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Wednesday 10 March 2021

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Disco Mermaid Zooms to school SORRENTO pop musician Matilda Pearl treated Somers Primary School students to a song or two and a question-and-answer session last week. The performing arts students have been inspired by Pearl and her 2020 release, Soak. This led the self-described Mermaid meets Disco Ball to visit the school, via Zoom on Wednesday 3 March. The class has been learning a dance routine to her disco pop track inspired by artists Deee-Lite, Madonna, Dua Lupa, Jamiroquai and Boney M. Pearl created her own music video during lockdown last year which inspired the students to do the same. The extracurricular classes are being run by Southern School of Creative Arts, which aims to bring affordable and accessible creative opportunities to students on the peninsula. Artistic director Melanie McLean said the students were “in awe of Pearl’s creativity”. Students, dressed in sequins, asked Pearl about her song-writing process, how she started in the industry and what it was like to be a recording artist. She then gave an acapella performance of her new track. In term two ther students will have a chance to make a short film for entry into the International Youth Silent film festival. Stephen Taylor

Let’s get creative: Somers students Amelia Coit, Savannah Dillon, Elsha Cupidon, Quinnah Heffernan and Finn Micallef at the music day with Matilda Pearl (inset). Picture: Supplied

Rage ramps up over ‘neglect’ Stephen Taylor steve@mpnews.com.au THE state government is being urged to hurry up its takeover of managing Mornington Peninsula’s boat launching ramps. It is believed the state of the boat ramps was high on the agenda during a recent meeting between Fishing and Boating Minister Melissa Horne and shire CEO John Baker. In the lead-up to the 2018 election the state government promised to “embark on the biggest reforms to the way that boating infrastructure is managed that Victoria has ever seen [by] fixing boat ramps, abolishing boat ramp park-

ing and launching fees, and reforming boat ramp management in Port Phillip and Western Port”. The plan was outlined in the preelection handbook: Labor’s plan for fishing and boating 2018. The handbook says $27 million would be spent on fishing, with money collected from boat licence and registration fees to be spent on improving facilities and safety for boaters and abolish boat ramp parking and launching fees. (“Spring takeover for boat ramps” The News 3/6/19). But the high-profile Futurefish Foundation has accused the shire and management committees of neglecting the ramps in both bays. Director David Kramer describes

the situation as “disrespectful to the thousands of boat owners crying out for improved facilities after decades of neglect”. “Boaters and fishers visiting the Mornington Peninsula contribute significant tourism dollars to the local economy, and yet the assets that attract their visits are neglected to such a level that people are not going boating on busy days now,” Mr Kramer said. He said there were “problems with every boat ramp” from Dromana to Sorrento. Mr Kramer said the channel at Tootgarook was only dredged once a year “leaving the boat ramp unusable during the prime winter and spring calamari season”.

“The channel needs to be dredged twice a year and become an all-yearround-usable ramp,” he said. Tootgarook also needed a car park along the foreshore to “get the cars and trailers off the side of Point Nepean road”. Anecdotal evidence supports Mr Kramer’s claim that a lack of boat and trailer parking at the Tootgarook – as well as the congestion on the ramp – is causing problems. “Up to six boats and trailers are parking up Burdett Street near the state school,” a boater told The News. A lack of enforcement meant that single cars were parking in boat trailer bays at Rye. “On a busy day, launching of boats

exceeds the number of car and trailer car parks, resulting in cars and trailers parking on grassed areas,” Mr Kramer said. “Yet, on a busy day, often more than 50 car parks are taken up by single cars.” The Rye channel also needed monitoring and dredging, Mr Kramer said. “On very low tides, larger boats are unable to use the channel.” He said the Tyrone boat ramp, channel and launch area needed dredging. “Several years ago, the committee of management thought it was a good idea to run the bay walking trail right through the car park on the south side of Point Nepean road,” he said. Continued Page 10

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Western Port News 10 March 2021


NEWS DESK

Science called in to probe apple-eating kangaroos Keith Platt keith@mpnews.com.au THE Department of Environment, Land, Water and Planning (DELWP) is being asked to provide details about eastern grey kangaroos on the Mornington Peninsula. Mornington Peninsula Shire councillors wants to know if the DELWP has any management plans for the peninsula’s kangaroos and what scientific research is available. The DELWP says the licences it issues to kill kangaroos is based on scientific evidence but will not release details of how many are estimated to be living on the peninsula or how many have been allowed to be “harvested” each year. The move by council to contact and meet with DELWP follows a failed attempt by Cr David Gill to have kangaroo shooting banned on the peninsula (“Council ignores move to end kangaroo shoots” The News 15/2/21). “Our kangaroos are no more pests than koalas; kangaroos eat different grasses to sheep and cattle and do little damage to farm land, Cr Gill said.” “Governments and some large property owners believe that shooting kangaroos is OK. However, many are wounded and joeys are often left to die of starvation”. However, Gary Katerelos, who lives on an orchard at Red Hill, says kangaroo numbers in his area are increasing. He said that 20 years ago he regarded one kangaroo “living in the scrub … as a pleasantry”. “But time and nature take its toll.

JUST what the doctor didn’t order: Apples said to have been shaken from the tree by kangaroos (Gary Katerelos picture) and, inset a kangaroo photographed elsewhere on the Mornington Peninsula. Picture: Gary Sissons

These days one can sometimes count up to 20 ‘roos in a mob,” Mr Katerelos said. “They do eat crops. Early shoots from grapevines are eaten; apples are taken off trees and discarded after a few bites. Trees are damaged as they attempt to pull fruit from them, and

they can strip a pear tree of most fruit in a week.” Mr Katerelos said he had seen “large males on their hind [legs] shaking trees so the fruit will fall”. “When the females are in season, have seen them being chased by four

males into a shed, out the other side, around the shed and back through the shed again and this repeated four to five times. [It’s] like something out of a comedy skit. “These males in these numbers are dangerous, especially at these times.

“I've stood less than two metres from a tall male, yelling, but there is only one thing on his mind, and he is not afraid of anything.” Mr Katerelos said kangaroos “a hazard if they get on the roads and in these [increasing] numbers”. Councillors on Tuesday 23 February were told by the shire’s interim director-place Jessica Wingad that they should seek a meeting with DELWP to “access to the most accurate and relevant information … to discuss the state of kangaroos on the peninsula”. “As the authority managing wildlife management, DELWP representatives will be best placed to provide councillors with information and answer questions, and to provide access to the wealth of scientific research available which explores kangaroo management,” Ms Wingad stated in a report. “The existing management plans have been developed using expert scientific research.” Councillors adopted Cr Gill’s notice of motion calling for a meeting with DELWP before deciding “whether to advocate to the state government to develop a management plan for maintaining wild populations of eastern grey kangaroos [on the peninsula]”. For the motion were Crs Gill, Steve Holland, Lisa Dixon, Debra Mar, Kerri McCafferty and Antonella Celi; against: Anthony Marsh, Paul Mercurio, Sarah Race, Hugh Fraser and the mayor, Despi O’Connor.

Concert COVID safety plans approved - mayor Keith Platt keith@mpnews.com.au PREPARATION of a COVID-safe plan was part of the requirements of a permit issued for a two-day music concert held last month at The Briars, Mount Martha. Mornington Peninsula Shire charged promoters $10,000 for the use of the council-owned property and says it only gave the concert the go ahead after an assessment by the state government. Held over the 20-21 February weekend to audiences of 8000 each day, the SummerSalt concert was accused of overcrowding and lack of social distancing on social media.

“People bought their tickets and went along … If they were worried about transmission, perhaps it wasn’t a good place to go,” the mayor Cr Despi O’Connor said when responding to presenter Virginia Trioli on ABC Radio. Trioli had said Cr O’Connor did not “sound as concerned by it as those that attended” who regarded it as “potentially being an event of transmission”. Cr O’Connor said there had been “COVID plans, there on the ground, absolutely, from both the state and council”. She said the state government had approved the concert and the shire had issued a permit and “rented out our space”. The area allocated at The

Briars for the concert was “not a small space” and the number of people allowed to attend had been capped. Mount Martha resident Ken Anderson said he had been “appalled” to see TV news reports of the concert “with ecstatic humans jiving around waving their arms in the air and completely ignoring the social distancing requirements of all public events in Victoria”. He said the “short sighted people who issue permits for these events” should cancel them and apologise to the people of Mount Martha. Mr Anderson said he had received a commitment last year that “these events” would no longer be held at The Briars (“Ratepayers playing second fiddle to music concerts” Letters Page

16). A council officer last week wrote to him saying the shire was “trying to strike a balance in activating the site to provide long term financial stability, supporting the recovery of businesses that have been severely impacted by COVID-19 (e.g. event providers, artists etc), while keeping the site accessible and free to those who love it for what it is”. Jessica Wingad, the shire’s director of place, said the government’s permit followed “an assessment by the public health advisory panel and Chief Health Officer”. The area allocated for the concert measured 30,500 square metres. “Under the state government approval process the organisers were required to

prepare a COVID safe events plan and were responsible for adherence to it,” Ms Wingad said. “We understand staff from the Department of Health and Human Services and Victoria Police were in attendance to assists the organisers.” The concert at The Briars was part of the national SummerSalt tour being staged by Zaccaria Concerts and Touring and including performances by Emily Wurramara, Montaigne, Boy & Bear, John Butler, The Cat Empire and The Teskey Brothers. It was the first time Perth-based Zaccaria, which started selling tickets last November, had hired The Briars. Four hours of Sunday’s show, which sold out, was live-streamed on the internet.

