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SEPTEMBER 2014 |

The Monthly Magazine of the League of California Cities®

®

annual Conference & Expo preview Highlights p.12 Engaging Your City’s Youth Through The Arts p.29 Regulating Fracking in California p.22

www.westerncity.com


CONTENTS 2 Calendar of League Events 3 Executive Director’s Message Disruptive Technology, Public Policy and Leadership

By Chris McKenzie

Public sector leaders face a number of challenges related to disruptive technology.

9 City Forum

Cities and Schools: Playing Well Together Pays Off for Children and Families Innovative partnerships provide essential services to children and families.

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 ews From the Institute for N Local Government

Kick Off the School Year With Safe Routes To School Cities can ensure that students have safe ways to walk and bike to school.

Making the Case 26  For Fracking

By Catherine Reheis-Boyd

 xpanded production of the E Monterey Shale formation could create new jobs.

California Needs to Call 27  Time-Out on Fracking

By Damon Nagami

 afeguards have not kept pace S with fracking, which poses hazards.

Engaging Your City’s 29 

Youth Through the Arts

By Mary Beth Barber

 ities can participate directly in C youth arts programs that have lasting impacts.

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 alifornia Cities Helen Putnam C Award for Excellence

Monrovia’s YES Program Opens Doors For At-Risk Teens The program provides career opportunities and guidance.

Preview 12 

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By Anna Swanson

Eureka Reaches Teens With the GULCH

 ttend educational sessions and A hear speakers with inspiring ideas.

Expo Exhibitors 14

 2014 Annual Conference & Expo Highlights

Regulating Fracking in 22 

California: An Overview

By Ed Wilson

 ecent legislation provides a new R regulatory framework.

 alifornia Cities Helen Putnam C Award for Excellence

Youth helped design a characterbuilding program.

Job Opportunities 36  Professional Services 46  Directory

On the Record 49 

 over Photo: Los Angeles Convention C Center, courtesy of the Los Angeles Convention & Tourism Board

Experience the U.S. Communities Difference U.S. Communities is the leading cooperative purchasing program for a reason. • Dedicated Public Agency Resources to Identify Solutions and Provide Support • Lowest Price Commitment • Transparency Protecting Public Agency Interests

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®

President José Cisneros Treasurer San Francisco

1400 K Street Sacramento, CA 95814 (916) 658-8200 Fax (916) 658-8240

Immediate Past President Bill Bogaard Mayor Pasadena

Executive Director Chris McKenzie

leaguevents

Editor in Chief Jude Hudson, Hudson + Associates (916) 658-8234 email: editor@westerncity.com

SEPTEMBER

Managing Editor Eva Spiegel (916) 658-8228 email: espiegel@cacities.org

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Policy Committee Meetings, JW Marriott Los Angeles The League’s policy committees review issues of interest to cities statewide and make recommendations to the League board of directors.

Advertising Sales Manager Pam Maxwell-Blodgett (916) 658-8256 email: maxwellp@cacities.org

Legal Advocacy Committee Meeting, JW Marriott Los Angeles The committee reviews and recommends friend-of-the-court efforts on cases of significant statewide interest to California cities.

Administrative Assistant (916) 658-8223 email: adminwc@cacities.org Rebecca Inman Lorraine Okabe Jason Rhine Steve Sanders Randi Kay Stephens

Associate Editors Jim Carnes Carol Malinowski Carolyn Walker

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League of California Cities 2014 Annual Conference & Expo, Los Angeles Convention Center This conference offers dozens of educational sessions, numerous professional development opportunities, hundreds of exhibits and a chance to participate in the League’s policy-making activities at the Annual Business Meeting.

November

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Advertising Design ImagePoint Design For photo credits, see page 37. Western City (ISSN 0279-5337) is published monthly by the League of California Cities, 1400 K St., Sacramento, CA 95814. Subscriptions: $39.00/1 year; $63.00/2 years; student: $26.50; foreign: $52.00; single copies: $4.00, including sales tax. Entered as periodical mail January 30, 1930, at the Post Office, Los Angeles, CA 90013, under the Act of April 13, 1879. Periodical postage paid at Sacramento, Calif.

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Postmaster: Send address changes to Western City, 1400 K Street, Sacramento, CA 95814. Western City Trademark Reg. U.S. Pat. Off. ©2014 League of California Cities. All rights reserved. Material may not be reprinted without written permission. This issue is Volume XC, No. 9.

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FSC ® is an independent, not-for-profit organization that promotes environmentally appropriate, socially beneficial and economically viable forest management worldwide. Products with the FSC label are independently certified to ensure that they come from forests managed to meet the needs of present and future generations.

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Second Vice President Katherine Miller Council Member Stockton

For a complete list of the League board of directors, visit www.cacities.org/board.

Magazine Staff

Contributors Dan Carrigg Norman Coppinger Michael Egan Martin Gonzalez Melissa Kuehne

First Vice President Tony Ferrara Mayor Arroyo Grande

League of California Cities

Board of Directors Meeting, Sacramento The League board reviews, discusses and takes action on a variety of issues affecting cities, including legislation, legal advocacy, education and training, and more.

December 3– 4

Municipal Finance Institute, Hyatt Regency Monterey This conference provides essential information for city officials and staff involved in fiscal planning for municipalities.

3– 5

City Clerks’ New Law and Elections Seminar, Hyatt Regency Monterey The seminar covers laws affecting elections as well as many aspects of the clerk’s responsibilities.

Event and registration information is available at www.cacities.org/events. For the latest information on League conferences and events, follow us on Twitter @CaCitiesLearn. For legislative and policy updates and more, follow @CaCities. Follow Western City @WesternCityMag. Join us on Facebook. www.facebook.com/westerncity www.facebook.com/LeagueofCaCities www.cacities.org


Executive Director’s Message by Chris McKenzie

Disruptive Technology, Public Policy and Leadership We hear a lot today about “disruptive technology.” My favorite comic strip, Doonesbury, recently illustrated the concept: An aging rock musician boasts to an interviewer that he has successfully adapted to the radical changes the Internet has caused in the music business. The musician says, “The industry I grew up in no longer exists, but the new model is great — I embrace it! I don’t need a major label behind me anymore. I can make my music on my schedule and release it directly to my fans! It is a true disruption.” The interviewer compliments him for successfully dealing with such a “paradigm shift” and asks, “So where are you living these days?” The musician responds sheepishly, “My car.” Not long ago a city manager friend from the Silicon Valley area told me that one of his regional gurus predicted we will reach the tipping point in putting electric vehicles on the road by 2018. This suggests: • We should tell our kids to become electricians because we may need a lot of 240-volt outlets in our garages;

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• The electric power grid and supplies and electricity rates will need to be expanded unless renewable energy powers the recharging of the vehicles; • We will experience even faster declines in motor fuel revenues and will need an alternative tax method; and • We will experience fewer greenhouse gas emissions from vehicles that today account for 40 percent of all emissions, but we will potentially have more emissions from power plants. These are just a few of the changes that could occur if electric cars become the norm — not to mention the impact on jobs and government revenues. Many of these changes will require a policy response from state and local agencies.

New Technologies Redefine What’s Possible In its 2013 annual report Goldman Sachs describes some of the technologies that it

believes “are reinventing, once again, the notion of what’s possible.” The report lists: 3-D Printing. Compared to traditional manufacturing, 3-D printing will drive greater customization, reduce costs for complex designs and lower overhead on short-run parts. Already growing at over 20 percent annually, the adoption of 3-D manufacturing is expected to continue on its path of rapid acceleration. Big data solutions. Companies and organizations everywhere are seeking to garner insights from the mountains of data collected by PCs, sensors, smartphones, tablets and other devices, enabling them to better synthesize the world’s information. Poised to attract even greater demand, such technologies help companies to get a better sense of customers’ needs and identify important market developments and product trends. continued

Western City, September 2014

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Disruptive Technology, Public Policy and Leadership, continued

Software-defined networking (SDN). While the rest of tech has moved to the cloud, networking largely remains trapped in a paradigm of hardware and software boxes that are manually configured and nonscalable. SDN liberates

networking from expensive hardware, making it easier and cheaper for technology administrators to respond to changing business needs. The field is likely to create new platform leaders and high-margin software companies.

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The Dangers of Ignoring a Looming Crisis Reading about disruptive technology has caused me to think about the public policies — some intentional and some simply the product of overt neglect — that have dramatically disrupted our lives. In California the mad rush to deregulate the generation and distribution of electricity in the 1990s offers one example. Enron and other companies fleeced ratepayers, the state government incurred ridiculous levels of debt to finance power purchases to prevent blackouts, and we lost a governor to a recall and got a new one in perhaps the strangest statewide election ever. All of this resulted from a state policy built on an untested yet alluring idea that was never properly vetted, which policy-makers scrambled to support in overwhelming numbers. Certainly no one intended the devastating cavalcade of consequences, but this failure had serious repercussions. One of the most obvious disruptive national policies is our intentional federal policy encouraging carbon emissions

Irrational exuberance about overly rosy projections can lead to devastating consequences.

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League of California Cities

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and global warming. I describe it this way because it is becoming quite clear that as a nation we don’t have a policy against it, and we are second only to China in leading the world in carbon emissions. (According to the U.S. EPA, the United States produces 19 percent; China produces 23 percent.) What we have done, however, is spend the past 10 years arguing about whether we need 90 percent, 95 percent or 100 percent of the nation’s scientific experts on this subject to agree that if we fail to take action we will cause irreversible environmental, social and economic impacts of enormous magnitude. An article titled “The Coming Climate Crash: Lessons for Climate Change in the 2008 Recession” in the New York Times recently commanded my attention. Written by former Bush Administration Treasury Secretary Henry Paulson, the column compared our ignoring excesses in greenhouse gas production to how we ignored the excesses in the credit markets before the Great Recession began in 2008

There are no “do-overs” for some public policies, so you had better get it right the first time.

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Western City, September 2014

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Disruptive Technology, Public Policy and Leadership, continued

A state policy built on an untested yet alluring idea that was never properly vetted had serious repercussions.

that caused deep, lasting pain for millions of Americans. Paulson’s colleagues on Wall Street helped create that problem, and his job as secretary of the U.S. Treasury was to contain and help us recover from it — a job still not finished. Now he sees the same magnitude of economic risk and disruption facing us with unchecked climate change. He writes: For too many years, we failed to rein in the excesses building up in the nation’s financial markets. When the credit bubble burst in 2008, the damage was devastating. Millions suffered. Many still do. We’re making the same mistake today with climate change. We’re staring down a climate bubble that poses enormous risks to both our environment and economy. The warning signs are clear and growing more urgent as the risks go unchecked. This is a crisis we can’t afford to ignore. I feel as if I’m watching as we fly in slow motion on a collision course toward a giant mountain. We can see the crash coming, and yet we’re sitting on our hands rather than altering course.

