Page 1


Readiness for the Unthinkable Current risk management practice should include preparation and planning for emerging threats such as natural disasters, active shooter and vehicular attacks, terrorism and intruders. Having a plan is only the first step toward readiness. It is critical that you and your staff are not putting those procedures into action for the first time during an actual incident.

Operations Planning, staff classroom training to exercises and tabletop drills, IMReady will raise preparedness and organizational resiliency.

Keenan has created IMReady, an intensive emergency assessment, resource, and training program. It’s specifically customized to your facilities, staff and exposures, conducted by qualified and experienced incident management experts. From Threat Assessment to Emergency

Learn more about IMReady, please visit www.keenan.com/imready or contact a Keenan representative at IMReady@keenan.com.

Empower your team to execute their incident management roles and responsibilities with greater confidence and effectiveness when lives are on the line. Let us design an IMReady training program for your public agency.

IMReady... Are you?

License No. 0451271

Innovative Solutions. Enduring Principles.

www.keenan.com


CONTENTS Calendar of League Events 2  3 President’s Message  Pushing Back on Infrastructure Issues: Key to Our Local and State Economies

By Rich Garbarino

 he League has focused on transT portation infrastructure needs for over a decade, and this remains a priority for California cities in 2018.

Reassembling 11 

Redevelopment

By Dan Carrigg

 he new tax-increment tools lack T the concentrated financial impact provided by the former redevelopment tool. Left unaddressed, this financing gap presents significant challenges for the future use of these tools.

Redevelopment’s 20 

Elimination: Remembering the Local Experience

7 City Forum

Task Force Report Helps Cities Address Homelessness

By Melissa Kuehne

 s national and state programs fall A short of fully addressing this issue, California’s cities and counties are focusing on collaboration, cooperation and support at the local level to tackle homelessness.

By Dan Carrigg

 s new tools emerge, expect local A officials to exercise caution.

28 California Cities Helen Putnam Award for Excellence

 emecula’s Arts and T Culture Support a Thriving Economy

9 News From the Instiute for

 artnerships foster economic, P educational and cultural growth.

 tate Climate Investments S Boost Local Communities

W hy We Need Diversity 29 

By Steve Sanders

 tate programs aimed at solving S climate change can also help cities tackle many of their other community priorities. The cap-and-trade program generates substantial revenue that the state invests to further reduce greenhouse gas emissions and achieve other community co-benefits.

Local Government

in City Management

By Wade McKinney

 romoting diversity at City Hall is a P key strategy for ensuring equitable public service.

Job Opportunities 30  Professional Services 39  Directory

 On the cover: Original graphic by Leontura; adapted by Taber Creative Group

Correction: In last month’s “On the Record” feature, Palmdale Mayor pro Tem Juan Carrillo erroneously stated he was the city’s first Hispanic council member. Prior to Carrillo’s election, two Hispanic council members served on the Palmdale City Council: Richard Loa and Antonio Sosa.


®

President Rich Garbarino Council Member South San Francisco

1400 K Street Sacramento, CA 95814 (916) 658-8200 Fax (916) 658-8240

First Vice President Jan Arbuckle Council Member Grass Valley

Second Vice President Randon Lane Council Member Murrieta

Immediate Past President JoAnne Mounce Mayor pro Tem Lodi

Executive Director Carolyn Coleman

For a complete list of the League board of directors, visit www.cacities.org/board.

Magazine Staff Editor in Chief Jude Hudson, Hudson + Associates (916) 658-8234; email: editor@westerncity.com Managing Editor Norman Coppinger (916) 658-8277; email: ncoppinger@cacities.org Contributing Editor Eva Spiegel (916) 658-8228; email: espiegel@cacities.org Advertising Sales Manager Pam Maxwell-Blodgett (916) 658-8256; email: maxwellp@cacities.org Administrative Assistant Savannah Cobbs (916) 658-8223; email: scobbs@cacities.org Contributors Michael Coleman Meghan McKelvey Betsy Strauss

leaguevents may 2–4

City Attorneys’ Spring Conference, San Diego This meeting covers the latest trends and issues affecting public law practitioners and provides an opportunity to connect with colleagues.

JUNE 7–8

Policy Committee Meetings, Sacramento The League policy committees review issues of interest to cities statewide and make recommendations to the League board of directors.

8

Legal Advocacy Committee Meeting, Sacramento The committee reviews and recommends friend-of-the-court efforts on cases of significant statewide interest to California cities.

Associate Editors Carol Malinowski Carolyn Walker

27–28

Design Taber Creative Group

Mayors and Council Members’ Executive Forum, Monterey The forum offers sessions to keep elected officials up to date on key issues.

Advertising Design ImagePoint Design

29

For photo credits, see page 31. Western City (ISSN 0279-5337) is published monthly by the League of California Cities, 1400 K St., Sacramento, CA 95814. Subscriptions: $39.00/1 year; $63.00/2 years; student: $26.50; foreign: $52.00; single copies: $4.00, including sales tax. Entered as periodical mail January 30, 1930, at the Post Office, Los Angeles, CA 90013, under the Act of April 13, 1879. Periodical postage paid at Sacramento, Calif.

ED US IN NT RI

G

P

Postmaster: Send address changes to Western City, 1400 K Street, Sacramento, CA 95814. Western City Trademark Reg. U.S. Pat. Off. ©2018 League of California Cities. All rights reserved. Material may not be reprinted without written permission. This issue is Volume XCIV, No. 5.

W

29–30

Board of Directors’ Meeting, Monterey The League board reviews, discusses and takes action on a variety of issues affecting cities, including legislation, legal advocacy, education and training, and more.

SEPTEMBER 12–14

League of California Cities 2018 Annual Conference & Expo, Long Beach The conference offers dozens of educational sessions, numerous professional development opportunities, hundreds of exhibits and a chance to participate in the League’s policy-making activities.

R

0

GY

10

%

Mayors and Council Members’ Advanced Leadership Workshops, Monterey The workshops offer local elected officials who attended the preceding Executive Forum an opportunity to explore in greater detail topics such as managing municipal finances and resources.

IND EN

E

Supplied by Community Energy

Event and registration information is available at www.cacities.org/events. FSC ® is an independent, not-for-profit organization that promotes environmentally appropriate, socially beneficial and economically viable forest management worldwide. Products with the FSC label are independently certified to ensure that they come from forests managed to meet the needs of present and future generations.

2

League of California Cities

For the latest information on League conferences and events, follow us on Twitter @CaCitiesLearn. For legislative and policy updates and more, follow @CaCities. Follow Western City @WesternCityMag. Join us on Facebook. www.facebook.com/westerncity www.facebook.com/LeagueofCaCities

www.cacities.org


President’s Message by Rich Garbarino

Pushing Back on Infrastructure Issues:

Key to Our Local and State Economies Transportation infrastructure continues to be a priority issue for cities statewide. The economic health and vitality of our cities and regions depend on transportation infrastructure, which facilitates the flow of goods, workers and services. Transportation affects nearly every aspect of daily life. A reliable transportation system is essential for public safety and California’s economy. But keeping our streets, roads and bridges safe and functioning optimally requires adequate funding and regular maintenance. The League has focused on transportation infrastructure needs for over a decade, and this remains a priority for California cities in 2018.

www.westerncity.com

I recently visited Washington, D.C., as part of a California city delegation to advocate for the League’s 2018 federal priorities, along with League First Vice President and Grass Valley City Council Member Jan Arbuckle, Immediate Past President and Lodi Mayor pro Tem JoAnne Mounce and Executive Director Carolyn Coleman.

congressional leaders welcomed hearing directly from city leaders on the importance of addressing the homelessness crisis, housing affordability and the need for greater infrastructure investment in California communities.

We met with members of the California congressional delegation, including Sen. Dianne Feinstein, Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, Rep. Nanette Diaz Barragán, Rep. Jimmy Gomez and staff from the offices of Sen. Kamala Harris, Rep. Pete Aguilar and Rep. Jeff Denham. The

Streets and roads in our cities generally are in bad shape and continue to decline, as a series of biennial statewide surveys has shown (see “Coalition Focuses on Protecting Local Transportation Improvements” on page 4).

Infrastructure and the Economy: Local Observations

continued

Western City, May 2018

3


Pushing Back on Infrastructure Issues: Key to Our Local and State Economies, continued

Coalition Focuses on Protecting Local Transportation Improvements The League, California State Association of Counties (CSAC) and the state’s regional planning agencies have conducted six biennial assessments of the local road system since 2008, documenting the system’s continual decline and underscoring a severe funding shortfall. (See “Local Streets and Roads Remain a League Priority in 2018” at www.westerncity.com for more about this data.) Thanks to SB 1 (Beall, Chapter 5, Statutes of 2017), cities are now receiving double the amount of transportation dollars from the state to repair and maintain the local transportation system. SB 1 will bring much-needed capital to invest in our streets and roads, and the construction and allied services jobs associated with this effort will have a positive impact on local economies. While SB 1 represents a significant step in the right direction, additional federal funds are still urgently needed to make up the infrastructure funding shortfall — and now even the SB 1 funding is at risk. The League is part of the Coalition to Protect Local Transportation Improvements, a broad group of cities, counties, labor, business and transportation advocates that formed to meet Gov. Jerry Brown’s call to address California’s chronic transportation infrastructure funding shortfall. This coalition is working to protect transportation dollars by supporting Proposition 69 (on the June 2018 ballot) and opposing any repeal of SB 1. More information about the coalition and how to join can be found at fixcaroads. com and on twitter at @FixCARoads.