Western Port News

10 March 2021

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Western Port News 10 March 2021


NEWS DESK

Legal eagles serve up free brew

BirdLife bird bander Kasun Ekanayake and Parks Victoria ranger Jack Dewhurst releasing a hooded plover at Rye. Picture: Holly Barker

Plovers set new breeding records DEDICATED followers of the hooded plover are rejoicing with the news that two pairs of the locally endangered birds have each hatched and fledged three chicks. It is only the third time in 15 years that hooded plovers on Mornington Peninsula beaches have succeeded in raising three chicks from one nest “and now it’s happened twice this season”, Mark Lethlean, president of Friends of Hooded Plover (Mornington Peninsula), said. Last week Kasun Ekanayake and Renee Mead from Birdlife Australia’s beach-nesting bird project, joined the peninsula group in a bird banding day. “We had already flagged five fledglings in December 2020, and this was the second round,” Mr Lethlean said. “With now 18 fledglings and still four maturing chicks on the ground, we are

hoping for a further round of banding in a few weeks’ time.a” He said that this year was only the third time in 15 years that the number of fledged hooded plover chicks had reached double figures, with the previous numbers being 13 in 2016/17 and 12 in 2017/18). “Our most dismal year was 2013/14 when we managed only a single fledgling, while the past two years have each only produced six fledglings.” Mr Lethlean said three fledglings banded at Balnarring came from two hooded plovers originally banded on Phillip Island. “They set up a new nesting territory at Balnarring for the first time in December, which was amazing but, on their third attempt, managed to hatch and fledge three chicks,” Mr Lethlean said. Keith Platt

COMBINING lawyers and a coffee fix is an ideal way to boost access to legal advice for Mornington Peninsula residents. With this in mind, Peninsula Community Legal Centre has begun hitting the streets to provide free legal assistance with their Street Law Coffee Van in partnership with White Lion and Social Engine. This pop-up coffee van and legal service team visits locations ranging from emergency food relief centres and showers for the homeless to weekend markets and the car park at Bunnings. Its primary goal is to talk to people wherever they are in the community, making speaking to a lawyer as easy

and accessible as possible. People can get a free legal “health check” and then follow up as needed with a PCLC lawyer or other local services via referrals. “Our Street Law Van flips the usual arrangement where a lawyer sits in an office and waits for clients to come to them,” community engagement officer Kirsten Young said. “This assertive outreach approach was particularly valuable during COVID restrictions and meant we could assist people wherever they were, particularly those who were struggling to access traditional support services.” The van also provides training and employment opportunities to young

people wanting to become baristas. CEO Jackie Galloway believes the future of community legal services lies in their ability to meet people where they work and live. That means partnering with health and community services and outreach initiatives like the coffee van. “Peninsula CLC is taking our expertise to the streets of the peninsula and south-east so more people can get legal help more easily,” she said. “This complements our traditional appointments, legal clinics and legal education activities.” For free legal advice or to find out the coffee van’s schedule contact the Peninsula Community Legal Centre on 9783 3600 or visit pclc.org.au

Coffee time: Customers take up the offer of a coffee and free legal advice at the Peninsula Community Legal Centre’s van last week. Picture: Supplied

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Western Port News

10 March 2021

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Western Port News 10 March 2021

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NEWS DESK

Art going out of this world ARTIST Vicki Sullivan chose the Moon as a light source to give her painting Moon Goddess an ethereal feeling. Little did she know that when first applying oil paint to a portrait of model Lena at her St Andrews Beach studio, that an image of the finished work would end up on the Moon. Sullivan’s work is included in a digital archive of works by visual, music and literary artists being carried in a time capsule aboard the Astrobiotics Peregrine Lunar Lander scheduled to be sent to the Moon in July. She said the delivery would be the first art by women on the Moon. While scientific instruments make up most of the Peregrine’s 90 kilogram cargo, physicist, writer and collector Dr Samuel Peralta has included works by 417 writers and artists on a micro SD card delivered in a DHL MoonBox. Listed as Manifest 9, Dr Peralta’s is the largest of 125 primary author payloads on the lunar lander. Sullivan painted Moon Goddess in 2019 specifically for last year’s Storytellers exhibition at Melbourne’s Flinders Lane Gallery. The painting is now in Barcelona at the European Museum of Modern Art in the Women Painting Exhibition which opened on the 6 March. But the Goddess being sent to Spain pales into insignificance when compared to a copy going to the Moon (average 348,400km from Earth). “As far as I know, Moon Goddess will be the first goddess on the actual Moon. It’s mind boggling stuff,” Sullivan said. “I just love moonlight and wanted to try a nocturne painting and thought a figurative painting would look beautiful and ethereal with a moonlight background.” The lander will touch down in the Lacus Mortis region of the Moon after being launched from Cape Canaveral in the United States. It will be the first mission carrying commercial payloads to the lunar surface. "This is the first commercial launch to the Moon in history and marks the first US spacecraft to land on the Moon since the Apollo program over 50 years ago,” Dr Peralta said. “Our hope is that future travellers who find this capsule will discover some of the richness of our world today. “These works on the Moon speak to the idea that, despite wars and pandemics and climate upheaval, humankind found time to dream, time to create art.” Let's hope whoever or whatever eventually finds the digitised treasure trove of art has the technology to open it. Keith Platt

Protesters adopt knight’s name to wedge developers

Over to the Moon: Vicki Sullivan is counting down to when a digitised version of her Moon Goddess painting (above) will be involved in an historic Moon landing. She is pictured at her St Andrews Beach studio with her Birth of Venus painting of Grace Farriss (daughter of INXS member Andrew Farris) commissioned for Grace’s upcoming solo Album. Pictures: Supplied

Anglers line up for annual whiting challenge ANGLERS are gearing up for the 32nd Annual Whiting Challenge to be held next weekend, Saturday and Sunday 13-14 March, at Westernport Angling Club adjacent to the Hastings public boat ramp. The event is approved COVID-19 safe with rule changes to enable safe social distancing. It is open to the public and entries can be lodged up until 2pm on the Saturday. This year, instead of competitors weighing their 10 best King George whiting each day, they will only weigh one heaviest whiting each day so as to avoid queues at the weigh station. Talking Fishing’s David Kramer will present prizes from 4pm, Sunday, at the clubhouse. Prizes will go to the top 10 whiting weighed by senior men and top five whiting in the senior female, teens and junior categories. The prize for the heaviest whiting is an original painting by Mornington Peninsula artist Bridgit Thomas. The first whiting of one kilogram or more to be weighed will win $1000 from TV fishing identity Paul Worsteling. The major prize of a $10,000 boat, motor and trailer package will be drawn at random from all competitors. Details: wpac. com.au under Events.

A keeper: Austyn Fawcett won the prize for the heaviest whiting last year. Picture: Supplied

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is here to Support Local Businesses Would you like to become a member, and be promoted on our social media and at the Visitor Information Centre? WPT is currently offering FREE 2021 MEMBERSHIP due to funding received from the Victorian State Government. for further details Please contact us at: enquiry@visitwesternport.com.au or call 5909 8409 or 0425 739 567

THE late businessman and aviator, Sir Reginald Ansett was not known for his involvement in protests, certainly not one that would have seen him holding a placard in the street as happened on Saturday. Known among locals for commuting to work in his helicopter (some say they could correct their watches as he flew overhead) from his stately property nestled near the bay in the green paddocks between Mount Eliza and Mornington, Sir Reginald’s name has now been appropriated to stop the building of an aged care centre by Ryman Health Care. The community group Save Reg’s Wedge has joined other objectors to the centre being built on the part of the former Ansett estate off Kunyung Road. The Save Reg’s Wedge campaigners have been letterboxing, handing out flyers, and “donating time and money in grassroots, community campaign” to stop the proposed Ryman Healthcare development at Mount Eliza. The volunteers have joined Mornington Peninsula Shire, Mornington MP David Morris, and more than 1000 objectors in the fight to stop the New Zealand company’s bid for a retirement village on the former Ansett Estate in Kunyung Road. The proposal is for a series of three-and-fourstorey buildings, 272 apartments, 362 car spaces, 115 nursing beds and a place of worship on more than 23,000 square metres. A major case hearing will be held at the Victorian Civil and Administrative Tribunal, 15-19 March. Save Reg’s Wedge, an incorporated volunteer community group, says it is fighting a Davidand-Goliath battle against the contentious proposal which it claims will be a “disaster for our environment”. It says Ryman is “attempting to exploit a planning loophole” to push their development through, despite the unanimous rejection of the application by the council, and in the face of opposition from our community”. (The alleged “loophole” is the re-establishment of a place of worship on the site which is allowed under SUZ2 zoning which permits retirement villages “in conjunction with a place of worship”.) Spokesperson Pamela Ross said: “The Kunyung community is horrified and living in dread of this development getting the go ahead.” Stephen Taylor

WESTERN PORT TOURISM runs a Visitor Information Centre from the Old Fish Shed at Hastings Pier.

We are looking for volunteers to help service the centre and provide assistance to visitors. Are you passionate about your local area? Love talking to people? If you would like to share your knowledge with locals and visitors...

Please contact us at: enquiry@visitwesternport.com.au or call 5909 8409 or 0425 739 567 Western Port News

10 March 2021

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NEWS DESK

Western Port

Proudly published by Mornington Peninsula News Group Pty Ltd

PHONE: 03 5974 9000 Published weekly. Circulation: 15,000

Journalists: Stephen Taylor, Brodie Cowburn 5974 9000 Photographers: Gary Sissons, Yanni Advertising Sales: Bruce Stewart 0409 428 171 Real Estate Account Manager: Jason Richardson 0421 190 318 Production/Graphic design: Marcus Pettifer, Danielle Espagne Group Editor: Keith Platt 0439 394 707 Publisher: Cameron McCullough REGULAR CONTRIBUTORS: Peter McCullough, Stuart McCullough, Andrew Hurst, Craig MacKenzie. ADDRESS: Mornington Peninsula News Group PO Box 588 Hastings 3915 Email: team@mpnews.com.au Web: www.mpnews.com.au DEADLINE FOR NEXT ISSUE: 1PM ON THURS 11 MARCH 2021 NEXT ISSUE PUBLICATION DATE: WED 17 MARCH 2021

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TWILIGHT

OPEN

DAYS 2021

Celebration of a milestone LETTERS of congratulation from the Queen, Governor-General, Prime Minister and other VIPs have been received by Bittern’s Brian and Joan McClelland as they prepare to celebrate their 60th wedding anniversary. The couple, who were married in a little timber church at Frankston originally built in Salmon Street, Hastings, in 1887 and moved in 1952, will mark the milestone on Thursday 4 March. Mr McClelland, a mechanic and car restorer, said he “remembers the big day well”. “We have enjoyed our life together

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Diamond to share: Bittern couple Brian and Joan McClelland who will celebrate their 60th wedding anniversary this month have already received many congratulatory messages (inset). Pictures: Yanni

Western Port News 10 March 2021

and achieved the things together that are important to us.” These probably include having close relationships with their son and daughter, Darren and Sandra, who are both “bonzer mates” and grandchildren April, John and Brayden. Mr McClelland said the family would enjoy a “quiet celebration” at home, although he had “heard whispers” of a larger gathering with friends, his brother and sister, and their extended families. “We will catch up with them all.” Of the diamond anniversary Mr

McClelland said: “It is something of a milestone, but we will continue on life’s journey and keep on enjoying ourselves.” Mr McClelland is a descendant of the Perrott family, who were early butchers at Hastings, Bittern and Crib Point. His sister Shirley Davies has been involved with the HastingsWestern Port Historical Society for a number of years and was Mornington Peninsula Shire’s Citizen of the Year in 2006. She received an Order of Australia Medal (OAM) in 2019.