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League of California Cities

We need to act now, even though there is much disagreement, including from members of my own Republican Party, on how to address this issue while remaining economically competitive. They’re right to consider the economic implications. But we must not lose sight of the profound economic risks of doing nothing. Another disruptive California policy with long-term policy changes was the drastic expansion of public pensions that accompanied the temporary economic boom of the late 1990s. Many of us remember the failures of the Legislature and governor at that time to use the spike in temporary capital gains income-tax revenues for onetime expenses (like debt reduction). But perhaps it’s more important to remember the “irrational exuberance” that led to the virtually irreversible growth in pension costs that resulted from expanding the pension benefits for state and local employees (and elected officials).

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When the 2008 recession finally hit, the days of “pension rate holidays” for local agency employers were long gone. The process of recognizing the true costs of those unsustainable decisions to expand benefits has been slow and horrendously expensive.

Putting Public Policy Into Perspective Every public policy has the potential to disrupt our lives for better or worse. For example, when the Rural Electrification Administration was created with the support of President Roosevelt in 1935, critics predicted it would be a highly disruptive public policy. At the time, 90 percent of urban residents had electric power but only 10 percent of rural dwellers did. Many groups opposed the federal government’s involvement in developing and distributing electric power, especially private utility companies that

argued it was bringing the nation closer to socialism. Few would argue today, however, that the availability of affordable public power in rural areas was not essential. One of my mentors, E.A. Mosher of the League of Kansas Municipalities, taught me that there are no “do-overs” for some public policies, so you had better get it right the first time. In that category he often put wars and nuclear power. The former has the potential to do real good and evil at a staggering personal and public cost. The latter presented literally never-ending public health risks due to the intractable practical and political problems associated with disposing of nuclear waste. There is a reason we have not yet located a permanent storage site in the continental United States for nuclear waste decades after we started operating nuclear power plants.

We are endlessly capable of dreaming up disruptive technologies and policies that can enrich or dramatically damage our lives. The job and challenge of public sector leaders is to know when disruptive technology needs to be regulated, which disruptive policies are needed and which ones need much more study and testing. That is indeed the sweet spot of public sector leadership. ■

Correction In the August issue, page 25 captions incorrectly identified two photos as a Los Angeles County project. The photos actually showed a City of Hayward project. Western City regrets the error.

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Western City, September 2014

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Cities and Schools: Playing Well Together Pays Off for Children and Families Cities and city officials are working with schools and others to create and sustain partnerships aimed at providing essential services and support to children and families. These community schools partnerships are transforming communities. The Cities Counties Schools (CCS) Partnership (www.ccspartnership.org), a collaborative effort of the League, California State Association of Counties and California School Boards Association, has developed an online toolkit for mayors, city council members and staff. The toolkit provides a way to learn more about strategies that connect the resources of cities, counties, schools and communitybased organizations. It offers examples of successful partnerships in urban, suburban and rural communities along with best practices and resources from California and national organizations. Some of the partnerships highlighted in the toolkit focus on the joint use of facilities, providing direct services to children and families or aligning limited resources to accomplish joint goals. Every collaborative effort is unique, but each addresses specific needs with resources and assets within the community. The City of Brentwood, the Brentwood Union School District and Liberty Union High School District have several ongoing partnerships. These include joint-use agreements for identified school and

city facilities, city-provided emergency preparedness trainings for both school districts and ongoing capital improvement and maintenance costs for three facilities in the Brentwood Union School District. The Brentwood Police Department also offers an after-school program at a middle school and provides school resource officers to both school districts. The City of Pico Rivera collaborates with the El Rancho Unified School District to provide a safe and nurturing after-school environment for students from kindergarten through 5th grade. The Department of Parks and Recreation operates the Recreation and Education Accelerating Children’s Hopes (REACH) program at various school sites. Pico Rivera also joins forces with the school district and surrounding churches and businesses to seek volunteers and help offset event costs. The City of Sunnyvale, the Sunnyvale Elementary School District, Advanced Micro Devices, Sunnyvale residents and numerous community agencies partnered to guide programs and operations of the Columbia Neighborhood Center (CNC). Launched in the fall of 1994 in conjunction with the opening of the Columbia Middle School, the center uses a onestop model to provide a connected network of services and programs in North Sunnyvale. Its goal is to support and empower youth and families so that children will develop the life skills necessary

to succeed. CNC is open to all community residents and provides services and activities year round, seven days a week, including evenings. Categories of programs and services provided include community education, health and mental health services, recreation, enrichment and youth and neighborhood safety. Union City has a very long history of collaboration with the New Haven Unified School District. The city staffs a student crisis intervention counseling program that serves several sites in the school district. Additionally, Union City helps provide a school resource officer at James Logan High School and collaborates with the district’s Kids’ Zone Initiative, which offers “Cradle to Career” services to children in the Decoto neighborhood. The Kids’ Zone collaboration involves community members and local elected officials and includes more than a dozen local service organizations that offer services ranging from early childhood education and health care service to youth violence prevention programs and job training. School board and city council members meet regularly to discuss issues of mutual interest and importance, as do staff from each agency. The City of Pasadena and the Pasadena Unified School District participate in a cooperative agreement known as the School-City-Community Work Plan. continued

This article is a service of the Institute for Local Government (ILG), the nonprofit research affiliate of the League and the California State Association of Counties. ILG administers the Cities Counties Schools Partnership. For more information, visit www.ccspartnership.org. For more about ILG, visit www.ca-ilg.org. www.westerncity.com

Western City, September 2014

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Cities and Schools: Playing Well Together Pays Off for Children and Families, continued

The plan’s goal is to foster critical thinking, problem-solving and media and communication skills to improve student outcomes. This in turn supports the local economy and helps ensure that the city grows as a local and global center of innovation. The plan identifies and integrates resources and services into a systemwide approach for service delivery and realigns existing funds to address gaps and avoid duplication of services. It encourages partnerships with the business community to align school curriculum and job training programs. Future activities for the city and school district include developing an Infant, Children, Youth and Family Master Plan. Because strategies to create community schools partnerships are not a one-size-fitsall solution, lessons learned from models throughout California can help support the efforts of cities, schools, counties and community-based organizations.

Teens as well as younger students benefit from community schools partnerships.

Generous support from Kaiser Permanente, the Stuart Foundation, United Way of the Bay Area and the three CCS partners made the toolkit project possible. For more information on the examples provided here, the Community Schools Partnerships Toolkit and additional resources, visit www.ccspartnership.org. To learn about community schools partnerships taking shape throughout California, visit www.ccspartnership.org/resources/ community-schools-partnerships. ■

Share Your Story Does your local agency have a partnership to share? The Cities Counties Schools Partnership welcomes partnership models in its toolkit. Send your agency’s story to Randi Kay Stephens, program coordinator, at rstephens@ca-ilg.org.

Let’s face it, when it comes to most projects, the entitlement process can get quite stressful, but it doesn’t have to. With the Northern California Carpenters Regional Council on your side you’ll get through the entitlement process in a more timely, efficient and cost effective manner.

Call 510.568.4788 or visit www.NCCRC.org for more information.

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League of California Cities

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News From the Institute for Local Government

Kick Off the School Year With

Safe Routes to School The new school year offers an opportunity to work with local schools to ensure that students in your community have safe ways to walk and bike to school. In addition to improving safety, Safe Routes to School programs provide many community benefits, such as promoting healthy lifestyle habits and reducing busing costs and traffic congestion.

New Funding Structure The funding structure for the Safe Routes to School programs changed in 2014; however, all the same types of projects and programs are eligible for funding. The program is now funded through the state’s larger Active Transportation Program, along with other types of walking and biking projects not associated with schools. Approximately $360 million in competitive grants will be awarded in California this year. Half of these grants — portions of which are reserved for disadvantaged communities and Safe Routes to School programs — will be awarded by Caltrans through a statewide competition.

The other half of the funds will be passed through to regional transportation planning agencies, which will make grants to local communities and other qualified recipients. Eighty percent of the pass-through funds are earmarked for large urban regions. The remaining 20 percent of the funds is reserved for rural areas. The first round of proposals was due in May. The next application period opens this fall. For more information on project selection criteria and proposal deadlines, visit www.catc.ca.gov/ programs/ATP.htm.

Safe Routes to School Online Toolkit The Institute for Local Government (ILG) has developed an online toolkit (at www.ca-ilg.org/SRTS-toolkit) to support cities, schools and county officials and their executive staff who are working to promote pedestrian and bike safety for students and to expand active transportation choices for all residents through Safe Routes to School and other programs. The online toolkit includes: • A guide to getting started, including questions to ask and the conditions that must be in place to implement Safe Routes to School and encourage more active forms of local transportation; • An overview of how individuals, agencies, departments and planning processes can influence transportation infrastructure in California; • Funding sources, including information on the Active Transportation Program funds, nongovernmental funding sources and the benefits of forming partnerships; and • Tools to help plan, implement, monitor and finance programs and facilities that support nonmotorized (or “active”) transportation and examples of communities that have implemented these tools. By considering Safe Routes to School in the regional context of transportation and land-use policies and plans, local decisionmakers can bring together multiple resources to create areas where students and the community have safe, enjoyable places to walk and bike. Collaboration and coordination across local and regional jurisdictions are smart ways to foster active communities. By using Safe Routes to School as a platform to collaborate across jurisdictions, local decision-makers can leverage funding and coordinate community infrastructure investments. ■

www.westerncity.com

Western City, September 2014

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PREview

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2014 annual Conf by Anna Swanson

Join city officials from throughout California at the League of California Cities 2014 Annual Conference & Expo to attend educational sessions and hear speakers with inspiring ideas to better serve your city and residents. Visit the Expo Hall to find state-of-the-art products and cost-saving services and explore the League Partner Speaker Theaters.

Expo and Grand Prize Giveaway This year’s Expo will showcase more than 230 exhibitors, including over 60 firsttime exhibitors. Be sure to schedule time to meet with vendors and learn how your city can benefit from their products, services and resources. The Expo Grand Opening, held in conjunction with the Host City Reception, will run from 5:00 to 7:00 p.m. on Wednesday, Sept. 3. The Expo will be open on Thursday, Sept. 4, with new extended hours from 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. A Grand Prize will be given away during this year’s conference. Your city could be the lucky winner of a $3,000 voucher to spend on any U.S. Communities vendor. U.S. Communities is the League-sponsored government purchasing cooperative designed to save local agencies money. Three Expo exhibitors are also U.S. Communities

supporting members: GameTime, SafewayMallory and TAPCO (Traffic and Parking Control). Please visit their booths to learn more about these products and services. The drawing will be held Friday, Sept. 5, during the Annual Business Meeting, which begins at noon. Be sure to watch for entry details inside the Expo Hall entrance. You must be present at the closing General Assembly to win.

League Partner Speaker Theaters The League Partner Speaker Theaters, located in the Expo Hall, present speakers on a variety of interests for cities statewide. These Expo sessions highlight successful examples of public-private partnerships as well as case studies of innovative projects and programs that have worked in California cities. Hear from elected officials, city staff and industry experts who have found creative solutions to some of the challenging problems that cities face.

Networking Opportunities The conference offers attendees a multitude of ways to connect with colleagues and experts from throughout the state to discuss common concerns, exchange ideas and share solutions. Networking

Anna Swanson is conference marketing coordinator for the League and can be reached at aswanson@cacities.org.

