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THE WHA’S SEMI-CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION



OCT. 13-16, 2011 OAKLAND, CALIFORNIA

MODERN HISTORIES of Ancient Places


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Western History AssociAtion Semi-Centennial ConferenCe Program

MODERN HISTORIES OF A NCIENT PLACES

october 13-16, 2011 oakland marriott City Center oakland, California


A Very Special Thanks to Our Generous Sponsors (JHKLT`VM(TLYPJHU-YHUJPZJHU/PZ[VY`‹ ;OL)PISPVNYHWOPJHS:VJPL[`VM(TLYPJH‹ )YVUJV>PUL*VTWHU`‹/L`KH`‹ 6HRSHUK4\ZL\TVM*HSPMVYUPH‹ :HU[H*SHYH<UP]LYZP[`‹ Wells Fargo Historical Services

cover illustration: erle Loran (1905-1999), “Henry Kaiser’s Miracle ship yard,” 1945, watercolor. Loran was a leader of a group of painters called the “Berkeley school.” image courtesy of the oakland Museum of california.


TABLE OF CONTENTS conference information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-5 Welcome to oakland from the President. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-8 2011 WHa officers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Business, Council, and Committee meetings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Breakfasts and luncheons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 receptions and Dinners . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 2011 local arrangements Committee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 Welcome. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14-15 Schedule-at-a-glance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16-18 oakland area maps . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19-20 WHa opening reception/Presidential luncheon/WHa awards Banquet . . 21-23 modern Histories of ancient Places tours . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24-25 Workshops/WHa founderâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s oral History Project. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26-27 Modern Histories of Ancient Places 2011 Program Committee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 from the Program Committee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30-31 meeting Space maps . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32-35 thursday Sessions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36-38 friday Sessions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38-44 Saturday Sessions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45-59 Sunday Sessions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59-65 exhibitors & Advertisers index of exhibitors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66 exhibit Hall map . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67 index of advertisers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68 advertising . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69-92 Western History Association awards and Honors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93 2011 WHa award Committees. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94-95 WHa Donors, Patrons, Sponsors, & in memoriam . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96-98 WHa History . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99-100 2012 Call for Proposals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101-102 index of Participants . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103-106 Membership Application . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 108 notes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109-112 2012 conference . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . inside back cover


CONFERENCE INFORMATION danielle demarest graduate research assistant Ashley Lock graduate research assistant

Kevin J. fernlund executive Director

Kendra gage graduate assistant Volunteer

Betty ditmeyer executive assistant Aaron Bashirian graduate research assistant

registrAtion Conference pre-registration Deadline is september 15, 2011. registration must be received in the office by that date, with full payment, in order to receive the pre-registration price including all electronic registrations and Paypal transactions. registration fees below apply Pre-registration on or before september 15, 2011 WHa member $92 WHa K-12 member (teacher Discount) $85 WHa Student member $40 non-members $135 guest/Spouse (must register w/attendee) $20 Single Day registration $60

onsite registration $102 $95 $50 $145 $30 $70

Please note: regular membership is $90.00. there is a membership application in the back of this program. the membership form is also available on our website at www.westernhistoryassociation.org. teachers: Please note that Continuing education Units (CeU) are available at the conference through the University of notre Dame. for more information, please contact Brian Collier (email: Brian.Collier@nd.edu; phone: 574-631-1637). CeU registration materials will be available onsite at the WHa registration Desk. CeUâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s are $25.00 per conference day and there are CeU scholarships available to those teaching at under resourced schools. refund PoLicy refunds less a $20.00 handling fee will be given for cancellations received by september 15, 2011. no refunds can be given for cancellations after that date. 4


CONFERENCE INFORMATION rooM reservAtions reservations for the event will be made by the individual attendees directly by calling 1-800-228-9290 for the oakland marriott City Center. members may also make arrangements with the hotel online by visiting the WHa website (www.westernhistoryassociation.org/conference). to receive the WHa group rate for the oakland marriott City Center, you will need to reference “Western History association” at the time your reservation is made. oakland marriott City Center rate is $149.00 single or double occupancy. cutoff date for room reservation under the group rate is october 12, 2011, 12:00 am. oakland Marriott city center 1001 Broadway oakland, cA, 94607, usA (510) 451-4000 conference & registrAtion oakland marriott City Center

grand foyer

registrAtion Hours thursday friday Saturday Sunday

1:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m. 8:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. 8:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. 8:00 a.m. – noon

conference BooK exHiBits oakland marriott City Center

Convention Center exhibit Hall east

exHiBit Hours friday Saturday Sunday

8:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. 8:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. 8:00 a.m. – noon

AcKnoWLedgMents the Western History association office would also like to take this opportunity to thank the University of missouri – St. louis for its generous support, in particular the Center for transportation Studies, the College of education, and the College of arts and Sciences. a very special thanks to Patty archer, University of missouri Printing Services. 5


FROM THE PRESIDENT folks, welcome to oakland, a city which in many ways represents what the West was, what it is, and what it can become. oakland's history began with the Huchiun people who were part of a larger linguistic group called the ohlone or "western people." these native people lived for hundreds of years primarily around what is now lake merritt. By 1772, Spanish-speaking colonists reached the area and the rest of northern California, claiming it for the Spanish Crown. in 1820, King ferdinand Vii of Spain deeded 44,800 acres, including what is now oakland, to luis maria Peralta for his service as a frontier soldier. Peralta named the grant rancho San antonio. after 1848, Peralta's descendants lost much of rancho San antonio to U.S. settlers, loggers, and whalers, many of whom resided in the small community of Contra Costa Quintard taylor (the other Coast), the site of what is now downtown oakland. the town itself incorporated on may 4, 1852, with 70 residents. oakland's first boom came in 1868 when the Central (now Southern) Pacific railroad constructed the oakland long Wharf and designated it the western terminus of the transcontinental railroad, signaling the rise of the city as a port and rail center. for the next century the port and the railroad were major employers. a second boom came in 1906 when oakland's population doubled because of the refugees made homeless by the San francisco earthquake and fire. By 1910, 150,174 people called the city home. in the early 1920s, oakland became the "Detroit of the West" following the establishment of Chevrolet, Chrysler, and Durant automobile manufacturing plants. in 1940, oakland's population stood at 302,163. oakland became a major defense production center in World War ii, a development that increased the city's population by 27%, as thousands of Southern whites and blacks arrived to work in the shipyards. less noticed at the time was the huge employer sponsored health care system, eventually called Kaiser Permanente, which became the nation's first Hmo. With the end of shipbuilding and the decline (or relocation) of auto manufacturing, oakland suffered a fate similar to the other Detroit as more than 100,000 white residents moved to the suburbs in the 1950s. oakland became poorer and blacker in the 1950s and 1960s, with growing racial tensions that partly explain the birth of the Black Panther Party there in 1966. Panther activity in West oakland anchored the southern end of a seven mile political and geographic corridor which extended north into Berkeley and the University of California campus. that corridor fused the black empowerment movement with the student and antiwar movements and produced arguably the nation's most radical politics in the mid-20th Century. if oakland in the 1970s and 1980s was the poster city for radical politics, deindustrialization, crime, poverty, urban decline, and racial tensions, by the 1990s, it began a 6


long process of economic renewal. massive downtown redevelopment projects revitalized the center of the city and brought thousands of middle class white residents back to downtown and to the nearby Jack london Square District (whose most famous new resident was then mayor Jerry Brown). gentrification also came to inner city neighborhoods along with the debate about whether this process helped or hurt long time neighborhood residents. today oakland is one of the most racially and ethnically diverse cities in the nation. the non-Hispanic white population comprises about 27% of the population. the african american population of oakland, which peaked at 47% in 1980, is about 30% of the city today. oakland's 447,000 people include large and growing latino and asian american populations partly due to immigration. in november 2010, when Jean Quan was elected mayor she became the first asian american to head a large city. last year at lake tahoe we began a one year celebration of the Western History association's fifty-year history. the oakland meeting represents both the culmination of that celebration and the commencement of our next half century. our oakland program reflects the vision of the WHa Program Committee led so ably by Patricia loughlin and Benjamin Johnson. that committee has worked long and hard to craft a program that reflects our setting in the other city by the Bay, our diverse historical interests, and our ongoing reflection on the things that have made the WHa a remarkably successful organization. there are changes in this year's program including "Presidential Sessions" that were organized to explore particular themes related to both our celebration of the WHa's fiftieth birthday and the oakland setting. the first of the Presidential sessions takes place on thursday afternoon. "fifty Years: reflections on the Past and future of Western History" brings together three of the most distinguished members of our association, William Cronon and richard White who will share their views on the past and future of the WHa, along with Patricia limerick who will moderate the panel. on friday, our only plenary session, "the Past and future of Western History: Weaving Strands of inquiry in a (Still) Contested region," features a cross-section of historians who contributed to the Western Historical Quarterly Commemorative issue on 50 Years of the association. other "birthday" sessions include "the Past, Present, and future of Public History in the WHa," "Women and the WHa @50," "Whither Western History 2011: new Directions for the Study of the american West," and "(re?) Shaping Western History: Synthesis and new Paradigms." the oakland WHa meeting also includes an amazing array of other panels which explore diverse issues reflective of our interests as historians of the West. the friday panels alone include sessions on women's suffrage in the West, the 1969 alcatraz takeover, western landscapes and ecologies, race in idaho, women, health, and state building in the 20th century West, the Civil War, corruption and conservation in California and nevada, generational conflict and eating practices among people of color in the region, and the Sioux and the State in the 19th Century. other sessions explore tourism, the debate over pioneer monuments, the development of 19th and 20th Century California hospitals, baseball on the west coast, ansel adams, Sal Castro and Chicano activism, wild horses, indian captivity narratives, Western antiquities, disease and public health, mormon women and marriage, transnational families on the borderlands, and the Civil War in indian territory. i 7


want to particularly note the panel: "Do Historians matter? Perspectives on arizona in 2010," which will explore the role of the WHa in the ongoing debate about arizona's controversial new immigration legislation. over 350 historians will participate in the oakland meeting, addressing a host of questions about the past and future of the american West. thanks to the efforts of Co-Chairs rose marie Beebe, louise Pubols, and the entire 2011 local arrangements Committee, we have a wealth of activities planned for the oakland area, capped by three tours that promise to excite mind and body. the Black Panther tour scheduled for friday morning will be led by David Hilliard, the former Chief of Staff of the Party. Demand for this tour was so great that Hilliard agreed to lead a second tour on Sunday morning. a new York times travel reviewer recently remarked that the Panther tours "aren't for your typical tour group types." i'm not exactly sure what he means by the statement but i urge you to take the challenge. i certainly will. the Berkeley- Bancroft friday afternoon tour includes Sproul Plaza and Sather gate, the site of the 1964 free Speech movement and continues with the historic Doe library, and finally the Bancroft library, with its exhibits covering mark twain, the Woman Suffrage Campaign in California, and 20th Century migrations to the golden State. oakland and the Bay area have a wealth of interesting historic and cultural sites beyond our scheduled tours. of course, our thursday Presidential Session will be at one of them, the oakland museum. Within walking distance of the oakland marriott, our meeting hotel, are Chinatown, Jack london Square, the oakland art gallery, and Preservation Park, a group of sixteen exquisitely restored Victorian homes. for those interested in San francisco, a Bart Station (12th Street-City Center) is across the street from the front entrance of the oakland marriott. from there Bart takes one to downtown San francisco in fifteen minutes. thanks to the preparation of our executive Director, Kevin fernlund and his staff, the oakland meeting of the Western History association promises to kick off our next fifty years in grand style. i wish you all a great time in oakland, the other city by the Bay. Welcome to oakland. Quintard taylor

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2011 WHA OFFICERS President Quintard taylor, University of Washington President-eLect albert l. Hurtado, University of oklahoma executive director Kevin J. fernlund, University of missouri, St. louis counciL Dan flores (2012) University of montana

David g. gutierrez (2011) University of California, San Diego

Karen merrill (2012) Williams College

george miles (2013) Beinecke library

Katherine g. morrissey (2011) University of arizona

Sandra Schackel (2013) Santa fe, new mexico

Sherry l. Smith (2011) Southern methodist University

louis Warren (2013) University of California, Davis

John Wunder (2012) University of nebraska noMinAting coMMittee thomas g. andrews (2012) University of Colorado, Denver

Durwood Ball (2012) University of new mexico

emily greenwald, Co-Chair (2011) Historical research associates, inc.

alessandra J. tamulevich (2012) University of oklahoma Press

marsha Weisiger, Co-Chair (2011) new mexico State University PuBLicAtions molly Holz montana magazine

David rich lewis Western Historical Quarterly finAnciAL Advisory coMMittee

Janet fireman, Chair California History

lynn roper merrill lynch lincoln, nebraska 9

gregory thompson University of Utah


BUSINESS, COUNCIL, AND COMMIT TEE MEETINGS tHursdAy 8:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. • Skyline room WHA council Meeting 10:00 a.m. – noon • oCC 202 crAW (committee on race in the American West) 10:00 a.m. – noon • oCC 203 WHA Membership committee Meeting 10:00 a.m. – noon • oCC 204 cWWH Business Meeting Parliamentarian thomas g. alexander, Brigham Young University noon – 1:30 p.m. • oCC 206 WHA curators, Librarians, Archivists Meeting 2:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m. • Skyline room WAML executive Board Meeting 2:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m. • oCC 202 WHA technology committee Meeting fridAy 7:00 a.m. - 8:30 a.m. • oCC 204 WHA committee for teaching and Public education Meeting sAturdAy 10:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m. • California room WHA 2012 Program committee Meeting Closed Door 4:00 p.m. - 5:30 p.m. • oCC 201 WAML Business Meeting 4:00 p.m. - 5:30 p.m. • Junior Ballroom 4 Westerners international Board Meeting 5:30 p.m. - 6:30 p.m. • Junior Ballroom 4 WHA Business Meeting 10


BREAKFASTS AND LUNCHEONS fridAy 7:00 a.m. – 8:00 a.m. • oakland room Mining History Breakfast 7:00 a.m. – 8:00 a.m. • California room AseH Breakfast noon • California room Montana Luncheon noon • Junior Ballroom 1 scholarship direct to the classroom Luncheon noon • Junior Ballroom 4 WAML Luncheon noon • oakland room WHQ editorial Board Luncheon sAturdAy 7:00 a.m. – 8:00 a.m. • oakland room cWWH Breakfast 7:00 a.m. – 8:00 a.m. • California room Public History Breakfast noon • grand Ballroom Presidential Luncheon sundAy 7:00 a.m. – 8:00 a.m. • oCC 201 Westerners international Breakfast 7:00 a.m. – 8:00 a.m. • oakland room Borderlands/fronterizo Breakfast 7:00 a.m. – 8:00 a.m. • California room community college Breakfast noon • oakland room indian scholars Luncheon noon • California room Military History Luncheon 11


RECEPTIONS AND DINNERS

tHursdAy 11:15 a.m. - noon • oCC 205 K-12 teacher reception 6:00 p.m. - 7:30 p.m. • oakland museum of California WHA opening cocktail reception ticket required. (at the museum the Presidential Session, “fifty Years..of Western History,” will immediately precede the reception. the session starts at 4:30. Your ticket will cover transportation and admission to both events.)

fridAy 5:00 p.m. • Skyline room graduate student reception ticket required. 7:00 p.m. - 10:00 p.m. • California room WAML Banquet

sAturdAy Cocktails, 6:30 p.m. (Cash Bar) • grand Ballroom Dinner, 7:00 p.m. • grand Ballroom WHA Awards Banquet ticket required.