‘Parklets’ program extended MORNINGTON Peninsula Shire has extended all parklet permits until 30 April. It says the move follows consultation with traders and “positive feedback” from residents and visitors. The extended outdoor dining program allowed traders to temporarily use car parking spaces for outdoor dining in towns and shopping areas from Mount Eliza to Sorrento. The outdoor dining areas were separated from rods with fences, planter boxes and decking. The shire says most of 400 people asked in a January survey in Rosebud, Mount Eliza and Mornington gave the parklets a score of either nine or 10 (out of 10) and wanted them to be kept in place longer. It found that cafes and restaurants lost about 40 per cent of capacity due to COVID-19 social distancing requirements, with the parklets able to return 90 per cent of that lost seating capacity. “Parklets have been a fantastic feature of our summer and can now be enjoyed until after Easter at no additional cost to traders,” the mayor Cr Despi O’Connor said. “While we have been fortunate to have had relatively few restrictions, there is still a need to social distance and remain COVID safe. Extending the parklets program will support our traders and allow us to continue to dine outdoors through autumn.” Traders wanting to return to normal trading conditions can pack the parklets up earlier by notifying the shire so that signs or infrastructure can be removed.

Eating habits THE Community Plate in conjunction with Peninsula Health and Monash University would like to hear from the public about their experiences of accessing and eating healthy food, including fruit and vegetables Associate Professor Department of Nutrition, Dietetics and Food, Claire Palermo said the

survey responses would help gather insights into healthy eating habits. “It will ultimately help our team to develop a promotional campaign focused on improving healthy eating outcomes in the Frankston and Mornington Peninsula regions,” Ms Palermo said. The survey asks questions like: How many serves of fruit do you usually eat each day? And how often do you eat vegetables with your lunch? “We want to get an understanding about what is important to our community and what barriers may exist in regards to choosing healthy options,” Ms Palermo said. By completing the survey respondents can go into the draw to win a hamper of local products to the value of $100. “We will also be running community workshops in the near future, and we would like for people to register to attend those so they can contribute their ideas about this very topical issue.” To take part in the survey, or to register our interest in the community workshops visit: research.net/r/TheCommunityPlate2021

Basketballers ready SOUTHERN Peninsula Basketball Association’s Big V season starts at Hillview Stadium on Saturday 13 March with the state champion women versus Sunbury at 5pm. This game will be followed by the Division 1 Men versus Collingwood at 7pm. The Youth League Women will play Wallan at 12pm on Sunday 14 March followed by the Youth League Men versus Wallan at 2pm. Southern Peninsula Basketball community engagement officer Peter Caspersz said other programs “in the wings” were walking basketball, an all-abilities program, and an Indigenous program with the Big V playing an Indigenous round.

VOLUNTEERS steer a surfer safely to shore when the Disabled Surfers Association made its debut at Clifton Beach in Tasmania. Picture: Supplied

Surf day gets go ahead THE Disabled Surfers Association Mornington Peninsula branch heads back into the water at Point Leo on Saturday. The event, which is expected to see hundreds of volunteers helping surfers enjoy their time in the waves, is the first for this year. The January event was cancelled due to COVID-19 restrictions and Saturday’s day at the beach will include taking precautions with sanitisers available and equipment being frequently cleaned. The number of people attending the event will fall safely within state government limits and there will be restrictions on crowding around the Point Leo Lifesaving Club.

A maximum 140 surfers are expected to participate with possibly double that number of volunteers helping to run the event which starts at 10.30am. The day at Point Leo follows DSAMP members John Bowers and Bill Hallett attending an inaugural surf day for the disabled at Clifton Beach, Tasmania. Mr Bowers, a former president of the DSAMP, described the Tasmanian event as “a really good day, with 105 volunteers, 25 participants and about 20 carers”. Details for Saturday 13 March at Point Leo are on the DSAMP’s Facebook page. Keith Platt

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NEWS DESK

Anger over boat ramp ‘neglect’ Continued from Page 1 Mr Kramer saoid Tyrone had become the only boat ramp car park in Australia that offered only parallel parking. It is an absolute joke to expect drivers to parallel-park with a trailer on. The bay trail must be realigned and angle parking reintroduced.” Dredging was also needed at Sorrento where “one third of the tie up area is unusable due to the sand build up”. “The Andrews government made an election commitment to make boating better during this term of government and they have set up a Better Boating Fund [generating] $30 million annually for all this maintenance and improvements,” Mr Kramer said. “They just can’t get the council or the committees of management to do the work.”

A member of the minister’s Boating Strategy Roundtable Group, Mr Kramer believes the ramps need to be managed by one authority that will “show proper care for the facilities and get them to a condition that meets boaters’ expectations”. “On 1 February, Better Boating Victoria was moved under the Victorian Fisheries Authorities control,” he said. “The VFA has a strong record for getting things done, and fishing in Victoria has never been better. “Now it is time for boat ramps to take the same path.” Mornington Peninsula Shire was contacted for comment.

SPECTACULAR sunrises can sometimes make up for any frustrations of launching a boat at the Stony Point ramp. Picture: Gary Sissons

Police calling halt to gender bias POLICE from Hastings, Mornington and Rosebud stations are striking the “Choose to Challenge” pose as part of their International Women’s Day activities, Monday 8 March. Hastings Acting Senior Sergeant Deanne Williams and First Constable Jenny Baker are keen to celebrate and raise an awareness of the achievements of women and to champion the goal of achieving gender equality. They say: “Let’s all choose to challenge gender bias and inequality. A challenged world is an alert world. And from challenge comes change.” Their message is: Choose to call out gender bias, discrimination and stereotypes, and choose to seek out and celebrate women’s achievements. “Everyone has a role to play in creating gender equality. From challenge comes change, so let’s all choose to challenge.” Visit #ChooseToChallenge to participate.

Jabs on the frontline FRONTLINE workers at Frankston Hospital have begun to receive the COVID-19 vaccine. Peninsula Health staff began to receive their first vaccine doses on 3 March. Nurse Vanessa Nolan said “it went absolutely fine, barely felt a thing.” “It was a really simple and seamless process. I sat in the chair, signed a consent form, got the vaccination, sat down for about 15 minutes or so and then back off to work,” she said. “I’ve seen the effects of the virus on people and their families. I’m just doing my part to get vaccinated, not just to protect myself and my family from infection, but everyone else in the entire community. “Every vaccine that is received brings us that further step closer towards curbing the spread of the virus in our community.” Ms Nolan has been working in the Bass Ward at the hospital, which is dedicated to caring for COVID-19 patients. The vaccination clinic for staff has been set up at the hospital’s John Madder Hall. Around 15 staff are based at the clinic, tasked with delivering doses to more than 100 staff members a day. Peninsula Health says that a trained immunisation nurse is on site to administer adrenaline if someone has an adverse reaction.

PAGE 10

Western Port News 10 March 2021


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Swinging time: Anna Krasicki, Shannon Pullinger, Debra Bartholomeusz, Cr Kerri McCafferty, Stuart Guthrie, Cr Debra Mar, Cr Antonella Celi, Michelle Peck, Elyssa Gunn and Alex Christie. Picture: Supplied

Swinging time for wheelchairs A LIBERTY Swing at Lawson Park, Rosebud, will allow wheelchair users to experience the joy and therapeutic benefits of swinging. The swing allows wheelchairs to be rolled aboard and securely attached, allowing wheelchair-bound children and adults to experience the joy and exhilaration of swinging in the air. Disability support service Gen U recommended the Australian-made award-winning swing as the safest for children and adults in wheelchairs. It was funded by Mornington Peninsula Shire as part of the 2015-2020 Playspace Strategy and is also one of the objectives of the Disability Inclusion Plan 2018-2022.

Disability Advisory Committee member Cr Kerri McCafferty said: “Adults and children living with a disability have every right to access parks just like everyone else. It’s wonderful to see the collaborative work of the Disability Advisory Committee and the shire rolling out successful endeavours such as the Liberty Swing. I look forward to seeing more of it. “The benefits of the Liberty Swing go beyond just having fun: it has created a place of inclusion and has great therapeutic benefits.” The swing can be accessed from Leon Avenue. A Master Locksmiths access key is required to operate it.

• New Windows Front & Side • New Roofs • Rust Repairs • Small or Large Repairs • Chassis Work

LIvE & LOCAL sat 20 & sun 21 ma

Each month the Westernport News will run a Community Events page, where your school or organisation can promote upcoming events, fund raisers, social events, etc. at no charge.

Community Events

PO Box 588, Hastings 3915 or email communityevents@mpnews.com.au

& Rubber Flooring

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& community groups

Lisiting should be about 40 words and include event name, date, time & address.

or Repairs

2/8 Simcock St, Somerville Vic 3912

Attention Schools, sporting clubs

This page is sponsored by the Balnarring & District Commuinity Bank, and listings are completely free.

• Paint Work • Lights & Rewiring • Floor Replacement

r c h 2021

FrEE Entry

LIvE MuSIC • FOoD TruCKS MArKET STALLS • AMuSEMENTs youth ACTIvITIES

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Western Port News

10 March 2021

PAGE 11


WHAT’S NEW...

Education coming full circle at Peninsula Grammar By Lucy Gowdie THE paths we walk in education, the roads we travel, are often so fast paced, we forget to look back at the steps we have taken. Yet sometimes, every now and again, the road catches up with us and we realise, what we left behind mattered. As a young graduate teacher, only three years older than the Year 12 cohort I taught, I relied on my untested resolve and unyielding energy to engage my students in their learning. In that classroom, sat an even younger Samantha Hutston, a quiet and shy learner, with a passion for literature and a penchant for exceptional essay writing. As an aspiring leader, now substantially older than the Year 12 cohort I taught, I relied on my years of experience in curriculum design and my understanding of co-education, to engage my students in their learning. In that classroom sat an even younger, Madeleine Dwyer, a quiet and shy learner, with a passion for politics and a penchant for pushing herself. As an experienced Deputy Principal, I stand today, shoulder to shoulder with these two women, these educational leaders in their own right, profoundly proud of who they have become and hoping that the time I spent teaching them, had a small part to play in their decisions to choose the education profession. They say that the legacies we gift our schools as leaders, cannot be measured in outcome, but rather we should look to the influence we have had on others, to the indelible marks we have left on our young people so that they may pursue excellence in their own lives. When I look at Sami and Maddy today, when I hear colleagues speaking of their ingenuity and their energy, when I see students focused and absorbed in their classrooms, I realise that they will be celebrated and successful leaders in their own right. Both women possess the innate understanding of the vocation of teaching and a quiet humility that belies their exceptional

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Western Port News 10 March 2021

A legacy of education: (left to right) Peninsula Grammar teachers Samantha Hutson and Madeleine Dwyer, Peninsula Grammar Depty Principal Lucy Gowdie and aspriring educator Grace Handley. Picture: Gary Sissons

strength and skill. They say that life comes full circle, and so when I learnt in January, that Grace Handley, a student of Maddy’s, had chosen a career in education, I could not but help smile at the stories Maddy and Grace will now be able to share;

as the next generation of exceptional educators forges a path of possibility for the young men and women of Peninsula Grammar School. Education needs leaders who believe in the vocation of teaching, who work in the service of others. Those who share a quiet resolve to

change the world, but a fierce determination to see their students succeed. I am immensely proud of Sami, of Maddy and of Grace, for choosing to forge their own paths, to travel their own roads and to share in the joy and privilege that it is to work in education.