4

League of California Cities

While traveling the state during my year as League president, I’ve seen firsthand the condition of our infrastructure. In some areas, such as Orange County, local infrastructure appears to be in somewhat better shape than in many of our other regions, but north of Bakersfield, traveling through communities such as Delano, I saw roads desperately in need of repair. Infrastructure is tied directly to economic activity and economic development. In Northern California, for example, the City of Cloverdale was a thriving community until Highway 101 was rerouted in 1994 to bypass the town. After traffic was diverted and no longer flowed through the city’s center, Cloverdale’s economy suffered. Businesses closed. Without the tax base provided by employers and employees, it became problematic to fund the local services and amenities that attract new businesses and maintain the city’s infrastructure. The City of Fresno grew from a small, primarily agricultural community and spread out to cover about 112 square miles. Now it is being eyed as the next potential investment center for industries such as banking, insurance and financial services. Land and housing are less expensive here, and Interstate 5 and Highway 99

traverse the city. Fresno is centrally located in the state, and its outlook is good economically. But in Ceres and other small agricultural towns in the Central Valley and elsewhere, the same question arises as it did in Cloverdale: how to pay for services without an adequate tax base. In my community, the City of South San Francisco, we are fortunate to have a robust economy with a diverse mix of industries. The downside is that housing prices are very high and affordable housing is scarce. The tech and biotech industries pay high wages, but lower-wage workers can’t afford housing near their place of employment. This is particularly true in the San Francisco Bay Area and the Silicon Valley region. This means long commutes — often two or three hours in each direction — and increasing levels of traffic congestion with the associated negative impact on air quality and increased wear and tear on our streets and roads. Perhaps worst of all, these long commutes rob families of spending quality time together.

One Size Certainly Does Not Fit All Local economies and infrastructure needs vary dramatically from city to city and from county to county. In my travels through Alpine County, a less densely

www.cacities.org


The League has focused on transportation infrastructure needs for over a decade, and this remains a priority for California cities in 2018.

populated area in the high country southeast of South Lake Tahoe, I noted that although there are far fewer roads, their condition is critically important because access to the very popular local recreational areas requires the roads to be in good shape. Given the diversity of California’s cities, it should be easy for policymakers to understand that “one size fits all” solutions don’t work for us. Many of our state policymakers get this fact — but the federal government seems certain that one size should fit all. During the League’s visits with our congressional representatives in Washington, D.C., a great deal of the discussion centered around the urgent need to adequately fund federal programs like the Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) program that supports transportation and housing in our com-

www.westerncity.com

munities. The Trump administration’s budget proposed eliminating the CDBG, HOME, Transportation Investment Generating Economic Recovery (TIGER) and other programs. Congress, however, subsequently rejected the proposed cuts with the passage of the Bipartisan Budget Act of 2018, which provides level or increased spending for the most critical grant programs that cities rely on. Minority Leader Pelosi and others encouraged each of us, not only as members of the National League of Cities but also as local officials, to reach out continually to all of our state and federal elected officials and let them know how their decisions at the state and federal levels affect our cities. They told us that it is extremely helpful to hear from local officials, especially on common issues that affect a broad range of jurisdictions. Their encouragement reminded me that this outreach should be an ongoing,

sustained effort — as part of our duty as local elected and appointed officials — to make our voices heard. We must speak to specific legislation with a clear message on the impacts, both positive and negative. Even if a representative is outside your district, when an issue that is the subject of legislation affects your community, tell them about it. Explain the challenges facing your city and ask for solutions that take community needs into account.

Take Action: Push Back We must staunchly defend our cities and communities against one-size-fits-all solutions imposed by other levels of government that lack an understanding of each of our communities’ unique needs and challenges. Please join me in putting this item on your to-do list: “Contact legislators every week on key bills and proposals that impact my city and constituents.” Together, we can make a difference. ■

Western City, May 2018

5


Thank you to all of our 2018 League Partners Platinum ($15,000+) 2

1,2

1,2 2

2

2

2

2

2

1

1,2

2

1

2

2

2

1,2

2

1,2

2

2

2 BUILDING AMERICA®

Gold ($10,000+) Hanson Bridgett LLP Interwest Consulting Group Inc.2 J Wallin Opinion Research1 LECET Southwest 1,2

Lewis Investment Company2 LiveStories1 Meyers Nave1,2 Morongo Band of Mission Indians2

Probolsky Research1 James Ramos Renne Sloan Holtzman Sakai LLP1,2 Republic Services Inc.2

Sherwin-Williams Transtech Engineers2 Western States Petroleum Association Young Homes2

Silver ($5,000+) ABM AMR2 Albertsons American Fidelity Assurance Company Charles Abbott Associates2 California Contract Cities Association2 Californians for Energy Independence

Dart Container Corp.2 Dividend Finance LLC EMS Management2 Fascination Ranch2 Garaventa Enterprises2 General Motors Goldfarb & Lipman LLP Joe A. Gonsalves & Son2 Greenwaste Recovery Inc.2

Greystar2 HR Green2 Harris & Associates2 Kaufman Legal Group1 Kronick Moskovitz Tiedemann & Girard1 Mintier Harnish1 Mt. Diablo Recycling2 Northrop Grumman

Public Financial Management Inc. Redflex San Manuel Band of Mission Indians2 Sares Regis Group2 ServPro2 State Farm Stradling Yocca Carlson & Rauth

Tribal Alliance of Sovereign Indian Nations Tripepi Smith & Associates1,2 Union Bank2 Vavrinek Trine Day & Co. LLP Walgreens Waste Management1 Ygrene2 Zanker Green Waste2

Bronze ($3,000+) Accela Advanced Disposal2 Alvarez-Glasman & Colvin2 Amador Valley Industries2 American Forest & Paper Association Association For Los Angeles Deputy Sheriffs2 Atkins Best Way Disposal2 Brookfield Norcal Builders Inc2 CalPortland2 Cerrell Colantuono Highsmith & Whatley PC2

Commercial Bank of California DD Dannar LLC DW Development2 Desert Valley Medical Group Inc./ Prime Healthcare2 E&J Gallo2 Edgewood Partners Insurance Center Fieldman Rolapp & Associates ForeFront Power Genentech Geo-Logic Associates2 George K. Baum & Company Griswold LaSalle Cobb Dowd & Gin LLP2

Accretive Realtors2 Acquisition Partners of America LLC American Water Works Association CA-NV Section AndersonPenna Partners Inc.2 Athens Services2 Avery Associates2 Blue Line Transfer Inc.2 CARE2 CIFAC CR&R2 CSAC EIA California Apartment Association2 California Consulting, LLC California Debt and Investment Advisory Commission

California Independent Petroleum Association California Refuse Recycling Council Carpenter/Robbins Commercial Real Estate Inc.2 Civil Engineering Associates2 Classic Communities2 Cost Control Associates Inc. Cunningham Davis2 Der Manouel Insurance Group2 Desert Valleys Builders Dokken Engineering2 Dublin Crossing2 EMS Management LLC2 Emanuels Jones and Associates

2

Hill International2 Holliday Rock Company ISES Corporation Kosmont Companies2 LaBarge Industries2 Library Systems & Services LLC Los Angeles Yellow Cab Madaffer Enterprises1,2 Marin Sanitary Service2 Matarango Inc.2 McKinstry Mid Valley Disposal2 Mitsubishi Cement2 Bob Murray & Associates NHA Advisors

NL Industries Inc. NV5 Inc. Nixon Peabody Norton Rose Fulbright2 PARS2 Peters Engineering2 Precision Engineering2 Prime Healthcare2 Prometheus Real Estate Group Inc.2 Psomas2 Quad Knopf2 Quality Management Group Inc. Recology2 Robson Homes LLC2

Rutan & Tucker LLP SCI Consulting Group SGI Construction Management2 San Bernardino County Safety Employees2 San Bernardino Police Officers Association San Diego County Water Authority Santa Ynez Band of Mission Indians2 SummerHill Homes2 TREH Development2 Townsend Public Affairs Inc.2 USA Properties Fund Inc. Willdan

Kasdan Lippsmith Weber Turner LLP Leibold McClendon & Mann Livermore Sanitation2 MCE Clean Energy Marchetti Construction Inc.2 Napa Recycling2 Newport Pacific Capital Company Inc. Norton Rose Fulbright2 Pace Funding Group LLC2 Pinewave Developmentgroup, Inc2 Pleasanton Garbage Services Inc.2 Ponderosa Homes II Inc.2 Riverside Construction2 San Jose POA