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2011 LOCAL ARRANGEMENTS Local Arrangements co-chairs: rose Marie Beebe, Santa Clara University Louise Pubols, oakland museum of California

louise Pubols

rose marie Beebe

Bob and Judy van Austen, Westerners international, San francisco Corral Bob and sue chandler, Westerners international, San francisco Corral tim evans, Society of California Pioneers charles faulhaber, the Bancroft library glen gendzel, San JosĂŠ State University Malcolm Margolin, Heyday Books richard orsi, California State University, east Bay robert senkewicz, Santa Clara University susan snyder, the Bancroft library

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WELCOME TO OAKLAND oakland, California, the historic terminus of the transcontinental railway, is San francisco’s diverse and gritty sibling across the Bay. But it’s much more than a busy port town. it has more than fifty distinct neighborhoods, and a population that speaks more than 150 languages. With a surge of migrants lured by jobs at the port and shipyards during World War ii, oakland became a center of african-american population on the West Coast, but redlining and restrictive covenants concentrated most of that population to the “flatlands.” West oakland, in particular, became a hub of West Coast Blues. But many of these communities were cut off from post-war prosperity, and the Black Panthers and other groups formed to fight perceived injustice (struggles which continue today). in the late 20th century, many more immigrant groups made oakland their home, including mexicans and other latin american migrants in the fruitvale District, and asians in Chinatown. today, redevelopment efforts have succeeded in luring artists and chefs across the Bay, adding to its mosaic of small businesses and lively street scene. oakland’s climate is one of the best in the U.S., and views from the string of parks and trails in the hills overlooking the Bay are fabulous. Several of oakland’s neighborhoods are within easy reach of the conference center, and are worth exploring. the old oakland Historic District is just to the one of the many nearby oakland west of the conference hotel. over the past attractions, “the trappist.” decade, the city has worked to preserve the Photo courtesy of greg fischer. Victorian architecture and lured in new residents, art galleries, pubs and restaurants. the old oakland district was the “original” downtown oakland, sparked by the completion of the Central Pacific railroad’s terminus on 7th Street. By the 1870s, elegant brick Victorian hotels were being built in the blocks surrounding the railroad station to accommodate travelers. the architectural styles of the time featured tall, cast-iron columns and large plate glass windows. north of the hotel, around the 19th street Bart station, is the Uptown district. the epicenter of this neighborhood’s resurgence is the glorious art Deco Paramount theater on Broadway, which, inside its gilded and bas relief laden archways, one can still catch silent movies and concerts. nearby buildings showcase art Deco tilework and decoration, such as the fox theater on telegraph and 19th, and across the street, the floral Depot with its black and blue terracotta tiles with silver highlights. Southeast of the marriott, is a working Chinatown. this district has little of the touristy shops of San francisco’s Chinatown, but lots of great produce markets and 14


small restaurants. and the neighborhood is not just Chinese: it contains a diverse asian population, with many Vietnamese, Korean and thai businesses and residents. a mile south of the hotel, you can take a walk along the waterfront at Jack london Square. named for the author who got his start here when it was a rough and tumble port, the Square is now home to industrial lofts, but also to Jack london’s reconstructed Yukon cabin and Heinold’s first and last Chance saloon. opened in 1883, Heinhold’s was built from the timbers of an old whaling ship and still attracts locals looking for a drink and a link to local history. from the Square, you can catch a ferry to San francisco, alcatraz or angel island. other neighborhoods, a little further away, offer more options for dining or shopping. easy to reach by Bart, rockridge along College avenue, is an upscale neighborhood of Craftsman houses. once a predominantly italian neighborhood, temescal is now an ethnically diverse district with several good options for eating. Piedmont avenue has another great stretch of shops and restaurants, ending at the top at mountain View Cemetery, laid out by frederick law olmsted in 1863. this meandering cemetery holds elaborate tombs of the Bay area’s first families, including the Crockers, the Bechtels, and the ghirardellis. Just before the entry to the cemetery, don’t miss the Chapel of the Chimes, and columbarium created in part by Julia morgan, filled with sky-lit courtyards, bubbling fountains, and comfortable chairs. finally, beyond Chinatown and a short Bart ride from the conference hotel, is lake merritt, a lovely salt-water estuary circled by a walking or running path. on the north shore is lakeside Park, where you can rent a boat or catch a gondola ride on weekends. around to the west is the new Cathedral completed in 2008, and at the southern end the oakland museum of California. the omCa is housed in a terraced modernist building, and contains newly-reinstalled galleries featuring California’s art and history. During the conference, the museum will be hosting the opening reception, and its temporary galleries will be showcasing a special exhibition on John muir. rose marie Beebe Santa Clara University louise Pubols oakland museum of California Co-chairs, 2011 local arrangements Committee

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SCHEDULE-AT-A-GLANCE tHursdAy, octoBer 13tH

exhibitors registration Workshop: rugged individualism WHA council Meeting Workshop: active learning techniques crAW committee Meeting WHA Membership committee Meeting cWWH Business Meeting K-12 teacher reception teaching the american West in a global Context roundtable: teaching gender in the american West roundtable: Woman Suffrage: What Difference... northern arizona teaching american History grant modern methods for teaching ancient History WAML: executive Board Meeting WHA technology committee Meeting WHA curators, Librarians, Archivists Meeting fifty Years: reflections of the Past & future of Western... WHA opening cocktail reception

8:00 am 8:30 am 10:00 am 10:00 am 10:00 am 10:00 am 11:15 am noon noon 2:00 pm 2:00 pm 2:00 pm 2:00 pm 2:00 pm 2:00 pm 4:30 pm 6:00 pm

9:30 am 12:30 pm 11:15 pm noon noon noon noon 1:30 pm 1:30 pm 3:30 pm 3:30 pm 3:30 pm 4:00 pm 4:00 pm 4:00 pm 6:00 pm 7:30 pm

oCC 201 Skyline room oCC 201 oCC 202 oCC 203 oCC 204 oCC 205 oCC 201 oCC 202 oCC 205 oCC 204 oCC 203 Skyline room oCC 202 oCC 206 oakland museum oakland museum

7:00 am Mining History Breakfast 7:00 am AseH Breakfast WHA committee for teaching & Public educ Meeting 7:00 am 8:30 am Black Panther tour 8:30 am Plenary: the Past and future of Western History... 10:00 am WAML: opening remarks & Welcome Waml: infinite City, finite atlas, our myriad adventures... 10:30 am 10:30 am Presidential Session: oakland in the age of ... 10:30 am roundtable: the Past, Present, and future of Public... 10:30 am roundtable: red Power and native nationalism... 10:30 am interpreting a farther West: landscapes, aesthetics... 10:30 am Confronting Boundaries, Crossing lines, negotiating... 10:30 am the Sioux and the State in the era of greater... noon WAML Luncheon: richard White, speaker noon WHQ editorial Board Luncheon noon Montana Luncheon noon scholarship direct to the classroom Luncheon 1:30 pm Berkeley tour 2:00 pm WAML: stanford field trip 2:30 pm the Body in the american West 2:30 pm Shaping 19th Century far West: Civil War, Corruption... roundtable: Serving the Westâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Varied Publics: ideas from... 2:30 pm now Picture this: tourism, Visual Culture, and the trans... 2:30 pm not Quite as Planned: the West as a Dynamic Juncture... 2:30 pm

8:00 am 8:00 am 8:30 am 11:30 am 10:00 am 10:30 am noon noon noon noon noon noon noon 2:00 pm 1:00 pm 1:00 pm 1:30 pm 5:30 pm 5:00 pm 4:00 pm 4:00 pm 4:00 pm 4:00 pm 4:00 pm

oakland room California room oCC 204 Departs from Hotel oCC 210/211 oCC 201 oCC 201 oCC 206 oCC 207 oCC 202 oCC 205 oCC 203 oCC 204 Junior Ballroom 4 oakland room California room Junior Ballroom 1 Departs from Hotel Waml members only oCC 201 oCC 202 oCC 203 oCC 208 oCC 210/211

fridAy, octoBer 14tH

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SCHEDULE-AT-A-GLANCE radical activism in the Bay area, 1960s-1970s Commerce, Diplomacy, and religion: forging the... regional and national Histories in Conversation: the... graduate student reception WAML Banquet

sAturdAy, octoBer 15tH

2:30 pm 2:30 pm 2:30 pm 5:00 pm 7:00 pm

7:00 am cWWH Breakfast 7:00 am Public History Breakfast Waml: mapping ancient Places: Digitization and access... 8:30 am 8:30 am interrogating racialized intimacies: language... 8:30 am making Space, Closing Space 8:30 am Bridging the Historiographical Divide Between... 8:30 am Playing america’s game: minorities and Baseball... 8:30 am revisiting ansel adams’s american West 8:30 am Storytelling in the national Parks, then and now 8:30 am Beyond Battlefields & Homefronts: California and the... a Discussion of mario t. garcia and Sal Castro’s Blowout!.. 8:30 am 10:00 am WHA 2012 Program committee Meeting the Power of Western grassroots activism and Politics... 10:30 am negotiating new identities in alternative Communities... 10:30 am 10:30 am the Business and Culture of Sport in the West Creating and Policing the US-mexico Border: Past and... 10:30 am 10:30 am roundtable: the State of the field: Western african... Sources on Western military Warfare and remembrance 10:30 am 10:30 am roundtable: the legacy of Women and gender in... 10:30 am monumental memories 10:30 am Wild Horses: Symbols of a Changing West noon Presidential Luncheon Building modern medicine: the Development of Hospitals.. 2:00 pm 2:00 pm roundtable: interdisciplinary approaches to indian... 2:00 pm the Diseased West: Plagues and Progressives on the... 2:00 pm Waml: the Urban West: Cartographic representation 2:00 pm overlooked migrations and Unfamiliar Struggles:... 2:00 pm roundtable: Do Historians matter?... 2:00 pm roundtable: Public History Programs in the West 2:00 pm Workshop: mixed and transitional families in the... 2:00 pm Building tranquility Base on the moon: foundations... 2:00 pm roundtable: Women and the WHa at fifty Years 4:00 pm WAML Business Meeting ethnic and labor activism and Post-War Politics in the... 4:00 pm roundtable: teaching the State and Provincial History... 4:00 pm american memory, myth-making, and Display in the West.. 4:00 pm 4:00 pm Digital frontiers: a Digital History Workshop 4:00 pm the local Politics of Boundary-making 4:00 pm idaho and race 4:00 pm roundtable: Whither Western History 2011: new...

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4:00 pm 4:00 pm 4:00 pm

oCC 204 oCC 207 oCC 205 Skyline room 10:00 pm California room

8:00 am 8:00 am 10:00 am 10:00 am 10:00 am 10:00 am 10:00 am 10:00 am 10:00 am 10:00 am 10:00 am 4:00 pm noon noon noon noon noon noon noon noon noon 3:30 pm 3:30 pm 3:30 pm 3:30 pm 3:30 pm 3:30 pm 3:30 pm 3:30 pm 3:30 pm 3:30 pm 5:30 pm 5:30 pm 5:30 pm 5:30 pm 5:30 pm 5:30 pm 5:30 pm 5:30 pm

Junior Ballroom 2/3 California room oCC 201 oCC 202 oCC 203 oCC 204 oCC 205 oCC 208 oCC 210/211 oCC 206 oCC 207 California room oCC 201 oCC 202 oCC 203 oCC 204 oCC 205 oCC 206 oCC 208 oCC 210/211 Junior Ballroom 1 grand Ballroom oCC 201 oCC 208 oCC 210/211 oCC 202 oCC 203 oCC 204 oCC 205 oCC 206 oCC 207 Junior Ballroom 1 oCC 201 oCC 202 oCC 203 oCC 204 oCC 210/211 oCC 208 oCC 205 oCC 206


SCHEDULE-AT-A-GLANCE fascinated by relics and ruins: encounters with... red Power at Home and abroad Westerners international Board Meeting WHA Business Meeting WHA Awards Banquet

sundAy, octoBer 16tH

Westerners international Breakfast Borderlands/fronterizo Breakfast community college Breakfast roundtable: national Parks and Public History Pedagogy and the african american experience in the... Sex, race, and migration in the american West transnational Culture and labor in the U.S.-mexico... americaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s forgotten Wests roundtable: teaching California History: many People... Western Historians and Western Heroes in Changing... mormon Women, marriage and identity across... roundtable: (re?)Shaping Western History: Synthesis... Black Panther tour Ballots and Beyond: three oregon Suffragists Help Pave... indian territoryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Civil Wars on the margins: refugees, immigrants, and Poverty... race and Place: indigenous, Japanese, and mexican... Western environments, imperial landscapes roundtable: Surveillance and Confinement... Underexplored Dimensions of grassroots Civil rights... natives in the Process of Colonization: auxillary troops... indian scholars Luncheon Military History Luncheon

18

4:00 pm 4:00 pm 4:00 pm 5:30 pm 7:00 pm

5:30 pm 5:30 pm 5:30 pm 6:30 pm

oCC 207 Junior Ballroom 1 Junior Ballroom 4 Junior Ballroom 4 grand Ballroom

7:00 am 7:00 am 7:00 am 8:30 am 8:30 am 8:30 am 8:30 am 8:30 am 8:30 am 8:30 am 8:30 am 8:30 am 8:30 am 10:30 am 10:30 am 10:30 am 10:30 am 10:30 am 10:30 am 10:30 am 10:30 am noon noon

8:00 am 8:00 am 8:00 am 10:00 am 10:00 am 10:00 am 10:00 am 10:00 am 10:00 am 10:00 am 10:00 am 10:00 am 10:00 am noon noon noon noon noon noon noon noon 1:00 pm 1:00 pm

oCC 201 oakland room California room oCC 208 oCC 201 oCC 210/211 oCC 202 oCC 203 oCC 204 oCC 205 oCC 206 oCC 207 Departs from lobby, 8:30 oCC 201 oCC 202 oCC 203 oCC 204 oCC 205 Junior Ballroom 1 oCC 207 oCC 206 oakland room California room


DOWNTOWN OAKLAND

19


OAKLAND AREA

20


WHA OPENING RECEPTION Fift ft ty t yY Year ear rs: Past and Reflections on the Pa Future of Western History Join us for the WHA Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Opening R Reception eception at the Oakland Museum of California, featuring speakers William Cronon and Richard White, moderated by Patricia Nelson Limerick.

The Presidential Session will begin at 4:30 P P.M. .M.. on Thursdayy,, October 13th, 2011. Cocktail hour begins at 6:00 P P.M. .M. Transpor rans tation from, and to, the hotel will be provided. Sponsored by: Oakland Museum of California, Bronco Wine Company and Santa Clara Universityy.

This is a combined, ticketed event. Please visit the WHA website or the registraation booth ffo or ticket sales.

21


PRESIDENTIAL LUNCHEON Join us fo for r the

Presidential Luncheon Sa aturda ay, October 15, Noon Grand nd B Ballr allr roo o m Quintar ui uintar i d Taylor l , Luncheon Address by Q WHA President Facing the U Urban rban F Frrontier: African American Histor Histtorry in the R Reshaping eshaping e of the 20th Centur Cen nturry American can West West

Ticketed Ev Event. 22


WHA AWARDS BANQUET Join us for the

WHA A AW WARDS WARDS A BANQUET Sa aturda ay, Oc O tober 15, 7:00 P P.M. .M .M. Grand nd B Ballr allr roo o m Guest Speaker Kevin Starr, Author of Golden n Drreams: eams: C Califor ali alifornia IIn n An A Age ge O Off Abundance, 1950-1963

Ticketed dE Evvent Sponsored by the Academy of American Franciscan History 23


2011 MODERN HISTORIES OF ANCIENT PLACES TOUR SCHEDULE fridAy, octoBer 14, 2011 Berkeley-Bancroft Walking tour 1:30 p.m. - 5:30 p.m.

freedom of Speech rally leader, mario Savio, Sounding off, november 9, 1964. image Courtesy of the Bancroft library.

the guided tour begins at the corner of telegraph avenue and Bancroft Way, proceeding through legendary Sproul Plaza and Sather gate, the site of historic campus protests, to the free Speech movement Cafe, where a permanent exhibit commemorates the events of the 1960s. a short walk uphill takes you to the monumental Doe library, where youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll pass by the current Brown gallery exhibit "golden gate mysteries," showcasing the rich legacy of mystery literature in the Bay area. after an ascent to the newly renovated great rooms on the second floor, the tour will move next door to the Bancroft library, passing wall exhibits on the centennial of woman suffrage in California, and on women's history at UC Berkeley. the major exhibition in the new Bancroft library gallery will be California Crossings: Stories of migration, relocation, and new encounters . then the tour will enter the Bancroft library itself to watch students of the letterpress Class at work on their semester project to create a book on a hand press; to meet with staff working on oral history projects; to visit the mark twain Papers and see the preparations for the best-selling autobiography; to see a display and talk with library staff about Bancroft's treasures, including its protest collections; and for a behind-the-scenes visit to manuscript and pictorial processing areas. tour length: 3 hours, not including travel. number of people: maximum 50. ticket and WHA name Badge required. 24


2011 MODERN HISTORIES OF ANCIENT PLACES TOUR SCHEDULE fridAy, octoBer 14, 2011 sundAy, octoBer 16, 2011 Black Panther tour 8:30 a.m. - 11:30 a.m.

Black Panthers, c. 1967. image courtesy of the oakland museum of California History.

the Black Panther legacy tour is your opportunity to rendezvous with history. this three-hour narrated bus tour will be led by David Hilliard, one of the Party’s founding members, a former chief of staff, and childhood friend of Huey newton. the tour traces the history of the oakland-born movement by visiting eighteen sites that were significant to the Black Panther Party and the Civil rights movement. See the boxy building where Huey newton and Bobby Seale drew up the Party’s “ten Point Program” in 1966. Visit St. augustine’s episcopal Church where the Panthers initiated a free breakfast program for children. at each site, Hilliard will share his personal recollections of the people and events that shaped the Black Panther Party. the bus tour begins and ends at the Marriott Hotel. seating is limited. ticket and WHA name Badge required.

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2011 MODERN HISTORIES OF ANCIENT PLACES WORKSHOPS tHursdAy

8:00

AM-9:30 AM

occ 201

Workshop: rugged individualism: designing Performance for the History classroom (K-university) to stem the tide of cheating Presenters:

tHursdAy

Lindsey Passenger Wieck, University of notre Dame Leisl carr childers, northern arizona University Brian s. collier, University of notre Dame

10:00

AM-11:15 AM

occ 201

Workshop: Active Learning for the K-20 classroom Chair: Panelists:

Linda sargent Wood, northern arizona University 2011 redd center Award Winners

sAturdAy

2:00

PM-3:30 PM

occ 206

Mixed and transnational families in the Borderlands: A Workshop a note on format: this is a workshop intended to discuss works in progress. the papers will be circulated before the conference and will not be read in the session. to sign up and receive copies of the manuscripts, please send an email to whaworkshop@gmail.com. Presenter: Comment:

Allison gorsuch, Yale University charlene Lynn Porsild, University of new mexico

Presenter: Comment:

verónica castillo-Muñoz, University of California, Santa Barbara eric Meeks, northern arizona University

Presenter: Comment:

Juliette Maiorana, University of California, San Diego Julia María schiavone camacho, University of texas, el Paso

Presenter: Comment:

selfa crew, University of texas, el Paso rudy guevarra, arizona State University

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2011 MODERN HISTORIES OF ANCIENT PLACES WORKSHOPS sAturdAy

4:00

PM-5:30 PM

occ 210/211

digital frontiers: A digital History Workshop are you curious about how the new model digital scholarship promises to impact your research methods and scholarly communication practices? Would you like to find out what is out there on the web for western historians? Do you teach western history with digital media, or do you just want to find out what are people doing in those "smart" classrooms? Do you work in a museum, archive or public agency and have questions about the open-source or free tools to create digital archives, web-based exhibits of digital content, "web 2.0" ways to involve the public? this digital history workshop is an opportunity for those in our membership interested in the increasingly significant role that technology plays in research, teaching, and public history, to gather virtually and in person, to discuss digital frontiers before, during, and after the conference. all are welcome–from the digital guru to the techno-novice–to come together and ask questions, share ideas and join in conversations online prior to the conference. We invite potential workshop participants to use the blog, "Digital frontiers" - whadigitalfrontiers.wordpress.com - to share their interests and favorite resources before we meet in person to hear some brief presentations, ask questions about resources, tools, and best practices, and take away some exciting ideas to ponder while we develop a lively western digital history community. all conference-goers are welcome to drop in and sit in on any part of the session. facilitator:

douglas seefeldt, University of nebraska, lincoln tHe WHa oral HiStorY ProJeCt gregory e. Smoak University of Utah greg.smoak@utah.edu

the 2011 WHa meeting in oakland will be a time to look forward to our organization’s second half century, but it will also present an opportunity to reflect on where we have been. We are at an important juncture as an organization – old enough to have developed a legacy yet young enough that some of our founders and oldest members are still with us. now is the time to capture their stories and our organization’s history. Beginning at the oakland meeting, the WHa in partnership with the University of Utah’s american West Center, marriott library, and Department of History, will begin a multi-year project to collect and preserve an oral history of the Western History association. our plan is to begin with audio and video interviews of the WHa’s founders and most senior members and then in subsequent years expand our pool of interviewees to encompass a broad view of the organization’s history. We will have space set aside to carry out interviews in oakland and will also seek ways to interview those who may not be able to travel to the meeting. We hope to do approximately ten interviews at each meeting. We welcome your suggestions and comments concerning the project, potential interviewees, etc. See you in oakland!