Western Port

property

NIGHT SWIMMING PAGE 3

WEDNESDAY, 10th MARCH 2021

SOMERVILLE, TYABB, HASTINGS, BITTERN, CRIB POINT, BALNARRING, FLINDERS

Speak to your agent about listing on realestateview.com.au. Be seen everywhere.


Easter Colouring Competition. Easter Colouring Competition.

3 fantastic prizes to be won. Child’s Child’s Name Name

1st prizeFamily Nintendo Switch 1st prize Movie Experience @ Village 2nd prize prizeLarge Chesterfield Farm Family x 4 Pass Easter Egg Hamper Hamper 3rd prize prizeMedium Village Easter FamilyEgg Movie Pass ticket

Age Age

Parent/Guardian Name Parent/Guardian Name

Simply colour in the picture and fill in your details below. Simply in thecompleted picture and fill in your details below. Send orcolour drop your form into OBrien Real Send or drop your completed form into OBrien Real Estate Hastings by Tuesday 30th of March, 2021 for Estate your Wantirna Thursday 9th prizes! April 2020 for your chance chance toby win 1 of 3 great Winners to be drawnto on win 1 of 3 great prizes! Winners to be drawn on Tuesday Wednesday 31st of March, 2021. Must be between the age 14th April 2020. of 0 to 12 to enter.  

Email Email Phone Phone Address Address

By supplying your information, you consent to being contacted by a representative of OBrien Real Estate for marketing purposes.

Wantirna 207 Stud Road 8820 8338 obrienrealestate.com.au

By supplying your information you consent to being contacted by a representative of OBrien Real Estate for marketing purposes.

Hastings 4/82 High Street 5979 8833 obre.com.au

mpnews.com.au

Wednesday, 10th March 2021

WESTERN PORT NEWS

Page 2


ON THE COVER

MOUNT MARTHA OASIS HIDING IN PLAIN SIGHT THE cursory Saturday afternoon drive-by simply will not do with this splendid Mount Martha home, set just moments from the quaint shops and cafes of the village. The neat, yet unassuming facade of the home does little to reveal the spectacular pool and garden delights that await within. The expansive living zones have been thoughtfully designed to embrace a magnificent resort-class entertaining area that just soaks up the sun and is complete with a luxurious pool and spa set in the beautiful established gardens. Lucky owners can relax on the sun decks or take a meal in the comfortable outdoor room which has a built in barbecue. The interior is superb; boasting a decor that gives a gracious

HOME ESSENTIALS

tip of the hat to the deco period with wonderful servings of sleek blacks, crisp whites and subtle shades of beige. Handsome polished timber floors flow throughout a series of stunning, beautifully decorated living and dining zones including the fabulous kitchen which has a stone-topped breakfast bar, an enormous wine fridge and stylish mirrored splash backs. Providing generous living options are the five excellent bedrooms that are well placed throughout the home for space and privacy. The elegant master suite gleefully spreads out through what is roughly the middle of the home, with his and hers walk-in robes to one side and a huge, breathtakingly well done ensuite to the right.

Branching off from here is a versatile space for a home office or gym. There is a smaller fifth bedroom with built-in robes and a guest bedroom down the hall also has a walk-in robe and an equally impressive ensuite. The first floor is perfectly set up for the older children with two more bedrooms each featuring a study nook and walk-in robe. There is a shared full bathroom also on this level. Live a life of convenience close to shops, nature trails and beaches, all the while enjoying the timeless elegance of a home where only a private inspection can reveal its true beauty.n

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ADDRESS: 17 Watson Road, MOUNT MARTHA FOR SALE: $3,500,000 - $3,800,000 DESCRIPTION: 5 bedrooms, 3 bathrooms, 3 car AGENT: Amanda Haimona 0419 387 682, Bonaccorde, 4/42 Lochiel Avenue, Mount Martha, 5974 8900

mpnews.com.au

Wednesday, 10th March 2021

WESTERN PORT NEWS

Page 3


Trinket Farm captured the hearts of buyers and investors alike, resulting in a high demand sale after only one weekend of inspections. Our exclusive Stone Real Estate buyer database is overflowing with city escapees and local families seeking out the idyllic country lifestyle the Mornington Peninsula can provide. If you are thinking of selling your acreage property, or would like to hear more about this incredible result, contact our agent Malcolm Parkinson today.

Sold:

Contact agent

Contact:

Malcolm Parkinson / 0421 704 246 malcolmparkinson@stonerealestate.com.au Sue Monaghan / 0400 481 862 suemonaghan@stonerealestate.com.au

> Sold after first weekend of inspections > High demand for acreage properties > Multiple buyers seeking similar properties to purchase

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stonerealestate.com.au

mpnews.com.au

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WESTERN PORT NEWS

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5 Ridgeview Court, SOMERVILLE

6

3.5

4 Orchid Drive, GRANTVILLE

2

Modern Old World Charm In Somerville n

Ceiling fans, ducted heating, air-conditioning

n

Multiple living areas on both levels

n

1498sqm block with spacious,private yard Polished timber floors throughout

n

Walking distance to all amenities

n

1 Manna Gum Drive, PAKENHAM Porter Davis home in Silver Gums Estate

n

Blanco stainless-steel appliances

n

Gas ducted heating & r/cycle air conditioning

n n

Open plan living with multiple lounge areas 576sqm fully landscaped block

HASTINGS 03 5979 4177 69 High Street, Hastings, Vic, 3915

2

2

A Stones Throw From The Beach PRICE

Contact Agent

VIEWING Saturday, March 13th 2:00-2:30pm CONTACT Leonie Worrall: 0420 979 956 HASTINGS, 69 High Street

4

2

n

Split-system heating & cooling

n

543m2 block with space for a garden shed

n

Open plan kitchen and dining

n

20mm stone benchtops, 900mm gas cooktop

n

Walking distance to beach and local shops

PRICE

$485,000 - $510,000

VIEWING As Advertised Or By Appointment CONTACT Adam Schutz 0448 922 292 KOO WEE RUP, 48a Station Street

1/27 Ruby Joy Drive, SOMERVILLE

2

Gateway To Gippsland n

ER UND R OFF4 E

3

2

2

Spacious Secluded Unit PRICE

$560,000 - $590,000

VIEWING Saturday, March 13th 11:00-11:30am CONTACT Leonie Worrall: 0420 979 956 HASTINGS, 69 High Street

n

Open plan living areas

n

Gorgeous kitchen with s/steel appliances

n

Master bedroom with ensuite & WIR

n n

N I D L SO

! S Y A 5D

$595,000 - $650,000

VIEWING Saturday, March 13th 1:00-1:30pm CONTACT Leonie Worrall: 0420 979 956 HASTINGS, 69 High Street

Hardwood floors to the downstairs level 377sqm yard with patio

KOO WEE RUP 03 5997 1899 48a Station Street, Koo Wee Rup, Vic, 3981

Fabulous 3 bedroom home in Somerville....

PRICE

PHILLIP ISLAND 03 5922 9300 45 Thompson Ave, Cowes, Vic, 3922

*22 Offers! *46,159 Web Hits

*5 days on the market

*91 Inspections, 106 enquiries

*$44,500 more than the asking price

Call us on 5977 1737, we have qualified buyers looking!

14/33 Milgate Drive Mornington 3931

www.McNeillRealEstate.com.au LET OUR FAMILY SHOW YOUR FAMILY THE WAY HOME mpnews.com.au

Wednesday, 10th March 2021

WESTERN PORT NEWS

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Women In Real Estate SPECIAL FEATURE

“The Roberts and Green partnership is committed to growth and innovation. Awarded Agency Of The Year 2021 for Bittern, Crib Point & Somers based on client recommendations via RateMyAgent, their tailored service meets the individual needs of client and property in an environment where dynamic teamwork, skilful negotiation and an organised, structured approach is the key to ultimate success on the real estate journey.” Lisa Roberts was awarded #1 Agent in Hastings and Crib Point for 2017, 2018, 2019 and 2020 by RateMyAgent, based on client recommendations and overall sales Lisa understands that success is based on fairness, honesty, tolerance and hard work. Selling homes throughout the area for over 14 years has given her great local knowledge, commercial insight and a broad client network to attract high numbers of potential buyers to properties. Through proven market research and sales strategies, Lisa targets and attracts the right buyers to Roberts & Green real estate listings. LISA ROBERTS - BUSINESS OWNER / LICENSED ESTATE AGENT 0488 910 368 lisa@robertsandgreen.com.au

Michelle brings with her a wealth of knowledge from over 16 years in the industry, gaining experience in many areas from Executive Assistant to Sales Administration, Property Management Administration and Reception. Michelle’s wide range of experience makes her a valued member of the team, assisting in many areas of the business. Michelle’s approach is very customer focused and she enjoys meeting and assisting new clients and communicating regularly with current ones. Michelle is driven to ensure her clients have the most pleasant real estate experience possible, providing impeccable customer service to ensure the whole process is stress free. MICHELLE CAHIR OFFICE MANAGER & PERSONAL ASSISTANT TO LISA ROBERTS 0404 012 654 sales@robertsandgreen.com.au

MEGAN HARRIS PROPERTY MANAGER 5979 2489 megan@robertsandgreen.com.au

REBECCA EVANS PROPERTY MANAGER 5979 2489 rentals@robertsandgreen.com.au

TAMARA HUSSAR ADMINISTRATION 5979 2489 admin@robertsandgreen.com.au

Megan Harris and Rebecca Evans lead the Roberts & Green Property Management department, ably served by Tamara Hussar in the critical administration role. All bring a wealth of invaluable skills garnered over decades living and working in the Western Port area. They are always focused on providing high quality service enhanced by excellent communication and have quickly become favourites amongst the many owners and tenants of Roberts & Green through their approachable and caring nature.