San Mateo County Association of Realtors2 Santa Monica Police Officers Association Seifel Consulting Inc. Sobrato Organization2 South San Francisco Scavengers2 Specialty Solid Waste & Recycling2 Studio T SQ2 Swinerton Management2 TADD LCC2 Transwestern Vali Cooper & Associates Inc.2 Van Scoyoc Associates2 West Builders2 West Coast Arborists2

Basic ($1,000+) Envise/Southland Energy Fard Engineers2 FlashVote1 Forefront Power Fresno Police Officers Association GHD Inc.2 Giacalone Design Services2 Gilton Solid Waste2 Gray Bowen Scott2 Hospital Council of Northern California Innisfree Ventures2 J.R. Roberts/Deacon Inc.2 Jamboree Housing Corporation Jones Hall2 Jones & Mayer

Join the Partners Program Today! Contact Mike Egan | (916) 658-8271 | egan@cacities.org

1 – Institute for Local Government supporter 2 – CITIPAC supporter Partial list as of 4/6/2018


Task Force Report Helps Cities Address Homelessness by Melissa Kuehne After steady declines in homelessness from 2007 through 2014, the number of people without homes in California has now risen for three consecutive years. This is occurring not just in major cities and urban areas but also in rural California. Homelessness is no longer confined to our major metropolitan areas but has spread to every part of our state. The rise is earmarked by large increases in the number of unsheltered homeless people — those who not only have no place to call home, but are unable to find even temporary shelter.

The Pervasive Reach of Homelessness The demographics of homelessness are changing, too. Many homeless individuals struggle with substance abuse issues and mental illness. However, domestic violence, lack of affordable housing and employment opportunities and the cost of health care have also pushed individuals into homelessness. In addition, natural disasters such as floods and wildfires displace thousands of Californians every year. California is home to 21 of the 30 most expensive rental markets in the nation and does not have enough affordable housing stock to meet the demand of low-income households. The state’s 2.2 million extremely low-income and very low-income renter households compete for 664,000 affordable rental units.

Cities and Counties Join Forces As national and state programs fall short of fully addressing this issue, local governments are collaborating on solutions for their communities. Collaboration, cooperation and support at the local level are key to addressing homelessness, so the League and the California State Association of Counties (CSAC) formed the Joint Homelessness Task Force in late 2016 to examine these issues and discuss collaborative local solutions to address this crisis.

Local government representatives met over the course of a year to better understand homelessness in California. The task force identified best practices and promising new practices that cities and counties are implementing to address homelessness. The task force also focused on the challenges, lessons and gaps communities are facing in the fight to end homelessness.

Task Force Report Offers Tools and Resources This work culminated in the Homelessness Task Force Report, which was developed in partnership with the Institute for Local Government, the League’s nonprofit affiliate. The report provides practical tools for cities and counties in California to use in addressing homelessness in their communities. It includes an overview of the state of homelessness in California with data trends and information about its causes. The report also covers: • Assessing the Cost of Homelessness — data collection methods and tools to assess the cost savings of preventive services; • Funding Options — federal, state and local sources; • Existing and Emerging Approaches — proven and innovative programs and strategies local governments are currently implementing; • Creating a Homelessness Plan — a template cities can use to develop their own Homelessness Plan along with examples; • Partnering for Greater Impact — tips for creating and expanding partnerships with other local governments, nonprofits, the business community and faith-based organizations; and • Building Community Support — strategies and tips local governments can use to build support for homelessness and affordable housing programs and projects in their communities. continued

Melissa Kuehne is communications and development manager for the Institute for Local Government and can be reached at mkuehne@ca-ilg.org. www.westerncity.com

Western City, May 2018

7


Task Force Report Helps Cities Address Homelessness, continued

The report provides case stories featuring cities and counties that are using innovative programs, initiatives and partnerships to combat homelessness in California communities. “The homelessness crisis affects cities and counties throughout California, and we can’t begin to address the needs of our homeless residents without resources, best practices and collaboration,” says Grass Valley City Council Member Jan Arbuckle, League first vice president and co-chair of the Joint Homelessness Task Force. “This report represents cities and counties coming together to work proactively on one of our state’s greatest challenges. We can hope to find solutions that help house and provide services for our homeless residents only through a joint effort by cities, counties, and the state and federal governments.” To successfully reduce homelessness, local governments must continue moving forward in creative and innovative ways. Each city and county is unique and may be at very different stages of addressing homelessness in their communities. However, to succeed in addressing an issue like homelessness, local governments must learn from each other, collaborate and forge partnerships. To access the report, case stories and additional information about the task force, visit www.ca-ilg.org/homelessness.

8

League of California Cities

Opportunities to Learn More The League is hosting two events that will bring together city and county officials to explore the information presented in the report and discuss how jurisdictions can best work together to address homelessness in their communities. For more information about these events and other upcoming educational opportunities, visit www.cacities.org/events or www.ca-ilg.org/homelessness. ■

www.cacities.org


State Climate Investments Boost Local Communities by Steve Sanders

City leaders throughout California are finding that state programs aimed at solving climate change can also help them tackle many other community priorities. The City of West Sacramento has ambitious plans to spur development along the Sacramento River, directly across from the City of Sacramento’s flourishing downtown. The Tower Bridge links the two cities, providing a “grand gateway” along Capitol Mall to the state Capitol building. West Sacramento is realizing its vision for a thriving River District in part through the California Climate Investments Program, funded through the state’s unique cap-and-trade greenhouse gas emissions auction. The program has invested more than $6.7 million to support affordable housing and transitoriented infrastructure in the area. People living in the new district can easily walk, bike or take transit to access over 100,000 jobs in downtown Sacramento. The City of Patterson, founded in 1909 as the hub of a thriving agricultural region in the San Joaquin Valley, relies on its street trees to help moderate the temperature (and energy bills) on hot summer days. But a healthy tree canopy requires planning and long-term maintenance. A $150,000 grant from the Urban and Community Forestry Program, also funded by cap and trade, will enable the city to create a long-term urban forest management plan and to plant and maintain

trees in disadvantaged neighborhoods that lack them. In the City of Long Beach, more than $2.4 million in cap-and-trade funds are supporting the development of Anchor Place, a 120-unit affordable housing project serving veterans and the homeless population. The project will help alleviate the severe shortage of permanent housing and support services for homeless individuals and veterans while also increasing transportation options and helping drive the city’s revitalization and economic development.

Cap and Trade Generates Funding In 2017, the Legislature and Gov. Jerry Brown approved an extension of the cap-and-trade program, providing a stable funding base through 2030. The marketbased system sets a limit (or “cap”) on greenhouse gas emissions, and utilities and other businesses subject to the cap can buy (or “trade”) greenhouse gas emissions permits within the cap at quarterly auctions. The sale of cap-and-trade allowances generates substantial revenue — estimated at between $2 and $3 billion per year — that the state invests to further reduce greenhouse gas emissions and achieve other community co-benefits such as reducing pollution, improving public health and accelerating economic growth. The Legislature allocates revenues to more than a dozen state agencies that

administer clean transportation, energy efficiency, waste management and natural resources programs, many of which can be an important source of funding for local governments to achieve their sustainability and other community goals.

Resource Center Offers Helpful Information on Cap and Trade To help cities navigate this maze of state programs, the Institute for Local Government (ILG) offers a one-stop online Cap and Trade Resource Center (www.ca-ilg. org/capandtrade). The resource center describes each program, provides examples of projects that have qualified for funding and offers links to the state agencies that administer each program. The Cap and Trade Resource Center is one service offered through ILG’s Beacon Program, which supports a growing network of more than 130 cities and counties that are taking voluntary steps to help meet the state’s climate, energy and sustainability goals. For more information, visit www.cailg.org/BeaconProgram or contact Karalee Browne, ILG sustainable communities program manager, at kbrowne@ca-ilg.org. ■

Steve Sanders is sustainable communities program director for the Institute for Local Government and can be reached at ssanders@ca-ilg.org.

www.westerncity.com

Western City, May 2018

9


Reassembling

Redevel

10

League of California Cities

www.cacities.org


opment by Dan Carrigg

In recent months, gubernatorial candidates and legislators have been discussing the need to bring back redevelopment, which some have called “redevelopment 2.0.” These conversations are positive for the future of California cities, given the importance of this former tool in revitalizing urban cores, supporting economic development and building affordable housing. Yet several new tax-increment tools have already been created, further complicating the policy discussion. Should new tools be added to the existing ones or is this about reviving old redevelopment law? The new tax-increment tools lack the concentrated financial impact provided by the former redevelopment tool. Left

unaddressed, this financing gap presents major challenges for the future use of these tools. The State of California should also be concerned, because weak local financing options will diminish many policies that it seeks to advance. The state is investing billions of dollars to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and vehicle miles traveled, increase transit usage, improve water infrastructure, build affordable housing and assist disadvantaged communities. The location of future development is critical to the success of these policies. Without sufficient local financing resources, however, many local projects will fail to maximize opportunities.