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League of California Cities

www.cacities.org


erence & Expo Highlights events held throughout the conference will include gatherings hosted by the League’s diversity caucuses, regional divisions and League Partners.

League Professional Departments Eleven professional departments make up the League, all of which play an integral part in the development and delivery of educational events and networking. These departments comprise: 1. City attorneys; 2. City clerks; 3. City managers; 4. Community services; 5. Fire chiefs; 6. Fiscal officers; 7. Mayors and council members; 8. Personnel and employee relations; 9. Planning and community development; 10. Police chiefs; and 11. Public works officers.

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Each professional department is represented on the board of directors and plays a key role in League policy-making. Most department business meetings will be held on Wednesday, Sept. 3.

Regional Divisions The League’s regional divisions function as a grassroots advocacy team and give city officials a way to become more involved in activities that reinforce the quality of life in their communities. The divisions provide the League board of directors with a diverse range of perspectives and give a voice to member cities throughout the state. All divisions are staffed locally by the League’s regional public affairs managers. Some League divisions hold networking events during the conference. Contact your regional public affairs manager (www.cacities.org/yourmanager) for more information.

Brown Act Requirements and League Conferences

body to attend a conference (or similar gathering open to the public) that addresses issues of general interest to the public or public agencies of the type represented by the legislative body. However, a majority of the members cannot discuss among themselves — other than as part of the scheduled program — business of a specific nature that is within the local agency’s jurisdiction. The League has long been a strong advocate for open government and transparency. Cities throughout California continue to comply with the requirements of the Brown Act even though the Legislature has suspended several of its provisions for a three-year period. City officials believe that this compliance serves the best interests of their communities and helps to foster transparency in local government.

More Information Online Visit the annual conference page on the League website at www.cacities.org/AC to plan your conference schedule. ■

The Brown Act, also referred to as California’s Open Meeting Law, permits a majority of the members of a legislative

Western City, September 2014

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Annual Conference Preview

Expo Exhibitors League Partners appear in teal. 1800 Hoarders/Steri-Clean

Amplified Public Sector

Burke, Williams & Sorensen LLP1,2

3Di

AndersonPenna Partners Inc.

Burrtec Waste Industries Inc.2

AAA Flag & Banner

Arborjet

CH2M HILL

AECOM

Asphalt Zipper

CMB Regional Centers

Accela

Atkins

CRW Systems Inc.

Access Products

Avery Associates

CSG Consultants Inc.

Active Bidder

BTI Appraisal

California Air Resources Board

Advanced GeoEnvironmental Inc.

Badger Meter Inc.

Alamo Capital

Best Best & Krieger LLP

California Association of Code Enforcement Officers

Alliance Resource Consulting LLC

Best Friends Animal Society

California Building Officials

America In Bloom

Blais & Associates

California Consulting LLC

American Fidelity Assurance Company

Bob Murray & Associates

California Contract Cities Association

Bolt Staffing Service

American Geotechnical Inc.

BonTerra Consulting

California Department of Motor Vehicles

American Honda Motor Co. Inc.

Borrego Solar Systems Inc.

2

1,2

1 – Institute for Local Government Partner, 2 – CitiPAC supporter. List current as of Aug. 1, 2014. Visit us at www.cacities.org/2014expo.

California Department of Veterans Affairs California Department of Water Resources California Department of Water Resources/Drought California Fuel Cell Partnership California Housing Finance Authority California Joint Powers Insurance Authority California Nevada Cement Association California Prison Industry Authority (CALPIA) California Product Stewardship Council California State Board of Equalization California Statewide Communities Development Authority CalCERTS Inc. CalPERS continued on page 16

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Western City, September 2014

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Expo Exhibitors, continued from page 14

CalRecycle

Colonial Life

enCode Plus

CalTRUST

Comcate Inc.

Energy From Shale

Careers In Government

Community Champions

Energy Management Services

Carl Warren & Company

Credit Bureau Associates

Energy Upgrade California

Champions Funding LLC

Crown Castle International Inc.

Charles Abbott Associates

DEACERO

Environmental Systems Research Institute

Chevron Energy Solutions

DN Tanks

Evonik Cyro LLC

Citrus Pest & Disease Prevention Program

Dapeer, Rosenblit & Litvak LLP

EYE Lighting International

Dart Container

Federal Highway Administration

City Clerks Association of California

David Taussig & Associates Inc.

Fieldman, Rolapp & Associates Inc.

City of Rancho Cucamonga

Digital Ally Inc.

Fire Recovery USA

City Ventures

Dudek

FirstSouthwest

Clean City

Earth Systems

Forbo Flooring Systems

CleanStreet

eCivis

Foundation Technology

Climatec BTG

EcoCentre

Clipper Creek Inc.

Embers Out

FUELMASTER/SYN-TECH SYSTEMS INC.

1 – Institute for Local Government Partner, 2 – CitiPAC supporter. List current as of Aug. 1, 2014. Visit us at www.cacities.org/2014expo.

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League of California Cities

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GPS Insight GST GameTime George Hills Company Inc. GeoStabilization International Good Energy LP GovDeals Inc. Grainger Graphic Solutions Great-West Financial Griffin Structures Inc. HAI, Hirsch & Associates Inc., Landscape Architects HdL Companies HEAL Cities Campaign HMC Architects continued

Public Access Wherever public sector offices are working to serve the public, Tyler is there. We make it our mission to improve the way local government and schools take care of business, by increasing efficiency, improving information

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Western City, September 2014

17


Expo Exhibitors, continued

Meyers Nave1,2

Heritage Bag Company

Kasdan Simonds Weber & Vaughan LLP

HydroPoint Data Systems

Keenan & Associates2

MuniServices

I-Bank

Kosmont Companies & Auction.com

NBS

HR Green Inc.

IE Regional Composting

Mountain States Wholesale Nursery

LECET Southwest

NATIONAL CONSTRUCTION RENTALS

LINC Housing

National League of Cities

LPA Inc.

National Life Group

Laserfiche

NerdWallet

Library Systems & Services

International Municipal Signal Association Far West

Liebert Cassidy Whitmore1

Newport Pacific Capital Family of Companies

Listen Technologies Corporation

Nexus eWater

International Parking Design

Live Earth Products Inc.

International TreeScapes LLC

Local Search Association

Northern California Carpenters Regional Council

JM Eagle

LogicTree IT Solutions Inc.

Omni-Means Ltd.

Jamboree Housing Corporation

Los Angeles City Employees Association

OpenGov.com

MCE Corporation MNS Engineers Inc.

Otto Environmental Systems North America

Mallory Safety and Supply

PARS

Matrix Consulting Group

PERC Water

MelRok LLC

Pacific Gas and Electric Company2

ING ITEM Ltd. IN GOD WE TRUST—AMERICA INC. Integrated Media Systems Intermountain

Jefferies LLC Jere Melo Foundation Johnson Controls Jones & Mayer Kaiser Permanente Kaizen InfoSource LLC

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PetData Pioneer, A Navient Company Piper Jaffray continued

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Western City, September 2014

19


Expo Exhibitors, continued

Siemens

Play Unplugged

Renovate America

Point & Pay

Republic Services

SIGMAnet Inc.

Precision Civil Engineering Inc.

Retail Strategies LLC

SimTek Fence

Presidio Graduate School

SSA Landscape Architects Inc.

SmartCitiesPrevail.org

Public Financial Management Group

STV

Smartcover by Hadronex

Public Restroom Company

Saber

Sol Inc.

Q-Star Technology

Safeguard Properties

Southern California Bronze Company

Quad Knopf

SafeSorb

Southern California Edison

RBF Consulting, a company of Michael Baker Corporation

Salsbury Industries/Mailboxes.com

Southern California Gas Company

2

RJM Design Group Inc.

San Bernardino Associated Governments

RKA Consulting Group

Schneider Electric2

Southern California Library Cooperative

RSG Inc.

Security Lines US

SouthTech Systems

Ralph Andersen and Associates

Sensus

Spohn Ranch Skateparks

Renne Sloan Holtzman Sakai LLP (Public Law Group)1,2

SERVPRO

Sportsplex USA

Severn Trent Services

Springsted Incorporated

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Stanley Convergent Security Solutions Inc. State Water Resources Control Board Stifel SyTech Solutions TAPCO TBWB Strategies TNT Fireworks Tanko Lighting Telefonix The Citadel Group The Energy Network The Hybrid Shop The United States Conference of Mayors TOTER WASTEQUIP Transtech Engineers Inc. Tribal Alliance of Sovereign Indian Nations2 U.S. Communities U.S. Flood Control Corp USA Properties Fund Inc. Union Pacific Railroad United Rentals United Storm Water Inc. University of La Verne

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Regulating

Fracking in California: An Overview by Ed Wilson Hydraulic fracturing, also known as fracking, is a technique to enhance oil recovery. It involves injecting a mixture of water, small amounts of various chemicals and a “proppant” (often sand) at high pressure into a geologic zone. The oil and gas industry has used this process in various forms since the 1940s. As the name implies, that process fractures tightly packed strata and allows oil or natural gas to flow to a wellhead. The proppant helps keep the fractures open. The chemicals, which sometimes include acids, have various purposes, such as maintaining the viscosity of fluid, eliminating bacteria and preventing corrosion or scale deposits. The oil and gas industry’s position is that the technique has allowed countless barrels of oil and cubic feet of natural gas to be produced that would otherwise have to be imported from foreign sources. But starting around 2010, concerned parties noted that in many places in the United States, the use of hydraulic fracturing was not specifically tracked or regulated. The call for government at every level to take action spread quickly. It was particularly loud in California, home of both the environmental movement and an oil and gas industry established in the late

Editor’s Note This Western City section presents three articles about hydraulic fracturing (fracking): an overview, the case for fracking and the case against. These articles are presented for informational purposes only. The views expressed represent the authors’ opinions and not the policies or positions of the League.

1800s; today the Golden State ranks third nationally in production. While California had extensive oil and gas regulations and well-integrity requirements, the state did not specifically track or study hydraulic fracturing.

Legislation Addresses Call for Regulation Eleven bills related to hydraulic fracturing or other well-stimulation techniques were introduced in the California Legislature in 2012. Of those, one became law: Senate Bill 4 (Chapter 313, Statutes of 2013), authored by state Senator Fran Pavley (D-27), who represents parts of Los Angeles and Ventura counties. SB 4 went into effect Jan. 1, 2014. The law: • Requires the Department of Conservation to adopt interim regulations to implement SB 4. Those regulations are currently in effect;

• Defines well-stimulation treatments, including hydraulic fracturing and acid matrix; • Requires an independent scientific study of well stimulation to be commissioned by the Natural Resources Agency and conducted by the California Council of Science and Technology; • Turns the use of well stimulation into an event that must be permitted by the Department of Conservation’s Division of Oil, Gas and Geothermal Resources as of Jan.1, 2015. During calendar year 2014, operators must notify the division in advance of using well stimulation and self-certify that they are meeting the law’s requirements; • Requires baseline and post-stimulation groundwater testing, groundwater and air quality monitoring and water management plans;

Ed Wilson is assistant director of communications for the California Department of Conservation and can be reached at PAO@conservation.ca.gov.