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“It is not in the nature of present-day society for men to give like for like, the same for the same. And so long as men continue to live in this competitive society, struggling tooth and nail with one another for food and shelter, (which is to struggle tooth and nail with one another for life), that long will the scab continue to exist. His will ‘to live’ will force him to exist.” —Jack London From “The Scab,” a speech given to the Oakland Socialist Party Local, April 5, 1903. Source: Jack London, War of the Classes, 1905. Image ©Mike McGee 28


2011 PROGRAM COMMIT TEE 2011 Program committee co-chairs:

Benjamin Johnson University of Wisconsin, milwaukee

Patti Loughlin University of Central oklahoma

Julia MarĂ­a schiavone camacho, University of texas, el Paso Brian collier, University of notre Dame Wendel eckford, los angeles City College susan ferber, oxford University Press suzzanne Kelley, north Dakota State University Lori Lahlum, minnesota State University, mankato K. tsianina Lomawaima, University of arizona Julie Maiorana, University of California, San Diego sheila McManus, University of lethbridge shirley Ann Moore, California State University, Sacramento rick Moss, african american museum and library at oakland roger nichols, University of arizona raĂşl ramos, University of Houston Linda reese, east Central University theresa salazar, the Bancroft library greg smoak, Colorado State University sam truett, University of new mexico Phoebe s. Kropp young, University of Colorado, Boulder

29


FROM THE PROGRAM COMMIT TEE in 1961, a group of historians and enthusiasts of the american West convened a conference in Santa fe. out of this first meeting emerged an organization committed to the study of western history. formal organization of the Western History association took place one year later. and today, we honor this milestone by continuing the work of producing histories of the West that speak to the contemporary world. our theme invokes the modern West so visible in oakland and the greater Bay area, where finance, manufacturing, agriculture, education, shipping, and technology have made this one of the world’s most dynamic and influential metropolitan centers. this racially and ethnically diverse place has shaped politics and life in the United States and far beyond, most notably through its social movements, from the founding of the Sierra Club to the new left, Black and red Power, and gay liberation. at the same time, it is an ancient place, marked from time immemorial by its native peoples and the centuries of colonization and migration that washed across it from all corners of the globe. this year’s annual meeting of the Western History association provided us with the opportunity to develop a program that reflects both continuity and innovation. on one hand, we wanted to be open to as wide a range of topics as possible, to provide western historians of all stripes and career stages with the opportunity to share their ongoing research, teaching, and public history projects to their peers. in this sense, the true creators of the annual program are those who consider themselves western historians. this is an eclectic and creative bunch, as suggested by topics that include ansel adams photographs, professional baseball, rodeo, native participation in colonialism, the prison system of recent decades, and the eighteenth-century mississippi frontier. on the other hand, this meeting presented a number of distinct opportunities that we tried to capitalize upon in our call for papers and in the work of assembling a program from a large number of panel and paper submissions. the fiftieth anniversary of the formation of the WHa seemed to call for some structured discussion of where Western history is as a field, and where the WHa is as an organization. although these topics can be addressed in formal scholarly venues or on H-net, we wanted them to have a presence on the program as well. even in the digital age, there is no replacement for face-to-face conversations. to take full advantage of the presence of so many western historians, we have scheduled two plenary sessions – time slots in which there are no competing sessions. the first features William Cronon and richard White, who were recently the finalists for the presidency of the american Historical association, an election that suggests just how influential western history has been to the profession as a whole. the second is a roundtable featuring some of the authors of articles in the 50th anniversary issue of the Western Historical Quarterly . our hope is that these sessions will contribute in some way to fostering a shared sense of stewardship and responsibility for western history as a field and the WHa as an organization. one of the strengths of western history has long been an attention to place. So we solicited and were happy to receive numerous proposals that speak to the history of oakland, the Bay area, and California more generally. these sessions include, among others, a discussion of robert Self’s american Babylon, 1960s and 1970s radical activism in the Bay area, and the development of California’s hospital system. 30


FROM THE PROGRAM COMMIT TEE like most academic conferences, this program is mostly constituted by the classic format of the oral delivery of papers and commentary. numerous roundtables join these panels. one working group – “mixed and transnational families in the Borderlands: a Workshop” – responded to our call for sessions based on papers circulated digitally in advance of the conference. Perhaps more of us will take advantage of the potential advantages of such formats in the future. finally, this program reflects the ongoing efforts of the WHa to reach beyond the academy and to organizations with similar missions. the organization’s efforts to influence the teaching of western and american history is reflected in the numerous teaching panels, and we are happy to be running sessions organized by the Western association of map libraries. the semi-centennial of the WHa provides a particularly compelling opportunity to assess the ways that the organization and field of study have developed over time. We extend special gratitude to President Quintard taylor for his leadership and vision for this program. We thank the program committee for their hard work, collaboration and innovative spirit, executive Director Kevin fernlund and his staff for their tireless efforts, and the local arrangements committee for their work in enriching the experience of WHa attendees. Benjamin Johnson, University of Wisconsin, milwaukee Patti loughlin, University of Central oklahoma Co-chairs, 2011 Program Committee

31


CONFERENCE CENTER MAPS F I R S T & S E C O N D F LO O R S

32


CONFERENCE CENTER MAPS

33


CONFERENCE CENTER MAPS

34


CONFERENCE CENTER MAPS

35


MODERN HISTORIES OF ANCIENT PLACES SESSIONS tHursdAy

8:00-9:30

occ 201

Workshop: rugged individualism: designing Performance Assessments for the History classroom (K-university) to stem the tide of cheating Presenters

tHursdAy

Lindsey Passenger Wieck, University of notre Dame Leisl carr childers, northern arizona University Brian s. collier, University of notre Dame

10:00-11:15

occ 201

Workshop: Active Learning techniques for the K-20 classroom Chair Panelists

tHursdAy

Linda sargent Wood, northern arizona University Winners of the 2011 charles redd center teaching Awards

noon-1:30

occ 201

teaching the American West in a global context Panelists

Comment

tHursdAy

chris Bunin, Director of teacher Scholars Program, america on the World Stage taH david Hicks, School of education, Virginia tech (Master teacher), america on the World Stage taH project Andy Mink, University of Virginia

noon-1:30 roundtable on teaching gender in the American West

moderator Panelists

Katherine sarah Massoth, University of iowa Katherine Benton-cohen, georgetown University sarah carter, University of alberta Zachary Lechner, temple University

36

occ 202


MODERN HISTORIES OF ANCIENT PLACES SESSIONS tHursdAy

2:00-3:30

occ 205

roundtable: Woman suffrage: What difference did it Make? sponsored by the coalition for Western Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s History moderators

robert W. cherny, San francisco State University Mary Ann irwin, California Community College System Ann Marie Wilson, Harvard University

Panelists

Janice Lynn dilg, Portland State University sue englander, City College of San francisco Jarrod Harrison, Social Studies Department Chair, Carlmont High School teresa Hurley, Senior Paralegal, morrison and foerster, San francisco sandra L. Henderson, University of illinois, Urbana-Champaign Michelle Kleehammer, University of illinois, Urbana-Champaign rebecca Mead, northern michigan University

tHursdAy

2:00-3:30

occ 204

northern Arizona teaching American History grant Project Chair

Linda sargent Wood, northern arizona University

Panelists

christi carlson, flagstaff Unified School District teacher Heather Walker, flagstaff Unified School District teacher Kathy Zimski, mentor teacher Leisl carr childers, northern arizona University

Comment

Kevin fernlund, University of missouri, St. louis

tHursdAy

2:00-3:30 Modern Methods for teaching Ancient History

Presenters

Annie Hanshew, Carroll College elizabeth Player, american West Center, University of Utah

37

occ 203


MODERN HISTORIES OF ANCIENT PLACES SESSIONS tHursdAy

4:30-6:00

PresidentiAL session/oAKLAnd MuseuM*

fifty years: reflections of the Past & future of Western History moderator Panelists

Patricia nelson Limerick, University of Colorado, Boulder richard White, Stanford University William cronon, University of Wisconsin *this is a ticketed event. ticket provides transportation from the conference hotel to the museum and admission to the opening reception, which begins at 6:00 pm.

fridAy

8:30-10:00

oPen PLenAry occ 210/211

roundtable: the Past and future of Western History: Weaving strands of inquiry in a (still) contested region Authors from the Western Historical Quarterly commemorative issue moderator Panelists

fridAy

colleen oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;neill, Western Historical Quarterly richard etulain, University of new mexico Mark fiege, Colorado State University, fort Collins Marsha Weisiger, University of oregon ned Blackhawk, Yale University Margaret Jacobs, University of nebraska, lincoln

10:00-10:30

occ 201

WAML session: opening remarks moderator

fridAy

cynthia Moriconi, University of California, Santa Cruz

10:30-noon WAML session: infinite city, finite Atlas, our Myriad Adventures in Mapping san francisco

Presenter

rebecca solnit, independent Writer

38

occ 201


MODERN HISTORIES OF ANCIENT PLACES SESSIONS fridAy

10:30-noon

occ 206

Presidential session: oakland in the Age of deindustrialization: A discussion of robert selfâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s American Babylon moderator Panelists

Comment

fridAy

Joel trotter, Carnegie mellon University clarence Lang, University of illinois Urbana-Champaign robin Muhammad, University of ohio-athens donna Murch, rutgers University robert self, Brown University

10:30-noon

occ 207

roundtable: the Past, Present, and future of Public History in the Western History Association moderator Panelists

fridAy

gregory e. smoak, University of Utah James M. Bailey, U.S. Bureau of reclamation e. richard Hart, Hart West and associates Patricia nelson Limerick, University of Colorado, Boulder Louise Pubols, oakland museum of California

10:30-noon roundtable: red Power and native nationalism: Historicizing the 1969 Alcatraz takeover

moderator Panelists

donald L. fixico, arizona State University sherry smith, Southern methodist University elizabeth castle, University of South Dakota daniel cobb, University of north Carolina, Chapel Hill Kent Blansett, University of minnesota, morris

39

occ 202


MODERN HISTORIES OF ANCIENT PLACES SESSIONS fridAy

10:30-noon

occ 205

interpreting a farther West: Landscapes, Aesthetics, ecologies Chair

carolyn Merchant, University of California, Berkeley

Paper

“are these lakes real or fake?”: interpretation of Human History in a “Wilderness” national Park clayton James Hanson, eastern Washington University

Paper

inv aded islands of the early trans-Pacific West: Biological introductions and Cultural Change in 1769-1850 John ryan fischer, University of Wisconsin, river falls

Comment

John Herron, University of nevada, las Vegas

fridAy

10:30-noon

occ 203

confronting Boundaries, crossing Lines, negotiating Policy: Women, Health, and state-building in the rural twentieth-century West Chair

cathleen cahill, University of new mexico

Paper

appropriating the maternalist State: rockefeller Philanthropy and the Dev elopment of administrativ e Capacities in the american West, 1920-1929 Kathi nehls, University of georgia

Paper

federal Policy or Pragmatism?: nursing on U.S reserv ations in the early tw entieth Century Lisa schuelke, University of nebraska, lincoln

Paper

reproducing the State: Birth Policies and americanization in new mexico, 1919-1940 Lena McQuade, Sonoma State University

Comment

Joan M. Jensen, new mexico State University

40


MODERN HISTORIES OF ANCIENT PLACES SESSIONS fridAy

10:30-noon

occ 204

the sioux and the state in the era of greater reconstruction Chair

tim Lehman, rocky mountain College

Paper

alex Charging Crow and the transformation of the Sioux Country, 1846-1870 ryan Hall, Yale University exiled from niobrara: the fall of Samuel Hinman and the Process of greater reconstruction in Sioux Country taylor spence, Yale University

Paper Paper Comment

fridAy

the oglala lakota and the modernization of american Culture, 1848-1890 Jeff Means, University of Wyoming gary Anderson, University of oklahoma

2:30-4:30

occ 201

the Body in the American West Chair

Peter Boag, Washington State University

Paper

exhibitions of Human remains, memory, and the american West samuel J. redman, University of California, Berkeley fashioning indians: Consumption, time, and Space on rosebud reserv ation thomas Biolsi, University of California, Berkeley

Paper Paper Comment

fridAy

“Bury me not on the lone Prairie”? mortal remains, Westw ard expansion, and the Colonial landscape of Public Death in the american West Matthew dennis, University of oregon Paul Kelton, University of Kansas

2:30-4:30

occ 202

shaping the nineteenth-century far West: the civil War, corruption, conservation, & renewal in california and nevada Chair

c. elizabeth raymond, University of nevada, reno

Paper

from Catastrophic Birth: the Civ il War origins of the Yosemite Park david c. Hickman, University of California, Davis

Paper Paper Comment

free Soil, free labor, “White” men: the Conditions of freedom on the Comstock lode robert chester, University of the Pacific “fruits of Civ il War: Corruption in late nineteenth-Century nev ada” Michael s. green, College of Southern nevada c. elizabeth raymond, University of nevada, reno

41


MODERN HISTORIES OF ANCIENT PLACES SESSIONS fridAy

2:30-4:00

occ 203

roundtable: serving the Westâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s varied Publics: ideas from the centers of the West moderator Panelists

fridAy

Matt Basso, american West Center, University of Utah Harry thompson, the Center for Western Studies, augustana College Kurt gutjahr, Center of the american West, University of Colorado at Boulder Jay gitlin and John Mack faragher, Howard r. lamar Center for the Study of frontiers and Borders, Yale University ruth Alexander, Public lands History Center, Colorado State University Wiliam deverell, Huntington-USC institute on California and the West stephen Aron and virginia scharff, autry institute for the Study of the american West Brian cannon, Charles redd Center for Western Studies, Brigham Young University Matt Basso, american West Center, University of Utah Jon christenson, Bill lane Center for the american West, Stanford University david Wrobel, institute for the applied History of the north american West, University of nevada, las Vegas

2:30-4:30

occ 208

now Picture this: tourism, visual culture, and the transnational West Chair

carol Higham, Davidson College

Paper

is montana or alberta more like Sw itzerland? Selling the rocky mountain Parks in the late 19th and early 20th Centuries sheila McManus, University of lethbridge

Paper

all aboard! trav elogues of the Canadian Pacific railw ay and the northern Pacific railw ay dominique BrĂŠgent-Heald, memorial University of newfoundland

Paper

Paper tropical tourism and the liberalization of Heterosexuality catherine cocks, independent Scholar

Comment

Peter Blodgett, Huntington library

42


MODERN HISTORIES OF ANCIENT PLACES SESSIONS fridAy

2:30-4:00

occ 210/211

not Quite as Planned: the West as a dynamic Juncture of Policy, Perceptions, and Peoples Chair

roger nichols, University of arizona

Paper

“to Be Know n as a Woman”: assessing federal Domestic assimilation Policy on the Wind riv er reserv ation, 1920-1935 Julie stidolph, University of oklahoma

Paper

good fences make good Citizens: tow ard an env ironmental History of Southern California indian Citizenship damon B. Akins, guilford College

Paper

indian and Borderlands education beyond the School in new mexico at the turn of the tw entieth Century Adrea Lawrence, american University

Paper

“Unfulfilled Promises and Half‐measures”: federal indian Health Policy at the Hayw ard indian School and lac Courte oreilles reserv ation, 1910-1934 Bryan c. rindfleisch, University of oklahoma

Comment

Katherine osburn, tennessee tech University

fridAy

2:30-4:00

occ 204

radical Activism in the Bay Area, 1960s-1970s Chair

Bruce gjeltema, University of new mexico, gallup

Paper

Black, red, and radicalism: african american and nativ e american activ ism in the Bay area Kyle Mays, University of illinois, Urbana-Champaign

Paper

occupying alcatraz: red Pow er and “the rock” Brian gillis, University of California, Berkeley

Comment

Jeffrey shepherd, University of texas, el Paso

43


MODERN HISTORIES OF ANCIENT PLACES SESSIONS fridAy

2:30-4:00

occ 207

commerce, diplomacy, and religion: forging the Mississippi river valley Borderland, 1763-1803 Chair