To prepare for the coming policy discussions, it’s helpful for cities to: • Revisit the benefits and challenges of the former redevelopment tool and how its elimination affected cities; • Summarize the League’s work since 2012 in shaping new tax-increment tools; • Compare prior redevelopment financing with new tools; • Review current state policy priorities to identify common ground; and • Outline what would be most helpful for cities going forward. continued

Dan Carrigg is deputy executive director and legislative director for the League and can be reached at dcarrigg@cacities.org.

www.westerncity.com

Western City, May 2018

11


Reassembling Redevelopment, continued

Redevelopment’s Benefits For over 60 years, redevelopment was the most robust community revitalization and economic development tool that cities had. Its use blossomed because it offered the opportunity to concentrate significant financial investment for reinvigorating an area without triggering a tax increase. Cities used redevelopment to: • Clean up brownfields; • Restore and upgrade infrastructure; • Assemble smaller and oddshaped parcels; • Improve local parks, libraries and other civic amenities; • Assist local businesses; • Expand economic development; and • Build transit-oriented development and affordable housing. When redevelopment was eliminated in 2011, nearly 400 redevelopment agencies were operating, generating over $6 billion in annual revenue and providing the state’s largest source of funding for affordable housing at over $1 billion per year. At a post-dissolution legislative hearing, former longtime Pasadena Mayor and then-League President Bill Bogaard described how the City of Pasadena used the tool to turn around its downtown, including bringing back businesses, renovating buildings and adding higher density affordable housing. He noted that redevelopment gave a community the resources to solve problems — identified by residents — that developers wouldn’t address, and this was one of its greatest benefits. Resolving these problems helped build community support for major revitalization efforts. Without redevelopment, such resources no longer exist.

Redevelopment’s Challenges Redevelopment was a powerful tool, but — like any large enterprise — imperfect. With agencies operating independently with broad powers and millions of

dollars in revenue, there were bound to be critics and problems. Residents vigorously debated the changes that revitalization can bring, including increased traffic and noise and the fear of being displaced. Projects can be poorly conceived, and governing boards can lose touch. Redevelopment’s problems surfaced in lawsuits and unfavorable media coverage. But when problems occurred, corrections were made under robust legislative and administrative oversight. Redevelopment’s financial data was sent to the state controller, and housing obligations were tracked in meticulous detail. The Legislature constantly refined the laws, and the creation, powers, administration and use of redevelopment were prescribed in over 200 pages of statute.

How ending Redevelopment affected Cities The elimination of redevelopment has had many lasting impacts as decades of community revitalization plans were wiped out. Shutting down this long-standing tool was bound to be controversial, and the disputes were compounded by: • The lack of an established dissolution regulatory structure with consistent rules; • Two comprehensive budget trailer bills in 2012 and 2015 that revised and reinterpreted dissolution laws largely to the benefit of the state’s coffers; • No state policy guidance or priorities on which projects — affordable housing, transit-oriented development, etc. — should be salvaged; and • Weak legislative oversight.

This situation left the courts and staff at the state Department of Finance (DOF) acting as the final arbiters of many decisions related to redevelopment’s dissolution. During this period, cities also lost most of their experienced economic development staff. Those who remained focused on salvaging whatever was possible in the DOF-managed dissolution process with successor agencies and local oversight boards. In 2013, the state also eliminated enterprise zones, which had provided employers with tax incentives to attract jobs to state-approved zones with higher unemployment. This experience caused doubts about the reliability of the state’s sustained interest and commitment to community development. Local budget conditions have also declined. Staffing levels have not rebounded since the severe staffing cuts made during the Great Recession. Sales tax is eroding as a reliable revenue source due to the changing retail marketplace, the challenges of collecting taxes from internet commerce and a continued shift toward a service economy. Property tax growth varies widely depending on local economic conditions. Public pension liabilities will double over the next seven years, outstripping revenue growth and further squeezing cities’ ability to provide essential services and invest in the future. Several ballot measures currently being circulated would, if approved by voters, further restrict local revenue. Cities are resilient and will continue to push forward, but even with new tools, it will take decades to recover from the elimination of redevelopment. continued on page 15

12

League of California Cities

www.cacities.org


League Efforts to Develop New Tax-Increment Financing Tools: A Brief Overview When redevelopment was eliminated, developing new tools that cities could use for infrastructure and economic development became a top League priority. The League formed the Task Force on the Next Generation of Economic Development Tools in spring 2012, chaired by then-League President Bill Bogaard. City officials on the task force provided key direction for the League to work on giving cities more options going forward. For the past six years, the League has focused on creating these options.

other proposed changes to the law. Working in partnership with the California Building Industry Association, the League supported a series of amendments to SB 214 (Wolk), which passed in the Legislature. Regrettably, Gov. Jerry Brown vetoed this measure along with several others, including SB 1156 (Steinberg), which would have reauthorized redevelopment in a more limited form. The governor’s veto messages stressed his desire to keep cities focused on dissolving redevelopment.

The League’s initial effort concentrated on making Infrastructure Financing District (IFD) law a useful tool. IFD law had many problems. It had been in place for 22 years and was rarely used. A major impediment was the requirement for two separate two-thirds public votes: one to establish a district, the other to issue debt. These vote requirements were sufficient to deter most agencies from considering further action. The League’s attorneys determined that these statutory vote requirements were not constitutionally required and identified

In 2014, the League’s work on SB 214 resurfaced as part of a tool called the Enhanced Infrastructure Finance District (EIFD) proposed by the Brown administration. Rather than amending IFD law, as SB 214 had proposed, the administration opted to craft an entirely new statute that mirrored many IFD elements. In the ensuing negotiations, the League succeeded in eliminating a requirement to have a public vote prior to establishing a district. Though a 55 percent voter approval requirement to issue bonds remains in the law, other ways to secure financing have

www.westerncity.com

been identified. SB 628 (Beall, Chapter 785, Statutes of 2014) enacted EIFD law and the League sponsored a cleanup bill to EIFD law in 2015 — AB 313 (Atkins, Chapter 320, Statutes of 2015). In addition, the League sponsored legislation to bring back the tools and powers of redevelopment through a three-year partnership with Assembly Member Luis Alejo (D-Watsonville) to craft the Community Revitalization Investment Authority (CRIA) law. The first effort, AB 1080 (Alejo) in 2013, stalled in the Appropriations Committee after the administration made it clear that no new economic development legislation would be signed that year. The following year, Gov. Brown vetoed AB 2280 (Alejo), with a veto message that sought drafting changes. In 2015, Gov. Brown signed AB 2 (Alejo and E. Garcia, Chapter 319, Statutes of 2015) into law. And in 2016, the League sponsored a cleanup bill, AB 2492 (Alejo, Chapter 524, Statutes of 2016).

continued

Western City, May 2018

13


League Efforts to Develop New Tax-Increment Financing Tools: A Brief Overview, continued

These conversations are positive for the future of California cities.

It’s Friday, 4:55pm.

Do you know where your desk is? City Data Services makes Housing and Community Services’ management, well, manageable. CDS provides comprehensive, cloud based systems for cities and counties since 2007 and HUD loves us ;) We are one of the few service providers that integrate with IDIS — yeah, it saves a bunch of time. City Data Services — citydataservices@yahoo.com or call us, 415.572.4572. We would love to meet with you and show you how to find your desk, well, for good! www.citydataservices.net

Available Now! 2018 City Hall Directory Find-it-fast information for every city in California

3 Mayors, Council Members and

City Department Head Information

3 City Addresses, Phone, Fax and Websites 3 Advertisers with Products and Services That Your City Needs

With the 2018 City Hall Directory, the information you need is right at your fingertips. Order online at: www.cacities.org/publications or call (916) 658-8217.