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League of California Cities

www.cacities.org


Underground injection is the most common method of disposing of water used in fracking (referred to as brine) or other substances from shale gas extraction operations. Disposal of flowback and produced water via underground injection is regulated under the Safe Drinking Water Act’s Underground Injection Control program and by SB 4.

More Information Online For additional resources and links, read the online version of this article at www.westerncity.com.

How Fracking Works

BRINE DISPOSAL

OIL & GAS RECOVERY

Base of Underground Sources of Drinking Water

• Ensures transparency by requiring neighbor notification prior to the use of well stimulation and the posting of pre- and post-stimulation reports online that capture a wide variety of data, including water and chemical usage as well as any nearby earthquakes; • Requires the Department of Conservation to work with a number of other concerned agencies — including the Department of Toxic Substances Control, the California Air Resources Board, the State Water Resources Control Board and local and/or regional air and water districts — to adopt rules and regulations specific to well stimulation; • Requires the Division of Oil, Gas and Geothermal Resources to perform random periodic spot-check inspections during well-stimulation treatments; • Requires the Department of Conservation to conduct an environmental impact report (EIR) on the statewide impacts of well-stimulation use; and • Requires disclosure of the chemical composition of hydraulic fracturing fluid to the Department of Conservation, even if a trade secret is claimed. SB 4 was designed to further protect public health and the environment by

enhancing current oil and gas industry regulations. Some environmentalists, however, continue to seek a New Yorkstyle moratorium on hydraulic fracturing until further study is concluded. “I think we ought to give science a chance before deciding on a ban on fracking,” Governor Jerry Brown told Bloomberg.com in October 2013, a month after signing SB 4 into law. “This is a very complicated equation. You can be sure that California is doing everything it can to reduce greenhouse gases and support a sustainable economy.”

Monterey Shale Estimates Downgraded Much of the debate about hydraulic fracturing in California has focused on the Monterey Shale. That 1,750-square-mile formation — running from offshore to the Central Valley and from San Benito County in the north to northern Los Angeles County in the south — was said to hold about 13.7 billion barrels of recoverable oil in a 2011 report by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA). A 2013 University of Southern California study estimated that the Monterey Shale oil boom could create nearly 3 million jobs and $25 billion a year in new taxes. continued

www.westerncity.com

WATER, CHEMICALS & PROPPANT INJECTED

Confining Formation

Confining Formation

Confining Formation BRINE DISPOSAL

OIL AND/OR GAS

Confining Formation

Confining Formation

ENHANCED RECOVERY

Source: U.S. Environmental Protection Agency

Western City, September 2014

23


Regulating Fracking in California: An Overview, continued

In mid-May 2014 the EIA released a new estimate on the Monterey Shale, bringing into question whether it is a bigger potential resource than the Marcellus Shale on the East Coast, the Bakken in North Dakota or the Eagle Ford in Texas. The EIA now estimates that only 600 million barrels — enough to cover U.S. consumption for about a month — can be recovered from the Monterey Shale with existing technology. The revised figure is 96 percent less than originally projected. Unlike those other shale formations, the Monterey Shale is extensively faulted and folded, making things much more difficult for producers. Unlike the type of hydraulic fracturing in other parts of the United States that involve long horizontal wells with substantial water usage, California’s faulted geology makes horizontal wells much less common. The wells in California are primarily vertical wells that use far less water than wells in other states. A 2013 report by the nonprofit organization Ceres, which advocates for sustainability leadership, cites national averages of water use for fracking and states that vertical wells on average use about 85 percent less water than horizontal wells. “From the information we’ve been able to gather, we’ve not seen evidence that oil extraction in this area is very productive

Monterey Shale Estimated Yield 2011 Estimate:  13.7 billion barrels 2014 Revised Estimate: 600 million barrels

Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration

using techniques like fracking,” EIA Petroleum Exploration and Production Analyst John Staub told the Los Angeles Times. Some media pundits and environmental organizations responded to the EIA’s revised estimates for the Monterey Shale by renewing the call for a hydraulic fracturing moratorium: no big recoverable resource, no big payday, no need for a controversial production method. “Regulators and oil producers alike consistently tried to downplay expectations for the short-term benefits of the Monterey Shale formation’s reserves,” Department of Conservation Chief Deputy Director Jason Marshall notes. “SB 4 was never just about the Monterey Shale. Well-stimulation techniques are used to produce oil and gas from a number of existing geologic formations in California.

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“Now, there are a lot of people who would like to halt oil and gas production altogether and move toward other sources of energy,” says Marshall. “We understand that, and the Brown administration is a worldwide leader in encouraging the development and use of sustainable energy. As the state transitions to more sustainable energy, it is critical that we have adequate regulation in place to ensure that our existing oil and gas industry does not cause damage to the environment.” The Department of Conservation held a series of public meetings both before and after issuing interim regulations supporting SB 4, which took effect on Jan. 1, 2014. It received, reviewed and responded to thousands of public comments. The department is currently fine-tuning the interim regulations into the permanent rules that will go into effect at the start of 2015. The public had additional opportunities to provide input on those permanent regulations in summer 2014. “California is known worldwide for its leadership in environmental issues, and we are proposing these regulations with that legacy in mind,” Department of Conservation Director Mark Nechodom says. “They will supplement existing regulations that protect health, safety and the environment through strong wellconstruction standards. We believe that once the proposed regulations go into effect at the start of 2015, we will have in place the strongest environmental and public health protections of any oil- and gas-producing state in the nation, while also ensuring that a key element of California’s economy can maintain its productivity.” ■

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Making the Case for Fracking by Catherine Reheis-Boyd Californians have come to rely on domestic hydraulic fracturing, as conventional oil wells supply 37 percent of California’s daily petroleum needs. Nearly a third of the wells drilled in California are hydraulically fractured at one time or another. Any conventional oil well can undergo hydraulic fracturing to break up a blockage or expand a well opening.

Fracking Can Create Jobs In 2013 economists at California State University, Fresno, found expanded production of the San Joaquin Valley’s Monterey Shale formation — via hydraulic fracturing and other well-stimulation techniques — could create over 195,000 new jobs in a region desperate for economic development. Development of the Monterey Shale formation in the San Joaquin Valley using proven technology holds the potential for enormous economic revitalization throughout the state. In a February 2014 opinion editorial published in the Fresno Bee, economist Jerry Nickelsburg of the University of California, Los Angeles, touted tapping the Monterey Shale formation as one of

four economic strategies that could help turn around the Central Valley’s longstanding recession. A recent analysis of the San Joaquin Valley workforce by the Los Angeles County Economic Development Corporation found nearly 20 percent of all households in the region lived below the poverty line and recommended immediate investment in petroleum industry training programs that, in some cases, could take an unskilled worker and train him or her for a “family wage job” in less than a month. What does all of this information suggest? One could argue that direct lines could be drawn from California’s at-risk communities to opportunities created by petroleum industry energy production. For many communities and families, the petroleum industry represents the kind of jumpstart for which they are hoping. The same could be said for California’s domestic energy production and the increased quality of life it extends to each and every California resident. California is the third largest gasoline-consuming market in the world, behind the United States as a whole and China. Californians

consume about 42 million gallons of gasoline and 14 million gallons of diesel fuel a day. The stability of California’s energy future depends on production of fossil fuels, which has increasingly come to rely on hydraulic fracturing and other innovative well-stimulation techniques.

Addressing Safety Concerns Hydraulic fracturing is a safe and proven technique. The petroleum industry in California has used hydraulic fracturing for nearly 60 years to reach oil reserves deep underground without environmental incident or hazard. Water use has been extremely limited — so much in fact that in 2013, an average golf course in California used more water on a daily basis than an entire hydraulic fracturing project, according to a Western States Petroleum Association analysis. Well-stimulation techniques and oil production have long been regulated by the California Department of Conservation’s Division of Oil, Gas and Geothermal Resources. At the close of the 2013 session, continued on page 28

Catherine Reheis-Boyd is president of the Western States Petroleum Association and can be reached at cathy@wspa.org.

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California Needs to Call Time-Out on Fracking by Damon Nagami Oil and gas drilling has expanded at a breakneck pace nationwide in recent years as a controversial extraction technique called hydraulic fracturing (fracking) has allowed companies to reach previously inaccessible deposits. Unfortunately, safeguards have not kept pace. The oil and gas industry is operating with unprecedented exemptions from bedrock federal laws to protect communities, health and the environment — the Safe Drinking Water Act, the Clean Air Act, the Clean Water Act and toxic waste laws. And states have failed to fill in those gaps. As a result, every community where fracking is taking place has become a battleground. California is no exception. Millions here are living with the reality or threat of fracking or other harmful extraction methods in their communities. The threat is growing as oil companies look to further exploit the Monterey Shale formation, which stretches hundreds of square miles from Northern to Southern California. Yet, despite regulatory legislation the state passed last year, there are not sufficient safeguards to ensure California’s residents,

drinking water, air and communities are protected. In fact, Californians still face uncertainty about where fracking is happening in the state. The best path forward for California would be a statewide moratorium to give officials time to fully evaluate the risks and how to protect against them. That’s something polling shows a majority of Californians support. And it’s something the State of New York has already done.

Locals Act on Concerns About Water, Air and More Unwilling to wait for the state to act, however, local governments are increasingly taking their fracking fate into their own hands. Joining a growing nationwide trend, California communities — from the cities of Los Angeles, Beverly Hills and Culver City to Monterey, Santa Barbara, Santa Cruz and San Benito counties and more — have been exercising their local authority to restrict or halt fracking. Why? The reasons include concerns about water, air quality and seismic activity. continued on page 31

Damon Nagami is a senior attorney at the Natural Resources Defense Council, based in the organization’s Santa Monica office. He can be reached at dnagami@nrdc.org.

www.westerncity.com

Western City, September 2014

27


Making the Case for Fracking, continued from page 26

state legislators passed SB 4 (Chapter 313, Statutes of 2013), a bill that introduced the most stringent regulations on hydraulic fracturing in the nation. These regulations continue to protect California’s environment while balancing the need to continue the production that is securing the state’s energy future. Governor Jerry Brown and the Legislature understood the need for balance in 2013. Their thoughtful leadership was on display yet again during the 2014 session when anti-oil activists attempted to push through a statewide moratorium on hydraulic fracturing. A moratorium would have effectively curtailed conventional production statewide, impacting jobs, state and local tax revenues and future economic development. If these moratoriums were to succeed, the casualties would be California consumers, workers and job seekers.

A search through the spring 2014 archives of the Los Angeles Times will yield editorials calling for local community moratoriums and citing concerns over earthquakes. However, a study conducted by Cardno Entrix, which examined the Inglewood Oil Field in the Los Angeles area, showed no evidence of a linkage between hydraulic fracturing and dangerous seismic activity.

California is

Despite the assertions of opponents, hydraulic fracturing will continue to be a safe and efficient technique that can be the key to California’s recovery. ■

the United

the third largest gasolineconsuming market in the world, behind States as a whole

More Information Online

and China.