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WESTERN PORT NEWS

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Proudly independent and beautifully boutique with limitless flexibility to meet individual client’s needs, Susan Clavin Real Estate offers a ‘unique formula for success’ that Susan has developed over her 15 years’ of working in this local market. She is a proud advocate of the Mornington lifestyle she and her family are passionate about. When you love what you do – it shows! See why our clients love us at susanclavinrealestate.com.au /testimonials

SUSAN CLAVIN 0417 141 007 susan@susanclavinrealestate.com.au

Susan Susan Clavin Clavin Real Real Estate Estate

“Go the extra mile, the road is never crowded!” LOCAL. BOUTIQUE. COMPETITIVE. Susan Clavin Real Estate is thrilled to welcome Maz Dunez to the team. Her experience and knowledge in the Mornington Peninsula Real Estate market will absolutely be an asset to not only us but to your next sale or purchase. Her warmth, care factor and commitment to her clients experience has established her as a leading professional on the Peninsula. See why our clients love us at susanclavinrealestate.com.au /testimonials

MAZ DUNEZ SUSAN CLAVIN REAL ESTATE 0400 448 224 maz@susanclavinrealestate.com.au

Women In Real Estate

LOCAL. BOUTIQUE. COMPETITIVE.

SPECIAL FEATURE

“To give great service, you must add something which cannot be bought or measured with money – and that is sincerity and integrity.”

Susan Clavin Real Estate

“Katie is passionate about providing a service that is second to none and is consistently improving her skills & knowledge through the continuous training of OBrien Real Estate.” Katie has worked in real estate for over 10 years and has been part of OBrien Real Estate for the past 7 years. Always determined to become a Director, Katie gained her full Real Estate License and is now Director / OIEC of OBrien Real Estate Hastings which will be celebrating its sixth year in business come June. KATIE OLIVER DIRECTOR AND LICENSED ESTATE AGENT 0437 284 449 katie.oliver@obrienrealestate.com.au

“A naturally warm, approachable and principled personality resulting in stress free transactions for her clients.” With over 15 years in the real estate industry, Candice brings her vast array of skills and experience to Impact Realty Group. Her extensive knowledge of the local market, established networks plus experience and practice in real estate law has enabled Candice to advise, prepare and market many successful sales campaigns. With her husband and two children, Candice has an enduring passion for the area. CANDICE BLANCH LICENSED ESTATE AGENT 0416 123 415 candice@impactrealtygroup.com.au mpnews.com.au

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WESTERN PORT NEWS

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Women In Real Estate SPECIAL FEATURE

Agent. Auctioneer. Mum. Hastings Local. Community Advocate. Over 25 years’ experience in high level sales, Karen Taylor brings a wealth of insight and achievement to her role at Century 21 Home Port. Karen’s past clients have described her as a ‘high achiever’, ‘incredibly hard working’ with ‘great attention to detail’, ‘determined’ and ‘passionate about her community‘. With Karen’s passion for sales and customer service and genuine commitment to delivering the very best experience for her customers, rest assured, that when you choose Karen to represent you that you are working with a sales professional, who will be with you all the way. KAREN TAYLOR LICENSED ESTATE AGENT & AUCTIONEER 0408 991 855 karen.taylor@century21.com.au

“Having lived in the Somerville area for 33 years herself, Leonie is well versed in the community and has an in-depth understanding of the selling points of the area.” Hardworking and diligent, Leonie is focused on providing a tailored service, giving each and every property her whole-hearted commitment. Her genuine and honest nature, coupled with strong communication skills and consistency in offering sound advice, is what keeps her clients coming back for more. Her principal focus is to develop strong relationships with clients – offering regular contact and the highest level of loyalty. LEONIE WORRALL Stockdale & Leggo Hastings 0420 979 956 leonie.worrall@stockdaleleggo.com.au

“Jacqui prides herself on providing the same high level of service to all clients, whether it’s their first home, an investment home, or their dream home” Jacqui understands first-hand, when it comes to property, you are not just selling a home, you are selling a way of life; and her love of the area and everything it has to offer has seen her successfully selling properties, from 1-bedroom units to million-dollar luxury escapes. Her natural rapport, coupled with her up to the minute knowledge of the property market and her passion to deliver results, is what makes her stand out from her peers. JACQUI ROBINSON Stockdale & Leggo Hastings 0428 091 204 jacqui.robinson@stockdaleleggo.com.au

“A boutique real estate business that focuses on clients requirements and personal service.” With the luxury of being looked after by the principal, every detail of your property is understood. Liz is totally involved at all times, so her attention to your personal requirements is guaranteed. Building on her years of experience working for and running other agencies on the peninsula, Liz continues to meet the aspirations and dreams of her clients and achieving premium results for her vendors. LIZ WALL LICENSED ESTATE AGENT Liz Wall Lifestyle Properties 0417 528 042 liz@lizwallproperties.com.au mpnews.com.au

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182 Overport Road Frankston South a

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Peace, privacy and play await in this beautifully maintained family property nestled on a magnificent 2706 sqm (approx.) allotment. The open-plan living and solid-timber kitchen overlooks a wisteria-draped verandah and views of the vast back garden, solar heated pool, spa and tennis court. A split level deck is ideal for entertaining, milestone family events and everyday recreation. The flexible, family-friendly space continues inside with four bedrooms, including a first-floor master with ensuite and balcony bay views. Use the separate studio bedroom with ensuite as a teenage retreat, home office or granny flat.

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rtedgar.com

19 Barmah Street Mount Eliza a

4

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2

c

2

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From the picturesque location to the welcoming interior and beautiful private garden oasis, every element of this fourbedroom residence showcases, bespoke style and a focus on relaxed living. Just a short walk to the renowned Moondah Beach and prestigious schools, it affords the opportunity to wander down to The Village and to return to the sanctuary of this uniquely charming home, where indoor-outdoor living is something to celebrate. Impressive interiors flow through a relaxed lounge room (OFP), dining room, poolside alfresco and room to play amongst open spaces.

�������������������������� ����������������������� ������������������������

rtedgar.com

mpnews.com.au

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‘a lifestyle village for the over 50’s’ 249 High Street, Hastings, 3915 www.peninsulaparklands.com.au

SOLD

$180,000 u u u u

Bed

Bath

Car

2

1

1

$190,000

Kitchen with great bench space Lounge room with air-conditioning Renovated bathroom and laundry Rear verandah, single carport

u u u u

Bed

Bath

Car

2

1

1

Large lounge & dining area Galley kitchen with upright stove Two large bedroom both w/BIR’s Separate laundry and bathroom

$240,000 u u u u

Bed

Bath

Car

2

1

1

Huge kitchen with separate dining Large lounge Two bedroom both w/BIR’s Single carport

NEW

$240,000 u u u u

Bed

Bath

Car

2

1

1

$250,000

Open plan living Kitchen & dining with bay windows Renovated bathroom and laundry Garage with auto roller door

u u u u

UNDERCT A CONTR

$270,000 u u u u

Bed

Bath

Car

2

1

1

Lounge with air-conditioning Open plan kitchen and dining Built-in robes to both bedrooms 3.3kw solar panel system installed

$265,000 u u u u

UNDERCT A CONTR

Bed

Bath

Car

2

1

1

Open plan living Great kitchen, dining area w/ bay window Two bedrooms with BIR’s Single garage with auto roller door

$279,000 u u u u

Bed

Bath

Car

2

1

1

Huge kitchen and lounge Dining area with bay window Two bedrooms with BIR’s Single carport

SOLD

Bed

Bath

Car

2

1

1

Two bedrooms with BIR’s Large lounge with raked ceiling Spacious kitchen/dining area Garden shed, single garage

$325,000 u u u u

Bed

Bath

Study

Car

2

1

1

1

Open plan living Great kitchen Dining area with bay window Outside entertaining area with timber deck

To arrange your site inspection contact David Nelli 0403 111 234 or at the office on 5979 2700 / Email: david@peninsulaparklands.com.au mpnews.com.au

Wednesday, 10th March 2021

WESTERN PORT NEWS

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INDUSTRIAL & COMMERCIAL

THINK INSIDE THE SQUARE TRULY iconic properties that are coveted by investors and developers alike are rarely made available to the market. Defying this is ‘Barkly Square’ at 53-55 Barkly Street, Mornington, home to well-known nightclubs and hospitality venues plus major retail businesses. The site comprises a combination of nine retail shops and restaurants which have a total building size of 1015 square metres on a 2029

PROPERTY ESSENTIALS

square metre block. Total net income is currently $517, 777 per annum after land tax. Offered for sale by auction on behalf of the Mortgagee in Possession, the property is being jointly marketed by Nichols Crowder in conjunction with Stonebridge Property Group in Southbank. “Barkly Square is a jewel on the Mornington Peninsula,” explains Jamie Stuart of Nichols Crowder Mornington.

“It’s just off Main Street and close to many shops and two major shopping centres which add to its appeal.” Rorey James of Stonebridge Property Group also added “With the beach just a short walk away and the property serviced by over 1500 car parks with 160 metres of combined corner frontage, this property is going to attract national and international attention”.n

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ADDRESS: 53-55 Barkly Street, MORNINGTON AUCTION: Wednesday, 17th March at 12 Noon on-site AGENT: Jamie Stuart 0412 565 562, Nichols Crowder, 4/230 Main Street, Mornington, 5925 6005

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Landmark Corner Investment Mortgagee Auction • Nine Shops on One Title Wednesday 17th March at 12pm on site • 53-55 Barkly Street, Mornington

P

P

BARKLY STREET

2

4

5

NE

WAT ERL

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RET

PLA C

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BAR

3

150m

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9

BARKLY SQUARE • Nine retail premises on the one title • Established & longstanding tenants • Rental income: $517,777* p.a (after land tax) • Three street frontages - combined 160m**

1

• Value-add potential of subdivision or redevelopment (STCA)

• Substantial landholding 2,029sqm** • Located between two shopping centres Woolworths & Coles

• Serviced by over 1,500 car parks

Outline Indicative only

*Subject to purchasers completing due diligence ** Sizes approx

Rorey James 0439 400 081 Nic Hage 0448 782 594 Level 3, 111 Coventry Street, Southbank VIC 3006 stonebridge.com.au mpnews.com.au

Jamie Stuart 0412 565 562 Tom Crowder 0438 670 300

5925 6005

4/230 Main Street, Mornington VIC 3931 nicholscrowder.com.au

Wednesday, 10th March 2021

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LETTERS

Letters - 300 words maximum and including full name, address and contact number - can be sent to The News, PO Box 588, Hastings 3915 or emailed to: team@mpnews.com.au