14

League of California Cities

Keeping in mind the “give us options” direction from its Task Force on the Next Generation of Economic Development Tools, the League also took advantage of growing legislative and administration interest in addressing the challenges faced by disadvantaged unincorporated communities. The League drafted and sponsored amendments to SB 614 (Wolk) to craft a simple tax-increment financing tool that cities and counties could use — as part of a city annexation of a disadvantaged unincorporated community — to repair and upgrade infrastructure. Gov. Brown signed it into law (Chapter 784, Statutes of 2014). In 2017, the League drafted and sponsored SB 711 (Hill), designed to authorize the use of the school share of property taxes to be invested as part of local tax-increment financing projects using EIFD, CRIA or other tools — if approved through a process using the state’s Strategic Growth Council — for projects that would advance important state goals, such as reducing greenhouse gas emissions and vehicle miles traveled and supporting affordable housing production and transit-oriented development. The bill included requirements for program oversight, reporting, and criteria and caps for the state’s financial exposure. Although that effort did not gain momentum, it is likely that such a concept will be revisited as discussions evolve about a “redevelopment 2.0” mechanism. The League and its attorneys also provided significant technical assistance in 2017 with drafting AB 1598 (Mullin, Chapter 764, Statutes of 2017), which used existing CRIA law as a model for adopting a new financing tool for affordable housing production. As these new tools were developed, the League produced various white papers, hosted webinars, participated in workshops and collaborated with the California Association for Local Economic Development in the formation of a Tax-Increment Financing Technical Committee, which issued additional guides to the uses of these new tools (available at https://caled.org/tif-technicalcommittee). In recent months, League representatives also met with gubernatorial candidates, legislators and their staff about how to restore and further enhance local community economic development tools. Several bills have been introduced in 2018, intended to refine discussions in anticipation that the next governor would be willing to approve a revised tool.

www.cacities.org


Reassembling Redevelopment, continued from page 12

Redevelopment Financing Redevelopment financing through tax increment was based on two principles: 1. Improvements could be made to a deteriorated area and the increased property values would pay for the improvements; and 2. Improving a deteriorated area increased property tax revenue for all taxing entities. Under redevelopment, the property tax base was frozen within a designated project area. Other taxing entities (counties, schools and special districts) would continue to receive the amounts they received during the base year when the project was established plus 2 percent annual growth. In some cases, property tax pass-through agreements were negotiated to allow some tax growth to flow to a specific entity. After a plan was adopted, however, and as improvements were made, all property tax growth “increment” was dedicated to the project and repayment of debt. This was the heart of redevelopment financing and the core of the debate that led to its demise. Counties and special districts disliked not being part of the decision to form redevel-

opment agencies in cities and had other funding priorities; state budget drafters complained because Proposition 98 (1988) required the state to backfill schools’ losses from redevelopment diversion that by 2011 amounted to about $2 billion per year.

New Tax-Increment Tools Lack Financial Capacity Compared with previous redevelopment, the new tools have limited financial capacity, thus requiring innovative thinking and new partnerships to maximize their potential. The new tools are: 1. Enhanced Infrastructure Financing Districts (EIFDs); 2. Community Revitalization and Investment Authority (CRIA); 3. Affordable Housing Authorities (AHAs); 4. Annexation Development Plans (ADPs); 5. Seaport Infrastructure Financing Districts (SIPDs); and 6. Infrastructure and Revitalization Financing Districts for former Military Bases (IRFDs).

Prior Redevelopment Funding Growth from all property tax shares went to redevelopment except when pass-through was negotiated.

Sp. Dist. Special Districts Share

County

School

Average City Share Average County Share School Share

City

Under the old model, after a city formed a redevelopment agency, all future growth from property tax shares — not just the city’s share — was directed to the redevelopment agency. This policy also reflected the philosophy that redevelopment created jobs and economic activity and increased property values, allowing all stakeholders to benefit. With the new tools, however, tax increment is much different: Agreement by any affected agency is now required — and schools are not currently allowed to participate. Cities, counties and special districts can choose whether to participate in a tax-increment financing project. A newly formed agency is entitled only to the increment generated on its own share of the property tax unless other local agencies also agree to contribute their shares. For example, a city can direct only the increment derived from its own share to this purpose, unless the county and/ or special districts also agree to have the growth of their respective shares dedicated. As a result, local governments must collaborate on infrastructure and economic development in order to maximize the tool’s financial capacity. When these tools were created, the Brown administration insisted on prohibiting access to growth from the school share of property tax. This is a major reduction in financial capacity because approximately 50 percent of property taxes are allocated to schools. Such restrictions, however, can be removed or allowed under specific conditions by future legislation. Schools are protected from negative impacts of taxincrement financing by Prop. 98, which requires the state to backfill any losses. So far, however, examples of collaborative efforts with cities, counties and special districts are hard to find. One reason is these tools just took effect within the past several years. Many city officials have been bogged down by redevelopment dissolution, leaving little time to evaluate or consider new tools. It also takes time to properly assess these options and conduct conversations with other taxing entities to continued

www.westerncity.com

Western City, May 2018

15


Reassembling Redevelopment, continued

explore possible shared priorities. And at some point, the numbers don’t work. For cities, which receive just 5, 10 or 15 percent of the property tax share, there may not be enough financial benefit to justify using the tool. Counties and special districts have also been cautious when approached by cities to explore interest in these new tools. County staff may have no prior experience with such financing methods or may have negative perceptions of former redevelopment. Their agency may be facing its own budget limitations and may have other challenges and priorities. Thus far, the potential for collaborative efforts with counties and special districts appears to be greater for infrastructure projects where there is a tangible benefit to unincorporated or special district territory. And these tools — as currently constructed — appear less useful for traditional urban core redevelopment. Counties and special districts seem less interested in such projects. Given this lack of interest, the only other potential partner for a city would be the state — by authorizing investment of the school share of the property tax. In addition to the traditional growth from property tax increment, entities that participate in an EIFD, CRIA or AHA can

16

League of California Cities

New Tools Funding Growth goes only to entity based on agreement, with no school share (due to Prop. 98 and state budget concerns).

City Spec. Districts

City Share

School

County

also agree to direct revenue from some or all of the following financing sources to the use of these tools: • Property tax revenue that cities and counties receive in lieu of the former vehicle license fee (VLF); • Property tax residuals that cities, counties and special districts may receive as the former redevelopment agencies , debts are repaid; and

County Must Agree Special Districts Must Agree Can't Touch School Share

• Funding derived from various special assessments and other financing mechanisms (such as landscaping and lighting districts, Mello-Roos taxes, etc.), which may be coordinated with these tools. continued on page 19

www.cacities.org


Summary of New Tax-Increment Tools The Enhanced Infrastructure Financing District (EIFD) law (beginning with Section 53398.50 of the California Government Code) is the most popular tool so far. It provides broad authority for local agencies to use tax increment to finance a wide variety of public infrastructure. Private projects can also be financed, including affordable housing, mixed-use development and sustainable development, industrial structures, and facilities to house consumer goods and services. No public vote is required to establish an authority, and though a 55 percent vote is required to issue bonds, other financing alternatives exist. Unlike former redevelopment, the EIFD imposes no geographic limitations on where it can be used and requires no blight findings. An EIFD can be used on a single street, in a neighborhood or throughout an entire city. It can also cross jurisdictional boundaries and involve multiple cities and a county. Though an individual city can form an EIFD without participation from other local governments, the flexibility of this tool and the enhanced financial capacity created by partnerships will likely generate creative discussions among local agencies on how the tool can be used to fund common priorities. Recent legislation, AB 1568 (Bloom, Chapter 562, Statutes of 2017), authorizes EIFDs to access sales tax in instances where the boundaries are “coterminous� with the boundaries of the underlying city or county and 20 percent of the revenue is spent on affordable housing on infill sites.

www.westerncity.com

Community Revitalization and Investment Authorities (CRIAs) law (beginning with Section 62000 of the California Government Code) gives these authorities all the former powers of redevelopment agencies. A CRIA focuses on assisting with the revitalization of poorer neighborhoods and former military bases. While similar to redevelopment, a CRIA is more streamlined. Accountability measures are included to ensure that the use of the CRIA remains consistent with community priorities, and a 25 percent set-aside is included for affordable housing. Although an initial protest opportunity exists, no public vote is required to establish a CRIA, and bonds and other debt can be issued after a CRIA is established. Affordable Housing Authority (AHA) financing law (beginning with Section 62250 of the California Government Code) is a new statute that authorizes a city or county to create by resolution an affordable housing authority (coterminous with its boundaries) with various powers and to dedicate a portion of its property tax increment, sales tax and other revenues to develop affordable (up to 120 percent of area median income) housing. An AHA may issue bonds; borrow; receive funds from and coordinate with other entities; remove hazardous substances; provide seismic retrofits; loan funds to owners and tenants to repair, improve or rehabilitate buildings in the plan area; and take other actions. The AHA has broad property acquisition and

disposal authority. Creating an AHA or bond issuance does not require a public vote. Annexation Development Plan (ADP) law (Section 99.3 of the California Revenue and Taxation Code) authorizes consenting local agencies (a city and/or a county or special district) to adopt tax-increment financing to improve or upgrade structures, roads, sewer or water facilities or other infrastructure as part of annexing a disadvantaged unincorporated community. An ADP can be implemented by a special district either formed for this purpose or incorporated into the duties of an existing special district. After the Local Agency Formation Commission (LAFCO) approves the annexation, the special district can issue debt without an additional vote. Seaport Financing Districts (SPDs) law (Section 1710, Harbors and Navigation Code of California) establishes a financing tool for seaport infrastructure based on a modified form of the EIFD law. Infrastructure and Revitalization Financing Districts for Former Military Bases (IRFDs) law (beginning with Section 53369 of the California Government Code) creates infrastructure and revitalization financing districts separate and apart from existing law that established infrastructure financing districts (IFDs), authorizes a military base reuse authority to form a district and allows these districts to finance a broader range of projects and facilities.

Western City, May 2018

17


THOUSANDS

of Public Entities.

BILLIONS

of Taxpayer Dollars. Protected.