For additional resources and links to reports referenced here, read the online version of this article at www.westerncity.com.

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Engaging Your City’s Youth

Through the Arts

by Mary Beth Barber

Participants in the Mariachi Master Apprentice Program learn beneficial skills and discipline that also help them in other areas of their lives.

The arts bring kids to school even on the rainiest days, the late columnist William Safire once noted, and it’s still true today. The arts also play a vital role in a community’s quality of life and contribute to a vibrant local economy. Cities can participate directly in youth arts programs that have lasting impacts. Arts programs benefit not only the young people who participate but also the broader community.

Music and Performing Arts Improve Life Skills and More For example, the City of San Fernando invests directly in an award-winning Mariachi Master Apprentice Program. Launched in 2001 as an experiment, the program has garnered international recognition. The program’s effect on young musicians is impressive. Over the past decade 100 percent of the students enrolled in the program have graduated. Typically comparable rates are less than

60 percent. Teen participants take pride in their heritage and cultural identity, and graduates of the program return to mentor younger students. The program received the National Arts and Humanities Youth Program Award from the President’s Committee on the Arts and the Humanities in 2012. “They learn to be at rehearsals on time and to come prepared,” says instructor Sergio Alonso. “They start to apply these skills in different aspects of their lives.” continued on page 38

Mary Beth Barber is special projects coordinator for the California Arts Council and can be reached at mbarber@cac.ca.gov. For more about the California Arts Council, visit www.arts.ca.gov. www.westerncity.com

Western City, September 2014

29


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California Needs to Call Time-Out on Fracking, continued from page 27

The state is in the midst of a crippling drought that has left water supplies so stressed it hinders the ability to fight wildfires, and fracking is a water-intensive practice. Yet, industry downplays the amount of water California wells use by saying other parts of the country require even more to frack. That doesn’t ease concerns increased fracking could further strain already dwindling supplies here — especially when most of the water used in fracking is lost from the water cycle forever, according to reports from the U.S. Government Accountability Office, Downstream Strategies and San Jose State University. And fracking puts the state’s limited water supply at risk of contamination from explosive methane and cancercausing chemicals. Americans all over the country have reported they can no longer use their well water — or worse, have gotten sick — after fracking moves in.

Californians know we have to be extra careful with our limited water resources; this should give our leaders pause. Fracking also adds to our air pollution problems. Of the dangerous substances emitted into the air from oil and gas production operations, chemicals referred to as volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are the largest group and typically evaporate easily into the air. They are primarily found in oil and gas itself, but are also a byproduct of fuel combustion to operate pumps and engines and are found in chemical additives used in oil and gas production. Benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, xylene, hexane, acrolein, acetaldehyde, and formaldehyde are common VOCs released during oil and gas production, according to a report from the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment, Air Pollution Control Division.

Opening up new areas to fracking will bring harmful air contaminants to more backyards and communities. These contaminants have been linked to respiratory and neurological problems, birth defects and cancer. In addition to these health concerns, scientists have confirmed that earthquakes linked to oil and gas production activities have been happening throughout the United States. The U.S. Geological Survey reports that earthquakes with a magnitude higher than 3.0 have increased significantly in the central and eastern United States in the past decade, with 450 quakes from 2010 to 2013, compared to a historical average of about 20 per year. If frackingrelated quakes are rattling places like Oklahoma and Ohio, what could the impact be here? Even low-magnitude quakes can threaten critical infrastructure. continued

www.westerncity.com

Western City, September 2014

31


California Needs to Call Time-Out on Fracking, continued

Despite all of the concerns, industry continues its campaign to gain access to the state’s oil while fighting real safeguards at every turn. Our leaders should not fall for it — especially when the potential benefits from fracking are speculative at best. For one, the amount of recoverable oil in the Monterey Shale formation, which has driven much of the hype to expand fracking in the state, remains uncertain. Once believed to hold as much as two-thirds of the country’s recoverable shale oil, federal officials downgraded their estimate in May 2014 by 96 percent — to roughly 32 days worth of oil. If this is accurate, it underscores the absurdity of rushing recklessly ahead.

Economic Benefits Overstated Meanwhile, the industry’s claims of economic benefits are overstated. When five leading economists from UC Berkeley, UCLA, the University of Southern California and UC Santa Barbara reviewed an industry-backed report outlining alleged economic benefits from fracking, they found it had major flaws, including inflated job and state revenue predictions. This backs up what we’ve seen in other states: Fracking does not bring an influx of jobs to the local community. For the most part, crews of specialized experts are brought in from out-of-state to do the work. continued on page 46

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YES Program graduates proudly display their diplomas. below Savannah Ayala built her skills and confidence through the program.

Monrovia’s YES Program Opens Doors for

At-Risk Teens Luis Gil, 18, was failing school. He received 23 Fs in a row on his report cards by the time he was a high-school sophomore. Gil was cutting class and getting into trouble; he had given his future little thought. David Castillo, 18, couldn’t sit in class very long without getting into some kind of trouble. He had a penchant for fighting, which eventually led to his arrest. Although he excelled in physical education and earned a C in math, he lacked the motivation to apply himself in any other class because he was counting on the military to accept him if he graduated from high school. Savannah Ayala, 16, was a shy girl barely getting by in school with a 2.0 grade point average. She was looking for some responsibility, structure and a way to develop professional skills.

The issues that put these teens at risk made them ideal candidates for the City of Monrovia’s Youth Employment Service (YES) Program, which provides mentoring and intervention geared toward high-school students who have failing grades, an unstable home life, a police record or just a bad attitude. Now in its eighth year, the YES Program has successfully graduated over 145 at-risk kids.

Implementing an Effective Approach Located in Los Angeles County, the City of Monrovia has a population of just under 40,000. In 2007 Monrovia was grappling with gang violence in some of its neighborhoods. As city leaders examined potential strategies to address the problem, they found studies indicating

effectively combating gang activity required dedicating 70 percent of resources to prevention and intervention and 30 percent to suppression. In Monrovia at that time, this formula was reversed: 80 percent was being spent on suppression, while only 20 percent was being spent on prevention and intervention. In addition, fewer youth employment opportunities existed in the city. Funding for internship programs had dwindled, and employers seemed less willing to hire high-school students. continued on page 40

The City of Monrovia won the Ruth Vreeland Award for Engaging Youth in City Government in the 2013 Helen Putnam Award for Excellence program. For more about the award program, visit www.helenputnam.org.

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Filmmaker M. Night Shyamalan (center) poses with GULCH teens and staff members. below GULCH youths enjoy a round of disc golf.

Eureka Reaches Teens With the

GULCH

In the City of Eureka, a coastal town in Northern California (pop. 27,021) many teens struggle with the same issues as millions of their peers throughout the nation — challenges ranging from obesity and bullying to drugs, alcohol and depression. The City of Eureka was determined to create a program that incorporated personal growth and characterbuilding into its activities and where teens could feel safe to be themselves.

Creating a Supportive Environment “All of our youth programs are facilitated by role models who are trained to celebrate youths for their individuality, contribution and achievements,” says Donna Wood, deputy director of Parks and Recreation for Eureka. “The facilitators’ job is to create an environment where the expectation is for youths to be accepted and recognized for tangible successes and the character they display. This approach provides opportunities for personal growth and for youths to discover their potential, learn to set goals and have the confidence to pursue them.” continued on page 42

The City of Eureka won a 2013 Helen Putnam Award for Excellence in the Community Services and Economic Development category. For more about the award program, visit www.helenputnam.org.

www.westerncity.com

Western City, September 2014

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Western City magazine’s job opportunity section is the source for job seekers looking for positions in local government. When you place a job opportunity ad in Western City

Call Pam Maxwell-Blodgett at (800) 262-1801 to place a display (boxed) ad or for rate and deadline information, or email admanager@westerncity.com. Website Job Postings Display ads are posted on our website at no additional charge. But if you miss the deadline for getting your job opportunity ad into the magazine, you can post it on the Western City website right away. To post your job opportunity ad on our automated website, visit www.westerncity.com or contact Western City’s administrative assistant; email: adminwc@cacities.org; phone: (916) 658-8223.

magazine, it will be posted at no additional charge on our website. For rates and deadlines, visit www.westerncity. com and click on the Advertise link.

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League of California Cities

The El Dorado Hills Community Services District (CSD) is an independent special district that owns and manages over 294 acres of land and serves a largely developed suburban population located east of the Sacramento County Line. The CSD is seeking a Director of Administration and Finance to assist the General Manager with tasks including board governance, planning issues, special projects, human resources, and risk management. A Bachelor’s degree is required with major coursework in recreation, public administration, or a related field. A Master’s degree is highly desirable. Candidates must possess at least five years of increasingly responsible supervisory experience in recreation, parks, and public agency administration. The annual salary for the Director of Administration and Finance is negotiable and dependent on qualifications. If you are interested in this outstanding opportunity, please apply online at www.bobmurrayassoc.com. Please contact Ms. Valerie Phillips at (916) 784-9080 should you have any questions. Position is open until filled. phone 916•784•9080 fax 916•784•1985 www.bobmurrayassoc.com

www.cacities.org


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City Manager, City of Rancho Palos Verdes, CA The City of Rancho Palos Verdes (population 42,000) is situated atop the beautiful hills and bluffs of the Palos Verdes Peninsula. Residents enjoy all the benefits of a bedroom community with a seaside location. Rancho Palos Verdes is now seeking a City Manager to oversee its 62-full-time and approximately 50 part-time employees; the City has a FY2014-2015 budget of $36 million with $11.1 million marked for infrastructure projects. The City Council seeks a strong leader and skilled administrator who has the ability to inspire City staff. The City Manager will be an innovative individual with excellent management and listening skills who demonstrates a collaborative, team-building style. Candidates for this position must possess a strong background in municipal management and/or comparable/ applicable private sector experience and a Bachelor’s Degree in Public Administration, Business Administration, or a related field; prior experience as a City Manager in a city of comparable size and complexity or as an Assistant City Manager in a larger city is desirable. Salary for this position is negotiable and is dependent upon qualifications. If you are interested in this outstanding opportunity, please apply online at www.bobmurrayassoc.com. Please contact Bob Murray at (916) 784-9080 should you have any questions. Brochure available.

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CALIFORNIA STATEWIDE COMMUNITIES DEVELOPMENT AUTHORITY

Closing date September 12, 2014. phone 916•784•9080 fax 916•784•1985 www.bobmurrayassoc.com

County Attorney Mesa County, Colorado

Mesa County, on the western slope of Colorado, is framed by the Colorado National Monument and the Grand Mesa National Forest. The County Seat is Grand Junction which serves as the health care services provider, banking and retail trade center for a large geographical area of western Colorado and eastern Utah. Reporting to a three member Board of Commissioners, this opportunity is a balance between being an excellent County Attorney to the Board and being a progressive manager of the offices’ highly skilled staff (6 attorneys and 8 ft/pt staff). Experience with Federal Agencies and strong litigation skills preferred. School of Law graduate, Colorado Bar, and 8 years experience required. Hiring range is from $110,000 to $140,000 DOQ with excellent benefits.