John P. Bowes, eastern Kentucky University

Paper

empires and indians in the illinois Borderlands, 1763-1800 Jacob f. Lee, University of California, Davis

Paper

god on the Borderland: the importance of religion in Shaping the Postrev olutionary trans-appalachian Backcountry, 1783-1792 Kevin t. Barksdale, marshall University

Paper

the failure of Pinckney’s treaty and the Coming of the louisiana Purchase: mississippi trade, 1796 to 1803 susan gaunt stearns, the University of Chicago

Comment

Kathleen duval, University of north Carolina, Chapel Hill

fridAy

2:30-4:00

occ 205

regional and national Histories in conversation: the Making of the economic, cultural, and racial Mexican-u.s. Borderlands, 1880s-1930s Chair

Julia M. schiavone camacho, University of texas at el Paso

Paper

the Chinese transnational Commercial orbit, 1882-1940 robert chao romero, University of California, los angeles

Paper

making mexicali into a Chinese Place Jason oliver chang, University of texas at austin/University of California, Berkeley

Paper

the Chinese Dragon and the eagle of anahuac: the national and international implications of the ensenada Boycott of 1934 fredy gonzález, Yale University

Paper

the “Color Bar” at the Border: race and immigration Policy in mexico, 1920-1935 Julian Lim, Cornell University

Comment

evelyn Hu-deHart, Brown University

44


MODERN HISTORIES OF ANCIENT PLACES SESSIONS sAturdAy

8:30-10:00

occ 201

WAML session: Mapping Ancient Places: digitization and Access to Historic Maps Presenters

nav igating to Success: finding Your Way through the Challenges of map Digitization Kathy rankin, University of nevada,reno cory Lampert, University of nevada,reno Creating a geoportal John ridener, University of California, Berkeley

sAturdAy

8:30-10:00

occ 202

interrogating racialized intimacies: Language, generational conflict, and eating Practices Chair

carol McKibben, Stanford University

Paper

Patriotic tongues: the Personal Struggle betw een americanization and Pan-american ideals in new mexico rosina Lozano, University of Southern California

Paper

the Problems of the Second generation: Chinese and Japanese american familial Pow er Dynamics chrissy Lau, University of Santa Barbara

Paper

flesh Prejudice: race and anti-Hippophagy Jeannette vaught, University of texas at austin

Comment

fay A. yarbrough, University of oklahoma

sAturdAy

8:30-10:00

occ 203

Making space, closing space Chair

Kathleen underwood, grand Valley State University

Paper

How french Canadians Changed the face of the Pacific northw est and then Disappeared from View Jean Barman, University of British Columbia

Paper

a Space of one’s ow n: race, Place, and memory in Div erse Women’s Wests elizabeth Jameson, University of Calgary

Paper

Western Canada’s frontier era: a Same-Sex golden age? Lyle dick, West Coast Historian, Parks Canada, Vancouver

Comment

sheila McManus, University of lethbridge

45


MODERN HISTORIES OF ANCIENT PLACES SESSIONS sAturdAy

8:30-10:00

occ 204

Bridging the Historiographical divide in Borderlands studies Chair

Kelly Lytle Hernandez, University of California, los angeles

Paper

tequileros, tariffs, and armed threats: mexican and U.S. View s of Contraband trade in the low er rio grande Borderlands, 1920-1930 george thaddeus díaz, South texas College

Paper

Victor ochoa: the making of an american Aaron Margolis, University of texas, el Paso

Paper

Building across the Div ide: roads and railroads along the U.S.-mexico Border, 1880-1950 Michael Bess, University of texas, el Paso

Comment

Kelly Lytle Hernandez, University of California, los angeles

sAturdAy

8:30-10:00

occ 205

Playing America’s game: Minorities and Baseball on the West coast Chair

carlos Muñoz, Jr., University of California, Berkeley

Paper

mexican american Baseball: from east la to Dodger Stadium, 1900-1980 francisco e. Balderrama, California State University, los angeles

Paper

the integration of the Pacific Coast league: a Social History of race on the West Coast Amy essington, Claremont graduate University

Paper

Baseball and asian american Communities in Haw ai’i and the Pacific Coast of the U.S. mainland Joel franks, San Jose State University

Comment

samuel o. regalado, California State University, Stanislaus

sAturdAy

8:30-10:00

occ 208

revisiting Ansel Adams’s American West Chair

Jeanne Adams, the ansel adams gallery, Yosemite national Park

Paper

ansel adams’ West: from the frontier to the timeless West rachel sailor, University of texas at tyler

Paper

the Dav id H. arrington Collection; ansel adams and minor White Andrew smith, andrew Smith gallery inc., Santa fe, new mexico

Paper

ansel adams find His market: from the 1927 Parmelian Prints of the High Sierras to the 1940s national Parks Project rebecca senf, Center for Creative Photography, University of arizona

Comment

Phillip Prodger, Peabody essex museum

46


MODERN HISTORIES OF ANCIENT PLACES SESSIONS sAturdAy

8:30-10:00

occ 210/211

storytelling in the national Parks, then and now Chair

charles Palmer, national Park Service

Paper

Storytelling in early Yellow stone: Beginnings of interpretation in the first national Park Lee Whittlesey, Yellowstone national Park

Paper

making Yosemite: Building the Park’s Cultural institutions Jeff Pappas, Yosemite national Park

Paper

Compromising Yellow stone: Politics and Science in national Park Policymaking Michael J. yochim, Yosemite national Park

Comment

charles Palmer, national Park Service

sAturdAy

8:30-10:00

occ 206

Beyond Battlefields & Homefronts: california and the civil War Chair

William f. deverell, University of Southern California

Paper

thomas Starr King and the Discourse of anti-racism glenna Matthews, independent Scholar

Paper

Sympathy for the Southern Cause in Southern California, 1860-1865 Henry H. goldman, longview Community College

Paper

Yankee lev iathan on the Pacific Coast: Business elites, federal engineers, and the rise of los angeles, 1861-1876 James tejani, California Polytechnic State University, San luis obispo

Comment

eileen Wallis, California Polytechnic State University, Pomona

sAturdAy

8:30-10:00

occ 207

A discussion of Mario t. garcía and sal castro’s Blowout! sal castro and the chicano struggle for educational Justice Chair Panelists

Pedro castillo, University of California, Santa Cruz Marc rodríguez, University of notre Dame Lorena Marquez, University of California, San Diego Karla Alonso, arizona State University James Patino, St. Cloud State University virginia espino, UCla oral History Project

respondents

sal castro, educator and activist Mario t. garcía, University of California, Santa Barbara

47


MODERN HISTORIES OF ANCIENT PLACES SESSIONS sAturdAy

10:30-noon

occ 201

the Power of Western grassroots Activism and Politics: Multiracial, transnational, and conservative Perspectives, 1960-1990 Chair

robert L. griswold, University of oklahoma

Paper

“it’s Your Coast!”: the Battle ov er the Control of the California and mexican Coastlines, 1960-1980 sara fingal, Brown University

Paper

making the “american Holocaust” and the new Dred Scott: race, genocide and Pro-life Politics in the four Corners States, 1973-1990 Jennifer Holland, University of Wisconsin, madison

Paper

mexican/latino grassroots leftist, and racial electoral Politics in los angeles, California, 1970-1980 Jose Moreno, michigan State University

Paper

“a new Battleground for Civ il rights”: the Desegregation of the Bakersfield City School District, 1969-1984 oliver A. rosales, University of California, Santa Barbara

Comment

Mark Brilliant, University of California, Berkeley

sAturdAy

10:30-noon

occ 202

negotiation of identities in Alternative communities: Hippies, Queers, and Lesbians in the u.s. West, 1950s-1970s Chair

suzzanne Kelley, minnesota State University, moorhead

Paper

r.C. gorman and the Queer Community of San francisco, California, 1959-1968 Jordan Biro, University of new mexico

Paper

a freer Human Being: finding feminism in lesbian’s Pursuit of identity, Partnership, and Community chelsea del rio, University of michigan

Paper

taos artists, Writers, and Hippies offer an alternativ e: freedom, rebirth, and the american West Brian King, University of new mexico

Comment

daniel Hurewitz, Hunter College, City University of new York

48


MODERN HISTORIES OF ANCIENT PLACES SESSIONS sAturdAy

10:30-noon

occ 203

the Business and culture of sport in the West Chair

Phoebe s. K. young, University of Colorado, Boulder

Paper

Paradise lost: the end of Prizefighting in Progressiv e era California Meg frisbee, new mexico State University

Paper

Commodifying the Wild: the emergence of an outfitting industry in idaho’s river of no return Backcountry Mark A. schreiter, Kodiak College, University of alaska, anchorage

Paper

african american Cow boys at the national finals rodeo roger d. Hardaway, northwestern oklahoma State University

Comment

Annie gilbert coleman, University of notre Dame

sAturdAy

10:30-noon

occ 204

creating and Policing the us-Mexico Border: Past and Present Chair

david Montejano, University of California, Berkeley

Paper

“mataron a todos”: ethnic tension, Violence, and opportunism in arizona’s early territorial Period Kendra Moore, northern arizona University

Paper

Disciplining Bodies in the Borderlands: Border enforcement and Human rights in California and arizona Heidy sarabia, University of California, Berkeley

Paper

“the third Border”: the Policing and Detention of immigrants in San Diego County and Central north Carolina Kathleen griesbach, University of California, San Diego

Comment

david Montejano, University of California, Berkeley

sAturdAy

10:30-noon

occ 205

roundtable: the state of the field: Western African American History Presidential session moderator Panelists

Albert s. Broussard, texas a & m University Matthew c. Whitaker, arizona State University Melissa stuckey, University of oregon Herbert g. ruffin ii, Syracuse University Albert s. Broussard, texas a & m University

49


MODERN HISTORIES OF ANCIENT PLACES SESSIONS sAturdAy

10:30-noon

occ 206

sources on Western Military Warfare and remembrance Chair

Linda reese, east Central University

Paper

the fort marion Sketchbooks: tow ards a new literary History of the West Birgit Brander rasmussen, Yale University

Paper

military records for non-military Historians: nav al intelligence reports as a Source for Western Social and Cultural History robert glass, the national archives at San francisco

Paper

memories of Progress and loss: the atomic Bomb in new mexico and Japan Alison fields, University of oklahoma

Comment

Michael f. Logan, oklahoma State University

sAturdAy

10:30-noon

occ 208

roundtable: the Legacy of Women and gender in Public History: new careers, voices, and Perspectives in Western History sponsored by the coalition for Western Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s History

Co-moderators Panelists

virginia scharff, University of new mexico Janet fireman, California History Mary Pavelsky, University of nevada, las Vegas Leslie Working, University of nebraska, lincoln and Center for Digital Studies in the Humanities Kristin Ahlberg, office of the Historian, Bureau of Public affairs, U.S. Department of State sonia dickey, lore of the land, inc. dorothea crosbie-taylor, oakland museum of California Leisl carr-childers, northern arizona University

50


MODERN HISTORIES OF ANCIENT PLACES SESSIONS sAturdAy

10:30-noon

occ 210/211

Monumental Memories Chair

Larry cebula, eastern Washington University

Paper

Controv ersy and Conformity in Pioneer monuments cynthia Prescott, University of north Dakota

Paper

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Dev otion to Her Dying Husband Caused Her ow n Deathâ&#x20AC;?: Portrayals of Women in the Campaign to Build the Pioneer/Donner monument, 1898-1918 Brenda d. frink, Stanford University

Paper

memorializing the little Bighorn: How Stories make the ground Sacred tim Lehman, rocky mountain College

Comment

Brian frehner, oklahoma State University

sAturdAy

10:30-noon

Junior BALLrooM 1

Wild Horses: symbols of a changing West Chair

tamsen Hert, University of Wyoming

Paper

Catching Wild Horses in the Sand Wash during the 1930s: the Horses, the men, and the Way it w as Done Paul Bonnifield, independent Historian

Paper

the Pryor mountain Wild Horse range: Symbol of the old and new american West christine reed, University of nebraska at omaha

Paper

Piloting the Herd: Wild Horse roundups from the Cockpit Andrea Mott, north Dakota State University

Comment

ron Mccoy, oklahoma State University

51


MODERN HISTORIES OF ANCIENT PLACES SESSIONS sAturdAy

2:00-3:30

occ 201

Building Modern Medicine: the development of Hospitals in california in the 19th and 20th centuries Chair

Jennifer Koslow, florida State University

Paper

modernizing the mission: financial Strategies for Charity Hospitals in late nineteenth-Century los angeles Kristine gunnell, Claremont mcKenna College

Paper

from Washington to the Wards: federal financing and the Dev elopment of Hospitals in California Jennifer vanore, University of Chicago

Paper

modern Structures, ancient afflictions: Building institutions for the mentally ill in California betw een 1900 and 1950 stephanie clayton, University of Southern California

Comment

Jennifer Koslow, florida State University

sAturdAy

2:00-3:30

occ 208

roundtable: interdisciplinary Approaches to indian captivity narratives sponsored by the Bibliographical society of America moderator Panelists

Comment

sAturdAy

John n. Hoover, St. louis mercantile library, University of missouri, St. louis Kathryn Zabelle derounian-stodola, University of arkansas, little rock carrie r. Zeman, independent Scholar christina snyder, indiana University, Bloomington Julie dunn-Morton, St. louis mercantile library, University of missouri, St. louis Katherine Lerwick, independent Scholar

2:00-3:30

occ 210/211

the diseased West: Plagues and Progressives on the Pacific coast Chair

Beverly Beeton, independent Scholar

Paper

american indians, tuberculosis, and reformers: fighting the â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;White Plagueâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; 1882-1942 elizabeth James, University of alaska, anchorage

Paper

the 1918 flu epidemic in alaska: great Death, great Silence, great Drugs & Vaccine sarah Barton, riSe alaska and Beverly Beeton, independent Scholar

Paper

a tale of tw o (Plague-infested) Cities: San francisco and los angeles respond to the Plague in the early tw entieth Century susanne teepe gaskins, California State University, fullerton

Comment

nancy J. taniguichi, California State University, Stanislaus

52


MODERN HISTORIES OF ANCIENT PLACES SESSIONS sAturdAy

2:00-3:30

occ 202

WAML: the urban West: cartographic representation Presenters

Japantow n atlas Ben Pease, Cartographer Urban Denv er: transformation and the Beginnings of Suburbanization sam clevenger, University of Wyoming

sAturdAy

2:00-3:30

occ 203

overlooked Migrations and unfamiliar struggles: African Americans, race, and civil rights in the twentieth-century West Chair

Lorn foster, Pomona College

Paper

migration and the Question of Blackness in interw ar Houston tyina L. steptoe, University of Washington

Paper

it may Hav e Been Hidden But it Was Here: the Civ il rights Struggle in Spokane dwayne A. Mack, Berea College

Paper

the Campaign to Sav e Sugar Hill: african american opposition to the olympic freew ay Kevin Allen Leonard, Western Washington University

Comment

Lorn foster, Pomona College

sAturdAy

2:00-3:30

occ 204

roundtable: do Historians Matter?: Perspectives on Arizona in 2010 sponsored by the committee on race in the American West

Chair Panelists

Katherine Benton-cohen, georgetown University Karen Leong, arizona State University david r. Ay贸n, loyola marymount University Lydia otero, University of arizona gerald cadava, northwestern University

53


MODERN HISTORIES OF ANCIENT PLACES SESSIONS sAturdAy

2:00-3:30

occ 205

roundtable: Public History Programs in the West: training the next generation of Public Historians moderator Panelists

sAturdAy

Bill Bryans, oklahoma State University Andy Kirk, University of nevada, las Vegas catherine Moore, Cultural resource Program manager, national Parks Conservation association Janet ore, Colorado State University charles c. Palmer, national Park Service, Pacific West region Marsha Weisiger, University of oregon

2:00

PM-3:30 PM

occ 206

Mixed and transnational families in the Borderlands: A Workshop a note on format: this is a workshop intended to discuss works in progress. the papers will be circulated before the conference and will not be read in the session. to sign up and receive copies of the manuscripts, please send an email to whaworkshop@gmail.com. Presenter: Comment:

Allison gorsuch, Yale University charlene Lynn Porsild, University of new mexico

Presenter: Comment:

verónica castillo-Muñoz, University of California, Santa Barbara eric Meeks, northern arizona University

Presenter: Comment:

Juliette Maiorana, University of California, San Diego Julia María schiavone camacho, University of texas, el Paso

Presenter: Comment:

selfa crew, University of texas, el Paso rudy guevarra, arizona State University

54


MODERN HISTORIES OF ANCIENT PLACES SESSIONS sAturdAy

2:00-3:30

occ 207

Building tranquility Base on the Moon: foundations in the Western united states sponsored by Westerners international

moderators Speaker

sAturdAy

Melvena Heisch, oklahoma Historical Society don reeves, national Cowboy and Western Heritage museum Lisa Westwood, rPa, eCorP Consulting, inc.

