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Western Port YOUR GUIDE TO WHAT’S ON THIS WEEKEND FOR PENINSULA FAMILIES FACEBOOK:

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Wednesday 12 May 2021

5974 9000 or email: team@mpnews.com.au www.mpnews.com.au

‘Lowlifes’ ruin Mother’s Day

Break in: Ian and Carmel Cuthbertson are hoping for the speedy return of their stolen mobility scooter. Picture: Gary Sissons

MOTHER’S Day is not supposed to be disappointing, but that’s how Carmel Cuthbertson of Hastings felt when she discovered her mobility scooter had been stolen overnight, Sunday 9 May. The Pride three-wheeler, which is also Ms Cuthbertson’s pride and joy, is red with grey tyres. It has a basket on the front and carrier bag behind. Husband Ian said the thieves had somehow opened a bike lock on the gate from Elizabeth Street. “We heard the dogs barking late at night but didn’t think anything of it,” he said. “When I went out in the morning I noticed the gate slightly open and, when Carmel asked if I’d noticed the scooter missing, I realised that was why [the dogs were barking].” The thieves also took the charger for the scooter, which will sadly make life even harder for Ms Cuthbertson, who is suffering from cancer. The scooter will probably cost about $5000 to replace. “She needs it to get around,” Mr Cuthbertson said. “Those low-lifes certainly wrecked her Mother’s Day.” Unlike the culprits who took the scooter, the Cuthbertsons are givers – not takers. Mr Cuthbertson has manned the rescue radio for Volunteer Marine Rescue at Western Port for 50 years after serving in the Coast Guard and CFA. He retired from the Defence Force in 1991. Ms Cuthbertson has served in the CFA and SES for many years. The scooter is an important part of their lives. “We will pay a reward for the scooter’s safe return,” he said. Hastings police are investigating the theft. Anyone with information is urged to call them on 5970 7800 or Crime Stoppers 1800 333 000. Stephen Taylor

Thumbs up to cut road speed Keith Platt keith@mpnews.com.au FOUR people have died so far this year on peninsula roads, but no deaths have been recorded on the 33 roads where speed limits have been set at 80kph. The speed cuts from 100kph and 90kph to 80kph were introduced in December 2019 on about 110 kilometres of selected Mornington Peninsula

Shire-managed roads as part of a twoyear trial. Now, half way into the trial, results of an online and phone survey into public acceptance of reducing speeds shows 59 per cent of the 1059 respondents in support and 21 per cent against. A further seven 7 per cent were strongly opposed to the speed trial while 20 per cent were neutral. In 2020, a year where COVID-19 saw road use drop, the peninsula re-

corded nine deaths; in 2019 there were 12 road fatalities. Many of the 33 “high risk sealed rural roads” chosen for the trial had a significant history of road deaths and injuries, and high crash risk rating when speed limits of 100kph and 90kph applied. National and international research has shown that a relatively small reduction in average vehicle speeds leads to a large decrease in road trauma.

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Councillors have been told that setting 80kph speed limits on high risk rural roads, deaths and serious injuries are expected to drop by 30 per cent and 20 per cent respectively. The speed trial is part of a five-year strategy aimed at eliminating road deaths on the peninsula, with safer roads, safer vehicles, safer speeds and safer drivers (“Strategy to end deaths on peninsula roads” The News 29/6/20).

It also comes at a time when the RACV is compiling a list of the Mornington Peninsula’s most dangerous roads so it can lobby governments at all levels to make roads safer and look at lowering speed limits to match conditions (“Defining ‘danger’ roads” The News 15/3/21). The trial was established to analyse quantitative and qualitative information about crash statistics, vehicle speeds, and the community’s views. Continued Page 8

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NEWS DESK

Western Port

Proudly published by Mornington Peninsula News Group Pty Ltd

PHONE: 03 5974 9000 Published weekly. Circulation: 15,000

Journalists: Stephen Taylor, Brodie Cowburn 5974 9000 Photographers: Gary Sissons, Yanni Advertising Sales: Bruce Stewart 0409 428 171 Real Estate Account Manager: Jason Richardson 0421 190 318 Production/Graphic design: Marcus Pettifer, Danielle Espagne Group Editor: Keith Platt 0439 394 707 Publisher: Cameron McCullough REGULAR CONTRIBUTORS: Peter McCullough, Stuart McCullough, Andrew Hurst, Craig MacKenzie. ADDRESS: Mornington Peninsula News Group PO Box 588 Hastings 3915 Email: team@mpnews.com.au Web: www.mpnews.com.au DEADLINE FOR NEXT ISSUE: 1PM ON THURS 13 MAY 2021 NEXT ISSUE PUBLICATION DATE: WED 19 MAY 2021

Local news for local people

We stand as the only locally owned and operated community newspaper on the peninsula. We are dedicated to the belief that a strong community newspaper is essential for a strong community. We exist to serve residents, community groups and businesses and ask for their support in return.

To advertise in Western Port News contact Bruce Stewart on 0409 428 171 or email bruce@mpnews.com.au Western Port

PAGE 2

Western Port News 12 May 2021

Changes at the top for lobby group Stephen Taylor steve@mpnews.com.au A WOMAN with a “wealth of experience in trade, investment, tourism and systems of government, and an authentic passion for the Mornington Peninsula as a local resident” has replaced former federal Liberal cabinet minister Bruce Billson on the Committee for Mornington Peninsula. Zoe McKenzie, who joins the management committee, is principal of Trade and Investment Advisory, a company which advises clients on market expansion into Australia or on current or future free trade agreements. The Committee for Mornington Peninsula describes itself as an “independent, member-based organisation committed to leading and influencing long-term outcomes and contributing to our strategic objectives for the broader Mornington Peninsula”. The committee says it works “beyond electoral cycles and partisan politics” to enhance social, economic and environmental sustainability “to improve living standards, growth and sustainability of our region”. “Zoe brings with her a breadth of expertise to drive our vision for an even better Mornington Peninsula,” committee president Shannon Smit said.

Ms McKenzie was chief of staff to Andrew Robb when he was the Liberal government’s trade, investment and tourism minister. During that time, she worked on Australia’s trade deals with China, Japan, South Korea and Singapore, as well as the Trans Pacific Partnership and future free trade agreements with Europe and Indonesia. She has also held policy development roles in education, the arts and the law. Ms McKenzie previously practiced as a commercial lawyer and was a strategic adviser to the CEO of “a major professional services firm”. She is also on the boards of several arts, education, careers, and trade organisations and chambers of commerce. The committee’s executive officer, Briony Hutton, appointed earlier this year, previously worked for Flinders MP Greg Hunt as an electorate officer and as an administrative assistant and assistant policy adviser for him as health minister in Canberra. Ms Hutton also works part-time as a business development executive at a nursing agency, and – as a musician in her own small business – sings at weddings and venues across the peninsula. She holds a Bachelor of Environmental Science with Honours from Deakin University.

Mr Billson was recently appointed to the $360,000 a year job as Australia’s small business and family enterprise ombudsman, a position that he announced the creation of in 2014, when he was small business minister. It is a five-year appointment. Mr Billson bowed out of politics at the 2016 election and announced took a job as executive director with the lobbying group the Franchise Council of Australia (FCA). The committee says its approach is to be “future focused and researchand-evidence based to ensure our work is strongly directed at driving, developing and safeguarding the future prosperity and sustainability of the Mornington Peninsula and the region”. The self-described independent, membership-based organisation “works collaboratively with stakeholders, opinion leaders, influencers and policy makers to support [the Mornington Peninsula’s] development”. It says it aims to have a “membership base of local, national and international organisations and individuals who set aside commercial gain, sectoral interests and personal perspectives to provide a united voice on” issues facing the peninsula.