Safe, Smart, Flexible Solutions for Managing Public Funds. Across the United States, local and state governmental organizations use the Insured Cash Sweep®, or ICS®, and CDARS® services to access multi-million-dollar FDIC insurance through a single bank relationship, safeguard taxpayer money, keep the amount of their deposit local, and eliminate the burden of ongoing collateral tracking. What could be easier? See if your bank offers ICS and/or CDARS, or find one of the thousands that do.

ICSandCDARS.com

&

Placement of customer funds through the ICS service or CDARS service is subject to the terms, conditions, and disclosures set forth in the agreements that a participating institution’s customer enters into with that institution, including the applicable Deposit Placement Agreement. Limits apply, and customer eligibility criteria may apply. Program withdrawals are limited to six per month when using the ICS savings option. If a depositor is subject to restrictions with respect to the placement of funds in depository institutions, it is the responsibility of the depositor to determine whether the placement of the depositor’s funds through ICS or CDARS, or a particular ICS or CDARS transaction, satisfies those restrictions. CDARS, ICS, and Insured Cash Sweep are registered service marks of Promontory Interfinancial Network, LLC.


Reassembling Redevelopment, continued from page 16

What Cities Need Going Forward: State Collaboration on Shared Priorities As legislators and gubernatorial candidates explore options for restoring redevelopment tools, they will encounter numerous policy issues involving scope, financing and powers. They will also need to reconcile this discussion with the tax-increment tools created in recent years, which rely on collaboration among agencies rather than compulsion. The biggest challenge of using these new tools is their insufficient financial boost, which is caused by prohibiting access to the school share of property tax. Because school financing connects to the state’s school funding obligations under Prop. 98, it is unlikely that the Legislature would authorize school districts to engage in such financing methods absent establishing a process that includes approval from a state entity. Under these circumstances, what would be most helpful to cities? The state should identify its policy priorities and then offer to engage in collaborative tax-increment financing efforts with local agencies to accomplish mutual objectives. Examples of the state priorities that match existing local priorities include:

Infrastructure Bank or similar entity. Caps on annual allocations of the school share of tax increment could be established, but any previously committed tax increment must be guaranteed through project completion. These new tools have potential but need a broader financing scope. If the state is

willing to restore its prior contribution to tax-increment financing via the school share, then promising opportunities will emerge for state and local governments using a collaborative approach to tax-increment financing that advances shared priorities. ■

• Increasing affordable housing; • Renovating urban core areas; • Improving disadvantaged communities; • Increasing transit-oriented development; • Reducing carbon emissions;

We’re not just another pea in the pod. Cooperative purchasing that is uniquely U.S. Communities.

• Maintaining critical infrastructure;

It is the U.S. Communities difference that delivers

• Supporting economic development and job creation; and

• Supplier commitments to pricing, economy, sales and corporate support • Solicitation, evaluation and award process led by an independent lead public agency • Program Managers focused exclusively on public agency support

• Improving local schools as part of community revitalization efforts. The state should also develop a process for selecting projects, which could include review and approval by a state body such as the Strategic Growth Council,

www.westerncity.com

Experience the unmatched value of U.S. Communities. Register today!

Founding Sponsor of U.S. Communities

Visit us at www.uscommunities.org/lcc

Western City, May 2018

19


Redevelopment’s Elimination:

Remembering the by Dan Carrigg Until recently, the State of California had a poor record of budget management, with boom-and-bust spending and little cash held in reserves. This undisciplined approach led to frequent multibillion dollar budget deficits. During deficit years, legislators were reluctant to cut state programs and faced difficulties securing the political will to raise taxes, which resulted in the Legislature eyeing local government funding for repeated raids. In response, a coalition led by the League, California State Association of Counties and California Special Districts Association qualified a ballot measure to protect local property and sales taxes and reduce

unfunded mandates. This effort produced Proposition 1A of 2004, which passed with over 83 percent of the vote.

The Vulnerability of Redevelopment and Local Revenues Prop. 1A did not protect redevelopment funding. Redevelopment attorneys had long held that redevelopment funds were already protected by the Constitution. That argument gave legislators and the governor leverage during negotiations over Prop. 1A to maintain that constitutional protection was not needed. Though the state had taken redevelopment funds

previously, agreements negotiated with the California Redevelopment Association (CRA) typically included extending the expiration dates of agency project areas to offset financial impacts — so prior to Prop. 1A, the constitutional issue had not yet been litigated. After a brief financial boom in the mid2000s, state budget conditions soured, and the Legislature again sought local revenue. This included an effort in 2008, when the Legislature attempted to sweep away $350 million from redevelopment without providing offsetting adjustments. CRA challenged the constitutionality of this effort and prevailed in the trial court.

Dan Carrigg is deputy executive director and legislative director for the League and can be reached at dcarrigg@cacities.org.

20

League of California Cities

www.cacities.org


Local Experience After a contentious budget year that comprised a series of budget proposals rejected by voters in a special May election, the 2009 state budget included borrowing $2 billion from cities, counties and special districts — in accordance with the terms of Prop. 1A — and a proposed sweep of $2.05 billion from redevelopment, which subsequently would be litigated. The budget also included a failed effort (narrowly defeated in the early morning hours on the Assembly floor) to sweep away all $1 billion in city and county local Highway User’s Tax revenue. (For more in-depth information about the state’s tumultuous budget conditions and local vulnerabilities at that time, read the “2009 Legislative Review” at www.westerncity.com.)

www.westerncity.com

These chaotic state budget conditions and demands from its member cities compelled the League to pursue additional local revenue protections on the state ballot. The local Highway User’s Tax revenue had been flowing to cities and counties for decades to support road maintenance. It was incomprehensible to local officials that the Legislature — in its desperation — came so close to sweeping away these funds. Redevelopment agencies were also in court attempting to avoid a $2.05 billion loss, which amounted to nearly every remaining dollar they had that was not already committed to debt. In this environment with local revenues under grave threats, the efforts to draft Prop. 22 began.

Prop. 22, the Local Taxpayer, Public Safety and Transportation Protection Act: • Contained additional protections for local Highway User’s Tax revenue; • Prohibited further state borrowing of local property taxes; • Protected all other locally levied taxes from potential raids; and • Contained additional protections for local redevelopment agency funds. California voters approved Prop. 22 by a vote of 61 percent in the November 2010 election. continued

Western City, May 2018

21


Redevelopment’s Elimination: Remembering the Local Experience, continued

Prop. 22’s language on redevelopment reaffirmed the constitutional theory that funds dedicated to redevelopment were protected for those purposes, but it also left an opening for the Legislature to continue changing laws related to redevelopment, under the assumption that the tool would continue to undergo future improvements and policy reforms. But lawmakers who were focused on eliminating redevelopment used this very opening to their advantage.

Post-Prop. 22 Redevelopment Retribution Warning Several weeks after Prop. 22 passed, thenState Treasurer Bill Lockyer was quite candid when speaking to an audience of city finance officers at the League’s Municipal Finance Institute. Lockyer said that Prop. 22 had angered a number of interests and people in the state Capitol and he expected to see an initiative that would take all redevelopment funds and shift them to schools. He was correct about the angry political mood among legislative Democrats and some of their core constituencies. But rather than by

22

League of California Cities

initiative, the proposal to eliminate redevelopment came from newly elected Gov. Jerry Brown, who was facing a $26 billion state budget deficit. Two other initiatives approved in the November 2010 election, Prop. 25 and Prop. 26, affected the state budget process and also contributed to redevelopment’s elimination. These measures made it easier to adopt a budget and limited the ability to raise fees to fund state programs. Prop. 25 reduced the vote threshold required to approve state budgets from two-thirds to a simple majority. Prop. 25 also contained a provision — used to help sell the measure to voters — that requires legislators to forfeit their pay when the state budget misses its statutory deadline. Prop. 26, sponsored by anti-tax and business groups, ended a recent practice used by legislative Democrats to pay for state programs with regulatory “fees.” It also prohibited the tactic of reducing a tax, backfilling the lost tax revenue with new fees, then increasing another tax to the level of the reduced tax. These fees are now defined as “taxes” requiring a twothirds vote.

Eliminating Redevelopment: The Most Radical Proposal in Governor’s 2011 Budget The return of Jerry Brown as governor after four decades in California politics signaled a political sea change. During his campaign, Brown indicated that he would be aggressive in fixing the budget deficit, thus raising expectations. His early actions, which included taking away cellphones and swag from state agencies and issuing fiscal austerity warnings such as “get ready for hard benches,” garnered extensive media attention. Yet when unveiled, most elements of his budget were relatively familiar, and the budget lacked any radical reorganizations of state programs or agencies. Half of Gov. Brown’s proposed solution to the deficit came from cuts and half from proposed revenue “extensions.” He proposed extending for five years the tax increases adopted in 2009 on the VLF, sales tax and personal income tax. Some of these “extended” taxes were to fund the realignment of various state programs to counties,


an effort the previous administration had begun. Ironically, the governor’s most aggressive proposals were reserved for local government — primarily cities. Without any prior effort to explore compromise or reform options with the affected entities, he proposed eliminating all redevelopment agencies. Gov. Brown also proposed eliminating the state’s 42 enterprise zones, an economic development program that brought jobs to disadvantaged areas. Killing redevelopment made little policy or budget sense. The official rationale was that the General Fund could no longer afford backfilling school property tax dollars captured by redevelopment projects. But strangely, the initial proposal did not benefit the General Fund in the long term. It achieved state budget savings for only one year; in all future years, any additional funds would be given to schools outside the state’s Prop. 98 school funding formula, reflecting State Treasurer Lockyer’s initial warning. Legislative Democrats fell into line behind “their” governor. Many did not like the proposed cuts, but they stuck with Gov. Brown nevertheless.