Ratepayers playing second fiddle to music concerts AFTER complaints to The News, Mornington Peninsula Shire Council, local MPs and councillors last year after a loud and long running disco event, the council has this year responded with a busy schedule of live music events at The Briars [Mount Martha] conservation reserve. Neighbours in Mount Martha, motorists trying to use Nepean Highway and people wanting to visit the peace and quiet of the Briars Eco Centre or astronomy events or visiting the nature reserve or wanting a quiet coffee at the cafe now take second fiddle to ongoing rock music events and music festivals. Some of which run over whole weekends. In these COVID times it was appalling to see TV coverage of the [20-21 February] weekend music concert with ecstatic humans jiving around waving their arms in the air and completely ignoring the social distancing requirements of all public events in Victoria. Residents had to endure late night concertgoers noisily disrupting the local streets on their way home and much blood from some incident or other at Mount Martha village had to be washed away by the CFA the next day. This was a serious breach of the state of emergency provisions we are mostly forced to endure. Shame on the MPSC and the event organisers. This is a classic conflict of interest between the purpose of The Briars and its immediate community’s expectations. I call on the short sighted people who issue permits for these events to immediately cancel them and apologise to the people of Mount Martha for their lack of understanding and their inappropriate responsibility to their ratepayer community. A commitment to cease these events altogether, which I was given last year at this time, is required. Put our ratepayer money to better use. Ken Anderson, Mount Martha

Stop rates rising THE ongoing saga of prayer and procedural matters [by Mornington Peninsula Shire] is becoming tiresome to ratepayers (“Prayer is back on the Agenda” The News 15/2/21). Frankly, I don’t care whether God gets a mention or not. All I would like to see is a pledge or affirmation by councillors to do the right thing by their community: the ratepayers. In this regard, an end to the automatic 2.5 per cent rate increases - the state governmentimposed cap - would be a good start. Rates do not need to rise by 2.5 per cent every year because the government allows it. Primarily, there are two reasons for this. The first is that in the past 12 months many new builds in the shire have added significantly to rate revenue. There have been four close to where I live. An architect who works in the shire thinks that planning permit applications total more than 2000. That would add a substantial amount to the rate revenue stream.

Secondly, the increase in property values on the peninsula means that CIV on the rate notice will be up, with more money flowing to the shire. Bureau of Statistics’ figures for the wage price index shows growth of 0.6 per cent. This is not the time, given the effect of the pandemic, to impose more costs on families. With prudent budgetary management and the elimination of wasteful practices, such as VCAT, Tyabb airfield, naming Yawa [ aquatic centre], it is achievable. John Manfield, Blairgowrie

Prayer for good I am writing to give a different perspective about [Mornington Peninsula Shire’s] prayer, based on my experience over many, many years. I have come to understand that prayer is a form of connectedness to a greater power, who I call “God”. I guess the prerequisite to understand this is a spark of “faith”. This power is available to all who seek it. Serendipity, or blessings, are just a part of the outward experience of communication to the creator. I have come to know that all good comes from this divine power. Prayer before any meeting to invite the presence of God, to be with each one in their deliberations shows more than maturity. Sharpness of mind, clarity of vision, and understanding beyond themselves will be enhanced by the presence of this divine power. If all communication to our creator ceases, then the wise, clear, and harmonious outcomes are less likely. This is somewhat to be observed in the article “Doubts about councillors’ understanding” (The News 2/3/21). All successful nations have creator-inspired laws that are just and fair, so that all people may benefit. We live in 2021, ask yourself what happened in year One? It was the birth of God’s son. Brian McClelland, Bittern

No harm in prayer WHY is there so much angst about a prayer preceding council meetings (“Prayer is back on the Agenda” The News 15/2/21)? Parliament does it. If it bothers atheists, or devil worshippers, perhaps they could wait outside. Who is to say that soulless atheists are right? God? If nothing else, the [council] prayer is a reminder to be honest and represent us, not themselves. Some faithfully abide by it. A prayer is not a sermon; it is an old tradition that does no harm and may do some good. As for it being archaic, outmoded and unnecessary; why, that’s a perfect description of local government. A great proportion of people are quite religious but don’t go to church for various reasons. My wife hasn’t been for 20 years and as I often say to her, if she did a confession, she’d need to take a cut lunch. I always took our children to Sunday school

and later to church services, in the belief that I had no right to raise them as atheists. At least by experiencing religious procedures they could make up their own minds since they then knew what they were talking about. A long time ago I was coached in deep meditation. You cannot achieve deep meditation and stillness of mind and what’s beyond by reading a book. It has always been of benefit to mind, body and soul. Many medicos and psychiatrists will attest to the benefits of meditation. I have long ago ceased discussing this phenomenon with people, even distressed people, because most of them dismiss it as misguided rubbish and me as gullible. How would they know if they’ve never experienced it? For Heaven’s sake, just leave the prayer. Brian A Mitchelson, Mornington

Brighter future AS sole carer of my 48-year-old son who was diagnosed with schizophrenia over 25 years ago, he and I have had an appalling history of not being listened to in a very broken system mental health system. He had to endure six admissions to various psychiatric hospitals last year. I am pleased that Victorian Premier Dan Andrews has acknowledged that we have a broken mental health system. Congratulations to him and his team for instigating the royal commission and agreeing to implement all the recommendations this lengthy document has acknowledged need to be made for these changes. One of many who made a lengthy submission to the royal Commission, I was listened to and will continue to lobby for equality for the full implementation of the findings for the forgotten people in our very stressed health system. It is very good news that Peninsula Health will be a targeted hub for more funding and, more important, much needed services. The future is looking brighter, hopefully for all carers and their love ones. Name and address supplied, Mount Martha

Need ‘stroke ambulance’ AT a time when the Mornington Peninsula could benefit from the good deeds of some, we find that self-serving and narrow minded interference or inaction not only devalues achievable benefit but actually sets opportunity on a negative path. Hillview Quarry can seriously give back from where it takes (currently less than 13 per cent of its donations over the past 30 years have stayed on the peninsula). We are still waiting for a response from Hillview’s CEO after approaching him with the idea of helping finance a local stroke ambulance as there is only one in Victoria serving Melbourne. Mornington Peninsula Shire Council should be sacked for wasting $200,000 to find a name [for the Yawa aquatic centre] and a further $200,000 on temporary fencing [at The Pillars, Mount Martha]. In private industry heads would roll if they miraculously survived bankruptcy. Such losses could have gone towards purchasing a life-saving stroke ambulance with a CT scanner to benefit the whole peninsula. We should blame those who instigated the decisions and those who stood by while they were implemented. The ratepayers must shoulder some blame for not holding them accountable.Either hold them

to task or suffer ongoing rate increases to meet these losses. A stroke ambulance can perform a timely scan which will determine if a patient’s stroke is affected by a blood clot or a haemorrhage, thus enabling proper diagnosis, treatment, time in emergency and even time spent in hospital. Apparently 1.9 million brain cells die for every minute a stroke patient is delayed from being administered the correct lifesaving medication. Paul Georgeson, Dromana

Legacy of debt THE federal government has made many funding promises, but the follow up has often been less than stunning. The bushfire support of January 2020 is one example where there are still many millions to be allocated to absolutely needy folk. The government makes claims that the budget was back in surplus but the necessary expenditure due to the pandemic will have confused the true position on the state of our economy. It has run up an enormous debt which needs to be serviced, without making any progress on meaningful work. Any government replacing it will be left with this spectacular legacy of inaction. The state of our aged care, health and education systems, support to bushfire victims, the lack of any real infrastructure programs and the need to create long terms jobs in new technologies, to name just a few. These issues require an enormous financial outlay for many years. It may even require the shifting of the tax burden to those who have done very well out of JobKeeper, the large businesses. It is time for a change, but we must all remember the legacy any incoming government inherits Ken Norris, McCrae

Victoria’s jab lag WE need our local member, Health Minister and Flinders MP Greg Hunt, to intervene in the rollout of the COVID-19 vaccine in Victoria. Figures have been released that indicate NSW has successfully inoculated almost three times more of its citizens thanVictoria. Once again, the Victorian Health Department has proved to be far inferior to that of NSW and the other Australian states. Bill Holmes, Sorrento

Sympathy for Hunt FLINDERS MP Greg Hunt is not one of my favourite politicians, but the weird and wonderful assembly of the flat earth brigade that is trying to change the majority’s commitment to get the jab are not what we need, and I feel for [federal Health Minister] Greg (“Protesters spread the no-jab message” The News 2/3/21). Anti-vaxxers are not what we need when it is so important for as many people as possible to get immunised against the coronavirus. These people probably are the same that were complaining against the other health measures introduced by all state and federal governments. We just have to look to the US, Britain and Brazil to see what tragedies ensue if leaders are not responsible adults and take the health of their nations seriously. I will get immunised as soon as it becomes available. Rupert Steiner, Balnarring

Western Port News

10 March 2021

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100 YEARS AGO THIS WEEK...

Westernport ‘cut up by land sharks’ Compiled by Cameron McCullough IN criticising the Westernport Development and Decentralisation League, a Melbourne journal says: “As regards Westernport, the land sharks have cut up and sold to the credulous, ‘desirable residential and factory sites’ by the thousands, so they at least have ceased to have any interest in the place .... There has never been any sincerity behind any of these decentralisation proposals.” All we can say is that there ought to be, for Westernport is one of the most neglected of all the natural ports in the world. *** SPEAKING of the dangerous air currents in certain parts of Australia, Major T. H. Shaw, the aviator, regards the country at Dromana as the most tricky for air currents, especially near Arthur’s Seat. At a certain point the air ceases to do any useful work, and instead of the current proving a lifting wind, it forces the machine down. The worst part, however, is between New South Wales and Queensland, where Sir Ross Smith dropped 200 feet. That part is described as “the Bay of Biscay aloft.” *** THE recent cricket match between the Dunlop Rubber Co. and Mornington resulted in victory for the seasiders by 101 runs. The visitors compiled 74 runs, Griffiths being the Mailey with 3 for 9. Mornington made 175, Griffiths heading the scores with 33 retired,

though he was well supported by Jenkins 25, Knuckey 29 not out, Freeman 22 retired, and Cavell 20 retired. *** THOMAS Morse, a resident of Sorrento, was charged in the Criminal Court last week with having unlawfully assaulted Ethel Finney, 26 years of age, at Sorrento on January 22nd last. Morse was acquitted by the jury, and Mr. Justice Cussen discharged him without comment. The jury found that the girl, who admitted being “in trouble” some eight years ago, was a consenting party to all that had occurred. *** A RECENT reference in “The Standard” to the old convict settlement at Sorrento has prompted other journals circulating throughout the Peninsula to enlarge upon the subject. Thus, we see the subject is not without interest. Most of the settlers at Sorrento suffered, evidently, from a tired feeling, for Captain Collins told Lord Hobart they were “a worthless set of people,” who made no attempt to be successful in agricultural pursuits. Still, vegetable gardening and duck raising reached astounding heights of popularity – everyone wanted to cultivate peas and raise ducks! *** “THE Peninsula is beautifully diversified with hills and dales,” wrote Tuckey, the explorer, a century ago, “but the kangaroo seems to reign undisturbed, lord of the soil – a dominion he is likely to retain for ages.” This is one of the most remarkable predictions ever rendered famous by

non-fulfilment! Lieut. Tuckey, like most of the explorers whose names are linked with the history of the Mornington Peninsula, had a tragic end, being captured by the French in 1805, and released in 1815, only to die of African fever whilst exploring the Congo. *** AN employee of the Country Roads Board, Clarence Roy Willis, aged 25 years, was arrested at Mornington last week and lodged in the Melbourne Gaol on a charge of having criminally assaulted an elderly widow of 67 years of age. *** SO Frankston is really to have its bowling green in common with other progressive centres. The green should have been established years ago. Bowling, as a pastime for the man who is not as youthful as he used to be, has come to stay, and its popularity is increasing so much so that the demesne is being invaded by the ladies. To the young, the game might appear to be just about as exciting as skittles, but it is a fact that the game can be developed almost into a science. Mornington has its bowling green, and, in following suit, Frankston has done the right thing. *** DESPITE the fact that the Mornington Peninsula Water Scheme has been completed for several months, water scarcity is still a common complaint between here and Chelsea, and water carting is the order of these days of heat and mosquitoes. Owners of houses have quickly