Environment leads the way in tidy town bid Keith Platt keith@mpnews.com.au PROJECTS and activities to improve or sustain the environment make up most of the nine projects entered by Hastings in this year’s Australian Sustainable Community – Tidy Town awards. Representatives from Mornington Peninsula Shire met with Keep Victoria Beautiful and Keep Australia Beautiful to present the projects as part of Hastings’ bid to win the tidy town award. The national winner, out of seven competing towns, will be announced at Beechworth in June. The nine projects in Hastings’ bid are: Devilbend-Hastings Landcare Group’s fox control program centred at Devilbend Natural Features Reserve, one of the cornerstones of the peninsula Landcare network's bio links plan. National EPBC-listed species known to inhabit the area include the endangered Australian bittern, vulnerable growling grass frog, white-throated needletail and satin flycatcher. State-listed species include blue-billed duck, little egret, and eastern long-necked turtle. Foxes are known to eat 300–400 grams of native wildlife every night. BlueScope Steel Western Port’s project follows the closure of the hot strip mill and consequent need to find an alternate destination for the waste unblended filter cake. The company found a Victorian business that could use the filter cake as a component in its road base blending process. The Willum Warrain Aboriginal gathering place in Hastings has created

a series of ephemeral water holes called “pun puns” to filter water before it runs into Warringine Creek and Western Port. Western Port Secondary College’s Harrison Hansen has supported such school community activities and initiatives as sporting events, community days, open nights and school tours. His accomplishments for the project include mentoring students to successfully transition to secondary school; running a year 7 camp while in year 10; school tours for parents; a human powered vehicle team; being in a state lawn bowl and basketball outside school; and ballroom dancing competitions, a skill he was initially self-conscious about but now views with pride. Other projects in Hastings’ bid for the tidy towns award include installing solar panels as part of the shire’s commitment to becoming carbon neutral; the shire’s Reconciliation Action Plan and Rap4RAP project; Advance College and Family Life’s VCAL A Team litter project. The role of the shire in helping about 1000 people (and their pets) evacuated to Hastings from bushfire-threatened Mallacoota in January 2020 is also listed as a project in the awards entry. The projects are rounded off with Hastings-based Dolphin Research Institute’s i see- i care marine ambassador program, which was started in 2000 to create a longer lasting impact in schools than just one day's excursion. The program is carried out with partnerships with organisations like Parks Victoria and Melbourne Water and local councils.

On tour: Australian Sustainable Community – Tidy Town award judges on a guided tour last month with Mornington Peninsula Shire representatives to inspect some of the projects entered by Hastings in this year’s awards. Picture: Yanni

Western Port News

12 May 2021

PAGE 3


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ARTIST whose studios will be open at the end of this month are, from left, Jennifer Buntine, Jennifer Fletcher and Peninsula Studio Trail group president, Lisa O’Keefe. Picture: Supplied

First of year’s art trail openings ARTISTS along the Peninsula Studio Trail are opening their doors at the end of this month for an open studios weekend (29, 30 May). Visitors are invited to visit the studios, speak with the artists about their creative process, see new artworks and satisfy curiosity about what goes on in the creative artist’s mind. The group has new branding with signs showing the way along the trail designed by portrait and graphic artist, Marta Gola. A website map makes it easy to plan a trip to

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Western Port News 12 May 2021

the three art zones. There are 30 artists along the Peninsula Studio Trail, which will be also open on 20, 21 and 27, 28 November. Some of their works will also be shown in a group exhibition 6-20 October at Southern Buoy Studios, 1/19 Carbine Way, Mornington. Details: www.facebook.com/PeninsulaStudioTrailInc or www.peninsulastudiotrailinc.org Studio visits outside of the trail weekends can also be arranged with individual artists.


NEWS DESK

Specialist staff to help recovery THE state government has given Mornington Peninsula Shire money to hire 41 temporary staff as part of its Working for Victoria campaign. The new jobs are in volunteering, community houses, business liaison, health and wellbeing, events, seniors’ inclusion, township activation, community engagement, youth employment and creative industries. They come under a $500 million program which aims to help jobseekers find work and employers find workers.  Economic and social impacts of the pandemic across the peninsula have been severe, with 2205 jobs lost at its peak in August, and preexisting social and health issues worsening. The new roles include a creative sustainability officer, health and wellbeing officer, senior inclusions officer and five business liaison officers. The creative sustainability officer will connect artists to spaces and encourage community participation in events, after-school classes and exhibitions. Professional development workshops will be offered to artists and organisations, as well as one-on-one support to those most in need. The senior inclusions officer will help organisations, groups and networks engage with older people, including U3As and senior citizens groups. The role will support deliver of the shire’s positive ageing strategy and other initiatives and campaigns. The five business liaison officers will assist small businesses, contact and assist townships, industry estates and home-based businesses as well as liaise with shire departments to resolve or assist in any business issues. The mayor, Cr Despi O’Connor said the Working for Victoria staff would help businesses and individuals with their recovery. “The officers will be out in the field talking to

‘Extinction’ coming THE global organisation Extinction Rebellion that uses “peaceful civil disobedience” to get the action on climate change is coming to the Mornington Peninsula. “We are in a climate and ecological emergency and time is running out,” Linda Pickering, an organiser of a public meeting this week at Rye said. “Our governments are failing to act with the urgency we need to avoid catastrophic weather events, rising sea levels and food insecurity. “The beautiful place where we live and the way that we live is under threat.” Ms Pickering said people who want to find out about the Extinction Rebellion movement should “come and explore what’s at stake and what you can do about it” at 6.30pm Thursday 13 May at Rye Civic Hall, 12 Napier Street. Details: fb.me/eW5bQfKFk or ausrebellion.earth/

Internet upgrades RESIDENTS of Hastings, Mornington, Rosebud and Somerville are in line to receive network upgrades to their internet services. Flinders MP Greg Hunt said the NBM upgrades meant services in these areas would be improved from fibre-to-the-node to fibre-tothe-premises. He said this would allow users to access gigabit download speeds, bringing the number of upgraded premises to 1.1 million. He said it was important that those self-isolating due to the pandemic, or otherwise unable to travel, would be able to more easily work from home or interact with businesses online.

Flinders Art returns

our community letting them know what support is available, and finding out their current needs and the kind of support they will need longterm,” she said.

THE 53rd Flinders Art Show is at the Civic Hall, Flinders, on the Queen’s Birthday Long Weekend, Friday 11 to Monday 14 June. The show was cancelled last year – for the first time since its inception in 1967 – due to the COVID-19 lockdown. Book for the opening night at the community hall by logging into trybooking.com/BQOBS or flindersartshow.com.au

Dromana Potters Group’s Judi Singleton with Chandos Ford. Judi teaches ceramics to adults with disabilities through Focus Individualised Support Services. An exhibition of the group’s work is on show at the Mornington Library.

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Police patrol POLICE cordoned off Station Street, Somerville, after an alleged assault on Sunday, which resulted in a 50-yearold Somerville man being airlifted to hospital Picture: Gary Sissons

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Fight victim flown to hospital

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FIBRE CEMENT SHEET UNDERLAY 1800x900 ............................................ $18.95ea

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OBHW F8 50x25 ................................................... $1.65mt 75x38 ................................................... $3.15mt 125x38 ................................................. $5.25mt

MDF CRAFTWOOD 2400x1200x3mm ................................ $11.00ea 2400x1200x6mm ................................ $18.00ea 2400x1200x9mm ................................ $24.00ea 2400x1200x12mm .............................. $27.00ea 2400x1200x16mm .............................. $33.00ea 2400x1200x18mm .............................. $36.00ea

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PAGE 6

Western Port News 12 May 2021

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Maxwell Street, Mornington, Friday afternoon 7 May. Two trucks from the Mornington brigade arrived within minutes of being alerted by multiple calls to 000. They found the rear of the house alight and were concerned the fire might spread to neighbouring properties. The blaze took 27 minutes to bring under control. Fire Rescue Victoria’s investigation unit is probing the fire’s cause. CFA crews on three fire trucks assisted in fighting the fire.

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A SOMERVILLE man was airlifted to hospital following an alleged assault, Sunday, 9 May. Police were told the victim got out of his car on Station Street, Somerville, early and approached two men who appeared to have a “gripe” against him, 1.30am. During an argument the victim, 50, was allegedly struck to the head. He fell to the ground and hit his head on the road. The other men left the scene. The victim is believed to be in a stable condition. Mornington Peninsula detectives are investigating and say they have a number of inquiries to make in relation to those involved. Anyone with information or who witnessed the incident can call Crime Stoppers, 1800 333 000.

