football leagues. Fining, suspending or even banning Williams is not going to solve the bigger issue for the NFL. The culture of football needs to be fundamentally changed if it hopes to continue to be America’s favorite game.

FOOTBALL needs a culture change.

Caldwell stars for GWC in the Beach Classic at CSULB Rustlers one of 28 teams competing in track and field event By Candace Finley and Adam Stites Western Sun staff writer and executive editor The Rustlers were one of 28 track and field teams, including Division I athletic programs like USC, Long Beach State, Cal State Fullerton and Loyola Marymount, that competed in the 2012 Beach Classic at Cerritos College on March 2-3. The two-day invitational hosted by Long Beach State featured many of the top collegiate athletes in Southern California, including several Golden West athletes that finished in the top 10 in their respective events. Freshman Natasha Caldwell earned the highest place of any GWC athlete with a 38.18 meter heave in the women’s javelin throw that was bested by only three other athletes and earned her a fourth-place finish. Two Rustlers finished in the top 10 for the women’s pole vault with Hawaii-bound Juli Powell finishing seventh with a 3.28 meter vault and Kaylie Higa finishing tenth with 3.13 meters. While the Rustlers men didn’t have as strong a showing as their women counterparts, three athletes finished in the top 10 of their events including sophomore DeAngelo Bonner, who finished tenth in the men’s high jump with a 1.87 meter jump. The Rustlers will next travel to Cal State Fullerton on March 9-10 to participate in the Ben Brown Invitational, a prestigious event that will also feature several Division I programs in competition.

GWC softball snaps 4-game losing streak The Golden West softball team snapped a four game winning streak with a 12-4 victory over Santa Monica on Saturday, March 3 to close out the 35th annual GWC Invitational. The tournament, hosted by the Rustlers on March 2-3, crowned Santa Barbara City as champions of the 12-team field after defeating Southwestern 8-4 in the finals. The hosts instead lost two consecutive games on the opening day of the tournament, but bounced back with a win to round out the weekend. With the victory, the Rustlers improved to 5-11 overall and carry a 2-3 conference record into a stretch of nine consecutive conference games starting with a trip to play Cypress on the road on March 7 (today) at 3 p.m.

Western Sun photo by Candace Finley

HOLLY ANTHONY (left), Kristi Perrotta and Joseph Lee were among the GWC athletes who competed in the Beach Classic.

Scores & Schedules n Baseball Results: March 3 – GWC 1, Irvine Valley 0 Upcoming: March 8 – GWC at Riverside, 2 p.m. March 10 - OCC at GWC, 12 p.m. March 13 - Cypress at GWC, 2 p.m. n Softball Results: March 3 – GWC 12, Santa Monica 4 Upcoming: March 7 - GWC at Cypress, 3 p.m. March 9 - Santa Ana at GWC, 2 p.m. March 12 - Saddleback at GWC, 6 p.m. n Men’s Volleyball Results: March 2 - GWC 3, SD Mesa 0 Upcoming: March 9 - OCC at GWC, 6 p.m. March 14 - GWC at SD City, 6 p.m. March 16 - Palomar at GWC. 6 p.m.


12 MARCH 7-21, 2012/THE WESTERN SUN

Sports

Adam Stites, executive and sports editor

Unbeaten streak of 10 games for Rustler baseball GWC tied for first in Orange Empire Conference race By Sarah Martinez Western Sun staff writer The Golden West baseball team hasn’t lost a game since Feb. 10 and continued that streak on March 3 when the Rustlers hosted the Irvine Valley, and held them off to earn a win, 1-0.  The only run of the game came during the second inning after William Shaw started off the inning with a single. Shaw later stole second base allowing Josh Cunningham to hit an RBI single and bring Shaw home.  The true hero of the game, though, was pitcher Jason Deitrich who pitched the entire game, and along with the defense, was able to shut out the opposition. “He pitched a great game, the pitch

Standings

Orange Empire Conference records

Team Conference Overall 2-0 15-1-1 Orange Coast 2-0 10-4-1 Golden West 1-1 12-3 Santa Ana 1-1 11-3 Cypress 1-1 7-8 Irvine Valley 1-1 6-9 Riverside 0-2 5-7 Saddleback 0-2 5-9-1 Fullerton

Top Batters

Leading Rustler batting averages

1. Blake Cooper 2. Alex Hernandez 3. Bobby Webb 4. Chase Harrison 5t. Donald Sneed 5t. Daniel DeWolf

.417 .389 .367 .351 .333 .333

Standings as of March 5

count was fine, that’s why we didn’t take him out of the game. He has proven he could go nine ininings before,” said Rustlers head coach Bert Villarreal. In the fourth inning, Irvine Valley threatened to tie, loading the bases with two outs, but Deitrich was able to force Dan Jimenez into a grounder that turned into an out at first base. “Jason [Deitrich] is doing heck of a job right now. He kept them off balance the entire game, and got them out

Western Sun photos by Sarah Martinez

KYLE JONES reached base three times against Irvine Valley on Saturday, getting two hits and one walk. of jams when he needed to,” Villarreal said. On March 6, Golden West traveled to play Saddleback. The Rustlers will

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next play on the road against Riverside at 2 p.m. on Thursday, March 8 and host Orange Coast at 12 p.m. on Saturday, March 10.

Men’s v-ball wins PCAC opening game By Jose Garcia and Adam Stites Western Sun staff writer and executive editor The Golden West men’s volleyball team kicked off conference play in the right direction, beating Irvine Valley College in three consecutive sets on Wednesday, Feb. 29. With a team-leading 11 kills from sophomore Aaron Girardi, 10 kills from freshman Phil Lopez and nine kills from freshman Jack Terry, the Rustlers were able to swamp the opposition 25-22, 25-23, 25-23. Golden West next traveled to San Diego Mesa for another Pacific Coast Athletic Conference game that they won 25-12, 25-22, 25-23. The Rustlers will next play host for Orange Coast in the Golden West gym on Friday, March 9 at 6 p.m and will again travel to San Diego, this time to compete against San Diego City College on Wednesday, March 14.

184-AA1-GeneralExcelence  

Golden West College

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