2:00-3:30

Junior BALLrooM 1

roundtable: Women and the WHA at fifty years moderator Panelists

Comment

sAturdAy

elaine Marie nelson, University of minnesota, morris Janet fireman, California History sue Armitage, Washington State University, emerita Bárbara o. reyes, University of new mexico renee Laegreid, Hastings College Melody Miyamoto, Collin County Community College, texas Audience

4:00-5:30

occ 202

ethnic and Labor Activism and Post-War Politics in the West Chair

ron Briley, Sandia Preparatory academy

Paper

the merits of Unity: mexican-american leadership and Politics in texas, 1948-1960 Joseph orbock Medina, University of California, Berkeley

Paper

the Break of the Progressiv e fulcrum: Democrats, Political economy, and the United farm Workers’ mov ement todd Holmes, Yale University

Comment

raúl ramos, University of Houston

55


MODERN HISTORIES OF ANCIENT PLACES SESSIONS sAturdAy

4:00-5:30

occ 203

roundtable: teaching the state and Provincial History courses in the north American West moderator Panelists

sAturdAy

sterling evans, University of oklahoma Michael Magliari, California State University-Chico teaching California History Linda english, University of texas-Pan american teaching texas History derek everett, metropolitan State College of Denver teaching Colorado History Lori Lahlum, minnesota State University, mankato teaching State History in the northern Plains: north Dakota and minnesota Jonathan swainger, University of northern British Columbia teaching Provincial History in Western Canada: British Columbia

4:00-5:30

occ 204

American Memory, Myth-making, and display in the West Chair

Ken owens, California State University, Sacramento

Paper

they Shed their Blood for Civ ilization: military Cemeteries and the memory of the indian Wars in the american West david W. grua, texas Christian University

Paper

rediscov ering the maximilian-Bodmer Collection, 1948-1963 robert Lee, University of California, Berkeley

Paper

angel island remembered: Place and memory on the San francisco Bay Haley Michaels Pollack, University of Wisconsin, madison

Comment

Ken owens, California State University, Sacramento

56


MODERN HISTORIES OF ANCIENT PLACES SESSIONS sAturdAy

4:00-5:30

occ 210/211

digital frontiers: A digital History Workshop are you curious about how the new model digital scholarship promises to impact your research methods and scholarly communication practices? Would you like to find out what is out there on the web for western historians? Do you teach western history with digital media, or do you just want to find out what are people doing in those "smart" classrooms? Do you work in a museum, archive or public agency and have questions about the open-source or free tools to create digital archives, web-based exhibits of digital content, "web 2.0" ways to involve the public? this digital history workshop is an opportunity for those in our membership interested in the increasingly significant role that technology plays in research, teaching, and public history, to gather virtually and in person, to discuss digital frontiers before, during, and after the conference. all are welcome–from the digital guru to the techno-novice–to come together and ask questions, share ideas and join in conversations online prior to the conference. We invite potential workshop participants to use the blog, "Digital frontiers" - whadigitalfrontiers.wordpress.com - to share their interests and favorite resources before we meet in person to hear some brief presentations, ask questions about resources, tools, and best practices, and take away some exciting ideas to ponder while we develop a lively western digital history community. all conference-goers are welcome to drop in and sit in on any part of the session.

facilitator:

sAturdAy

douglas seefeldt, University of nebraska, lincoln

4:00-5:30

occ 208

the Local Politics of Boundary-Making Chair

Alan taylor, University of California, Davis

Paper

the Usefulness of Boundaries in the Post-revolutionary West rob Harper, University of Wisconsin, Stevens Point

Paper

“after you have gone”: omaha indians’ Boundary negotiations in the midnineteenth Century rebekah Mergenthal, Pacific lutheran University

Paper

“Chinese Crossing the line:” immigration Control along the U.S.-Canadian Border in the Pacific northwest Beth Lew-Williams, Stanford University

Comment

Alan taylor, University of California, Davis

57


MODERN HISTORIES OF ANCIENT PLACES SESSIONS sAturdAy

4:00-5:30

occ 205

idaho and race Chair

Kevin Leonard, Western Washington University

Paper

Creating idaho: nativ e Boundaries and reserv ation Politics Laura Woodworth-ney, idaho State University

Paper

Confronting racial Discrimination: mexicans and other latinos in idaho’s History errol Jones, Boise State University

Paper

idaho’s aryan education: martin luther King Jr. Day and racial Politics Jill gill, Boise State University

Comment

Kevin Leonard, Western Washington University

sAturdAy

4:00-5:30

occ 206

roundtable: Whither Western History 2011: new directions for the study of the American West

sponsored by the committee on race in the American West moderator Panelists

sAturdAy

Maria Montoya, new York University Mae M. ngai, Columbia University Moon-Ho Jung, University of Washington tiya Miles, University of michigan Michael Witgen, University of michigan

4:00-5:30

occ 207

fascinated by relics and ruins: encounters with American Antiquities Chair

Anne Hyde, Colorado College

Paper

“the 3 stone axes w ere from Canyon del muerto”: Horatio nelson rust and th the Public experience w ith american antiquities in the late 19 Century James snead, george mason University

Paper

frontier ghosts: ruins, relics, and lost Worlds in the trans-appalachian West samuel truett, University of new mexico

Paper

the Destruction of “Big mound”: memory, Civ ic Culture, and the indigenous Past in nineteenth-Century St. louis Patricia cleary, California State University, long Beach

Comment

Kit Hinsley, northern arizona University

58


MODERN HISTORIES OF ANCIENT PLACES SESSIONS sAturdAy

4:00-5:30

Junior BALLrooM 1

red Power at Home and Abroad Chair

rebecca Bales, California State University, monterey Bay

Paper

“the ground You Walk on Belong to my People”: the emergence of red Pow er in a Western nebraska lakota Community, 1950-1975” david christensen, University of nevada, las Vegas

Paper

the impacts of the north american Pan-indian mov ement on the right to Self Determination: a Comprehensiv e Study of the mov ement in the international Political arena, 1970-1985 susana geliga, University of South Dakota

Paper

Wounded Knee and Wind riv er reserv ation Youth: ancient animosity in a modern Context Brandi Hilton-Hagemann, University of oklahoma

Comment

Bradley g. shreve, Diné College

sundAy

8:30-10:00

occ 208

roundtable: national Parks and Public History moderator Panelists

sundAy

Jeff Pappas, national Park Service and Colorado State University nancy dallett, arizona State University Linnéa caproni, arizona State University Billie Kiser, arizona State University Leah Harrison, arizona State University

8:30-10:00

occ 201

Pedagogy and the African American experience in the American West Chair

Herbert West, Stevenson University

Paper

on teaching the History of african american Philosophers: forrest o. Wiggins, academic racism, and the Univ ersity of minnesota John H. Mcclendon iii, michigan State University

Paper

teaching about Psychology and race in City College of San francisco terry day, City College of San francisco

Paper

Western law , law of the american West, and the african american experience Malik simba, California State University, fresno

Comment

t. Hasan Johnson, California State University, fresno

59


MODERN HISTORIES OF ANCIENT PLACES SESSIONS sundAy

8:30-10:00

occ 210/211

sex, race and Migration in the u.s. West

sponsored by the committee on race and the American West Chair

clare sears, San francisco State University

Paper

Cashing in: Sex, race and tourism in San francisco nan Alamilla Boyd, San francisco State University

Paper

West of Sex: mexicans and the american legal System in the early tw entieth Century Pablo Mitchell, oberlin College

Paper

Stranger intimacy and rethinking the alien land law nayan shah, University of California, San Diego

Comment

Judy tzu-chun Wu, the ohio State University

sundAy

8:30-10:00

occ 202

transnational culture and Labor in the u.s.-Mexican Borderlands Chair

dominique Brégeant-Heald, memorial University of newfoundland

Paper

Charros in oklahoma: the feats of ‘mexican Joe’ Barrera gary Moreno, University of oklahoma

Paper

iow a on the Border: midw estern Colonists and the Case for internal Colonialism in South texas tim Bowman, Southern methodist University

Paper

Pecan Shelling and its Discontents: migrant industrialization in Depressionera San antonio John Weber, old Dominion University

Comment

dominique Brégeant-Heald, memorial University of newfoundland

60


MODERN HISTORIES OF ANCIENT PLACES SESSIONS sundAy

8:30-10:00

occ 203

Americaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s forgotten Wests Chair

stephen Aron, University of California, los angeles and Director for the Study of the american West, autry national Center

Paper

Subv erting Settlement: the Confounding Case of the northern great lakes susan e. gray, arizona State University

Paper

the Significance of the (Southern) frontier in american History thomas chase Hagood, University of georgia

Paper

Haunting Barrow s: Unknow n Wests in the mind and fields of thomas Jefferson charles Allen Wallace, the College of William & mary

Comment

stephen Aron, University of California, los angeles and Director for the Study of the american West, autry national Center

sundAy

8:30-10:00

occ 204

roundtable: teaching california History: Many People, Many Perspectives moderator Panelists

sundAy

gordon Bakken, California State University, fullerton richard A. garcia, California State University, east Bay rebecca Bales, California State University, monterey Bay John Klein, California State University, monterey Bay steven Hackel, University of California, riverside gerald shenk, California State University, monterey Bay

8:30-10:00

occ 205

Western Historians and Western Heroes in changing times Chair

Michel Hogue, Carleton University

Paper

remembering and Dismembering Daniel Boone: theodore roosev eltâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s mythology for the modern nation Kevin shupe, george mason University

Paper

Bury my Hero at Wounded Knee: gender, race, and Historical Practice in the long 1970s susan Lee Johnson, University of Wisconsin, madison

Comment

Hilary Hallett, Columbia University

61


MODERN HISTORIES OF ANCIENT PLACES SESSIONS sundAy

8:30-10:00

occ 206

Mormon Women, Marriage and identity across generations Chair

rachel cope, Brigham Young University

Paper

“a White-Slav e factory?”: mormon Women and Polygamy in 1887 and 1953 natalie rose, michigan State University

Paper

god, Polygamy, and Woman Suffrage in nineteenth-Century Utah chris talbot, University of northern Colorado

Comment

rachel cope, Brigham Young University

sundAy

8:30-10:00

occ 207

roundtable: (re?)shaping Western History: synthesis and new Paradigms moderator Panelists

sundAy

sarah J. deutsch, Duke University Anne Hyde, Colorado College elliott West, University of arkansas sarah J. deutsch, Duke University John M. findlay, University of Washington

10:30-noon

occ 201

Ballots and Beyond: three oregon suffragists Help Pave the Way to Woman's full citizenship Chair

Karen J. Blair, Central Washington University

Paper

‘making Civ ilized Woman What She Should Be’: frances fuller Victor analyzes ‘the Woman Question’ in oregon sheri Bartlett Browne, tennessee State University

Paper

“not a Bundle of Dry goods and millinery”: Dr. Bethenia ow ens-adair and Her Quest for Women’s rights Jean M. Ward, lewis & Clark College

Paper

Votes for Women and Civ ic Health: esther Pohl lov ejoy, Suffrage, and female Citizenship in oregon Kimberly Jensen, Western oregon University

Comment

Karen J. Blair, Central Washington University

62


MODERN HISTORIES OF ANCIENT PLACES SESSIONS sundAy

10:30-noon

occ 202

indian territory’s civil Wars Chair

Kristen tegtmeier oertel, University of tulsa

Paper

Civ il Wars in the Cherokee nation tash smith, Cameron University

Paper

Div ided loyalties and the reification of race during opothleyahola’s exodus from indian territory, Winter 1861-1862 Adla earl, University of nevada, las Vegas

Paper

Prelude to the Peace Policy: repressed alternativ es and the 1865 fort Smith Council c. Joseph genetin-Pilawa, illinois College

Comment

Kristen tegtmeier oertel, University of tulsa

sundAy

10:30-noon

occ 203

on the Margins: refugees, immigrants, and Poverty in the twentieth century West Chair

Patrick ettinger, California State University, Sacramento

Paper

aiding mormon refugees fleeing the mexican rev olution thomas A. Krainz, DePaul University

Paper

immigrants v s. the Ku Klux Klan in the intermountain West Phyllis cancilla Martinelli, St. mary’s College of California

Paper

Consumers of Blight: the meaning of Pov erty in Postw ar San José Aaron cavin, University of michigan

Comment

Patrick ettinger, California State University, Sacramento

63


MODERN HISTORIES OF ANCIENT PLACES SESSIONS sundAy

10:30-noon

occ 204

race and Place: indigenous, Japanese, and Mexican racialization at three geographic/symbolic Boundaries Chair

cynthia Bejarano, new mexico State University

Paper

intermediaries Betw een Japan and the United States: Japanese american reracialization in Postw ar San francisco Meredith oda, University of Chicago

Paper

Urban Politics: eminent Domain and the Case of lincoln Park, el Paso, texas Miguel Juárez, University of texas, el Paso

Paper

reconfigured identifies and env ironments: the impact of the U.S.-Canada Boundary on the arrow lakes People, 1890-1956 Andrea geiger, Simon fraser University

Comment

Lisabeth Haas, University of California, Santa Cruz

sundAy

10:30-noon

occ 205

Western environments, imperial Landscapes Chair

david igler, University of California, irvine

Paper

an imperfect garden: the U.S. exploring expedition in Haw ai’i and the Creation of a Climatic Borderland Lawrence Kessler, temple University

Paper

the Walrus, the fox, and the Desert: City, region, and empire in los angeles and mexico, 1898-1944 Jessica Kim, University of Southern California

Paper

apostles of aridity: Hydraulic engineers in California and abroad eric steiger, University of California, irvine

Comment

Jared orsi, Colorado State University, fort Collins

sundAy

10:30-noon

Junior BALLrooM 1

roundtable: surveillance and confinement in the American West sponsored by the committee on race in the American West

moderator Panelists

Bárbara reyes, rutgers Center for Historical analysis Alan eladio gómez, arizona State University Monica Perales, University of Houston diane c. fujino, University of California, Santa Barbara

64


MODERN HISTORIES OF ANCIENT PLACES SESSIONS sundAy

10:30-noon

occ 206

natives in the Process of colonization: Auxiliary troops or conquerors? Chair

Jesús Méndez reyes, Universidad autónoma de Baja California, tijuana, Baja California

Paper

Conflicts and alliances Betw een Jesuits and indians in Baja California Lucila León velazco, Historical research institute, Universidad autónoma de Baja California

Paper

the iroquois role as British allies estela Báez-villaseñor, Universidad autónoma metropolitana-iztapalapa

Paper

aleut Contribution in the russian expansion into alaska Martha ortega, Universidad autónoma metropolitana-iztapalapa

Paper

the tlaxcalans as auxiliary troops in the Conquest of northern new Spain danna Levin rojo, Universidad autónoma metropolitana-azcapotzalco

Comment

Jesús Méndez reyes, Universidad autónoma de Baja California, tijuana, Baja California

sundAy

10:30-noon

occ 207

underexplored dimensions of grassroots civil rights Politics in california Chair

robert Bauman, Washington State University tri-Cities

Paper

los angeles’s War on Pov erty and mexican american’s Struggle for recognition during the age of african american Civ il rights casey d. nichols, Stanford University

Paper

the los angeles goals Program: Participatory Urban Planning and metropolitan inequality, 1964-1984 caitlin Parker, University of California, los angeles

Paper

Comment

a Precarious grassroots “rights rev olution”: Bounding interior immigration enforcement in metropolitan inequality, 1971-1996 Kelly Kelleher richter, Stanford University robert Bauman, Washington State University tri-Cities

65


INDEX OF EXHIBITORS academy of american franciscan History. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 association Book exhibit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 University of arizona Press . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 athabasca University Press . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 University of California Press . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Coalition for Western Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s History . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48 University Press of Colorado . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 fur trade Press . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49 gale/Cengage learning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45 Harlan Davidson, inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 Harvard University Press . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 Heyday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 University Press of Kansas. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 montana Historical Society Press/ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47 montana the magazine of Western History University of nebraska Press . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57-58 University of nevada Press . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 University of new mexico Press . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26-27 University of north Carolina Press . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 University of oklahoma Press . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . a oxford University Press. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44 South Dakota State Historical Society Press . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 William P. Clement Center for Southwest Studies, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Southern methodist University tesoro Cultural Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49 texas tech University Press . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-4 University of Utah Press . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37 University of Washington Press . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Western History association . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56 Yale University Press . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17

66


EXHIBIT HALL MAP

67


INDEX OF ADVERTISERS University of arizona Press . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91 the arthur H. Clark Co. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86 Bedford/St. martins Press. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69 University of California Press. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76-77 University Press of Colorado . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79 Harlan Davidson, inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . inside front cover Harvard University Press . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72 University Press of Kansas. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92 montana Historical Society Press. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70-71 University of nebraska Press. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73 University of nevada Press . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90 University of north Carolina Press . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78 University of oklahoma Press. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88-89, outside back cover William P. Clement Center for Southwest Studies, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80 Southern methodist University University of texas Press . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84 texas tech University Press . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74-75 University of Utah Press . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81 Utah State University Press . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83 University of Washington Press . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82 Western Historical Quarterly . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87 Yale University Press . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85

68


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Designed for understanding Understanding the American Promise A Brief History James L. Roark, Emory University Michael P. Johnson, Johns Hopkins University Patricia Cline Cohen, University of California, Santa Barbara

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In response to the ever-changing challenges of teaching the survey course, Understanding the American Promise combines a newly abridged narrative with an innovative chapter architecture to focus students’ attention on what’s truly significant. Each chapter is fully designed to guide students’ comprehension and foster their development of historical skills. Brief and affordable but still balanced in its coverage, this new textbook combines distinctive study aids, a bold new design, and lively art to give your students a clear pathway to what’s important.

A new interpretation for a new generation America’s History Seventh Edition James A. Henretta, University of Maryland Rebecca Edwards, Vassar College Robert O. Self, Brown University Also available in Budget Books loose-leaf editions.

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Celebrating 60 Years!

Monttana T The he Maggazine azine of Western esstern Historryy is now available on JSTOR! 70


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The Great Heart of the Republic St. Louis and the Cultural Civil War A DAM A RENSON $35.00

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$35.00 $26.25 paperback

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79


The William P. Clements Center for Southwest Studies Southern Methodist University, Dallas, TX welcomes its new director!

Andrew R. Graybill, professor, scholar and friend Since 1996 the Clements Center has provided opportunities to promote and deepen scholarship on the American Southwest and the U.S.-Mexico borderlands.

The Center’s Research Fellowships offer the “gift of time” to complete manuscripts.