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With Stephen Taylor

Short time on road for P-plater A P-PLATER who obtained her driver’s licence in December had it suspended for 11 months last week on drink-driving counts. The 18-year-old, who was driving south along Point Nepean Road, Rosebud, without lights, will be summonsed to appear at Dromana Magistrates’ Court at a later date. Rosebud Police spotted the white Ford Festiva at 3.30am, Saturday 1 May. The driver, of Mount Martha, was taken to Rosebud Police Station where she allegedly returned a breath test reading of 0.115 per cent. Her car was impounded for 28 days.

Mop up after mixer flips A TRUCK rollover closed the left-hand lane of Peninsula Link south-bound for four hours, Monday 3 May. The cement mixer, loaded with 13 cubic metres of concrete weighing 13 tonnes, flipped after the driver tried to correct a drift into the inside lane. Sergeant Bruce Buchan, of Somerville Highway Patrol, said the truck veered into shrubbery and ploughed through a light pole, 2pm. The driver, a Springvale man, 56, was not injured in the incident and did not require hospital treatment. Sergeant Buchan said two heavy haulage trucks were required to right the mixer near the Golf Links Road entry ramp. He said a Peninsula Link clean-up crew using a frontend loader arrived soon after to clear concrete from the road surface while an EPA crew mopped up spilled oil. South-bound traffic was redirected onto Golf Links Road and along Fulton Road or the Moorooduc Highway. Sergeant Buchan said the incident was being investigated.

‘Looking lost’ MORNINGTON police have charged a man with drink driving and other traffic offences after he allegedly crashed into two parked cars and a fence in Canadian Bay Road, Mount Eliza. The 32-year-old, from Mornington, allegedly walked away from the scene before police arrived, 4.30am, Thursday 29 April. Soon afterwards, police were called following reports a man had been seen walking around “looking lost in a dressing gown”. He was found nearby and taken back to the police station where he allegedly returned a breath-test reading of 0.192 per cent. The man’s licence was suspended and he is expected to be charged on summons with exceeding 0.05 per cent, careless driving and leaving the scene of an accident.

Pictures: Gary Sissons

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12 May 2021

PAGE 7


NEWS DESK

Approval for lower speeds Continued from Page 1 The interim survey also shows 66 per cent of respondents agree that lower speed limits reduce road trauma (16 per cent disagree), although only 51 per cent wanted the trial to be permanent; 89 per cent believe a safe journey is more important than a quick journey (2 per cent disagree); 64 per cent agree their chances of being involved in a crash on sealed rural roads is much higher at 100kph than 80kph (21 per cent disagree; and 57 per cent agreed that reduced speed limits would lead to fewer road crashes (24 per cent disagree). The survey, made between early November and early December 2020, also showed more people believed the lower speed limits were appropriate (26 per cent disagreed) and 50 per cent agreed they felt safer with the lower speeds (30 per cent disagreed). The state Department of Transport is evaluating the trial and data collection will continue until the end of the trial, with results reported in early 2022. The mayor Cr Despi O’Connor said the “pioneering trial” followed statistics that the peninsula as being Victoria’s “second worst municipality for road trauma for that year, including six deaths on the 33 Safer Speeds roads alone”. “Since the implementation of the 80kph speed limits, there have not been any fatalities involving these roads. While we await the results of the evaluation of the impact of the speed limits on fatalities and serious injuries, it is a very pleasing start to the trial,” Cr O’Connor said. “What we also find pleasing is the positive community sentiment towards the trial, particularly with almost three times as many people supporting the initiative as opposing it. “It debunks the perception that matching appropriate speed limits to the road environment would be viewed negatively by the broader community.”

Survival flights not affected by pandemic THE coronavirus pandemic may have put a firm brake on international travel for many people, but it has had no effect on the flights of migratory birds. The birds continued their annual hazardous 25,000 kilometre round trips from the northern to the southern hemisphere. Western Port and Port Phillip bays are the favoured destinations for many species and more than 300 artists have contributed to an exhibition that highlights the tenuous existence faced by these intrepid international travellers. A family day was held at Mornington Peninsula Regional Gallery, Mornington last weekend for World Migratory Bird Day and The Overwintering Project-Westernport exhibition which, co-curated by artist Kate Gorringe-Smith. The MPRG is a fitting place for the exhibition (which ends Sunday 23 May) as it sits between Port Phillip and Western Port bays, which both include important locations on the world map of bird migrations. The Overwintering Project is a long-term environmental art project that sees artists around Australia uniting to raise awareness for the most endangered group of birds, migratory shorebirds. Migratory shorebirds spend the summer on Australian beaches before heading north, some as far as the Arctic, to breed. The exhibition at the MPRG focusses on Western Port and features works by 17 artists in a variety of media. The works are being shown in conjunction with the Overwintering Project Print Portfolio, a growing collection of more than 300 original prints made by artists from Australia and New Zealand in response to the unique nature of their local migratory shorebird habitat. The exhibition was also being shown at the same time that power company AGL was refused permission on environmental grounds

YOU’RE MORE SUITED THAN YOU MIGHT THINK NOW RECRUITING FOR OVER 3000 POLICE POLICE CAREERS PAGE 8

Western Port News 12 May 2021

ARTIST Kate Gorringe-Smith has co-curated an exhibition of works to highlight the need to protect habitat for migratory birds. Picture: Yanni

to moor a floating gas import terminal at Crib Point. Gorringe-Smith said the local community had been “delighted” when Western Port’s internationally recognised shorebird habitat “won a recent

reprieve from AGL’s proposed development”. The Overwintering Project-Westernport ends Sunday 23 May at Mornington Peninsula Regional Gallery, Civic Reserve, Dunns Road, Mornington. Call 5950 1580. Keith Platt


Fined, but groggy Bella in no mood to move BELLA was finding it hard to move, but was booked for being out of bounds. Picture: Gary Sissons

Stephen Taylor steve@mpnews.com.au A MOUNT Martha dog owner says he will “go to jail” rather than pay a $248 dog-at-large fine incurred last month. David Ball, of Samuel Close, said his 14-year-old Staffordshire, Bella, was “nabbed by default” as the Mornington Peninsula Shire officer was in the deadend street, possibly looking for another dog which had “rushed” a neighbour, Wednesday 21 April. Mr Ball said Bella, just out of surgery after the removal of a cyst on her left back leg and several infected teeth, may have passed him on her way out to the garden which – like the neighbours – has no front fence. A grass easement abuts the made road. Mr Ball said the safety officer – not described as a ranger – walked up and asked if Bella belonged to him. After confirming she did, Mr Ball explained that the “old girl” had been groggy all night from the previous day’s operation and he had not expected her to come outside. In her weakened state she could only walk slowly and could not have “rushed” anyone. “This reasoning cut no ice with the safety officer [who] I believe had probably phoned the details ahead [to the local laws department] and was thus committed to charging me without prior notice and according to ‘the Act 1994’,” Mr Ball said. “I advise all dog owners, especially in Mornington, to be aware. This is a convenient wage earner.” Mr Ball said before confronting him the shire officer had left a note at a neighbour’s after a woman complained that a Jack Russell had “rushed” her and was off-leash. There is no such dog in the street, he said. “So, the fact is, Bella – who is known by everyone in the area as a friendly and placid “old girl’ – was due to circumstances unrelated nabbed by default,” he said. “I am hoping common sense will prevail with this case as I am determined to contest this with all means

at my disposal. I will even go to jail.” This is not Bella’s first brush with notoriety. Eight or nine years ago, when she and Mr Ball were more “sprightly” she was “dog-napped” from outside the Mornington Centrelink offices in Main Street. Mr Ball, his wife’s then-carer, had tied Bella up outside and, after a longer-than-expected appointment, returned to find her in the same spot but not attached to her lead. A woman told him she had seen some youths jump out of a car, undo Bella’s lead and bundle her into their car. “A short time later they drove back down Main Street and pushed Bella out with traffic all around her,” he said. “What I presumed had happened was that Bella was too hot to handle and wasn’t going to be abducted … or they realised she was spayed and no use for breeding. “Bella, being the intelligent dog she is, returned to the spot where I had left her. When I say ‘stay’ Bella stays. “This is the same dog found wandering in our front garden.” The shire’s environment protection manager Mark Upton said it was an offence for a dog to be at large outside the premises of the owner or not securely confined to the owner's premises. “Secure confinement of a dog to the owner’s premises means the yard must have a closed gate and an escape-proof fence that the dog cannot jump, get under or through. If the owner’s premises is not fenced, someone must be present and have effective control of the dog – it can’t be left to wander on its own,” Mr Upton said. “The Department of Agriculture Victoria has found most dog attacks in public places occur on the footpath or road in front of the attacking dog’s property and that confining dogs to their property would prevent 80 per cent of dog attacks in public places.”