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PAGE 26

Western Port News

10 March 2021

availed themselves of the benefits of the scheme, but several tenants of houses have complained that the residences they rent have been neglected in that respect. The State Rivers and Water Supply Commission, which is making preparation for the collection of levies, are, however, considering this matter from the viewpoint of general utility. *** THE Country Roads Board has nowa-days the respect of the general community, but it was not always so. When it first came into existence, 75 percent, of the shire councils opposed it. Today, 90 percent support it. Evidently the remaining 10 percent are sleeping as soundly as ever. Mr. Calder, the chairman, is naturally proud of the fact noted above. The Roads Board does certainly construct good roads, and has been responsible, to a large extent, for the development that has taken place of late in rural districts. Because of that, “The Standard” believes that the Country Roads Board has thoroughly justified its existence. *** “THE Standard” reminds those interested that the Moorooduc sports, under the auspices of the Moorooduc Branch of the Victorian Farmers’ Union, will take place at the Mornington Racecourse on Wednesday next. The programme was advertised in “The Standard’s” last issue, and is a large one, which will necessitate making an early start. The secretary, Mr. James McLellan, has arrangements completed for

a very successful day’s outing, and all that is wanted in that respect is kindly treatment by the weather. *** ADAMSON, Strettle & Co had a very good sale at the Tanti Market on the 21st, when 100 sheep, on account Mr Claude Grice, sold to 31s, and others to 28s, whilst fat lambs brought 14s. *** THE euchre party and dance organised by Mesdames Muday and McSweeney in aid of the funds of the Alfred Hospital, proved a splendid success in every way. The gross receipts amounted to £8/10/-, and, as expenses were small, the ladies above mentioned have been able to send on a cheque for £7 to the hospital authorities. The result is highly satisfactory, and shows what can be done by the exercise of energy and enterprise The gathering was also a great success from a social point of view. Al the card-tables were-filled, and much interest was taken in the competition. Mrs. Paxman donated the 1st prizes for ladies and gents, which were won by Mrs. Fielder and Mr. Frank Andrews respectively. The booby prizes donated by Mrs. McSweeney were won by Mrs. J. Cameron and Mr. McKenzie. The Frankston Orchestra supplied the dance music free of charge, and their generosity was much appreciated. The refreshments served during the evening were also donated. *** FROM the pages of the Frankston and Somerville Standard, 4 March 1921


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THE MEANING OF EXISTENCE... AND OTHER SHORT STORIES

The Great Canberra Hunger Games Dash By Stuart McCullough I IGNORED the first message. And the second, too. But as the third, fourth and fifth text messages arrived from various members of my family, I began to suspect something was going on. That something, as it turns out, was a decision to close the Victorian border. If we crossed before midnight, we’d be required to isolate until we received test results. After midnight, we’d have to isolate for a full two weeks. Once upon a time, visiting relatives in Canberra was considered a fairly routine activity. In fact, you might even say it was encouraged. How things have changed. In these uncertain times, I learned that going to Canberra was considered by some to be an activity on par with naked abseiling or sprinkling crack over your muesli in terms of sheer recklessness. Having listened to the announcement, there was a definite vibe that we were getting our just desserts by having the temerity to cross the border. We had to act immediately. I get it. These are serious times and things can change really quickly. That said, I’m not convinced that the whole ‘Hunger Games’ vibe around border closures is entirely called for. That said, my decision to abseil over the balcony and commence the return journey to Melbourne on foot can be attributed to momentary panic. The decision to abandon all my possessions was, while efficient, something I have later come to regret. After several tense minutes of negotiation, my wife convinced me we’d be better off taking the car and I returned to pack my bag. We needed to register. Or log on. Or get letters of transit from Senor Ferrari at the Blue Parrot – I’m not sure which. But within forty-five minutes, we had packed, checked out of our hotel room and were en route to the Victorian border. I’m not sure what I expected – queues of caravans, camel trains or hoards of people on foot and hoofing their way to Wodonga. We charged along the Hume along with every other Victorian

resident keen not to become an involuntary New South Wales resident. We stopped once, for food, in Gundagai. To say that it was busiest day in the history of Gundagai McDonald’s would be something of an understatement. The young staff were doing a sterling job serving customers, all of whom were in a race against time. It was too much for one patron, however. He would have been about my age but was wearing the tightest pair of white pants I’d ever seen. I can only assume they were once the property of a much slimmer man, but this fellow was

wearing them like a denim sausage casing. Perhaps it was the news the border was closing or the fact it was New Years’ Eve. Or maybe the very tight jeans had cut off circulation, but he was in an agitated state. Demanding to know the whereabouts of his large fries, he stated loudly that it was an ‘emergency’. I can only assume he was on his way to the hospital to have the Jaws of Life cut him out of his tight pants. I’m not sure the fries would have helped his cause. Soon enough, we were back on the road just as huge clouds began to roll in. As the clock ticked down, lightning flashed and an hour from Al-

bury, the heavens opened as it began to bucket down with rain. I had no idea what to expect at the checkpoint – would it take hours? Would it be relatively fuss-free? In the end, it took about half an hour to cross the border which – given what we were to learn later about those trying to cross nearer the coast – was absolutely fine. The Police, it must be said, were terrific. It was only slightly awkward when we were asked to show our licenses and my wife was unable to find hers. For a split second, I contemplated telling the officer that my wife was, in fact, a hitchhiker and I had no idea who she was, before all the possible consequences of such a joke were it to backfire flashed before my eyes. Miraculously, she managed to pull it and a rabbit out of her handbag in the nick of time. We had decided to stay somewhere near the border rather than arrive back in town at two in the morning. It was, we thought, safer that way. Trouble was, everyone else had the same idea and accommodation began to vanish faster than a packet of large fries given to a man in tight white pants. Eventually, we managed to find somewhere in Benalla and when we collapsed into bed it felt like a genius move. I’d forgotten it was New Year’s Eve. Those residing in the motel room next door had not, and returned at 2am to set up outside our room and continue drinking and talking at a volume more suited to a wind tunnel than the middle of the night. The next morning, I found a small pyramid of rum and Coke cans on an outside table. Pyramids made of empty cans are like crop circles for drunk people. In the truest sign that they had truly tied one on, the motel key was still in the door. We were home by early afternoon. It was an epic voyage that had seen us endure thunder, lightning, heavy rain, men wearing tight white pants and pyramid-building bogans. But we had prevailed. Now all we had to do is get tested and wait for the results. And that, as they say, is another story. stuart@stuartmccullough.com Western Port News

10 March 2021

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scoreboard WESTERN PORT

Baden Powell snare upset win to face Sorrento in Provincial Grand Final By Brodie Cowburn

PROVINCIAL

BADEN Powell have locked in a Grand Final spot with an upset win over Old Peninsula. The Old Peninsula Pirates were the team to beat all season, finishing with just one loss on their record after 14 games. Baden Powell secured their finals spot with a fourth place finish. They would have to be at their best to move on to the season decider. Baden Powell chose to bat first. A patient partnership between Craig Entwhistle and Rhys Elmi proved crucial for the batting side. The duo combined for 102 runs. Baden Powell’s middle order wasn't able to provide any further support. At the end of the side’s 40 overs they had 145 runs on the scoreboard. Baden Powell’s bowlers had more work ahead of them to wrap up a shock result. The Pirates’ run chase got off to a shaky start. Opener Dylan O’Malley fell first, losing his wicket for just four runs. It is just his second single-digit score of the year.

Things kept getting worse for the Pirates, as the wickets of key batsmen Thomas La Brooy and Wade Pelzer fell shortly afterwards. A few batsmen went on to make good starts, but none of them went on to make a big score. With just 123 runs on the scoreboard, Old Peninsula lost their last wicket. Rhys Whitling was run out with just under two overs left to play, bringing the club’s season to a close. Baden Powell will face Sorrento in the Provincial Grand Final. Sorrento defeated Langwarrin on Saturday to advance to the final round of finals. Jayde Herrick opened the batting for Langwarrin and proved tricky to deal with. He scored 48 runs, his side’s best effort. Langwarrin set Sorrento a target of 153 to score to win. Opener Jedd Falck’s half-century set Sorrento up well. Their path to victory would prove bumpier than expected though. From 4/145, Sorrento capitulated. They lost their next five wickets for just five runs, giving Langwarrin a chance to snatch victory from the jaws of defeat.

Sorrento managed to hit the winning runs eventually - a Grand Final place locked up with a thrilling one wicket win.

Jackson Mockett played a big part, posting figures of 2/7 and 3/11 respectively.