And each year a Clements Center symposium, organized with a partner institution, asks a “big question,” then the scholars’ papers become a book of essays for course adoption. The annual book prize celebrates fine writing and original research. Guest scholar travel research grants make available the riches of the DeGolyer Library. Please visit our WHA booth #12 and our website for more opportunities and information. www.smu.edu/swcenter

SMU 80


New Western Titles from The University of Utah Press The Glen Canyon Country The Bitterroot and Mr. Brandborg Clearcutting and the Struggle for Sustainable Forestry in the Northern Rockies Frederick H. Swanson Inaugural Winner of the Wallace Stegner Prize in Environmental or Western American History 416 pp., 6 x 9, 65 photos, 6 illus. and maps Cloth $39.95 Forced to Abandon Our Fields The 1914 Clay Southworth Gila River Pima Interviews David H. DeJong Finalist for the 2010 Wallace Stegner Prize in Environmental or Western American History 192 pp., 6 x 9, 8 photos, 3 maps Paper $34.95 Two Toms Lessons from a Shoshone Doctor Thomas H. Johnson and Helen S. Johnson 104 pp., 6 x 9, 8 photos, 1 map Paper $15.95 Troubled Trails The Meeker Affair and the Expulsion of Utes from Colorado Robert Silbernagel Foreword by Floyd A. O’Neil 250 pp., 6 x 9, 24 photos, 6 maps Paper $24.95 As If the Land Owned Us An Ethnohistory of the White Mesa Utes Robert S. McPherson 448 pp., 8 x 11, 100 photos, 7 maps Paper $29.95

A Personal Memoir Don D. Fowler Foreword by W. L. “Bud” Rusho 448 pp., 8 x 10, 110 photos, 3 maps Cloth $75.00 / Paper $39.95

Traces of Fremont Society and Rock Art in Ancient Utah Text by Steven R. Simms; Photographs by François Gohier 144 pp., 9 x 10, 122 color photos Paper $24.95

Tony Hillerman’s Navajoland Hideouts, Haunts, and Havens in the Joe Leaphorn and Jim Chee Mysteries Expanded Third Edition Laurance D. Linford 360 pp., 6 x 9, 65 b/w photos Paper $21.95

Opening Zion A Scrapbook of the National Park’s First Official Tourists John Clark and Melissa Clark 112 pp., 8 x 12, 160 b/w photos Paper $19.95

Ghosts of Glen Canyon History Beneath Lake Powell Revised Edition C. Gregory Crampton Foreword by Edward Abbey 176 pp., 8 1⁄2 x 10, 263 b/w photos, 14 color photos, 55 maps Paper $29.95

BAC K IN P RIN T Juanita Brooks The Life Story of a Courageous Historian of the Mountain Meadows Massacre Levi S. Peterson 516 pp., 21 photos Paper $24.95

Back to the Soil The Jewish Farmers of Clarion, Utah, and Their World Robert Alan Goldberg 224 pp., 17 photos, 6 maps Paper $19.95

Glory Hunter A Biography of Patrick Edward Connor Brigham D. Madsen 328 pp., 21 photos, 4 maps Paper $21.95

www.UofUpress.com Orders: 800-621-2736 81


UNI V ERSIT Y of WA SHINGTON PRE SS

A to m i c F r o nt i e r D a y s

S e e k i ng R e f ug e

Hanford and the Amer ican W Weest

Birds and Landscapes o off the Pacific F ly way

j o h n m . f i n d l a y a n d b r u c e h e v ly

rob e r t m . w i l s o n

e m i l a n d k at h l e e n s i c k s e r i e s i n

w e y e r h a e u s e r env i r o n m e n t a l b o o ks

w e s t er n his tor y a nd biogr a ph y

Tipi

B e f o r e S e at t l e R o c k e d

Her itage of of the Great Plains

A C i t y a n d It s M u s ic

e d i t e d by na a nc y b. rosoff

k u r t e. ar m b r u s t e r

a nd sus a n k e nne dy ze l l e r

D a rk R o s e

Voyages

Organi zed Cr ime and Cor r upt ion in Portland

To the New W Wo orld and Be yond

rob e r t c. d o n n e l l y

gordon mil l e r

E xplor i ng For t Va ncouver

Wi n n i ng t he West for Women

e d i t e d by d o u g l a s c . w i l s o n

T he Life o off Suff rag ist Emma Smith DeVoe

a n d t h e r e s a e. l a n g f o r d

j e n n i f e r m . r o s s - na z z a l

pub l i s h e d w i t h f o r t v a n c o u v e r n a t i o n a l t r u s t

w e y e r h a e u s e r e n v i r o n m e n t a l b o o ks s

O p e n Sp a c e s

New in Paperback

Voices ffrrom the No N o r t h we s t edit ed by penn y h a rrison

P u r ple F lat Top

D r e a m i ng o f S h e e p i n N a v a j o C o u nt r y

In P u r s u i t o off a Place

m ar sh a l . weisiger

jack nisbe t

T he Fisher men’s Front ier Seat t le i n Black a nd W h ite

People and Salmon in Southeast Alaska

T he Cong ress o off Racial Equalit y and the Fight fo for Equal O Op pp or t u n it y

d a v i d f. a r n o l d

S h a p i ng t h e S h o r e l i n e

joa n single r , je a n durning, b e t t y l o u v a l e n t i n e , a n d m a i d a d a ms

Fisher ies and To Tour ism on the Montere y Coast

v e t h e l w i l l i s w h i t e b o o ks

c o n n i e y. ch i a n g

S e e the s e and othe r b o ok s at b o o th # 1 5

w w w.w a shing ton.e du/u w p r e ss

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1 . 8 0 0 . 4 41 . 4115


83


new from texas

Engaged Resistance American Indian Art, Literature, and Film from Alcatraz to the NMAI by dean rader Profusely illustrated with more than one hundred images, this is the first book that focuses on how Native Americans have used artistic expression to both engage with and resist Anglo culture while asserting deeply held ethical values. The William and Bettye Nowlin Series in Art, History, and Culture of the Western Hemisphere

147 color and b&w illustrations $27.95 paperback • $60.00 hardcover

We Were Not Orphans

Don’t Make Me Go to Town

Stories from the Waco State Home by s herry matt he w s f oreword by robe rt d rap e r In these amazing stories, Texans who spent their youth in an institution for “dependent and neglected” children reveal both the positive outcomes and the horrific abuses that resulted when a governmentrun “home” was allowed to operate for decades without any public oversight.

Ranchwomen of the Texas Hill Country by r h on d a l a s h l ey lop ez Beautifully illustrated with rich black-andwhite photographs of ranchwomen at work, Don’t Make Me Go to Town is a remarkable record of women of strength and determination who are striving to preserve an increasingly rare way of life.

Jack and Doris Smothers Series in Texas History, Life, and Culture

The M. K. Brown Range Life Series

67 b&w photos • $34.95 hardcover

84 b&w photos • $29.95 hardcover

Read more about these books online.

university of texas press 800.252.3206 | www.utexaspress.com

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N EW

BOOKS FROM

Y ALE

Visit our booth #17

New Books in The Lamar Series in Western History SUBVERTING EXCLUSION WILLLIAM CLARK’S WORLD Transpacific Encounters with Race, Caste, and Borders, 1885-1928 Andrea Geiger

Describing America in an Age of Unknowns Peter J. Kastor

The only English-language book on the subject examines the history of immigrants descended from Japan’s outcaste communities in the North American West during the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries and their encounters with two separate cultures of exclusion. 304 pp., 18 b/w illus. $45.00

THE JEFFERSONS AT SHADWELL Susan Kern An original study of Shadwell, Thomas Jefferson’s boyhood home, providing new insights into the founding father’s formative years. 384 pp., 56 b/w illus. $30.00

Focusing on maps, surveys, journals and other objects William Clark created to help describe America’s West for those who had not yet seen it, this book casts new light on how the West took shape in the national imagination. 360 pp., 41 b/w illus. $45.00

HELL ON THE RANGE A Story of Honor, Conscience, and the American West Daniel J. Herman In this lively account of Arizona’s Rim Country War of the 1880s, the author uncovers surprising truths about the complex interplay of honor and conscience, violence and identity, in the history of the American West. 400 pp., 40 b/w illus. $45.00

Books for Western History Courses from The Lamar Series in Western History

FRONTIERS

EMERALD CITY

A Short History of the American West Robert V. Hine and John Mack Faragher

An Environmental History of Seattle Matthew Klingle

THE AMERICAN WEST

THE COMANCHE EMPIRE

A New Interpretive History Robert V. Hine and John Mack Faragher

Pekka Hämäläinen

FUGITIVE LANDSCAPES

Indian Raids and the U.S.-Mexican War Brian DeLay

WAR OF A THOUSAND DESERTS

The Forgotten History of the U.S.-Mexico Borderlands Samuel Truett

MAKING INDIAN LAW The Hualapai Land Case and the Birth of Ethnohistory Christian W. McMillen

THE SPANISH FRONTIER IN NORTH AMERICA The Brief Edition David J. Weber

FURS AND FRONTIERS IN THE FAR NORTH The Contest among Native and Foreign Nations for the Bering Strait Fur Trade John R. Bockstoce

BÁRBAROS Spaniards and Their Savages in the Age of Enlightenment David J. Weber

VICIOUS Wolves and Men in America Jon T. Coleman

Yale university press 85

YaleBooks.com


NEW ENGLAND TO GOLD RUSH CALIFORNIA The Journal of Alfred and Chastina W. Rix, 1849–1854 Edited with commentary by Lynn A. Bonfield $45.00 CLOTH · 356 PAGES

GREAT SIOUX WAR ORDERS OF BATTLE How the United States Army Waged War on the Northern Plains, 1876–1877 By Paul L. Hedren $39.95 CLOTH · 240 PAGES $150.00 LEATHER · 240 PAGES

VALENTINE T. MCGILLYCUDDY Army Surgeon, Agent to the Sioux By Candy Moulton $34.95 CLOTH · 296 PAGES

WITH ANZA TO CALIFORNIA, 1775–1776 The Journal of Pedro Font, O.F.M. Translated and edited by Alan K. Brown $55.00 CLOTH · 472 PAGES

THE ARTHUR H. CLARK CO. 2800 VENTURE DRIVE · NORMAN, OK 73069 · AHCLARK.COM An Imprint of the University of Oklahoma Press

86


Graduate Student Fellowships at the Western Historical Quarterly

Robert

M.

Utley

EDITORIAL FELLOWSHIP

For 2012–2013, a total stipend of $14,000, an out-of-state tuition waiver, health insurance, and summer research funds will be awarded.

t

he Fellow must enroll in Utah State University’s master’s program in history. Duties at the Western Historical Quarterly (WHQ) include 20 hours a week, beginning in August, helping to select, prepare, and copyedit manuscripts. The fellowship may be retained for a second year, depending upon satisfactory progress toward a master’s degree and acceptable completion of editorial assignments. During the summer of 2013, the editorial fellow will work 20 hours a week at the WHQ, with time off for research. Applicants should send a letter of interest and a writing sample directly to the editor of the WHQ. The full application, including three letters of recommendation to the USU School of Graduate Studies will suffice to complete the needed materials. All documents should be postmarked no later than 1 February 2012. Applicants will be notified in early April. NOTE: The S. George Ellsworth Fellowship and the Robert M. Utley Fellowship, are awarded in alternating years. Funding for WHQ fellowships is provided by:

Western Historical Quarterly USU School of Graduate Studies • USU Department of History • USU College of Humanities and Social Sciences • Mountain West Center for Regional Studies • Robert M. Utley Endowment • S. George Ellsworth Endowment • •

Correspondence:

Editor Western Historical Quarterly 0740 Old Main Hill Utah State University, Logan UT 84322-0740 whq@usu.edu www.usu.edu/whq

87


Congratulations Congr atulations to the late JACK EWERS, author, and his hi daughterr, JANE EWERS R ROBINSON, OBINSON, editor, of PLAINS INDIAN AR RT T: THE PIONEERING W WORK ORK OF JOHN C. E EW WERS for winning the ANGIE A DEBO BIENNIAL PRIZE of $3,000 0 ffor or the most distinguished book bo on the American Southwest outhwest published by the University of Oklahoma Press

RAINBOW

BRID G E TO

MONUMENT

VA L L E Y MAKING THE MODERN OLD WEST T H O M A S

J .

H A R V E Y

RAINBO RA OW BRIDGE TO MONUMENT V VALLEY ALLEY Making the Modern Old West By Thomas G. Har Harvey vey

WINDF FALL

A AFTER CUSTER

Wind Energy in America T Toda oday Robert W. W. Righter Righter By Robert

L Loss and Transfformation in Sioux Country By Paul L. Hedr en Hedren

$19.95 PAPER 路 232 PAGES

$34.95 CLOTH 路 304 PAGES

$24.95 CLOTH 路 272 PAGES

UNIVERSIT Y OF OKLAHOMA KLAHOMA PRESS 88


PLAINS INDIAN NDIAN ART

Plains Indian Art The Pioneering Work of John C. Ewers

The he Pioneering Work of John C. Ewers Edited Edit ed by Jane Ewers Ewers Robinson Preface Greene eene Pr efface by Candace S. Gr Maurer Introduction by Evan M. Maur er $39.95 CLOTH, 224 PAGES ILL S. 41 COLOR AND 99 B&W ILLU

Edited by Jane Ewers Robinson Preface by Candace S. Greene Introduction by Evan M. Maurer

For almost three-quarters of a centur y, the study of Plains lains Indian art has been shaped by the expertise, wisdom, and inspired leadership of John Canfield Ewers (1909– 1997). This his vividly illustrated collection of Ewers’s writings traces the histor y of the pictorial art of Plains peoples from images on rock surfaces ac to works on the walls of modern museums.

NED W WY YNKOOP AND THE LONELLY R RO OAD FR ROM OM SAND CREEK

THE NOR T RTHERN CHEYENNE EXODUS IN HISTOR RY AND MEMOR RY

By Louis Kr Kraft afft

By James N. Leiker and Ramon Powers Powers

The National Indian Y Youth outh Council and the Origins of Native Activism Bradley By Br adley G. Shreve Shreve

$34.95 CLOTH · 272 PAGES

$34.95 CLOTH · 272 PAGES

$34.95 CLOTH · 336 PAGES

RED ED POWER RISING

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89


University of Nevada Press w w w. u n p r e s s . n e v a d a . e d u

City Dreams, Country Schemes: Community and Identity in the American West

800.621.2736

Cave Rock: Climbers, Courts, and a Washoe Indian Sacred Place matthew s. makley and michael j. makley paper | $24.95

edited by

kathleen a. brosnan and amy l. scott paper | $39.95

The River and the Railroad: An Archaeological History of Reno mary ringhoff and edward j. stoner cloth | $34.95

A Short History of Carson City richard moreno paper | $21.95

30%

conference discount

90

Cities and Nature in the American West edited by

char miller paper | $34.95

A Short History of Lake Tahoe michael j. makley paper | $21.95


The T he B Big ig E Empty mpty The Great Plains in the Twentieth Century R. DOUGLAS HURT 352 pp. / $65.00 library cloth / $24.95 paper

Nature’s N ature’s N Northwest ortthwest The North Pacific Slope in the Twentieth Century WILLIAM G. ROBBINS and KATRINE BARBER 312 pp. / $55.00 cloth / $24.95 paper

S Smugglers, mugglers, B Brothels, rothels, aand nd T Twine wine Historical Perspectives on Contraband and Vice in North America’s Borderlands Edited by ELAINE CAREY and ANDRAE M. MARAK 240 pp. / $55.00 cloth

T Twelve welve H Hundred undred M Miles iles b byy H Horse orse aand nd B Burro urro J. Stokely Ligon and New Mexico’s First Breeding Bird Survey HARLEY G. SHAW and MARA E. WEISENBERGER 240 pp. / $26.95 paper First time in paperback—

Winning W inning T Their heir P Place lace Arizona Women in Politics, 1883-1950 HEIDI J. OSSELAER 248 pp. / $24.95 paper

Bitter Water Diné Oral Histories of the Navajo-Hopi Land Dispute Edited and Translated by MALCOLM D. BENALLY First Peoples: New Directions in Indigenous Studies 136 pp / $19.95 paper

www.uapress.arizona.edu tel. (800) 621-2736 91


'*// ++0$  Working the Land The Stories of Ranch and Farm Women in the Modern American West 3ANDRA+3CHACKEL PAGES PHOTOGRAPHS #LOTH

Prairie Fire A Great Plains History *ULIE#OURTWRIGHT PAGES PHOTOGRAPHS MAP #LOTH

The Making of Yosemite James Mason Hutchings and the Origin of Americaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Most Popular National Park *EN!(UNTLEY PAGES PHOTOGRAPHS MAPS #LOTH

Lessons from an Indian Day School Negotiating Colonization in Northern New Mexico, 1902â&#x20AC;&#x201C;1907 !DREA,AWRENCE PAGES PHOTOGRAPHS MAPS #LOTH

The Supreme Court and Tribal Gaming California v. Cabazon Band of Mission Indians 2ALPH!2OSSUM Landmark Law Cases and American Society PAGES #LOTH 0APER

NEW IN PAPERBACK

Promised Lands Promotion, Memory, and the Creation of the American West $AVID-7ROBEL PAGES PHOTOGRAPHS 0APER

Counterculture Green The Whole Earth Catalog and American Environmentalism !NDREW'+IRK CultureAmerica PAGES ILLUSTRATIONS 0APER

University Press of Kansas 0HONE  s&AX   WWWKANSASPRESSKUEDU

92


AWARDS AND HONORS Arrington-Prucha Prize ($500) – for the best article on the history of religion in the West. robert g. Athearn Award ($1,000) – biennial award for the best book on the twentieth

century West.