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12 May 2021

PAGE 9


LETTERS

Letters - 300 words maximum and including full name, address and contact number - can be sent to The News, PO Box 588, Hastings 3915 or emailed to: team@mpnews.com.au

Beware, AGL not only threat to Western Port So, thankfully, the big, bad AGL regassification plant is not to be, as the potential threat was, quite sensibly, rolled (“AGL withdraws request for federal approval” The News 3/5/21). Why, because of the value of Western Port as a natural resource. Yet, many threats to the Ramsar-protected ecology remain. Balnarring Beach is still subject to threats from sea level rise, horses, dogs, foxes, cats, invasive weeds, a toxic creek, and the annual pyrotechnical display of selfish stupidity. Yes, these are not the sorts of issues that will get your face on the television news, but they are real, present and damaging. A lot of impetus was generated by the Save Westernport [community group] movement. Will it be lost because these existing threats to the ecology are not as sexy as the AGL thing? While I hope not, I also worry a lot that our community will return to the complacency that preceded the No AGL campaign. As long as we can let our dogs run on the beach, gallop our horses along the sand and watch the fireworks blow the bejesus out of the place every New Year’s Eve, we’ll be happy. Or will we, in the long run? Barry Greer, Balnarring

Hydrogen gas project It was more than comforting to read that the AGL [gas import terminal] proposal has been withdrawn by [power company AGL]. I think we can all breathe easier on that one now, but we must remain vigilant on the never ending plans to turn Western Port into an industrial hub. The hydrogen [from Latrobe Valley brown coal] trial by the Japanese conglomerate led by Kawasaki Heavy Industries, to be exported from Hastings, is the latest threat to this fragile

environment. Cr David Gill is quite right when he says that governments cannot be trusted to protect Western Port and the Mornington Peninsula’s green wedge (“Cheers and fears over threats to green wedge” The News 3/5/21). We have been fortunate that our current state Planning Minister [Richard Wynne] was willing and able to resist the overtures of big business and, probably, big unions pushing the AGL proposal. This planned hydrogen gas project is another thin edge of a wedge to force industrial development on the area by stealth. Along with the industrial development there will be a need for ancillary industries and housing for employees with further encroachment on farm and recreational land for subdivision. If the “trial” proves to be successful, what happens next? Obviously, a major expansion of the industrial hub and all that depends on it. This project has no natural connection with Western Port other than the proximity of the sea. It needs to be strenuously resisted and killed off at the pilot plant stage along with any further rezoning of the area for any purpose. The state government needs to come clean with its long-term plans and vision for Hastings and Western Port in general. Is it to remain an enjoyable residential and holiday location or not? I have said before, and I say it again, the present government has a policy to urbanise the area by stealth and we all need to be aware of it before it is too late. Barry J Rumpf, McCrae

Rescuers thanked Our family would like to sincerely thank all of the emergency services involved in the rescue

of my husband Peter Harrison when his car plunged 30 metres down the embankment on Two Bays Road, Mount Eliza (“Rescue crews rush to save trapped man” The News 28/4/21). These included Baxter Fire Brigade, Moorooduc CFA, Fire Rescue Victoria Frankston, the High Angle Rescue Team, SES Frankston, police and Ambulance Victoria. The cooperation between all agencies was exceptional and very professional. A special thanks goes out to Leading Senior Constable Anthony Deason, of Somerville Highway Patrol, for keeping Peter company for well over two hours while he was trapped in the car. Peter is still recovering in hospital, but things could have been a lot worse if not for the amazing work of the first responders. Sue Harrison, Mount Eliza

Family heartbreak Families that stay together, stick together is often quoted. Families are regarded as important to the wellbeing of our society. Apparently, our MP for Flinders has other ideas. [Federal Health Minister] Greg Hunt wishes to put members of families in jail or be heavily fined if they attempt to return home from India. These families are faced with heartbreaking problems. Surely, we have the ability to cope with people returning home? Geoffrey Lane, Mornington Editor: The Prime Minister Scott Morrison announced on Friday that some of the more than 9000 Australians in India would start to be flown home via Darwin on 15 May. On Saturday 1 May Mr Hunt announced the temporary pause in flights from India would come into effect on Monday 3 May with fines of up to $66,000 or five-year jail terms for anyone trying to avoid the ban.

Paved paradise Who in their wildest days could think it a good thing to remove a small, grassed area in the park adjoining the Blairgowrie shops where people would sit and enjoy the glancing views of the beach and their coffees too, and replace it with loads of concrete paving and concrete walls? Unbelievable. Shopkeepers seem to know nothing of the disaster until it happened and were horrified. Please Mornington Peninsula Shire Council take it all down and reinstate our lovely peaceful shopping area. Peter Meeking, Blairgowrie

Praise reserved

Join us, the Aboriginal community of the Mornington Peninsula, for a leisurely stroll in the spirit of Reconciliation. Come with your family, school group or community group - everyone is welcome.

Includes Welcome to Country by the Bunurong Land Council, Mitch Tambo, Yeng Gali Mullum choir, cultural activities & free family BBQ from 11.30am onwards at Willum Warrain. The walk begins at Pelican Park on the Hastings Foreshore at 11:00am & proceeds to our Gathering Place at 10c Pound Road, Hastings. Park at Willum Warrain at 10:00am for the shuttle bus lift to Pelican Park. For more information please call 5979 1391 Organisations- please register your interest on the FB event to help with catering: https://www.facebook.com/WillumWarrain

PAGE 10

Western Port News 12 May 2021

We are both blessed and cursed to live immediately adjacent to the Moonah Warrain Reserve, Rye and I have been peripherally involved around its development for three decades (“Eyesore now nature’s haven” The News 4/5/21). We use the reserve every day for exercise and consider ourselves fortunate to have such a large area of bushland available to us without the previous threat of a school or a housing development. Unfortunately, there was little or no maintenance under the Education Department and since Mornington Peninsula Shire took it over, mere tinkering around the edges despite the best intentions of the friends group. The problem is the fuel load of downed trees and undergrowth has built up to such an extent that when we get a normal fire season this area presents a major danger. We have friends both in the regional and local CFA and they have advised us that the major fire risk is from the east and in that scenario our property would be lost because of the reserve and our lives are at risk. Both our families are farmers and if this fuel load had built up on their properties, they would have been served with a substantial penalty notice – the fact that this is shire land does not absolve it of this responsibility. I am pleased that the shire has purchased this land to maintain bushland areas, it does not have to be manicured, merely maintained – this can surely be done while looking after habitat and native vegetation. Our family contracting company is willing to donate our equipment and labour free of charge to achieve both a better amenity and bushfire mitigation if matched by a shire contribution. John Bagot, Rye