Please send your cover letter and resume electronically to:

Peckham & McKenney apply@peckhamandmckenney.com Resumes acknowledged within two business days. Call Phil McKenney at (866) 912-1919 for more information. A detailed brochure is available at www.peckhamandmckenney.com.

Providing California’s local governments with an effective tool for the timely financing of community-based public benefit projects.

Filing deadline will be

September 22, 2014

Since 1988, more than 500 cities, counties and special districts have used CSCDA as their conduit issuer.

Photo/art credits Cover: Courtesy of the Los Angeles Tourism & Convention Board Page 3: Ase/Shutterstock.com

Page 29: Courtesy of the City of San Fernando and California Arts Council

Pages 4 & 5: Shutter_M/Shutterstock.com

Page 30: top, Dhawit Ritdhiwikrom/Shutterstock.com

Page 9: Rawpixel/Shutterstock.com

Pages 30 & 31: SueC/Shutterstock.com

Page 10: RyFlip/Shutterstock.com

Pages 32 & 33: IRC/Shutterstock.com

Page 12: Courtesy of the Los Angeles Tourism & Convention Board

Page 34: Courtesy of the City of Monrovia and League of California Cities

Pages 13, 15, 17, 18, 19 & 21: Jeremy Sykes, courtesy of the League of California Cities Page 22: PhotoStock10/Shutterstock.com; Peerasak Kamngoen/ Shutterstock.com;

Pages 38 & 39: Brian O’Reilly, courtesy of the Vallejo Community Arts Foundation

Page 26: Iuril/Shutterstock.com

Pages 42–45: Courtesy of the City of Eureka and League of California Cities

Page 27: Spirit of America/Shutterstock.com Page 28: Han Maomin/Shutterstock.com

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Sponsored by:

Page 35: Courtesy of the City of Eureka and League of California Cities

Page 46: Fotoarek/Shutterstock.com Arts Foundation

www.cacommunities.org Western City, September 2014

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Engaging Your City’s Youth Through the Arts, continued from page 29

Cities can participate directly in youth arts programs that have lasting impacts. J

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Using the Arts to Address Youth-Related Issues

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City Of Merced Fire Chief City of Merced, California | $112,955.88 – $137,298.36 Annually Merced is a located in the heart of California’s Central Valley with easy access to the San Francisco Bay Area and Yosemite National Park. The City is home to the newest campus of the University of California which provides a dynamic resource to the City and community. The City of Merced (population 81,130) is seeking a leader who is innovative, energetic, collaborative and progressive as their next Fire Chief. The Fire Department has a proud history dating back to 1873. The department has a staff of 63 personnel with 5 stations covering the City of Merced. Candidates must have a BA in Public Administration, professional firefighting experience, five (5) years in a supervisory/management position at Division Chief or higher with a Chief Officer certification. To apply please visit the City of Merced website at www.cityofmerced.org. Final filing date: September 30, 2014

The arts can also help address major social issues. In an 18-month period between 2009 and 2011, several high-school students in Palo Alto committed suicide. “These tragic events rocked the community,” says Rhyena Halpern, assistant director of the Community Services Department of the City of Palo Alto. Palo Alto responded by developing Project Safety Net, a suicide-prevention initiative. The collaboration included the Teen Arts Council, which develops original performing-arts productions by teens on the subject of suicide, as well as performing and visual arts classes addressing other concerns. Cities Work With Schools To Provide Arts Services Some cities take an active role in providing arts services in schools. The City of Pasadena’s Arts & Culture Commission invests directly in children and youth. The “My Masterpieces” partnership with the Pasadena Unified School District and 10 nonprofits provides arts education programming for grades K–6, including teacher training, family access, field trips and classroom curricula. The Pasadena Arts & Culture Commission also supports the Northwest Student

City Manager, City of Arvin, CA The City of Arvin (population 19,000), located in Kern County about 15 miles southeast of the City of Bakersfield, is nestled against Bear Mountain and depicts a small town atmosphere that is driven by its agricultural community. The City is now seeking a professional City Manager with effective communication skills, who will encourage open and transparent relationships. The ideal candidate will possess at least 5 years progressively responsible experience in an administrative, managerial, or staff capacity in a government agency or similar complex organization with comparable services and issues. Experience working in a multicultural community is valued. Bilingual candidates are highly desirable. A Bachelor’s degree in public or business administration or a related field is required; a Master’s degree is preferred. The salary range for the City Manager is $115,000-$146,777 annually; placement within the range is DOQ. Contact Valerie Phillips at (916) 784-9080 with questions. To review a detailed job description and/or to apply for this position, please visit our website at www.bobmurrayassoc.com. Closing date September 12, 2014. phone 916•784•9080 fax 916•784•1985 www.bobmurrayassoc.com

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League of California Cities

Photos taken by local students are exhibited in Vallejo City Hall.


Ambassador Program for high-school students by hiring them to serve as docents during ArtsNight Pasadena. The students learn valuable job skills, and the various neighborhoods benefit from community interaction. A Win-Win Approach Arts programming can also give youths appreciation for their hometowns. About Productions, an arts nonprofit organization in Pasadena, created a program where youths engage in discussions with their neighbors and then use that dialogue as inspiration to create plays and a community mural. Funding from the City of Pasadena allowed About Productions to conduct additional workshops in local high schools, and one teacher said her students now want to explore their own cultural history and create a play as well. A very modest investment can help foster community interaction with youth and families. After displaying artwork from the Vallejo Community Arts Foundation’s youth summer camp program, the City of Vallejo opted to remove the 1970s artwork in city hall and invest in a professional arthanging system. Exhibits change quarterly and alternate between professional artists and youth programs. An inexpensive reception is held for each show, drawing people to city hall and encouraging residents to participate in civic life.

These are just a few examples of cities investing directly in arts programming for youth. Hundreds of programs like these operate throughout California, with limitless possibilities for local government officials and staff to engage the young people in their community through the performing and visual arts. ■ J

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Police Chief, City of Aurora, CO The City of Aurora, situated on prairie grasslands and rolling hills, offers something for every lifestyle, from convenient urban living to master-planned communities. Nearly 350,000 residents and 10,000 businesses choose to call Aurora home. The City covers 154 square miles and is Colorado’s safest city among those with more than 250,000 residents. The City is now seeking a Police Chief who will be a strong and compassionate leader. The City is especially interested in candidates with an understanding of and sensitivity to the importance of diversity in the workplace. Candidates must possess at least ten years of senior command level experience in a large police department, including at least five years of supervisory experience at a senior management level. In addition, candidates must also possess substantive knowledge of and experience with community policing principles and practices and gang and drug-oriented programs and strategies. Competitive candidates will be technologically savvy and possess strong fiscal and budgetary management skills. A Bachelor’s Degree in Public Administration, Business Administration, Law, Criminal Justice, or a related field is required. A Master’s Degree in one of these fields is preferred. The annual salary for the Police Chief is negotiable, DOQ. Apply online at www.bobmurrayassoc.com. Contact Regan Williams at (916) 784-9080 with questions. Closing date September 12, 2014. phone 916•784•9080 fax 916•784•1985 www.bobmurrayassoc.com

Public Works Director

City of Hermosa Beach, CA

H

ome to one of the most highly acclaimed beaches in the world, the City of Hermosa Beach (pop. 19,574) is seeking a new Public Works Director. This full-service urban coastal community in Los Angeles County spans 1.3 square miles and is one of the “greenest” cities in California. Reporting to the City Manager, the Director oversees a staff of 21 who support a full range of Public Works activities and services. The ideal candidate will be an empowering and collaborative manager with strong leadership skills. He/she will display an engaged and personable style coupled with outstanding interpersonal and communication skills. The individual selected will have a generalist background in Public Works with impressive depth and experience in managing capital projects. Five (5) years of progressively responsible and varied professional public works experience, including at least three (3) years of service in a supervisory or administrative capacity and a Bachelor’s degree are required.

The current salary range is $123,600 - $143,100. Salary is supplemented by a performance bonus and attractive benefits package. This recruitment will close at midnight on Sunday, October 5, 2014. Visit our website for extensive information and to apply online – www.tbcrecruiting.com. Teri Black • 424.296.3111 Carolyn Seeley • 949.487.7606

Western City, September 2014

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Monrovia’s YES Program Opens Doors for At-Risk Teens, continued from page 34

The program reaches out to at-risk youth and provides a structure to help guide them in their lives and career paths. J

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Finance Director

City of Sebastopol CA Sebastopol, California (population 7,379) is a rare blend of small-town charm, big-city sophistication, environmental sensibility, and progressive values. An hour north of San Francisco and 20 minutes from the rugged Sonoma coast, Sebastopol’s gently rolling, redwood-studded hills are at the heart of a region known for spectacular scenery, ideal climate, sustainable agriculture, endless recreation options, outstanding schools, and a superior quality of life. The Finance Director oversees the city’s financial operations and accounting practices, and oversees and directs treasury activities for the organization. In addition to managing the city’s financial data, responsibilities include budgeting, audit, tax reporting, employee benefits, and payroll. The Finance Director also shares responsibility for Human Resources with the City Manager. HR experience is desirable but not required. Requirements include a Bachelor’s degree in a related field and four to five years of relevant experience and/or training, or equivalent combination of education and experience. The salary range is $8,143 to $9,898 monthly.

Contact: City Manager Larry McLaughlin lwmclaughlin@juno.com • (707) 823-1153 • http://ci.sebastopol.ca.us/

Application deadline: October 1, 2014

Assistant Chief Financial Officer Las Vegas Valley Water District, NV The Las Vegas Valley Water District (LVVWD) is a not-for-profit agency that provides water to over 1 million people in Southern Nevada as one of seven member agencies that make up the Southern Nevada Water Authority (SNWA). The District seeks an Assistant Chief Financial Officer with expertise, seasoned professional judgment, and effective communication skills. The position also serves as Assistant Chief Financial Officer to SNWA. As major financial software system conversions are required, a background in system conversion project management would be extremely beneficial. A Bachelor’s Degree with major coursework in finance, economics, accounting, business administration, or a closely related field is required, as well as at least five years of progressively responsible financial management experience, at least two of which at a director or assistant director level; or an equivalent combination of training and experience. A Certified Public Accountant with a Master’s Degree in Accounting, Finance, or Business Administration is preferred, as is public utility or governmental experience. The annual salary for this position is $135,526-$170,000; placement within this range will be DOQ. Apply online at www.bobmurrayassoc.com. Contact Bob Murray or Gary Phillips at (916) 784-9080 with questions. Closing date September 12, 2014. phone 916•784•9080 fax 916•784•1985 www.bobmurrayassoc.com

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As a result, the city partnered with the Santa Anita Family YMCA, Monrovia Unified School District and Monrovia Chamber of Commerce to develop and launch the YES Program, which has three main goals: 1. Ensure Monrovia’s continued success as a regional employment hub; 2. Provide on-the-job training and life skills to Monrovia youth; and 3. Establish a path toward a job and/ or college and life readiness for local youth. The program reaches out to at-risk youth in the community and provides a structure to help guide them in their lives and career paths. To qualify, each student must submit an application. A panel interviews each applicant. The panel selects between 12 and 23 students (depending on available funding) for internship positions in city departments, the YMCA and school district offices. Supervisors assign daily tasks and projects and coach each intern on appropriate work methods and behavior. Mentors meet with each intern weekly to act as a role model and offer guidance. In addition to work, interns attend weekly training sessions on a number of topics, including improving customer service skills, professional image, business and workplace etiquette, networking and teamwork, character in the workplace, preparing a résumé and public speaking. These positions pay $9.00 per hour, and students have an opportunity to earn $2,268 during this internship.