Autry Public History Prize ($1000) – annual award for work completed that contributes to a broader public reflection and appreciation of the past or serves as a model of professional public history practice. ray Allen Billington Award ($500) – for the best journal article in Western history, not published in the Western Historical Quarterly. Bolton-cutter Award ($500) – for the best journal article on Spanish Borderlands history. caughey Western History Association Prize ($2,500) – for the best book of the year in Western History. John c. ewers Award ($500) – a biennial award for the best book on the topic of north american indian ethnohistory. Bert M. fireman Award ($500) – for the best student essay published in the Western Historical Quarterly. Arrell M. gibson Award ($500) – a biennial award for the best essay of the year on the history of native americans. Huntington-WHA Martin ridge fellowship ($2,000) – a one month research fellowship at the Huntington library in San marino, California. sara Jackson Award ($500) – to support graduate student research. W. turrentine Jackson Award ($1,000) – a biennial award for a first published book on the american West. Jensen-Miller Award ($500) – an annual award for the best article in the field of women and gender in the north american West. Joan Paterson Kerr Award ($500) – a biennial award for a first illustrated book on the american West. Michael P. Malone Award ($500) – a biennial award for the best article, essay or commentary on state, provincial, or territorial history in north america appearing in a periodical publication. Hal K. rothman Book Award ($500) – a biennial award for the best book in western environmental history. Walter rundell graduate student Award ($1,500) – to support dissertation research. dwight L. smith (ABc-cLio) Award ($500) – a biennial award for a bibliographic or research work. robert M. utley Award ($500) – annual award for the best book on the military history of the frontier and Western north america. oscar o. Winther Award ($500) – for the best article published in the Western Historical Quarterly. trennert-iverson conference scholarship ($500) – to support graduate student attendees at the WHa conference. indian student conference scholarship ($500) – to support indian student attendees at the WHa conference. charles redd center teaching Award – to support K-12 teacher attendees at the WHa conference. Award of Merit – for outstanding service to the field of Western history and to the Western History association. Honorary Life Membership – awarded by the WHa President. 93


WHA AWARDS COMMIT TEES 2011 Arrington-Prucha Prize Jessie embry, Chair Charles redd Center for Western Studies anne Butler, Western Historical Quarterly

Jay Buckley, Brigham Young University Paula Petrick, george mason University 2011 robert g. Athearn Award akim reinhardt, Chair towson University

Carol Higham, University of north Carolina, Charlotte

Suzanne gaskins, University of California, fullerton

2011 ray Allen Billington Prize mary murphy, Chair montana State University

2011 caughey Western History Association Prize george miles, Chair Western americana Collection, Beinecke library

John findlay, University of Washington michael magliari, California State University, Chico

todd Kerstetter, texas Christian University

2011 Bolton-cutter Award Ben Johnson, Chair University of Wisconsin, milwaukee

Susan lee Johnson, University of Wisconsin

Julianna Barr, University of florida

2011 John c. ewers Book Award laura Woodworth-ney, Chair University of nebraska, lincoln

ernesto Chavez, University of texas, el Paso

gary Zellar, University of Saskatchewan

2011 Arrell gibson Award Susan miller, Chair lincoln, ne rebecca Bales, University of California, monterey Bay

2011 W. turrentine Jackson Book Award Phoebe S. Kropp Young, Chair University of Colorado, Boulder

Pekka H채m채l채inen, University of California, Santa Barbara

andy Kirk, University of nevada, las Vegas

2010 Jensen-Miller Award elizabeth escobedo, Chair University of Denver

gordon Bakken, California State University, fullerton 2011 Joan Patterson Kerr Book Award Carolyn Brucken, Chair autry national Center elizabeth James, University of alaska, anchorage

Kevin leonard, Western Washington University Kathleen DuVal, University of north Carolina 2011 Michael P. Malone Award michael green, Chair College of Southern nevada

raymond Wilson, fort Hays State University

94


2011 Hal K. rothman Award James e. Sherow, Chair Kansas State University andy graybill, Southern methodist University Kathryn morse, middlebury College

2011 WHA indian student conference scholarship greg Smoak, Chair Colorado State University michael tate, University of nebraska, omaha Susan rugh, Brigham Young University

2012 dwight L. smith (ABc-cLio) Award Jeff roche, Chair the College of Wooster Kathleen Chamberlain, eastern michigan University

2011 WHA trennert-iverson scholarship laurie mercier, Chair Washington State University David nesheim, University of nebraska, lincoln michael lansing, augsburg College

2011 utley Book Award Jim leiker, Chair Johnson County Community College Victoria Smith, University of nebraska, lincoln Wally lewis, Western State College of Colorado 2011 Autry Public History Prize Julie Dunn-morton, Chair Saint louis mercantile library, University of missouri,St. louis michael amundson, northern arizona University Dennis P. trujillo, office of the State Historian (new mexico) 2011 sara Jackson Award matthew Whitaker, Chair arizona State University tekla ali Johnson, lincoln, nebraska lynne getz, appalachian State University

2011 Huntington-WHA Martin ridge fellowship Brian Delay, Chair University of Colorado, Boulder Sam truett, University of new mexico tyina Steptoe, University of Washington 2011 Award of Merit melody Webb, Chair national Park Service margaret Jacobs, University of nebraska, lincoln gregg Cantrell, texas Christian University 2011 charles redd center teaching Award lindsey Passenger Wieck, Chair University of notre Dame leisl Carr Childers, northern arizona University Berta Simic, our lady of lourdes

2011 rundell graduate student Award Sandra Schackel, Chair Boise State University rita napier, University of Kansas Bruce glasrud, Sul ross State University

95


2011 DONORS gordon m. Bakken thomas D. isern anthony a. Kinninger Karen merrill marĂ­a montoya l.g. moses Paula Petrik Virginia Scharff Quintard taylor, Jr. elliott West John Wunder

2011 PATRONS thomas alexander Kevin J. fernlund Karl e. geier David rich lewis John H. marshall Katherine morrissey

Walter nugent robert W. righter & Sherry l. Smith Caroline f. Schimmel richard White David m. Wrobel

96


2011 SPONSORING MEMBERS • a. K. Smiley Public library • amon Carter museum

• nebraska State Historical Society

• arizona Historical Society

• new mexico State records Center & archives

• nevada Historic Preservation office

• arizona State library, archives and Public records • autry museum of Western Heritage

• ninth Judicial Circuit Historical Society

• the Bancroft library, University of California, Berkeley

• oklahoma State University, Department of History

• Boise national forest

• Pepperdine University, History Program

• Boise State University

• Saint louis mercantile library

• Center for transportation Studies, University of missouri, St. louis

• Salt river Projects

• Charles redd Center for Western Studies, Brigham Young University

• Society of California Pioneers

• Coldwell Banker Heart of oklahoma • Colorado Historical Society

• theodore roosevelt nature & History association

• Colorado Springs Pioneers museum

• true West Publishing, inc., true West magazine

• Stark museum of art

• Degolyer library, Southern methodist University • Denver Public library

• University of missouri-St. louis, College of education

• Dubois museum/Wind river Historical Center

• University of missouri-St. louis, Department of History

• godfrey memorial library

• University of new mexico, Department of History

• Historical research associates

• University of oklahoma, Department of History

• History Compass, llC • the Huntington library

• University of oklahoma libraries

• JrP Historical Consulting

• University of Utah Press

• Kit Carson Home & museum • longmount museum & Cultural Center

• University of Washington, Department of History

• missouri national recreational river

• University of Wyoming libraries

• montana Historical Society

• Utah State University

• mormon History association

• Western Writers of america

• museum of the rockies

97


2011 SUSTAINING MEMBERS thomas alexander michael amundson edward angel Stephen aron Peter Blodgett Peter Boag alida Boorne Sarah Carter alan Cohen Brian Collier Jolane Culhane Bruce Dinges Dave edmunds iris engstrand John findlay David gutierrez anne Hyde Peter iverson marvin Kaiser todd Kerstetter

andy Kirk robert Kvasnicka lori ann lahlum Patricia loughlin Don macKendrick Kathleen mcDermott Paula m. nelson richard J. orsi leroy anthony reaza lyn roper mike Searles richard Smith Harold Sorenson Joseph e. taylor iii Col. rodney thomas Kathleen Underwood louis Warren gary Wilson raymond Wilson Kerry Wyatt

IN MEMORIAM oakah l. Jones, Jr.

98


WHA HISTORY the Western History association was founded in 1961 by a group of professional and avocational historians bound by their belief in the american West as a place rich in history and deserving of further study. “its purpose shall be to promote the study of the north american West in its varied aspects and broadest sense,” reads the WHa’s constitution, and the association maintains this ideal by providing incentives for excellence through its prize and scholarship programs, and by offering a venue for a wide variety of scholarship during its annual conference. although scholarship is the pride of the association, its mainstay continues to be the combination of professional and avocational historians that formed the WHa over five decades ago. this combination has given the organization the reputation of being not only intellectually stimulating, but just plain fun.

PAST PRESIDENTS ray allen Billington

Joe B. frantz

norris Hundley, Jr.

o. o. Winther

William t. Hagan

richard White

robert athearn

Vernon Carstensen

glenda riley

John f. Bannon

mary lee Spence

Janet fireman

W. eugene Hollon

Walter rundell, Jr.

richard W. etulain

robert m. Utley

francis Paul Prucha

Patricia nelson limerick

leonard arrington

C. l. Sonnichsen

James P. ronda

Clark Spence

gene m. gressley

elliott West

t. a. larson

gilbert fite

Brian Dippie

Howard lamar

martin ridge

iris H. W. engstrand

John Caughey

Sandra myres

Peter iverson

John P. Bloom

W. David Baird

Walter nugent

Donald Worcester

gerald D. nash

r. David edmunds

Donald C. Cutter

David J. Weber

Virginia Scharff

W. t. Jackson

richard m. Brown

Sherry l. Smith

rodman W. Paul

earl Pomeroy

John r. Wunder

alvin m. Josephy, Jr. 99


PAST SECRETARIES & EXECUTIVE DIRECTORS John Porter Bloom, 1961 – 1967 arrell m. gibson, 1968 – 1970 everett l. Cooley, 1971 – 1973 William D. rowley, 1973 – 1990 Paul andrew Hutton, 1990 – 2006 Kevin J. fernlund, 2006 – 2012

CONFERENCE LOCATION HISTORY 1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969 1970 1971 1972 1973 1974 1975 1976 1977

Santa fe Denver Salt lake City oklahoma City Helena el Paso San francisco tucson omaha reno Santa fe new Haven fort Worth rapid City tulsa Denver Portland

1978 1979 1980 1981 1982 1983 1984 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995

Hot Springs San Diego Kansas City San antonio Phoenix Salt lake City St. Paul Sacramento Billings los angeles Wichita tacoma reno austin new Haven tulsa albuquerque Denver 100

1996 lincoln 1997 St. Paul 1998 Sacramento 1999 Portland 2000 San antonio 2001 San Diego 2002 Colorado Springs 2003 fort Worth 2004 las Vegas 2005 Scottsdale 2006 St. louis 2007 oklahoma City 2008 Salt lake City 2009 Denver 2010 lake tahoe 2011 oakland


2012 CALL FOR PROPOSALS 52nd AnnuAL conference of tHe Western History AssociAtion denver, coLorAdo, octoBer 4-7, 2012 “BoundAry MArKers And Border crossers: finding tHe West And Westerners” suBMission deAdLine: sePteMBer 1, 2011 suBMission guideLines the Program Committee for the 2012 meeting of the Western History association invites proposals for panels, papers, and workshops for “Boundary markers and Border Crossers: finding the West and Westerners.” the boundaries of the american West are malleable and have changed over time. less a unified entity than a collection of regions, the places we now call the West have gone by many names: indian country, new Spain, louisiana, Deseret, and mexico, to mention a few identifiers that infer sovereignty as well as location. the West has been contested ground, but there is more to the West than national sovereignty. natives, explorers, conquerors, colonizers, sojourners, and settlers, all brought their own overlapping senses of order and community to the West. each of these groups set out to establish boundaries of one sort or another. all of them failed to a greater or lesser degree. this is one of western history’s ironies: yesterday’s border crossers mark boundaries to impede tomorrow’s newcomers. the rooted and the rootless struggle for sustenance in the western soil. Yet westerners old and new somehow became native to the place while making their own histories on the ground that they claimed. that process continues. How shall we interpret this continuously evolving West? Western historians are invited to re-examine the history of an american West that is being made anew in our own time. the nature of borders – whether political, cultural, or other – as well as the places that they enclose are fitting subjects for your consideration. the origins, implications, and complications of a multicultural society beg to be revealed. the lives of the famous and obscure have much to tell us. the environment has tales to tell. Public historians of the West, bring your unique and important experiences to the table. the practice of history is ultimately a collective effort that belongs in the public arena. in Denver the community of western historians will meet again so that we may learn from one another. When submitting an entire session or panel, include a brief abstract that outlines the purpose of the session and designate one participant as the contact person. each paper proposal, whether individual or part of a session, should include a one- paragraph abstract and a one-page c.v., including address, phone, and email address for each participant. indicate equipment needs, if any. the committee assumes that all 101


listed individuals have agreed to participate. email each submission, with supporting materials, as a single document (PDf) to: wha2012call@gmail.com or send by mail service to: Brian frehner, Dept. of History, oklahoma State University, 115 murray Hall, Stillwater, oK 74078-3054. electronic submissions are preferred. suBMissions sHouLd Be sent By sePteMBer 1, 2011. the 2012 Program Committee Co-chairs: Brian frehner, oklahoma State University; and fay Yarbrough, University of oklahoma.

2012 WHA ProgrAM coMMittee James r. Aguila, arizona State University Polytechnic sue fawn chung, University of nevada, las Vegas Michael childers, University of nevada, las Vegas Andrea geiger, Simon fraser University Michael Lansing, augsburg College Mark Lause, University of Cincinnati Karen Leong, arizona State University Kevin Leonard, Western Washington University Melody Miyamoto, Collin College catherine Moore, national Parks Conservation association Jeremy Mouat, University of alberta Michelle nickerson, loyola University Jeff Pappas, Colorado State University/national Park Service Julie reed, University of north Carolina

2012 WHA ProgrAM co-cHAirs

Brian frehner oklahoma State University

fay yarbrough University of oklahoma 102


INDEX OF PARTICIPANTS A

adams, ansel - 7, 46 adams, Jeanne - 46 aguila, James r. - 102 ahlberg, Kristin - 50 akins, Damon B. - 43 alexander, ruth - 42 alexander, thomas g. - 98 alonso, Karla - 47 amundson, michael - 95, 98 anderson, gary - 41 athearn, robert - 99 andrews, thomas g. - 9 armitage, Sue - 55 aron, Stephen - 42, 61, 98 arrington, leonard - 99 ayón, David r. - 53

Bloom, John Porter - 99, 100 Boag, Peter - 41. 98 Bonnifield, Paul - 51 Boorne, alida - 98 Bowes, John P. - 44 Brégeant-Heald, Dominique 42, 60 Briley, ron - 55 Brilliant, mark - 48 Broussard, albert S. - 49 Brown, Jerry - 7 Brown, richard m. - 99 Browne, Sheri Bartlett - 62 Brucken, Carolyn - 94 Bryans, Bill - 54 Buckley, Jay - 94 Bunin, Chris - 36 Butler, anne - 94

B

c

Báez-Villaseñor, estela - 65 Bailey, James m. - 39 Baird, W. David - 99 Bakken, gordon - 61, 94, 96 Balderrama, francisco e. - 46 Bales, rebecca - 59, 61, 94 Ball, Durwood - 9 Bannon, John f. - 99 Barksdale, Kevin t. - 44 Barman, Jean - 45 Barr, Julianna - 94 Barton, Sarah - 52 Bashirian, aaron - 4 Basso, matt - 42 Bauman, robert - 65 Beebe, rose marie - 8, 13, 15 Beeton, Beverly - 52 Bejarano, Cynthia - 64 Benton-Cohen, Katherine Sarah - 36, 53 Bess, michael - 46 Billington, ray allen - 99 Biolsi, thomas - 41 Biro, Jordan - 48 Blackhawk, ned - 38 Blair, Karen J. - 62 Blansett, Kent - 39 Blodgett, Peter - 42, 98

Cadava, gerald - 53 Cahill, Cathleen - 40 Camacho, Julia m. Schiavone - 26, 29, 44, 54 Cannon, Brian - 42 Cantrell, gregg - 95 Caproni, linnéa - 59 Carlson, Christi - 37 Carr-Childers, leisl - 26, 37, 50, 95 Carstensen, Vernon - 99 Carter, Sarah - 36, 98 Castillo, Pedro - 47 Castillo-muñoz, Verónica 99 Castle, elizabeth - 39 Castro, Sal - 7, 47 Caughey, John - 99 Cavin, aaron - 63 Cebula, larry - 51 Chamberlain, Kathleen - 95 Chandler, Bob - 13 Chandler, Sue - 13 Chang, Jason oliver - 44 Chavez, ernesto - 94 Cherny, robert W. - 37 Chester, robert - 41 103