‘Usual suspect’ responds I was intrigued and somewhat uplifted by Mornington Peninsula Shire CEO John Baker’s comments to newbie councillor Susan Bissinger

that [citizens panels] would be protected from the “usual suspects” and exposed exclusively to the “sophisticated citizens” only (“Reassuring omissions” Letters 3/5/21). I put my hand up to being a proud member of the usual suspects and lacking sophistication. I could think of several other well-meaning and unloved elderly ratepayers who tirelessly confront the council with pettifogging maintenance, spiritual, public safety and societal health issues. I won’t embarrass them by mentioning these wonderful people who try to express their concerns and show passionate care for our community. Most of them have done sterling unpaid service to local clubs, seniors clubs, associations and been embedded in our peninsula for years, unlike the cancel culture and supposedly “woke” recent bunch of renta-councillor lobby group members. I regard the CEO’s comments as being arrogant and politically incorrect towards these usual suspects and require a retraction and public apology. I don’t think past CEOs like Dr Michael Kennedy would have spoken like this. Many of these so-called litigious complainants have often sought support from their councillors and state politicians only to be ignored and distanced from opportunities to participate in such events as a proposed citizens panel. Just to be listened to and some small effort to mediate a happy outcome, whether it is a council railing, a dead light bulb or overgrown grass, would show humanity and justify respect for both parties. Some of our elected representatives and paid council officers lack basic people skills and have lost the respect of the electorate. Ian Morrison, Mount Eliza

Motivated memories I’ve been reminded about the “pink batts” insulation scheme to provide jobs during the global financial crisis was a great policy rorted by a very few ratbag tradies (“Spending rules” Letters 4/5/21). But then, how could we ever forget after the ideologically-motivated, neoliberal pseudo-Christian extremist party (then in opposition) and News Corp went on and on about it for months? Yet nary a word from the ideologically-motivated, neoliberal pseudo-Christian extremist government and News Corp about the hundreds of millions of dollars of JobKeeper fees paid to the corporate mafia to be passed on in profits, executive bonuses, and dividends to fat cat investors. Just think if those hundreds of millions had been paid directly to those who “earned” it. Jobs would have been maintained, small business would have benefited and more people would have been employed. Think about how many tens of thousands of dollars the ideologically motivated neoliberal pseudo-Christian extremist government would spend to collect $250 that they overpaid to a pensioner. Joe Lenzo, Safety Beach

Shocking figures The Victorian government announced a $3000 subsidy for 20,000 new electric vehicles sold here, claiming savings of $1600 a year in fuel and maintenance. Before rushing to buy one, consider: Available cars are micro or small, there are no family-sized cars. Have you ever seen an electric car towing a caravan? Mileage (range) claims are exaggerated. In the real world it’s about half that being claimed. Cars have huge and hugely expensive compliShopping mall charging stations, some free, supply 22kw. A small car with a 70kw-hour battery will need three hours to charge. Home electricity costs about 25 cents a kwh; so, with a 7kw, $2500 wall charger hard-wired into your house, the charge cost is $17. Plus the new road tax. If you live in a flat you cannot charge at home. Roadside chargers, none in most country towns, are around 45 cents a kwh, that’s $31 for this small car. Fast chargers only charge to 80 per cent and still take an hour. Electricity is not zero-emission, most of our grid is coal generated, particularly at night. The average house uses 100kwh a week. If all cars went electric we’d have to double our already inadequate power generation. EV batteries last seven to 15 years, average maybe 10. When you sell your $50,000 small car, with a weak or dud battery, it won’t be worth much, possibly zero. Brian A Mitchelson, Mornington


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WESTERN PORT NEWS

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ON THE COVER

NOTHING QUITE LIKE SOME FLAIR AND FUN WHY settle for just the sea change experience of the Mornington Peninsula, when, with this absolutely charming home, you get the ultimate tree-change vibe as well. One of only a few properties along the prized Fairhills ridge line that commands such an aspect, this very cool three bedroom home captures a stunning 270-degree vista that encompasses open pasture and famous golf courses all the way to Bass Strait and around to Port Phillip Bay. The main living zone is encased by floor to ceiling windows and opens

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to timber decks on both sides, allowing for a seamless connection to the rugged surf coastline beyond, whilst at all times you have the welcome feeling of total immersion in the gum trees. The wonderful use of timber throughout the home is a real stand out feature with beautifully crafted natural floors, handrails and superb timber casement windows immediately attracting the eye. Accommodation across both levels is very generous with two bedrooms upstairs – both with built-in robes – sharing a powder room and separate

shower. Downstairs is the larger main bedroom and a fantastic rumpus room; there is also the main bathroom and a combined laundry has a shower and toilet. Set at the rear of a wedge-shaped block the home enjoys great privacy and pleasingly still offers a canvas to which you can add your own personal touches. Offered to the market for the first time in 20 years, if breathtaking views, rustic charm and boundless creativity are your thing then an inspection of this property is an absolute must.n

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mpnews.com.au

Wednesday, 12th May 2021

WESTERN PORT NEWS

Page 3


Tucked away on just over an acre in the peaceful seaside town of Somers, this breathtaking home is a rare blend of modern design and timeless charm. Complete with all the creature comforts, including seamless indoor-outdoor flow, an upstairs parent´s retreat, luxe bedrooms, a huge barn shed, and expansive views over Westernport Bay from the comfort of your fireplace or balcony.

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Wednesday, 12th May 2021

WESTERN PORT NEWS

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100 YEARS AGO THIS WEEK...

Little boy shot dead at Carrum - Man charged with murder Compiled by Cameron McCullough AN extraordinary shooting tragedy took place on Sunday last, the victim being a little boy, Don Marcel Kirkham, aged five years. At the time we write, there is not much information available, beyond the fact that Clement George Eyles, aged 22 years, has been arrested on a charge of willful murder. It appears that Eyles, who is a farm laborer, and John Gervasoni had been batching at Thompson Street, Carrum, and Mr Kirkham and his little boy came to visit them. Eyles had been cleaning a room at the house, and placed a gun on the verandah. Kirkham and Gervasoni had been conversing at the back of the house, when they heard the report of a gunshot, and rushing to the verandah, they found that the little fellow had been shot through the eye, and killed instantly. It was thought to be accidental, but Detective Ethell went to Carrum on Wednesday, and, after making inquiries, he arrested Eyles on a charge of murder. The accused was lodged in the Melbourne gaol. *** For influenza colds, take Woods Great Peppermint Cure. *** Mr and Mrs J. M. Rivett, of Baxter, have had the misfortune to lose their youngest child from pneumonia. *** We omitted to state in our last issue that the State School children formed part of the Anzac procession. ***

By direction of the Committee, Mr J. D. Jennings has selected a very nice strong name-plate for the trees in the Frankston Honor Avenue. It is of brass, 5in by 1¾in, and 14 gauge. The engraving of the names is now in progress. *** Mr A. H. Gregory, of Frankston, met with a motor accident on Tuesday last. One of the wheels of the car in which Mr Gregory was travelling came off, and although he received a severe shaking he is now able to be about. *** Mr O. Olsen, who recently underwent an operation at Mount St. Evin’s Hospital, Melbourne, returned to his home at Frankson on Wednesday last. *** The committee of the Frankston Caledonian Society met on Wednesday evening last, Mr W. Crawford Young occupying the chair, and there was a large attendance. Owing to the Mechanics’ Hall undergoing repairs it was decided to postpone the concert arranged for this month until June. Several new members were proposed. *** The death of Mrs Martha Millard, wife of Mr James Millard, occurred at her residence, Wells Street, Frankston, on Sunday night last. The late Mrs Millard had been ill for some considerable time – the last five weeks being spent in a continual state of collapse – and her demise was not altogether unexpected. Although she had lingered for a long time, the end was peaceful.