Tracking the Program’s Successes Among students who participated in the program, grade point averages increased by 14 percent, and absenteeism and tardiness decreased significantly. Program participants have gone on to college or landed jobs working for the city and in the community. The YES Program gave Luis Gil a chance to observe Fire Department operations and inspired him to pursue a career.

www.cacities.org


Gil is currently enrolled in a local community college working on obtaining his fire safety and paramedic credentials while earning a paycheck at a local nonprofit organization that provides services to the homeless population. Today he is an articulate young man with an appreciation for how the program has helped change his life. “The YES Program got me off the streets and helped me change my perspective on life,” Gil says. “Now my mom is proud of me.” The city hired Savannah Ayala to work part time at the reception desk after she graduated from the YES Program. Her confidence can be seen when she greets people coming into Monrovia City Hall, and the experience has opened her eyes to the different types of career paths she may be able to pursue. “The YES Program taught me responsibility — and to show up on time, to earn my own money and how to manage my money,” says Ayala. The program also helped her overcome her shyness in a professional setting. Participating in the YES Program helped David Castillo understand the importance of having structure in his life. After graduating from the program, Castillo landed a job working in the city’s Community Development Department where he has identified a new career goal; he wants to be an architect. He stopped fighting on the streets and joined a boxing club, using money earned through the YES Program to pay for the club membership. “I was flattered that the city decided to hire me,” says Castillo. “I think that they saw my work ethic and that I could be thorough with the projects they gave me. The YES Program was a great opportunity — it’s a program I recommend for any students who are starting to go down the wrong path.” “The YES Program emerged when youth mentorship and job-training programs in Monrovia were scarce and the need for them was high,” says Monrovia Mayor Mary Ann Lutz. “Over the past seven years, we have seen so many young people succeed, through a truly joint effort of community members and organizations stepping up to support them.

www.westerncity.com

YES provides the opportunity that we all want to be given — the opportunity to show that we can contribute to our community, that we can do more.” ■

More Information Online For a link to a video about the YES Program, read the online version of this article at www.westerncity.com.

Contact: Danielle Tellez, human resources manager, City of Monrovia; email: dtellez@ ci.monrovia.ca.us; phone: (626) 932-5518.

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Solid Waste & Recycling Manager City of Berkeley, CA The City of Berkeley (population 112,000) is a highly educated and ethnically, economically, socially, and politically diverse community. The City is now seeking a Solid Waste and Recycling Manager to plan, organize, and direct the activities of the Solid Waste Management Division. Candidates with the ability to multi-task, prioritize, and wear a variety of different hats will be valuable in the position. The City is seeking a strong leader with exceptional interpersonal and communication skills. Candidates must possess a Bachelor’s degree with major coursework in environmental science, engineering, business administration, or a closely related field; and five years of contract and program management experience of which three years were in the field of solid waste management and two years of which has included the planning, development, implementation, and management of a sizable waste collection or recycling program. Progressively responsible management and program planning related experience may be substituted for the college coursework on a year-for-year basis. A Master’s degree in Business Administration, Solid Waste Management, Engineering, or a related field is desirable. The annual salary range for the position is $117,492 $141,996, DOQ. Apply online at www.bobmurrayassoc.com. Contact Joel Bryden at (916) 784-9080 with questions. Closing date September 19, 2014. phone 916•784•9080 fax 916•784•1985 www.bobmurrayassoc.com

Director of Information Technology City of Merced, California | $96,858.24 – $117,731.88 Annually Merced is located in the heart of the Central Valley with easy access to the San Francisco Bay Area and Yosemite National Park. With a population of 80,130, Merced features a charming downtown with historic homes as well as new subdivisions. The City is home to the newest campus of the University of California which provides a dynamic resource to City staff and the Community. The City is currently seeking a highly capable individual to provide leadership in the planning and direction of operations in the Information Technology Department. The position requires a BA/BS in Management Information Systems, Computer Science, Business Administration or related field and 8 years of management involving professional IT work overseeing supervisory and professional staff. To apply please visit the City of Merced website at www.cityofmerced.org. Final filing date: September 30, 2014

Western City, September 2014

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Eureka Reaches Teens With the GULCH, continued from page 35

“We have leaders and coordinators on staff today who grew up in Eureka youth programs,” says Brian Millett, recreation coordinator. “They saw such value in their experience that they chose to follow a career path to pass that on to today’s youth, bringing these experiences full circle.”

GULCH staff member Nathan Davis-Floyd plays a card game with teen participants.

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AVERY ASSOCIATES Upcoming Recruitments: Calaveras County – Director of Public Works City of Loveland, CO – Parks and Recreation Director City of Paso Robles – Public Works Director City of Roseville – Environmental Utilities Director

City staff was confident that this same formula had the potential to create long-term impacts on local teens. “The teen population is at an age where they are discovering who they are and starting on a path that will determine who they are as adults,” says Millett.

Hitting the Target

Recent Appointments: City of Benicia – Finance Director City of Camarillo – Assistant Director of Community Development City of Half Moon Bay – City Manager City of Hercules – City Manager City of Oakland – Employee Relations Director City of San Mateo – City Manager City of San Ramon – Assistant City Manager City of Santa Cruz – Human Resources Director City of Santa Cruz – Information Technology Director City of Santa Rosa – Chief Financial Officer City of Saratoga – City Manager City of South San Francisco – City Manager City of Sunnyvale – City Manager

William Avery & Associates Management Consultants 31/2 N. Santa Cruz Ave., Suite A Los Gatos, CA 95030 408.399.4424 Fax: 408.399.4423 email: jobs@averyassoc.net www.averyassoc.net

The challenge, according to Millett, was to develop and market programs that would appeal to teens’ interests and get them in the door. “Teens are a difficult group to market to — in addition to sports, academics and their social life, we’re competing with social media,” he says. “The trick was to create programming the teens would find ‘cool’ enough to buy into.”

Please check our website at http://www.averyassoc.net/jobs for formal position announcements.

Community & Economic Development Director City of Salinas, CA The City of Salinas (approximate population 154,484) offers a unique combination of climate, natural resources, and people. Salinas is known as “The Salad Bowl of the World” for its production of lettuce, broccoli, mushrooms, and strawberries, along with numerous other crops. The City is seeking a Community and Economic Development Director who will provide strong visionary and collaborative leadership. The ideal candidate will demonstrate an entrepreneurial spirit and forward-thinking philosophy. Trust, confidence, professionalism, and employee development will be highly valued traits. Experience working in an ethnically diverse community is essential. Candidates must possess a Bachelor’s Degree in Urban Planning, Planning Administration, Public Administration, or a closely related field and seven years of increasingly responsible experience in managing a community development program, including five years of administrative and management responsibility. A Master’s Degree in Public Administration, Planning, Economics, Marketing, or a field relevant to the requirements of the position is highly desirable. The annual salary for the Community and Economic Development Director is $130,476 - $158,592 (before a 13% salary concession that is in effect through June 2015). If you are interested in this outstanding opportunity, please apply online at www.bobmurrayassoc.com. Contact Valerie Phillips at (916) 784-9080 with questions. Brochure available. Closing date September 12, 2014. phone 916•784•9080 fax 916•784•1985 www.bobmurrayassoc.com

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League of California Cities

Participants in the GULCH Teen Filmmaking Workshop share a laugh between takes.

www.cacities.org


The City of Eureka began by rebranding the teen program as the “GULCH,” an acronym standing for the core values they wanted to develop in teen participants: Growing Unity, Leadership, Community and Health. The GULCH introduced itself to the community by partnering with a local school and offering a weekly program based in the classroom, where teens earned community service hours by developing monthly GULCH events. These events included Eureka’s first-ever teen skateboard competition as well as a pilot music program where teens wrote, produced and recorded original songs. Involving the teens in the development of programming yielded positive results. The teen skateboard competition was a huge success and is now in its fourth year. The pilot music program generated the song “Kids Today,” a teen empowerment anthem featured on local radio stations and performed live at local venues. continued

In-kind donations and volunteer support enable the City of Eureka to offer high quality programs with little or no cost to the city beyond personnel expenses. J

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District Manager San Lorenzo Valley Water District, CA The San Lorenzo Valley Water District is headquartered in the community of Boulder Creek, California, a small town located approximately 45 minutes southwest from San Jose in the beautiful mountains and redwoods of northern Santa Cruz County, and serves more than 7,300 metered connections in the San Lorenzo Valley. The Board of Directors is now seeking a District Manager to lead a staff of 24 fulltime employees and administer a FY2014/2015 budget of $7 million. Candidates must possess knowledge of the functions, authorities, and responsibilities of water districts; water treatment and distribution principles and practices; and applicable Federal, State, and local laws, codes, and regulations. A Bachelor’s Degree in Business or Public Administration, Engineering, or a related field and five years of increasingly responsible upper-level management experience in a public sector setting (preferably in the area of water treatment and distribution) are required, as is possession of a valid Class C California Driver’s License and a safe driving record. A master’s degree is desirable. Salary for this position is currently under review and will be DOQ. Interested individuals may apply online at www.bobmurrayassoc.com. Please contact Regan Williams at (916) 784-9080 with questions. Brochure with further details available. Closing date October 10, 2014. phone 916•784•9080 fax 916•784•1985 www.bobmurrayassoc.com

Chief of Police

CITY OF CRESCENT CITY Salary: $80,204 - $101,206/annually Plus excellent benefits

The City of Crescent City is seeking a highly energetic, motivated individual with strong leadership and management skills for the Chief of Police. Under administrative direction of the City Manager, manages and administers all activities of the Police Department; Any combination of education and experience providing the necessary knowledge, skills and abilities would be qualifying; a typical candidate will possess ten years of broad and extensive municipal law enforcement experience (with a minimum of three years experience in a supervisory law enforcement management position); a Bachelor’s Degree in Police Science, Criminal Justice, Public Administration, or related field, is required. A Master’s Degree in any of the related fields is desirable. Candidates must possess or be able to obtain a valid California Driver’s License and a POST Management Certificate. Graduation from the P.O.S.T. Command College is highly desirable. A full description and application materials are available at www.crescentcity.org or contact Cathy Hafterson, Human Resources Manager at (707) 464-7483. Open until filled. EOE

www.westerncity.com

Western City, September 2014

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Eureka Reaches Teens With the GULCH, continued

The GULCH recruited highly qualified and skilled program leaders who shared interests with the teens. These leaders created workshops and programs based around those common interests. “Our philosophy was to choose youth mentors who are motivated by the desire to offer J

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rewarding experiences that have a positive impact on youth,” says Millett. With the program leaders’ guidance, the GULCH launched two new weekly programs: “Fresh Voices,” a music production program facilitated by a local hip-hop artist; and a filmmaking workshop led by a R

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Proudly celebrating our 10th anniversary! We’d like to thank the 300+ client agencies that have entrusted us with their most critical recruitments, afforded us the opportunity to meet and place hundreds of exceptional candidates, and made us their Preferred Recruiter. We’d also like to thank our many placements that remain in those same positions today. Lastly, thank you to the team that supports us each and every day – Joyce Johnson (Office Manager), Cathy West-Packard (marketing/design), Becky Bach (research specialist), Kevin Johnson (research associate), and Bradley Frank (technology guru). We look forward to continuing to serve local government agencies and candidates with integrity, respect, and personal commitment.

local award-winning filmmaker. The workshop drew the attention of Hollywood filmmaker M. Night Shyamalan, who was in the City of Eureka shooting a movie and served as a guest speaker at the workshop.