Given these dynamics, cities faced enormous challenges battling redevelopment elimination in the Legislature. Democratic leaders supported the governor’s budget, most of which could now be approved with a simple majority vote. The California Teachers Association and the California Professional Firefighters, organizations that had led the opposition to Prop. 22, eagerly supported it as well. Most legislative Democrats would not take action without their leaders’ approval, and several key staff zealously championed the proposal. Anger over Prop. 22 was palpable. Hostility toward cities and redevelopment, however, did not extend to all legislators, some of whom began asking questions. Then-Assembly Member Diane Harkey (R-Laguna Niguel) was helpful in pressuring the legislative counsel to issue a legal opinion that concluded taking redevelop-

ment funds to pay for state programs violated the state Constitution, a point made by redevelopment attorneys since the debate began. The League and CRA worked to develop a reform package that responded aggressively to criticisms of redevelopment and would better position it for the future. A proposed alternative financing package also granted redevelopment agencies time extensions in exchange for financial contributions that offset state obligations to school. A pragmatic group of Democratic legislators began engaging on the issue. Many had seen firsthand in their communities the role redevelopment played to spur economic revitalization and create jobs. They considered it wasteful to toss away such a valuable tool. The reform proposals surfaced as SB 286 by Sen. Rod Wright (D-Los Angeles) and AB 1250 continued on page 25

At LCW we are not solely lawyers. For nearly 40 years, we have been your trusted partners, helping public employers avoid legal problems and navigate challenging situations. California cities serve others, and we are honored to serve them in all areas of law, including: • • • • • • •

Employment Law Litigation Labor Relations Negotiations Retirement Wage & Hour Preventative Training

“Service to others is the payment you make for your space here on earth.” Mohammad Ali You serve others and LCW is honored to serve you. www.LCWLEGAL.com Western City, May 2018

23


CREATE AN ACTIVE WORKSPACE

Your workspace matters. When it’s active, it attracts the best talent and helps to create a healthier, more productive office.* Our desktop and standing-desk solutions make it easy to add more movement and flexibility to every day. Don’t miss out on the chance to budget for a better workspace.

CALL (855) 282-8786 TO TURN YOUR OFFICE INTO AN ACTIVE WORKSPACE Availability subject to change. | *All sources cited available at VARIDESK.com/resources. | Patent and trademark information: VARIDESK.com/patents. | ©2018 VARIDESK®. All rights reserved.


Redevelopment’s Elimination: Remembering the Local Experience, continued from page 23

by Assembly Member Luis Alejo (DWatsonville). The financing proposal was introduced as SB x1 24 (Wright). Lacking leadership support, these efforts failed to gather momentum. Republican legislators negotiating with the governor over possible votes to extend temporary tax increases also sought to protect redevelopment. Sen. Bob Huff (R-Diamond Bar) worked with his colleagues in this effort. Although accounts conflict about why a comprehensive agreement ultimately was not struck, redevelopment would have been protected in such an accord.

Paycheck-Inspired 2011 Budget Includes Redevelopment Elimination When an agreement with Republicans to increase taxes did not materialize, the prospect under Prop. 25 of potentially forfeiting salary for every day the budget was late inspired quick action by legislators. They sent Gov. Brown a majority-vote budget in advance of the traditionally ignored constitutional deadline of June 15. The final budget included a proposal, AB x1 26, that eliminated redevelopment agencies unless they agreed to make specific payments to the state’s benefit as specified in AB x1 27. The budget also included SB 89 (Chapter 35, Statutes of 2011), a budget trailer bill passed with little public review, which swept away $130 million in city VLF funds and approximately $50 million from Orange County. Thanks to the outstanding work of the California Association of Enterprise Zones and a coalition including the League and other groups, enterprise zones survived the budget intact. The two-thirds vote requirement created a strategic advantage in this effort, because Republicans refused to provide the needed votes. The Enterprise Zone program, however, was eliminated in subsequent years. Some still question why CRA and the League opted to legally challenge the AB x1 26/27 scheme. Realistically, local agencies had little choice. Over 30 percent of redevelopment agencies reported that they would be eliminated because they couldn’t www.westerncity.com

Decades of community efforts were disposed of in a clinical fashion through a DOF-administered process that favored harvesting cash and disposing of assets over community priorities.

afford to make the “ransom payment” required by AB x1 27. The prior budget’s proposed sweep of $2.05 billion was still pending in court. AB x1 26 would eliminate constitutional protection for redevelopment agency funding, leaving no protection from future legislative raids. The Legislature was also facing yet another $8 billion deficit in 2012. Given that legislators had been reluctant to cut programs and unable to raise revenue and had previously supported the full elimination of redevelopment, it was likely they would sweep away the rest of redevelop-

ment funding in the coming year. Local agencies demanded that CRA and the League enforce the constitutional protections that had been further strengthened for redevelopment revenues in Prop. 22. The League and CRA filed litigation and persuaded the California Supreme Court to take original jurisdiction of the matter. At 2011’s end, the California Supreme Court issued its ruling in California Redevelopment Association v. Matosantos, holding that AB x1 27 was unconstitutional but upholding AB x1 26, the redevelopment continued on page 27

Comprehensive Legal Services for Economic Development

• • • • • •

Construction Development Agreements Environmental Laws Housing Infrastructure Land Use Planning

• • • • • •

Neighborhood Preservation Public Finance Public-Private Partnerships Real Estate Water Supply and Rights Zoning

OFFICES THROUGHOUT CALIFORNIA | MEYERSNAVE.COM | 800.464.3559

Western City, May 2018

25


Celebrating generations of CaCities empowering and innovating communities yesterday, today and tomorrow.

On behalf of our 48 national sponsors, we congratulate the League of California Cities on 120 years of strengthening California cities through advocacy and education. U.S. Communities Government Purchasing Alliance is a nonprofit purchasing cooperative that reduces the cost of goods and services by aggregating the purchasing power of public agencies nationwide. Contracts are competitively solicited, evaluated and awarded by an impartial lead public agency, which allows local government agencies access to world-class procurement resources, solutions and savings from over 40 national suppliers.


Redevelopment’s Elimination: Remembering the Local Experience, continued from page 25

elimination measure. This ruling eliminated redevelopment agencies effective Feb. 1, 2012. CRA and the League launched a final legislative effort in January 2012 with SB 659 (Padilla) to delay the elimination date so that alternatives could be explored, but that effort failed to gain traction in the Legislature or administration. Thus, Gov. Brown achieved his objective of eliminating redevelopment agencies, the tool that had been essential to urban development and affordable housing in California.

Redevelopment Dissolution and Its Aftermath The loss of redevelopment devastated many communities, but cities accepted the outcome of the court’s decision and prepared to move on. In 2012, the League worked on AB 1585 with then-Assembly Speaker John Pérez (D-Los Angeles) to develop a cleanup bill to AB x1 26 to address local implementation issues, which included preserving remaining affordable housing funds and requiring the repayment of city-agency loans. The measure passed the Assembly in March with an urgency clause and bipartisan support but regrettably was not provided a hearing in the Senate. After the Senate failed to hear AB 1585, the redevelopment issue was folded into the budget process. The state Department of Finance (DOF) released redevelopment trailer bill language in conjunction with the governor’s “May Revise,” aimed primarily at improving the state’s leverage over redevelopment successor agencies. The League testified against this proposal and submitted alternative language to legislators to expand due process and promote equitable resolution of outstanding disputes, repay city agency loans, allow for the use of unexpended bond funds and other provisions. The measure stalled. DOF staff and Senate and Assembly Democratic leaders began meeting privately to draft language. AB 1484, a comprehensive 80-page bill released on June 25, 2012, emerged from these discussions. The following day, the Senate Budget Committee convened an evening session. Despite severe time constraints, the League reviewed the bill’s language, www.westerncity.com

Killing redevelopment made little policy or budget sense. identified problems and drafted proposed amendments. The bill’s claw-back provisions, unrealistic deadlines and other major items raised policy and constitutional issues. Legislators voiced concerns and stated that they would not vote for the bill without specific changes. But after some overnight arm-twisting by the governor, the principled statements made the previous evening morphed into rationalizations by the next morning. The Legislature approved the bill without change, and Gov. Brown signed it into law (Chapter 26, Statutes of 2012) on June 27. Lacking viable legislative recourse, the League filed litigation against the state on Sept. 24 over various aspects of AB 1484, including claw-back mechanisms that could divert local sales or property tax. The League ultimately prevailed in this lawsuit.