The deceased lady was a Tasmanian by birth, and was 73 years of age. The daughter of the late Joseph Chudley Codell, one of the early pilots of Port Phillip Bay who had been transferred from the Tasmanian Pilot Service, she came to Frankston with her sister, the late Mrs J. Thompson, when only eight years of age, and had lived here ever since – more than 65 years. Thus, she, with her husband, watched Frankston grow from the little olden time sleepy hollow to its present commanding position and status – the outlet to Melbourne’s expanding population. Mr and Mrs Millard were married at Brighton, and had as issue two sons and five daughters, namely – Messrs Arthur (Melbourne) and Alfred Millard (Sydney), the late Mrs. Kerr, and Mesdames C. Fletcher, Kirvell, C. Bunny, and J. A. Benson, all of whom reside at Frankston. The late Mrs Millard herself was the youngest of a family of 14 children. The funeral took place on Tuesday last, when a very large number of people gathered at the graveside to pay their last respects to the fine old lady whom they so widely respected. The floral tributes were exceptionally numerous. The Rev C. Angwin, assisted by Captain Kathleen Carr, of the Salvation Army, conducted the burial service, whilst the pall-bearers were – Messrs Arthur and Alfred Millard (sons), J. A. Benson and C. Bunny (sons-in-law) and W. Kervell and J. Kerr (grandsons). *** THE circumstances of the death of Charles Clifton Welsh, of Malvern Road, Toorak, who died from injuries

sustained in a motor accident near Hastings on March 24th, were investigated at the Melbourne Morgue on Wednesday last. Kenneth McKenzie Austin, student at Trinity College, stated that he and Welsh were motoring to Flinders for the Easter holidays. They had proceeded about two miles from Toorak, when witness’s machine skidded and struck the road. Although the handle bar was broken, he rode the cycle slowly to Frankston. The bicycle was left there, and he mounted behind Welsh and continued the journey. They had just passed Hastings, at 7.30pm, when they collided with a car. They were travelling at 30 odd miles an hour, but had no lights. Evidence was given by Aage Hansen (chara-banc owner), William H. Gomm (orchardist), Constable Stanbury and Edward Algernon Leveckie. The latter said he was driving a car from Flinders to Melbourne, at 25 miles an hour. He had one headlight and two side lamps burning. He conveyed Welsh to St Pancras Hospital, Frankston, where he died. The Deputy Coroner returned verdict of accidental death, stating that Welsh had been entirely to blame in not carrying a lamp. It was, he said, one of those unfortunate accidents which were becoming all too frequent, but he exonerated Levecke from all blame. *** On the 9th March a very pretty wedding was celebrated in the local hall at Pearcedale, the contracting parties being Mr T.C. Roberts, of Hopetoun,

and Miss R. Pearce, of Pearcedale. The knot was tied by the Rev A. C. F. Gates, Church of England clergyman, Somerville. The bride, who was given away by her brother, was attired in a beautiful dress of ivory crepe-de-chine and customary wreath and veil. The bridesmaids (Miss Bessie Pearce and Miss Agnes Roberts) were becomingly robed in dresses of net over pink satin, with black picture hat and embroidered voile, with pink satin and white tuille hat. The bride carried a beautiful bouquet of white daisies, dalhias and maiden hair fern, whilst the bridesmaids carried bouquets of pink belladonna lillies and asparagus fern. The breakfast, which was served at the residence of the bride’s mother, was partaken of by the relatives and a few very old friends of the young couple. The usual toasts were proposed and responded to, and everything passed off merrily. In the evening about 130 of the young couples’ friends were entertained at an evening in the hall. Dancing and vocal items were the order of the evening, and these were thoroughly enjoyed by everyone present. The party dispersed at 3.30am and as the folk wended their ways to their respective homes each declared that it was the best night’s entertainment they had had for a long time. The happy couple spent their honeymoon at Healesville and Frankston. *** FROM the pages of the Frankston and Somerville Standard, 6 May 1921

PETE THE SHEEP A LIVELY and mischievous musical for young audiences based on the picture book ‘Pete the Sheep’ by Jackie French and Bruce Whatley is set to bound onto the Frankston Arts Centre stage. Adapted by Monkey Baa Theatre Company, with foot tapping music and lyrics by Phil Scott and comedic direction by Jonathan Biggins, Pete the Sheep is an award-winning musical, which will enthral young audiences and their adults. Shaun isn’t like the other Shearers in Shaggy Gully… he’d rather be styling than shearing and instead of ‘sheep-dog’, he has a ‘sheep-sheep’ named Pete. After being rejected by the shearers and their dogs, Shaun and Pete set up their own Shearing Salon in town and before long word is out and they are inundated with woolly clients and maybe a Ringer or two!

This hilarious show, imaginatively told by four performers playing shearers, dogs and sheep explores the challenges and rewards of being an individual. It is a tribute to honouring your own spirit and strength, whilst working with the flock. Director, Jonathan Biggins, says, “Pete the Sheep began life on the page and now it finds a new life in the theatre. “Pete the Sheep is a simple yarn of difference, acceptance and friendship. But it was never our intention to simplify it further – why should theatre for children be devoid of sophistication, wit and wordplay? Thankfully, we’ve left in a sheep poo joke for the grownups.” Pete the Sheep can be seen Frankston Arts Centre on Friday 18 June, 10.30am & 1.30pm. Tickets at thefac.com.au or 03 9784 1060. Western Port News 12 May 2021

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ACROSS 1. Lacking principles 5. Irritation 7. Milky gems 8. Afterwards 9. Science rooms 10. South American dance 11. Pulsing light 13. Within range

29. Women DOWN 1. Human rights group, ... International 2. Relative amounts 3. Hair parasite 4. Drinks server 5. Small land masses

6. Leaf vegetable 12. Buzzing insect 15. Pungent gas 16. Overlook 17. Make depraved 19. Anger 20. Accounts books 22. Wild 23. Performed play

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THE MEANING OF EXISTENCE... AND OTHER SHORT STORIES

A Hardware’s Day’s Night By Stuart McCullough IN the past fortnight, I’ve been to the local hardware store four times. As someone for whom such a trip is, at best, an annual event, this is quite the turn of events. But despite the vastly increased frequency of my visits, I remain none the wiser. The whole experience is as mystical and as unfathomably mysterious as ever. I appreciate that terms like ‘mystical’ and ‘mysterious’ are seldom used in reference to a store that sells lug-nuts but there is a simple reason for this: I am not a handy man. By ‘handy man’, I don’t mean someone with a Mario-style tool belt who’s available to perform odd jobs around the house or, alternatively, leap over barrels maliciously hurled across a building site by a gigantic monkey. Not at all. Rather, I mean I missed out on whatever genetic makeup is necessary to be able to distinguish between a left-handed hammer and a righthanded hammer. If I’m being honest, they all look the same to me. For me, going to a hardware store is like going to another country; one where everyone else speaks a language I don’t. I live in fear that, at any moment, someone will say something to me I won’t comprehend and I’ll be left to simply shrug my shoulders, grunt in reply and point. At best, I feel like an imposter even for being there, which is why I tried to dress the part for my first visit and purchased a checkered shirt, gumboots and chewing tobacco in the hope that I’d fit in seamlessly. I also bought a pair of denim overalls to add, so I hoped, to the overall effect. (Incidentally, I may well start a band

PAGE 16

called ‘The Overall Effect’ where all the members wear denim overalls. I might even write a song called ‘Overall’ to the tune of ‘Wonderwall’. I’ll keep you posted.) Turns out, people who frequent hardware stores do not chew tobacco.

Western Port News 12 May 2021

Instead of making me fit in, it made me stick out like a sore thumb that, presumably, had found itself on the business end of a left-handed hammer. Spurting tobacco juice through the gaps in your front teeth like some kind of hillbilly whale is frowned upon if

not outright prohibited by the proprietors. Indeed, it was after one such nicotine-laden liquid expulsion that I was encouraged to buy a mop. Before making my second trip, I decided to do a little research. By looking at websites, I discovered that people who visit hardware stores are, without exception, delighted to be there, as nothing else could account for the wall-to-wall smiles on the faces of those present. Also, I learned that when members of the general public interact with staff members, one of them is always holding something while the other is always pointing. But as I continued my research into the products themselves, I was left more confused than ever. Even objects that I consider to be relatively basic come in a near-infinite number of varieties. Much as in nature, you can refer to a ‘bird’ or, if you prefer to be super-precise, a ‘Slenderbilled Flufftail Gruiforme’, so it goes with almost everything at a hardware store. I’ve no idea what a ‘Fernuggin Nut’ is, much less the heightened circumstances that might necessitate it being pressed into service. How a ‘Shaka-shaka Wing Wang Doodle Cordless Drill Bit’ is used is, I feel, best left unanswered. The less said about the ‘Lolly Gobble Bliss Bomb Two-inch Adapter’, the better. There were some objects I recognized, even though they appeared in a different context. I, for one, was unaware that a ‘Dutch-oven’ was something you could purchase for the very reasonable price of one hundred and seven dollars and fifty cents. Who’d have thought? I feel misled.