Building Community Support and Participation The GULCH also focused on developing partnerships with volunteer members of the community and local businesses who offered in-kind donations and/or services. Teachers in local schools have offered required service hours or extra credit for specific GULCH programs. Community members also volunteer their time to facilitate workshops based on the teens’ growing interests. In the past six months, the GULCH has hosted workshops focusing on poetry, skateboarding, graffiti art and cosmetology. In-kind donations

Bobbi C. Peckham & Phil McKenney

(866) 912-1919 www.peckhamandmckenney.com

Community Development Director/City Engineer City of Pittsburg, CA

Pittsburg is a growing, culturally rich and diverse community of over 66,000 ideally located at the confluence of the Sacramento and San Joaquin rivers. The city has an immediate need for a City Engineer, but is ideally looking for a Community Development Director who would serve as City Engineer as well as manage the engineering, planning and building divisions with a total of 24 staff. Development experience along with the ability to manage the day-to-day as well as look to the future strongly desired; CA Civil Engineer, Bachelor’s degree, and a minimum of 10 years experience with 3 of those in a management/ supervisory capacity required, Master’s degree preferred. Salary range is from $133,128 to TBD depending on qualifications along with comprehensive benefits.

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League of California Cities

Please send your cover letter and resume electronically to:

Peckham & McKenney apply@peckhamandmckenney.com Resumes acknowledged within two business days. Call Phil McKenney at (866) 912-1919 for more information. A detailed brochure is available at www.peckhamandmckenney.com. Filing deadline: September 29,2014.

www.cacities.org


and volunteer support enable the City of Eureka to offer high quality programs with little or no cost to the city beyond personnel expenses. “From the minute teens walk through the doors of the GULCH, they feel safe to be exactly who they are, to have their voices heard and feel a sense of belonging and ownership,” says Klark Swan, former Eureka youth program participant and current GULCH coordinator. “The GULCH is a place where teens want to be because they get to experience innovative, fun activities that they helped design.” ■ Contact: Donna Wood, deputy director, Parks and Recreation, City of Eureka; phone: (707) 268-1858; email: dwood@ci.eureka.ca.gov.

Monthly GULCH events included Eureka’s first-ever teen skateboard competition and a pilot music program.

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Opening in September . . .

Fire Chief

Livermore-Pleasanton Fire Department GULCH staff member Zach Lehner offers tips to teen participant Zariah Larsen as she prepares to record a song. below The teen skateboarding competition has proved extremely popular with local youth.

at left

Deputy Fire Chief

Menlo Park Fire Protection District

Assistant City Managers City of Pleasanton

Community Development Director City of Fairfield

Finance Director City of Goleta

Teri Black • 424.296.3111

www.westerncity.com

Carolyn Seeley • 949.487.7606

Western City, September 2014

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California Needs to Call Time-Out on Fracking, continued from page 32

And the few jobs that are created locally are subject to the boom-and-bust cycle inherent in oil and gas development. 

our sacred places, our coastal waters and our communities. Or they can prioritize clean energy sources and energy efficiency — like wind, solar and alternative fuels — that are already revitalizing rural communities and manufacturing towns nationwide. These are the energy sources that can power us safely into the future. ■

The real job-creating industries lie in the clean energy sector. Investments in clean energy create on average about six times as many jobs as investments in the fossil fuels sector. While the oil and gas industry laid off 10,000 workers during the recession, renewable energy companies added 500,000 jobs between 2003 and 2010. According to the Brookings Institution, the renewable energy industry has grown at twice the rate of the overall economy. Green jobs employ 3.1 million people in the United States, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics — that’s more than the entire fossil fuels industries combined.

More Information Online For citations, source material and links to reports referenced here, read the online version of this article at www.westerncity.com.

California communities have been exercising their local authority to restrict or halt fracking.

California’s oil demand is declining, thanks in part to our climate and sustainable communities laws. Regions throughout the state are adopting plans to invest in more transportation choices, including transit, walking and biking, that can help reduce the need to drive. State and local incentives are putting more electric vehicles on the road, and we are working toward having 1 million electric vehicles on the roads in the next decade. This is the direction in which California and the nation must move. California is at a crossroads. Our leaders can choose a path that endangers our families, our farmers, our drinking water,

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William Avery & Associates, Inc. Labor Relations / Executive Search / Human Resources Consulting 31/2 N. Santa Cruz Ave., Suite A Los Gatos, CA 95030 408.399.4424 Fax: 408.399.4423 email: jobs@averyassoc.net www.averyassoc.net

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Bobbi C. Peckham • Phil McKenney

Peckham&McKenney “All About Fit” www.peckhamandmckenney.com Roseville, CA

866.912.1919

www.cacities.org


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www.westerncity.com

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Western City, September 2014

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League of California Cities

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What compelled you to run for the city council? Read more “On the Record” at www.westerncity.com.

Debe Hopkins Mayor Anderson

James Toma Council Member West Covina

Katy Miessner Council Member Vallejo

www.westerncity.com

I believe if you don’t like the way things are, you should stop complaining and do something about it.

A development decision made by the council got me involved, and I decided a change was needed.

As a Vallejo native, I wanted to see my city realize its full potential.

Mel Turner Mayor Citrus Heights

Pat Morton Council Member Portola

John Moore Council Member Cotati

The city was financially stable and doing well. I didn’t want that to change.

Not too many people in our area run for office, and I thought voters needed more choices of candidates.

The council appointed me to fill a vacancy as a continuation of my community involvement.

Western City, September 2014

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Thank you to all of the 2014 League Partners

Platinum ($15,000+) 1,2

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2 BUILDING AMERICA®

Gold ($10,000+) California Apartment Association Hanson Bridgett LLP1,2 JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Lewis Investment Company2 Liebert Cassidy Whitmore1 Meyers Nave1,2

Silver ($5,000+) AMR2 AT&T Charles Abbott Associates2 California & Nevada IBEW/ NECA Labor-Management Cooperation Trust California Grocers Association2 California Restaurant Association DW Development2

Dart Container Corp.2 ecoATM EMS Management2 Goldfarb & Lipman LLP Greenwaste Recovery Inc.2 Interwest Consulting Group Inc. Kronick Moskovitz Tiedemann & Girard1 Merlone Geier2

Renne Sloan Holtzman Sakai LLP1,2 Republic Services Inc.2 Sherwin-Williams Young Homes2

NBS Northrop Grumman The Olson Company2 Prometheus Real Estate Group Inc.2 James Ramos San Manuel Band of Mission Indians2 Sares Regis Group2

Schiff Hardin LLP ServPro2 Tribal Alliance of Sovereign Indian Nations2 US Bank Union Bank2 Vavrinek Trine Day & Company LLP Western Tropicana Development2 Willdan

Bronze ($3,000+) Accela2 Advanced Disposal2 Alvarez-Glasman & Colvin2 Amador Valley Industries2 American Forest & Paper Association Atkins Best Way Disposal2 CMTC CalPortland2 Carpenter/Robbins Commercial Real Estate Inc. Accretive Realtors AndersonPenna Partners Inc.2 Architects Orange2 Ashwood Construction Athens Services2 Avery Associates2 Berliner Cohen Blue Line Transfer Inc.2 Bowlby Group Inc.2 CARE2 CR&R2 California Debt and Investment Advisory Commission California Refuse Recycling Council 2

Cerrell Associates Colantuono & Levin2 CORE Public Affairs2 Desert Valley Medical Group Inc./Prime Healthcare2 E&J Gallo2 Edgewood Partners Insurance Center Fortis Quay Inc. GDQ Law2 Garaventa Enterprises2 Geo-Logic Associates2 Griswold LaSalle Cobb Dowd & Gin LLP

Hill International2 Holliday Rock Company Jefferies LLC Library Systems & Services LLC Marin Sanitary Service2 Matarango Inc.2 Michael & Robinson LLP Mid Valley Disposal2 Mitsubishi Cement 2 Molycorp2 Bob Murray & Associates

Calimesa Chamber of Commerce2 Civil Engineering Associates2 Classic Communities2 Climatec2 Cost Control Associates Inc. Cunningham Davis2 Desert Valleys Builders2 Diamond Hills Auto2 Dokken Engineering2 Emanuels Jones and Associates Fard Engineers2 Fresno Police Officers Association

GHD Inc.2 Josie Gonzales2 Gresham Savage Nolan & Tilden PC Innisfree Ventures2 J.R. Roberts/Deacon Inc.2 Jamboree Housing Corporation Jones Hall2 Jones & Mayer Kasdan Simonds Riley & Vaughan LLP Kosmont Companies LaBarge Industries2 Livermore Sanitation2

Basic ($1,000+)

Join the Partners Program Today! Contact Mike Egan | (916) 658-8271 | egan@cacities.org

National ADA Accrediting & Consulting Inc. 2 PARS/Phase II2 Pacific Rail2 Peters Engineering2 Piper Jaffray2 Precision Engineering Inc.2 Prime Healthcare2 Psomas2 Quad Knopf 2 Kenneth Ramirez2 Recology2 Robson Homes LLC2

San Bernardino County Safety Employees2 San Bernardino Police Officers Association Santa Ynez Band of Mission Indians2 Schneider Electric2 Stradling Yocca Carlson & Rauth SummerHill Homes2 Tripepi Smith & Associates2 TREH Development2 Urban Futures2

Marchetti Construction Inc.2 Morley Brothers LLC2 Kevin Mullin for Assembly2 Murphy Rearson Bradley & Feeny Napa Recycling2 Potential Industries Rabobank2 Rancho San Gorgonio2 Riverside Construction2 San Mateo County Association of Realtors2 Santa Monica Police Officers Association Seifel Consulting Inc.

Severn Trent Environmental2 Sobrato Organization2 Specialty Solid Waste & Recycling2 Studio T SQ2 Swinerton Management Townsend Public Affairs Inc.2 Van Scoyoc Associates2 Vali Cooper & Associates Inc. Vanir Construction2 Waste Management2 West Builders2

Partial list as of 7/31/2014

1 – Institute for Local Government supporter 2 – CITIPAC supporter


Western City September Issue