PENINSULA

THE stage is set. The District Grand Final will be contested by Rosebud and Delacombe Park. Up against the top-of the-ladder Carrum, Delacombe Park would have to bring their best to advance to the season decider. Carrum chose to bat first but had a frustrating time. Many batsmen made good starts, but all were dismissed before they could reach the 25-run mark. Carrum finished all out for 142. Although less than they would have hoped for, they could still secure a win with a brilliant bowling performance. Although both of their openers fell quickly, a strong middle order performance got the job done for Delacombe Park. They wrapped up the win with three wickets left in hand and one over left to play. A dominant bowling display by Rosebud secured them their place in the Grand Final. Rosebud chose to bat first and

PINES and Long Island will do battle in the Peninsula division Grand Final this weekend. Long Island defeated Flinders to advance to the big dance. Star batsman Nick Jewell has struggled at times this season, but looks to be hitting form at the right time. His 62 not out helped Long Island put together an impressive innings. Flinders would have to chase down 196 to win. First drop batsman Shane Beggs top scored for Flinders, putting 45 runs on the board. It ultimately was not enough. Flinders finished their innings at 9/147, 50 runs short of a win. Pines thumped Somerville by nine wickets in their semi-final matchup. Somerville set Pines a target of 95 to win, which they chased down with ease. Pines bowlers Billy Humphrey and

DISTRICT

scored 130 runs. Opener Lyle House top scored with 53. Dromana had no response to Rosebud. They were bowled out for just 75 runs. Michael Clavin was the pick of the bowlers. His 4/24 proved vital for his side.

SUB DISTRICT

TYABB will contest the Sub District Grand Final this weekend after scoring a dominant win over Mt Martha. Mt Martha chose to bat first in the semi-final clash. Their innings didn’t go to plan, as they were bowled out for just 93. Tyabb capitalised on their opponent’s struggles. They wrapped up the win with eight wickets to spare and ten overs left to play. Tyabb will face Carrum Downs in the competition decider. Carrum Downs defeated Balnarring by five wickets in their semi-final clash on Saturday. James Quamby was the winning side’s top scorer with a 50-run knock.

McArdle’s juveniles light up the track HORSE RACING

On fire: John McArdle-trained La Rocque wins the Group Three TBV Thoroughbred Breeders Stakes at Flemington on Saturday. Picture: Supplied

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10 March 2021

By Ben Triandafillou JOHN McArdle brought up his second two-year-old Stakes winner over consecutive Saturday’s as La Rocque shot clear to comprehensively win the $160,000 Group Three TBV Thoroughbred Breeders Stakes (1200m) at Flemington. Ridden by Jamie Mott, La Rocque sat up on the speed before pulling away from her opposition in the final 100m to win by 1.5-lengths over the Anthony and Sam Freedmantrained Flying Evelyn. The victory kept the Kuroshio-sired filly’s unbeaten record intact having won twice from as many starts. Her stablemate Tycoon Humma scored an impressive victory in the Listed Very Special Kids Plate (1000m) seven days earlier. Despite her early brilliance, Mornington-based trainer John McArdle said there’s still plenty of improvement to come with La Rocuqe who is owned and bred by his wife Bernadette McArdle. “[La Rocque] just doesn’t know what she’s doing yet. She’s a very green horse, she rolled around a bit today. She’s actually an even better horse ridden behind them,” John

McArdle said post-race. McArdle hinted at spelling La Rocque with her stablemate Tycoon Humma with the early three-yearold Spring races on the agenda. He said it was a tough call comparing the two fillies on ability. “It’s a good problem to have. [La Rocque] has beaten her in a trial but in their work at home there’s not much between them,” he said. Jockey Jamie Mott was thrilled to be heading into the Spring with two talented fillies on the up. “I’ve always had a big opinion of this filly and she’s obviously been to the races twice now for two wins so she hasn’t put a foot wrong but she’s still got a few little things to iron out,” he said. “I can’t wait until we get into a better race and there’s genuine speed and she can sit off them because most of her trackwork we do sit her off and she’s quite electric so when she gets a raceday scenario like that you’ll see the best of her. Obviously, we had the filly win last week so two really nice fillies going forward.”


WESTERN PORT scoreboard

Pines prevail, Seaford bows out SOCCER

By Craig MacKenzie FRANKSTON Pines overcame the spirited resistance of fellow State 3 outfit Hampton East Brighton in a riveting FFA Cup tie on Saturday. This was a contest from go to whoa and although the final whistle signalled a 2-0 win for Pines their opponents left no-one in doubt about their promotion credentials. In just over 90 minutes a rivalry was born and Hampton East Brighton represents a clear threat to the lofty ambitions of the men from Monterey. Had Pines not prevailed there would have been much discussion around the contest’s most controversial moment. In the 15th minute Pines’ star Tito Vodowaqa exploded into action leaving opponents in his wake. Hampton East Brighton keeper Sebastian Chenkov-Shaw charged just outside his area and as Vodowaqa lobbed the ball over the keeper’s head and prepared to run past him heading into the unguarded goal ChenkovShaw deliberately handled. It seemed a no brainer that the keeper would be sent off but referee Cheng Hoo chose to brandish a yellow card instead. Both sides had chances to break the deadlock but that moment eventually arrived 10 minutes into the second half. The one player on the pitch who attacked Jordan Avraham’s curling free kick on the left with real intent was Simon Webster and he got a faint headed touch which left Chenkov-Shaw stranded. Vodowaqa received some consolation for being denied in the first half when he robbed a defender in the 64th minute and ran off the ball eventually getting it back and striking it past Chenkov-Shaw from the edge of the box for the clincher. While much of the hype around Pines has understandably centred on the club’s Fijian internationals there is a lot of ability and experience in the squad. The Webster twins, Scott and Simon, are good examples. It was as if time stood still as these 38-year-olds were back on their old stomping ground (no pun intended) and looking as mobile as ever. Simon Webster was running as hard at the end of the contest as he was at the beginning even twice vacating his central defensive role in the last 10 minutes and momentarily slotting into a central striker’s role. The Websters’ contribution doesn’t simply centre on their inherited ability

Pines power: Hampton East Brighton’s Marco Francese comes off second best after a Simon Webster challenge as Webster’s Frankston Pines teammate Tito Vodowaqa looks on. Picture: Darryl Kennedy

to read the play. They add steel to the unit and a competitive edge. Avraham is revelling in his midfield role, Joe O’Connor is comfortable with his back to goal and is strong enough to shield the ball and prove an effective target while Max Boulton is starting to recapture match fitness and sharpness after his long lay-off. Pines went into the clash without injured duo Cedric Benza (knee) who is another fortnight away and Alex Roberts (foot) while Matthew Hames has gone to Keysborough. In the other Cup tie last weekend featuring a local club (Somerville had a bye) Seaford United lost 4-1 away to East Kew and coach Peter Schwellinger was forced to take off Blake Hicks and Dylan Waugh as precautionary measures in a physical and sometimes spiteful clash. Substitute Mitch Hawkins scored for Seaford. Schwellinger should learn this week of the full extent of the ankle injury suffered by midfielder Jack Carter the previous week against Baxter but he expects Carter to join Matthias Schwellinger (broken leg) and Mitch Lander (hamstring) on the sidelines. Langwarrin, Mornington, Peninsula Strikers and Skye United join Pines and Somerville in the next round of

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the Cup to be drawn this week. In NPL2 news Langwarrin signed Rogan McGeorge from Casey Comets and Jeremy Min Fa from Malvern City last week. Midfielder McGeorge, 29, is a former Cambridge United player whose first season in Melbourne was with Altona City in 2018. Min Fa, 25, is a former Springvale White Eagles player and can play in either full back roles. In State 5 news Rosebud’s hunt for a new senior coach ended last week when the club announced that it had agreed terms with striker Mark Pagliarulo who will be assisted by Gab Alonzo. No sooner had “Pags” accepted the role than he plunged headlong into a recruitment drive and a shock target is fellow Scot and close friend Dougie Cunnison from State 1 side Keilor Park. The veteran stopper is a former Arniston Rangers and Penicuik Athletic player who is set to train with Rosebud this week. Other targets are ex-Seaford playercoach Matty Morris-Thomas, soon to be ex-Pines player Callum Richardson (who scored for Rosebud against Skye in a friendly), Jarryd McMinimee (Somerville), Louis Griffiths (Somer-

ville), Ashley Scholes (Somerville) and Ryan Monk (ex-Rosebud Heart). Former Baxter keeper Francis Beck, Brandon Monk and teenage Mornington keeper Sean Benz are other possible signings. Cory Osorio was uncertain whether or not to play this year but after last week’s appointment he has agreed to stay. Former Rosebud Heart and Somerville star Carlo Cardoso is a long shot given the travel involved but “Pags” remains keen to sign the experienced midfielder. State 5 rivals Aspendale Stingrays have signed midfielder Taylor Davison from Chelsea, central defender Nick Carter from Kingston City, midfielder Michael Antic from Dandenong City and striker Guilherme Ribeiro who returns to the club after a stint at Berwick City. Last week’s friendlies yielded a mixed bag of results for local clubs. On Thursday Langwarrin lost 3-2 away to Box Hill United while Mount Martha drew 3-3 with HMAS Cerberus in difficult conditions after a heavy downpour at Civic Reserve. Langy’s scorers were George Howard and Damir Stoilovic. Mount Martha was 2-0 down after five minutes but hit back through goals

from Ale Giordano, Kyle Burich and a last-minute pile driver from Bayside Argonauts debutant Neal Byrne. On Friday Chelsea’s friendly at home against Sandringham had to be abandoned while Rosebud lost 4-1 at home to Skye United. A Piers Brelsford second half goal had put Chelsea ahead when home team captain Connor Scott fell awkwardly and had to be taken to hospital where it was confirmed that he’d suffered a fractured and dislocated elbow. Rosebud led after 20 minutes when Richardson broke onto a superb Scholes through ball and lobbed advancing Skye keeper Jonathan Crook. Skye levelled from a Mitch Blake penalty 10 minutes later and the sides went in 1-1 at the break. Rosebud had defended well in the first half but couldn’t keep its higher league opponent at bay in the second period with Mark O’Connor, Blake and Travis Ernsdoerfer rounding off the scoreline. On Saturday the match between Casey Panthers and Somerville Eagles was called off at half-time with Somerville leading 4-2. A first half incident saw players on the Casey Panthers bench run onto the pitch after Somerville’s keeper had been sent off for retaliation. Somerville’s scorers were Davey Jones (3) and Sam Brick. Results of other friendlies on Saturday: Mornington 3 (Josh Hine 2, Matt Harrington) Caroline Springs George Cross 1, Peninsula Strikers 2 (Aaran Currie, Ben Doree) Malvern City 4, Mount Martha 0 Keysborough 3. In other news referee stocks in Victoria are understood to be at their lowest level in years with over 200 less match officials registering than at the same period last year. Peninsula numbers are reportedly down by around 70 and the areas of competition expected to be most affected are community juniors and lower State League divisions. Football Victoria referees manager Luke Brennan was contacted last Tuesday seeking confirmation of the numbers but failed to respond. This week’s friendlies: THURSDAY: Lyndale Utd v Chelsea (Lyndale Secondary College, 6.30pm & 8.30pm). SATURDAY: Baxter v Kings Domain (Baxter Park, 1pm & 3pm), Mount Martha v Old Melburnians (Civic Reserve, 1pm & 3pm).

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