On my third trip, I took my brother. In the genetic lottery, my brother scooped the pool when it came to being handy. If you were to give me a set of instructions and ask me to construct an infant’s cradle, I’d fail on every level. There’d be nothing to show for my efforts other than a pile of splintered wood and smoldering wreckage. My brother, on the other hand, built his own crib as a newborn using a cordless power drill. He also added a small gazebo and a feature wall. Show off. If hardware stores were a principality, my brother would be King. As it is, he walked into that place like he owned it and other patrons doffed their hats and referred to him as ‘your Majesty’. With confidence and great certainty, he navigated through the aisles like someone who knew exactly how and when to use a Fernuggin Nut. Within minutes, he had retrieved me from the small base camp I had established over near the outdoor furniture settings and we were on our way. The fourth trip was showing off on my part. Having received a royal pardon from my brother, I returned to get a Shaka-shaka Wing Wang Doodle Cordless Drill Bit before surrendering my inhibitions completely and splurging on a Dutch Oven. As I write, I am surrounded by a sea of instructions and bits and pieces of everything and it’s becoming increasingly obvious that I’ll never figure out how to put them all together, despite my lefthanded hammer. After all, I am not a handy man. stuart@stuartmccullough.com


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PAGE 17


scoreboard WESTERN PORT

Pythons come from behind to get first win DIVISION ONE

Letting it slip: Dromana weren't able to keep Frankston YCW contained, falling to a 37 point loss. Picture: Craig Barrett

By Brodie Cowburn EDITHVALE-ASPENDALE fell just short of a win in a see-sawing thriller against Mt Eliza on Saturday. Edi-Asp were looking to score their first win of the season. The Redlegs raced out of the blocks at Regents Park, taking a 29 point lead into the first break. Momentum swung the other way in the second term. An eight goals to zero blitz saw Edi-Asp muscle their way into a 15 point lead by half time. The Redlegs took advantage of having the scoring end in the third quarter, converting seven goals of their own. Heading into the final term, Mt Eliza led by 15. The Redlegs weren’t able to hit the scoreboard in the final term, but Edithvale-Aspendale couldn’t capitalise. The final siren blew with Mt Eliza one point ahead 13.8 (86) to 11.21 (87). The loss keeps Edi-Asp on the bottom of the ladder with an 0-5 record. Thomas Rourke kicked five goals for Edi-Asp. Jeremy Burton and Elliot Simmons were Mt Eliza’s best. Pines have finally won their first game of the 2021 season, getting the better of Red Hill. The Pythons did it tough, but managed to secure the points. They overcame a nine point three-quarter-time deficit to win 10.9 (69) to 13.6 (84). Guy and Beau Hendry were both influential for Pines. Guy Hendry booted five goals. Bonbeach’s great start to 2021 continued with a win over Sorrento at David Macfarlane Reserve last week. The contest looked poised to go down to the wire, with Bonbeach just two points ahead at the final break.

Superb Seaford smash disappointing Demons DIVISION TWO

Tim Broomhead’s great form for Seaford continued. He kicked four goals and was named best-on-ground. Two goals from former Richmond star Brett Deledio helped Devon Meadows get a win on Saturday. The Panthers took on Hastings at Glover Reserve. Devon Meadows got off to a great start, scoring five goals to one in the first term. Hastings weren’t able to recover from their shaky start, going on to lose 11.9 (75) to 7.15 (57).

By Brodie Cowburn RYE have come crashing down after a good start to 2021, losing to Seaford by more than 100 points. Seaford looked sensational all day, applying consistent scoreboard pressure. They scored at least five goals in every quarter of the match. Rye had no answers for Seaford, eventually succumbing to an 8.6 (54) to 23.21 (159) loss.

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Jordan Smale’s four goals were vital for the Panthers. A seven-goal haul from Luke Daniel helped Pearcedale defeat Tyabb at Bunguyan Reserve. Daniel has now kicked 21 goals this season from six matches. Pearcedale won comfortably by 54 points. Somerville scored a good win on the weekend, taking all four points against Mornington. Mornington had plenty of chances,

but their inaccuracy in front of goal cost them badly. The Bulldogs kicked four goals and eighteen behinds for the match. Somerville ran out 31 point winners. Karingal defeated Crib Point at Ballam Park Reserve on Saturday 18.7 (115) to 10.12 (72). Langwarrin have continued their good form with a win over Chelsea.

A stunning final quarter swarm saw Bonbeach run out 8.10 (58) to 14.12 (96) winners. Trent Dennis-Lane kicked four goals for the victors. Frankston Bombers came from behind to win a thriller against Rosebud at Olympic Oval on Saturday. Down by 27 at three-quarter-time, the Bombers’ backs were to the wall. Frankston booted five goals to one in the final quarter to scrape over the line by just one point. The final score read 8.16 (64) to 8.17 (65). Frankston YCW rounded out the winner's list from round five with a 13.4 (82) to 6.9 (45) win over Dromana. The Stonecats finished the round on top of the ladder.

NEXT WEEK’S GAMES MPNFL Division One Seniors Saturday, May 15, 2021 Dromana Vs Sorrento, 2PM – Dromana Recreation Reserve Pines Vs Edithvale-Aspendale, 2PM – Eric Bell Reserve Frankston Bombers Vs Bonbeach, 2PM – Greg Beck Oval (Baxter Park) Rosebud Vs Mt Eliza, 2PM – Olympic Oval Red Hill Vs Frankston YCW, 2PM – Red Hill Recreation Reserve MPNFL Division Two Seniors Saturday, May 15, 2021 Karingal Vs Devon Meadows, 2PM – Ballam Park Reserve Tyabb Vs Somerville, 2PM – Bunguyan Reserve Chelsea Vs Mornington, 2PM – Chelsea Reserve Crib Point Vs Langwarrin, 2PM – Crib Point Recreation Reserve Seaford Vs Pearcedale, 2PM – Oval 2 Belvedere Reserve Hastings Vs Rye, 2PM – Thomas Barclay Oval SEWF Premier Friday, May 14, 2021 Tyabb Vs Eastern Devils, 7:30PM – Bunguyan Reserve Saturday, May 15, 2021 Frankston Vs Seaford, 11AM – Skybus Stadium Sunday, May 16, 2021 Mornington Vs Coburg Lions, 12PM – Alexandra Park St. Kilda Sharks Vs Mount Eliza, 2:00PM – Peanut Farm Reserve

Yabbies struggle against Sharks SEWF PREMIER

By Brodie Cowburn TYABB’S dominant start to the SEWF Premier season has come to an end at the hands of the St Kilda Sharks. The Yabbies were dominant in their first two games of the year, but faced a tougher challenge at home against the Sharks. St Kilda piled on the pressure early with a six goals to zero opening term. Tyabb were able to stop the onslaught throughout the second and third quarters, but play opened up again in the final term. A five goals to zero quarter saw St Kilda run out dominant winners over Tyabb 2.6 (18) to 13.7 (85). Jess Gardner was named in the Sharks’ best thanks to her three goals. Mornington got the better of Mt Eliza on Sunday in a scrappy contest at Alexandra Park.

Mt Eliza had plenty of opportunities throughout the day, but were let down by poor goalkicking. They kicked 2.13 for the afternoon. The Bulldogs capitalised, running out 18 point winners. Skye Nisbet scored two goals for Mornington, while Georgia Howes and Bianca Vernon also impressed. Frankston had a tough day at home on the weekend. They fell to defeat at the hands of the Eastern Devils. The Dolphins started well, holding the Devils scoreless until quarter time. They were soon overwhelmed and eventually lost 2.3 (15) to 9.5 (59). Seaford scored an impressive win in their clash against Coburg. The Tigers held Coburg goalless after the first term, running out 8.7 (55) to 1.1 (7) winners.