Childers, michael - 102 Christensen, David - 59 Christensen, Jon - 42 Clayton, Stephanie - 52 Cleary, Patricia - 58 Clevenger, Sam - 53 Cobb, Daniel - 39 Cocks, Catherine - 42 Cohen, alan - 98 Coleman, annie gilbert - 49 Collier, Brian S. - 4, 26, 29, 98 Cooley, everett l. - 100 Cope, rachel - 62 Crew, Selfa - 26, 54 Cronon, William - 7, 21, 30, 38 Crosbie-taylor, Dorothea - 50 Culhane, Jolane - 98 Cutter, Donald C. - 99

d

Dallett, nancy - 59 Day, terry - 59 Del rio, Chelsea - 48 Delay, Brian - 95 Demarest, Danielle - 4 Dennis, matthew - 41 Derounian-Stodola, Kathryn Zabelle - 52 Deutsch, Sarah J. - 62 Deverell, William f. - 42, 47 Diaz, george thaddeus - 46 Dick, lyle - 45 Dickey, Sonia - 50 Dilg, Janice lynn - 37 Dinges, Bruce - 98 Dippie, Brian - 99 Ditmeyer, Betty - 4 Draper, Don - 107 Dunn-morton, Julie - 52, 95 DuVal, Kathleen - 44, 94

e

earl, adla - 63 eckford, Wendel - 29 edmunds, David - 98, 99 embry, Jessie - 94


engel, edward - 98 englander, Sue - 37 english, linda - 56 engstrand, iris - 98, 99 escobedo, elizabeth - 94 espino, Virginia - 47 essington, amy - 46 ettinger, Patrick - 63 etulain, richard - 38, 99 evans, Sterling - 56 evans, tim - 13 everett, Derek - 56

f

faragher, John mack - 42 faulhaber, Charles C. - 13 ferber, Susan - 29 fernlund, Kevin - 4, 8, 9, 31, 37, 96, 100 fiege, mark - 38 fields, alison - 50 findlay, John m. - 62, 94, 98 fingal, Sara - 48 fireman, Janet - 9, 50, 55, 99 fischer, John ryan - 40 fite, gilbert - 99 fixico, Donald l. - 39 flores, Dan - 9 foster, lorn - 53 franks, Joel - 46 frantz, Joe B. - 99 frehner, Brian - 51, 102 frink, Brenda D. - 51 frisbee, meg - 49 fujino, Diane C. - 64

g

gage, Kendra - 4 garcia, mario t. - 47 garcia, richard a. - 61 gaskins, Susanne teepe - 52, 94 gaunt Stearns, Susan - 44 geier, Karl e. - 96 geiger, andrea - 64 geliga, Susana - 59 gendzel, glen - 13 gibson, arrell m. - 100 gill, Jill - 58

gillis, Brian - 43 gitlin, Jay - 42 gjeltema, Bruce - 43 glasrud, Bruce - 95 glass, robert - 50 goldman, Henry H. - 47 gómez, alan eladio - 64 gonzález, fredy - 44 gorsuch, allison - 26, 54 gray, Susan e. - 61 graybill, andy - 95 green, michael S. - 41 green, michael - 94 greenwald, emily - 9 gressley, gene m. - 99 griesbach, Kathleen - 49 griswold, robert l. - 48 grua, David W. - 56 guevarra, rudy - 26, 54 gunnell, Kristine - 52 gutierrez, David g. - 9. 98 gutjahr, Kurt - 42

H

Haas, lisabeth - 64 Hackel, Steven - 61 Hagan, William t. - 99 Hagood, thomas Chase - 61 Hall, ryan - 41 Hallett, Hilary - 61 Hämäläinen, Pekka - 94 Hanshew, annie - 37 Hanson, Clayton James - 40 Hardaway, roger D. - 49 Harper, rob - 57 Harrison, Jarrod - 37 Harrison, leah - 59 Hart, e. richard - 39 Heisch, melvena - 55 Henderson, Sandra l. - 37 Hernandez, Kelly lytle - 46 Herron, John - 40 Hert, tamsen - 51 Hickman, David C. - 41 Hicks, David - 36 Higham, Carolyn - 42, 94 Hilliard, David - 8, 25 Hilton-Hagemann, Brandi - 59 104

Hinsley, Kit - 58 Hogue, michel - 61 Holland, Jennifer - 48 Hollon, W. eugene - 99 Holmes, todd - 55 Holz, molly - 9 Hoover, John - 52 Hu-DeHart, evelyn - 44 Hundley, norris Jr. - 99 Hurewitz, Daniel - 48 Hurley, teresa - 37 Hurtado, albert - 9 Hutton, Paul a. - 96 Hyde, anne - 58, 62, 98

i

igler, David - 64 irwin, mary ann - 37 isern, thomas D. - 96 iverson, Peter - 98, 99

J

Jackson, W. t. - 99 Jacobs, margaret - 38, 95 James, elizabeth - 52, 94 Jameson, elizabeth - 45 Jensen, Joan m. - 40 Jensen, Kimberly - 62 Jeter, edward H. - 44 Johnson, Benjamin - 7, 29, 31, 94 Johnson, Susan lee - 61, 94 Johnson, t. Hasan - 59 Johnson, tekla ali - 95 Jones, errol - 58 Josephy, alvin m. Jr. - 99 Juárez, miguel - 64 Jung, moon-Ho - 58

K

Kaiser, marvin - 98 Kelley, Suzzanne - 29, 48 Kelton, Paul - 41 Kerstetter, todd - 94, 98 Kessler, lawrence - 64 Kim, Jessica - 64 King, Brian - 48 Kinninger, anthony a. - 96 Kirk, andy - 54, 94, 98 Kiser, Billie - 59


Kleehammer, michelle - 37 Klein, John - 61 Koslow, Jennifer - 52 Krainz, thomas a. - 63 Kvasnicka, robert - 98

L

laegreid, renee - 55 lahlum, lori - 29, 56, 98 lamar, Howard - 99 lampert, Cory - 45 lang, Clarence - 39 lansing, michael - 95 larson, t. a. - 99 lau, Chrissy - 45 lause, mark - 102 lawrence, adrea - 43 lechner, Zachary - 36 lee, Jacob f. - 44 lee, robert - 56 lehman, tim - 41, 51 leiker, James - 95 leonard, Kevin allen - 53, 58, 94 leong, Karen - 53 lerwick, Katherine - 52 lewis, David rich - 9, 96 lewis, Wally - 95 levo-Henriksson, ritva - 47 lew-Williams, Beth - 57 lim, Julian - 44 limerick, Patricia nelson 7, 21, 38, 39, 99 lock, ashley - 4 logan, michael f. - 50 lomawaima, K. tsianina - 29 london, Jack - 38 loughlin, Patricia - 7, 29, 31, 98 lozano, rosina - 45

M

mack, Dwayne a. - 53 macKendrick, Don - 98 magliari, michael - 56, 94 maiorana, Juliette - 26, 29, 54 margolin, malcolm - 13 margolis, aaron - 46 marques, lorena - 47 marshall, John H. - 96 martinelli, Phyllis Cancilla - 63 massoth, Katherine Sarah - 36 matthews, glenna - 47 mays, Kyle - 43

mcClendon iii, John H. - 59 mcCoy, ron - 51 mcDermott, Kathleen - 98 mcKibben, Carol - 45 mcmanus, Sheila - 29, 42, 45 mcQuade, lena - 40 mead, rebecca - 37 means, Jeff - 41 medina, Joseph orbock - 55 meeks, eric - 26, 54 merchant, Carolyn - 40 mercier, laurie - 95 mergenthal, rebekah - 57 merrill, Karen - 9, 96 miles, george thaddeus - 9, 94 miles, tiya - 58 miller, Susan - 94 mink, andy - 36 mitchell, Pablo - 60 miyamoto, melody - 55, 102 montejano, David - 49 montoya, maria - 58, 96 moore, Catherine - 54 moore, Kendra - 49 moore, Shirley ann - 29 moreno, gary - 60 moreno, Jose - 48 moriconi, Cynthia - 38 morrissey, Katherine g. - 9, 96 morse, Kathryn - 95 moses, l. g. - 96 moss, rick - 29 mott, andrea - 51 mouat, Jeremy - 102 muhammad, robin - 39 muñoz, Carlos Jr. - 46 murch, Donna - 39 muir, John - 15 murphy, mary - 94 myres, Sandra - 99

nichols, roger - 29, 43 nickerson, michelle 102 nugent, Walter - 96, 99

n

Q

napier, rita - 95 nash, gerald D. - 99 nehls, Kathi - 40 nelson, elaine m. - 55 nelson, Paula a. - 98 nesheim, David - 95 newton, Huey - 25 nichols, Casey D. - 65 105

o

oda, meredith - 64 oertel, Kristen tegtmeier - 63 olmstead, frederick law - 15 o’neill, Colleen - 38 ore, Janet - 54 orsi, Jared - 64 orsi, richard J. - 98 ortega, martha - 65 osburn, Katherine - 43 otero, lydia - 53 owens, Kendra - 56

P

Palmer, Charles C. - 47, 54 Pappas, Jeff - 47, 59 Parker, Caitlin - 65 Patino, James - 47 Pavelsky, mary - 50 Pease, Ben - 53 Perales, monica - 64 Peralta, luis maria - 6 Petrik, Paula - 94, 96 Player, elizabeth - 37 Pollack, Haley michaels 56 Pomeroy, earl - 99 Porsild, Charlene lynn 26, 54 Prescott, Cynthia - 51 Prodger, Phillip - 46 Prucha, francis Paul 99 Pubols, louise - 8, 13, 15, 39 Quan, Jean - 7

r

ramos, raúl - 29, 55 rankin, Kathy - 45 rasmussen, Birgit Brander 50 raymond, C. elizabeth - 41 reaza, leroy anthony - 98


redman, Samuel J. - 41 reed, Christine - 51 reed, Julie - 102 reese, linda - 29, 50 reeves, Don - 55 regalado, Samuel o. - 46 reinhardt, akim - 94 reyes, Bárbara o. - 55, 64 reyes, Jesús méndez - 65 richter, Kelly Kelleher - 65 ridener, John - 45 ridge, martin - 99 righter, robert W. - 96 riley, glenda - 99 rindfleisch, Bryan C. - 43 roche, Jeff - 95 rodriguez, marc - 47 rodman, W. Paul - 99 rojo, Danna levine - 65 rosi, richard - 13 romero, robert Chao - 44 ronda, James P. - 99 roper, lynn - 9, 98 rosales, oliver a. - 48 rose, natalie - 62 rowley, William D. - 100 ruffin ii, Herbert g. - 49 rugh, Susan - 95 rundell, Walter Jr. - 99

s

Sailor, rachel - 46 Salazar, theresa - 29 Sarabia, Heidy - 49 Sargent Wood, linda - 26, 37 Savio, mario - 24 Schackel, Sandra - 9, 95 Scharff, Virginia - 42, 50, 96, 99 Schimmel, Caroline f. - 96 Schreiter, mark a. - 49 Schuelke, lisa - 40 Seale, Bobby - 25 Searles, mike - 98 Sears, Clare - 60 Seefeldt, Douglas - 57 Self, robert - 30, 39 Senf, rebecca - 46 Senkewicz, robert - 13 Shah, nayan - 60 Shenk, gerald - 61

Shupe, Kevin - 61 Shepherd, Jeffrey - 43 Shreve, Bradley g. - 59 Simba, malik - 59 Smith, richard - 98 Smith, Sherry - 99 Smith, tash - 63 Smith, Victoria - 95 Smoak, greg - 27, 95 Snyder, Susan - 13 Solnit, rebecca - 38 Sonnichsen, C. l. - 99 Sorenson, Harold - 98 Spence, Clark - 99 Spence, mary lee - 99 Spence, taylor - 41 Starr, Kevin - 23 Steiger, eric - 64 Steptoe, tyina l. - 53, 95 Stearns, Susan gaunt - 44 Stidolph, Julie - 43 Stuckey, melissa - 49 Swainger, Jonathan - 56

t

talbot, Chris - 62 tamulevich, alessandra J. - 9 taniguichi, nancy J. - 52 tate, michael - 95 taylor, alan - 57 taylor iii, Joseph e. - 98 taylor, Quintard - 6, 9, 22, 31, 96 tejani, James - 47 thomas, Col. rodney - 98 thompson, Harry - 42 trotter, Joel - 39 truett, Samuel - 29, 58, 95 trujilo, Dennis P. - 95 turner, frederick Jackson 107 twain, mark - 8

u

Underwood, Kathleen - 45, 98 Utley, robert m. - 99

v

Vanausten, Bob - 13 Vanausten, Judy - 13 106

Vanore, Jennifer - 52 Vaught, Jeannette - 45 Velazco, lucila león - 65

W

Walker, Heather - 37 Wallace, Charles allen - 61 Wallis, eileen - 47 Ward, Jean m. - 62 Warren, louis - 9, 98 Webb, melody - 95 Weber, David - 99 Weber, John - 60 Weisiger, marsha - 9, 38, 54 West, elliott - 62, 96, 99 West, Herbert - 59 Westwood, lisa - 55 Whitaker, matthew C. - 49, 95 White, richard - 7, 21, 30, 38, 96, 99 Whittlesey, lee - 47 Wieck, lindsey Passenger 26, 95 Wilson, ann marie - 37 Wilson, gary - 98 Wilson, raymond - 94, 98 Winther, o. o. - 99 Witgen, michael - 58 Woodworth-ney, laura - 58, 94 Worcester, Donald - 99 Working, leslie - 50 Wrobel, David - 42, 96 Wunder, John - 9, 96, 99 Wyatt, Kerry - 98

y

Yarbrough, fay a. - 45, 102 Yochim, michael J. - 47 Young, Phoebe S. K. 29, 49, 94

Z

Zellar, gary - 94 Zeman, Carrie r. - 52 Zimski, Kathy - 37


WHA ORGANIZATION the WHa is governed by its members who elect a president, president-elect, council, and nomination committee. the latter consists of five members, each serving a two-year term. the council consists of the president, president-elect, executive director, seven regularly elected members (serving three year terms), and past presidents and executive directors during the two years succeeding their terms of office. membership in the organization is open to all.

WHA CONFERENCE the annual conference usually starts on Columbus Day in october, and features over fifty sessions on all aspects of the american West, as well as tours to nearby historic sites on thursday and Sunday afternoons. the location changes yearly, with recent conferences held in oklahoma City, Salt lake City, Denver, and incline Village, nevada. the highlights of the conference include the Presidential luncheon where the president addresses the association as well as an evening banquet where the WHa awards are presented and the incoming president ushers in the new year. Conference programs with registration information are mailed in July. There is no such thing as American History, only a frontier. —Don Draper (in “Mad Men”)

Each age tries to form its own conception of the past. Each age writes the history of the past anew with reference to the conditions uppermost in its own time. -Frederick Jackson Turner

Frederick Jackson Turner Sesquicentennial 1861-2011

107


Western History Association ANNUAL MEMBERSHIP APPLICATION

Membership in the association is open to any person interested in the North American West. Name ________________________________________________________________ Mailing Address ________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________ City _______________________ State or Province __________ Zip ______________ Country ____________________ Affiliation (if applicable) __________________________________________________________ Phone ________________________________________________________________ E-Mail __________________________________ (email and phone for WHA office use only) MEMBERSHIP LEVEL:

NEW MEMBER

CONTINUING MEMBER

If new please indicate level by checking one of the choices below. REGULAR - $90 STUDENT - $30 EMERITUS/RETIRED - $45 JOINT - $95

SUSTAINING - $150 PATRON - $300 DONOR - $500 SPONSOR (Institution) - $150

For a full description of membership benefits, please see our website –www.westernhistoryassociation.org – or membership brochure.

PAYMENT:

• Members outside the United States, Canada, and Mexico must pay an additional $20 for postage. • Acceptable payment methods: check or money order in U.S. dollars, or credit card (below) • The Western History Association is a not-for-profit organization, EIN# 54-6044435.

MASTERCARD

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(CHECK ONE) **no debit cards

Name on Card (print) _____________________________________ Authorized Amount $ _________ Card Number ________________________________ CSC # ___________ Exp. Date _____/_______ Signature __________________________________________________

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Please submit this completed form with payment to: WESTERN HISTORY ASSOCIATION University of Missouri-St. Louis • 152C University Center • One University Boulevard • St. Louis, MO 63121-4400 Phone: 314-516-7282 • Fax: 314-516-7272 • Email: wha@umsl.edu

108


NOTES

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Join us for the 52nd Annual WHA Conference Boundary Markers and Border Crossers: Finding the West and Westerners

Denver, Colorado October 4-7, 2012


SHOOTING SHO O T I N G F FROM R O M THE T HE L LIP IP

Plains Indian Art The Pioneering Work of John C. Ewers

THE T HE LIFE LIFE OF OF SENATOR S E N A T OR Edited by Jane Ewers Robinson

AL SI SIMPSON MPSON

DONALD LOREN HARDY

Preface by Candace S. Greene Introduction by Evan M. Maurer

D ON A L D

L OR E N

H A R DY

PLAINS IINDIAN NDIAN ART ART

S SHOOTING HOOTING G FR FROM ROM OM THE LIP LIP

The Pioneering Work of John C. Ewers Edit Edited ed by Jane Ewer Ewerss Robinson

The Liffe of Senator Al Simpson By Donald Lor Loren en Hardy

$39.95 CLOTH 224 PAGES, 41 COLOR AND 99 B&W ILLUS.

$26.95 CLOTH 472 P PA AGES

V VIOLENT IOLENT ENCOUNTERS ENCOUNTERS

ARAPAHO ARAPAHO JOURNEYS JOURNEYS

Interrviews on Western Massacres By Debor Deborah ah and Jon Lawrence Lawrence

Photographs and Stories from the Wind River Reserrvation Text T ext and Photogr Photographs aphs by Sar Saraa Wiles

$34.95 CLOTH 224 P PA AGES

UNIVERSIT Y OF O KLAHOMA PRESS OKLAHOMA

$34.95 CLOTH 256 PAGES, 130 DUOTONE ILLUS.

2800 VENTURE DRIVE 路 NORMAN, OK 73069 TEL 800 627 7377 路 OUPRESS.COM

2011 WHA Semi-Centennial Conference Program  

WHA's Annual Conference Program.

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