WESTERN PORT scoreboard

Seaford United still unbeaten SOCCER

By Craig MacKenzie SEAFORD United is the only local club that remains unbeaten after seven rounds of the 2021 league season. Peter Schwellinger’s side prevailed 2-1 against Chelsea in Saturday’s State 4 South local derby at North Seaford Reserve while State 1 leader Mornington and State 3 pacesetter Frankston Pines both lost their unblemished league records. Mornington went down 3-2 away to Boroondara-Carey Eagles on Saturday while Pines lost 2-1 to Hampton East Brighton at Carrum Downs Recreation Reserve on Friday night. Two second-half goals from Wayne Gordon put Mornington 2-1 up but Benjamin Osei-Safo equalised shortly after and Alex Meaney got the winner from the penalty spot in the 80th minute. Meanwhile Pines’ goalkeeper Aeseli Batikasa had a night to forget and was at fault for both of the visitors’ goals. Pines were down 1-0 at half-time but not long after the restart Joe O’Connor finished well from an Alex Roberts cross to the back post. Hampton East Brighton sub Oscar Knight was only on the pitch for five minutes before being gifted the winner when Batikasa’s attempted clearance went straight to him and he ran in and scored. In NPL2 Langwarrin lost 1-0 at home to Goulburn Valley Suns. Goulburn keeper Zac Mcleod made a superb save in the 59th minute to deny Langy striker Damir Stoilovic and the visitors broke forward quickly where Vani Shamoon finished from a one-on-one with Langy keeper Fraser Maclaren. In State 2 Peninsula Strikers drew 2-2 away against Collingwood City on Friday night while Skye United lost 2-1 at home to Heatherton United the following day. In State 4 it’s increasingly likely that only second spot is up for grabs in the promotion race as league leader Noble Park United firms into odds-on favouritism for the title. And Seaford is in the chasing pack. Peter Schwellinger and assistant Andy Lancaster have fashioned a side

Danger averted: Seaford United midfielder Jack Carter clears the ball before Chelsea striker Adrian Lotca can get to the contest. Picture: Darryl Kennedy

with structure, discipline and resolve and a side that is fit and can maintain a competitive edge right through to the final whistle. All this despite having their plans being thrown into disarray when Matthais Schwellinger’s season ended with a broken leg in a Cup match and other key players were injured. The derby against Chelsea last weekend was always going to be a test and the physical nature of Chelsea target man Adrian Lotca’s approach would have unsettled most opponents but Dean Snoxell and Jeremy Schwellinger withstood the challenge. Seaford was without suspended goal ace Dylan Waugh so Mitch Lander led the frontline with Blake Hicks and

Mitch Hawkins in supporting roles. Right back Jamie Baxter and left back Tom Hogan were given licence to get forward when the opportunity presented itself. Baxter’s first half opponent William Ong was subbed at half-time and Baxter made a series of well-timed runs in the second half that had the Chelsea defence on the back foot. Chelsea could have led in the 17th minute had Hayden Hicks not effected a good save to deny Max TimuskaCarr and the home side’s best chance came in the 39th minute through a stunning break from the back. Baxter’s crossfield pass picked out Blake Hicks on the left and he touched the ball off to Jack Carter who had

made a gut-busting run from his defensive midfield position only to blast his shot over when well positioned. A minute before the break the deadlock was broken. Chelsea failed to clear and a little dink over a static defence set up Lander who lobbed the ball over the head of keeper Calum McLauchlan. Lander had to follow up as the ball struck the post but he tucked away the rebound from point blank range. Six minutes into the second half Lander should have extended the lead. He played a one-two with Blake Hicks and charged toward goal. He placed his shot well or so it seemed until it struck the inside of the near post and bounced across the face of goal before being cleared. But two minutes later it was 2-0 when Hawkins was tripped and Blake Hicks converted from the spot. Chelsea had plenty of the ball in the last half-hour of the contest but couldn’t force Hayden Hicks into action often enough. It’s a problem that needs to be solved as Chelsea’s line-up is impressive and there’s no doubting the quality of its key players yet it has not won since the opening match of the season. It was given a lifeline against Seaford in the 80th minute when a handball prompted referee Aurel Ioana to point to the spot. Up stepped Chelsea’s leading scorer Piers Brelsford and he had no trouble converting to make it 2-1. But it wasn’t enough and there were no late Brelsford heroics this time around. In other State 4 matches Somerville Eagles went down 4-2 at home to FC Noble Hurricanes while Baxter lost 3-0 away to Sandown Lions. Somerville player-coach Dave Greening scored both his side’s goals but could not hide his disappointment after the loss. “As good as we’ve been in recent weeks we were not at the races today,” Greening said. “Silly mistakes again cost us dearly and at this level you get brutally punished.” In State 5 news Jarryd McMinimee has been released by Rosebud and could join Baxter while after just one

appearance for the ‘Buds Carlo Cardoso has called it quits due to family commitments and travel. Midfielder Callum Richardson also has stopped playing for Rosebud and can’t say whether or not he’ll play again this year. The leading local club in State 5 is Aspendale Stingrays and they continued on their way last weekend with a 4-3 win at home over Casey Panthers. Lee Barber’s outfit now sits third in the league three points behind the top two clubs with a game in hand. Adrian Pace, Taylor Davison, Hayden Nuhanovic and second-half substitute Kenan Nuhanovic scored for the Stingrays whose best were Peter Dimopoulos, Davison and James Macnab. Mount Martha lost 3-0 to Pakenham United and Rosebud drew 3-3 with White Star Dandenong. Doug Cunnison, Chris Parry and player-coach Mark Pagliarulo scored for Rosebud.

NEXT WEEK’S GAMES Friday May 14, 7.30pm: Pascoe Vale v Langwarrin – CB Smith Reserve Friday 14 May, 8.30pm: Chelsea v Somerville Eagles – Edithvale Recreation Reserve Saturday 15 May, 3pm: Mornington v Richmond – Dallas Brooks Park Peninsula Strikers v Knox City – Centenary Park Skye Utd v Collingwood City – Skye Recreation Reserve South Yarra v Frankston Pines – Fawkner Park Baxter v Seaford Utd – Baxter Park Mount Martha v Knox Utd – Civic Reserve Hampton Park Utd v Aspendale Stingrays – KM Reedy Reserve Saturday 15 May, 8.30pm: Rosebud v Pakenham Utd – Olympic Park

You can’t keep a champ down HORSE RACING

By Ben Triandafillou MORNINGTON-based trainer Brett Scott landed one of the most memorable wins of the Warrnambool May Carnival having taken out the elusive Galleywood Hurdle (3200m) just five weeks after being released from hospital. Scott was immediately flooded with congratulatory cheers following the tenacious win of his promising jumper The Statesman, ridden by another Mornington-based jockey Will Gordon, in one of the carnival’s feature jumps races on Wednesday 5 May. Scott, a four-time Grand Annual Steeplechase-winning jockey, had overcome lifethreatening injuries after being kicked in the head by a horse at his Mornington property just two months earlier. Scott said to just be at the Warrnambool Carnival was a thrill in itself, let alone win one of the feature contests. “Just walking around and talking to people I’ve known for years and then to have this horse actually give us a reason to celebrate is just great. I’m just so happy to be here again,” Scott said post-race. Despite being a prominent jumps rider in

Victoria for more than a decade, the Galleywood Hurdle always seemed to evade Scott during his riding career having finished second in the race on two occasions. A feat that he has now ticked off as a trainer. “Will Gordon has done something I couldn’t do,” Scott quipped following the victory. Jockey Will Gordon gave the seven-year-old gelding a terrific ground-saving ride, ducking up the inside of the field at the final hurdle before kicking clear to win the Galleywood by a comfortable three-length margin. “I just wanted to win it more for [Brett] Scotty and the family than anything,” Gordon said. “They’ve obviously been through a tough time recently. It’s just a massive credit to the whole family. Scotty for bouncing back, Kylie for picking up the pieces, Tylah and everyone back at home that’s been supporting them – it’s unbelievable. “Scotty being the true champ he is said ‘you just do what you want mate’. It’s my second feature race but this one is up there at the top.” The Yulong Investments-owned jumper will now head to Sandown for his next start in the Australian Hurdle (3900m).

Scotty’s back: Mornington-based trainer Brett Scott and his daughter Tylah celebrate the win of The Statesman in the Galleywood Hurdle on Wednesday 5 May. Picture: Supplied Western Port News 12 May 2021

PAGE 19


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Western Port News 12 May 2021

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