The Controversies Continue in 2015 Dissolution controversies flared up again in 2015 when the Brown administration proposed comprehensive revisions to the dissolution process that reopened wounds and pitted local agencies against each other. The impacts of these revisions included causing significant harm to affected agencies by overturning court decisions, limiting expected loan repayments and restricting legal due process. Because it provided benefits to some and caused harm to others, the proposal proved divisive from the outset. The League adopted an “Oppose Unless Amended” position with a focus on eliminating the harmful elements of the proposal, because more than 100 cities would be harmed by the effort to undo court decisions and revise loan repayment statutes. Legislators recognized the problems as well and had refused to vote on earlier versions.

In May, the administration pulled back on some of the harmful provisions but then added to the mix four nonrelated budget provisions supported by individual local agencies. These new provisions had nothing to do with redevelopment and could have been passed separately, but they were folded into the bill to help chip away opposition. The League battled the measure throughout the year until the very last day of the legislative session when SB 107, a 104-page bill with the harmful elements modified from earlier versions, was placed into print and moved quickly to the Assembly floor without a hearing. After some debate, the bill passed to the Senate where it was also approved later that night. As expected, it was divisive. Representatives of counties, special districts and cities receiving specific benefits supported it; a handful opposed it. Given that the harmful elements remained in the bill, the League testified in opposition to the measure in the Senate Budget Committee and helped get a clarification on loan repayment amounts into a letter that the author filed with the Senate Journal.

Lessons Learned Many communities likely will never recover what they had in place prior to redevelopment dissolution. Decades of community efforts were disposed of in a clinical fashion through a DOF-administered process that favored harvesting cash and disposing of assets over community priorities. Some city officials remain jaded and disheartened after experiencing repeated efforts to raid redevelopment funding and witnessing the lack of support by legislators for alternatives to the governor’s elimination proposal and the harmful outcomes of two major dissolution trailer bills. Given this experience, as new tools emerge, expect local officials to exercise caution. ■ Western City, May 2018

27


The city’s investment in the arts draws visitors and generates revenue.

Temecula’s Arts and Culture Support a Thriving Economy Established in 1859 and incorporated in 1989, the City of Temecula (pop. 111, 024) is 40 miles southeast of Irvine and approximately a 60-minute drive from San Diego, Orange County and Palm Springs. The city’s Old Town area features wooden boardwalks and rustic Old West-era buildings, antique shops, specialty boutiques, craft breweries, unique restaurants, public art and live music venues. Designated as the city’s Cultural Arts District, Old Town Temecula serves as a hub for the arts, with museums, art galleries, a senior center and a theater. City Council Member Maryann Edwards says, “The arts help define the character of the

community and generate a great sense of pride. Temecula celebrates the arts and diverse cultures, which helps make newcomers and visitors feel welcome.” “The City of Temecula integrates arts and culture into community life by providing opportunities to experience the artistic and cultural assets in the Temecula Valley and through collaborative, supportive and creative partnerships,” says Mayor Matt Rahn. As part of its commitment to fostering a “cultural economy” with activities centered on the creative, performing and visual arts, the city collaborates with over 40 nonprofit organizations, professional associations, local businesses and school districts.

Investing in Arts Infrastructure The city council’s support for Temecula’s Cultural Arts District began with the construction of the Temecula Valley Museum in 1999, Pennypickle’s Workshop-Temecula Children’s Museum in 2004 and the Old Town Temecula Community Theater in 2005. The development process also incorporates public art. Developers must either donate city-approved public art or pay an in-lieu fee into the Public Art Fund. City Council Member Jeff Comerchero says, “This is

continued on page 38

The City of Temecula won the Award for Excellence in the Economic Development Through the Arts category of the 2017 Helen Putnam Award for Excellence program. For more about the awards program, visit www.helenputnam.org.

28

League of California Cities

www.cacities.org


Why We Need Diversity in City Management by Wade McKinney Cities are home to people from all walks of life. But how often does a city’s workforce — especially at management levels — closely reflect the diversity of the community it serves? Local governments face a growing challenge of providing public service to increasingly diverse communities. Promoting diversity at City Hall is a key strategy for ensuring equitable service.

Why Bosses Appreciate Diversity I challenge my fellow city managers to take a page out of Apple, Inc.’s playbook when it comes to diversity. At www.apple. com/diversity, the company outlines why

it is mindful about forming teams and hiring leaders from varied backgrounds. Its tagline opens with “Humanity is plural, not singular.” That concept rings as true for local government as it does in the world of technology.

reveal the way each person thinks and how they act upon their ideas. City managers who are able to harness these unique perspectives can leverage the full potential of their staff members to creatively tackle new challenges.

As Apple and other companies have demonstrated, having a truly diverse staff can lead to intensely creative problem-solving and foster a flexible, collaborative and inclusive work environment.

Why Staff Members Appreciate Diversity

In my work as a city manager, I have come to cherish the ways that my staff members set themselves apart from one another. The most valuable differences

Managers are not the only ones to benefit from a diverse workforce. Endeavoring to understand differing viewpoints and talents also enhances city staff ’s ability to work as a cohesive team. continued on page 34

Wade McKinney is city manager of Indian Wells and president of the California City Management Foundation; he can be reached at wmckinney@indianwells.com.

www.westerncity.com

Western City, May 2018

29


J

O

B

O

P

P

O

R

T

U

N

I

T

I

E

S

Display Advertising

Western City magazine’s job opportunity section is the source for job seekers looking for positions in local government. When you place a job opportunity ad in Western City

Call Pam Maxwell-Blodgett at (800) 262-1801 to place a display (boxed) ad or for rate and deadline information, or email admanager@westerncity.com. Website Job Postings Display ads are posted on our website at no additional charge. But if you miss the deadline for getting your job opportunity ad into the magazine, you can post it on the Western City website right away. To post your job opportunity ad on our automated website, visit www.westerncity.com or contact Savannah Cobbs, Western City’s administrative assistant; email: scobbs@ cacities.org; phone: (916) 658-8223.

magazine, it will be posted at no additional

Director of Parks & Recreation

charge on our website.

City of Santa Cruz, CA

For rates and deadlines,

nown for its outstanding quality of life and incredible outdoor activities, the City of Santa Cruz (pop. 64,465) is located just 75 miles south of San Francisco between the Santa Cruz Mountains and Monterey Bay. This coastal city has long-been known for its superior recreation programming, exceptional facilities, and beautiful parks and open space. The Parks & Recreation Department is currently organized across two divisions and is supported by a staff of 97 FTE and an annual operating budget of $17 million.

visit www.westerncity. com and click on the Advertise link.

K

Reporting to the City Manager, the Parks & Recreation Director will be a talented people manager who proactively invests in mentoring and developing team members. He/she will be a high energy leader known for inspiring innovation and encouraging fresh ideas and creative problem solving. Five years of progressively responsible experience in the parks and recreation field, that includes at least two years of management experience, and a Bachelor’s degree is required. Salary range up to $188,604. Compensation also includes an attractive benefits package and the priceless opportunity to work with a high performing, collaborative and fun executive team! Please visit www.tbcrecruiting.com for detailed information.

City Manager Highly qualified applicants are invited to apply for this exciting career opportunity to join a widely recognized, well-managed City as its next City Manager. Offering an exceptional quality of life, the City of Monterey is seeking high level, respected professionals who are looking for the opportunity to help lead and support this wonderful, first class, historic community. The annual City budget is approximately $127 million and the City currently has 456 full-time and regular part-time employees. The successful candidate for the position of City Manager must be a professional with outstanding judgment, management skills, and integrity. The City Manager will be an experienced executive who has knowledge of a variety of municipal functions. Requires a bachelor’s degree. A master’s degree is preferred but not required. Knowledge of California local government is highly desirable. Salary is D.O.Q., including an attractive benefits package. Interested candidates are encouraged to apply by 5/28/2018. Electronic submittals preferred to apply@ralphandersen.com and should include a compelling cover letter, comprehensive resume, and five professional references. Confidential inquiries welcomed to Dave Morgan at 916-630-4900. Detailed brochure available at www.ralphandersen.com.

Ralph Andersen & Associates

30

League of California Cities

Teri Black • 424.296.3111 • Bob McFall

CITY OF FREMONT The City of Fremont, located in Southern Alameda County, stretches from the top of Mission Peak to the San Francisco Bay. Fremont is the fourth largest city in the Bay Area with a population of more than 220,000 residents. Fremont takes pride in being one of the most ethnically and culturally diverse cities in the Bay Area. With its moderate climate and its proximity to major universities, shopping areas, recreational and cultural activities, and the Bay Area Rapid Transit system, Fremont captures metropolitan living at its best.

CITY MANAGER

The City Manager is responsible for providing leadership and direction to City staff and for providing information, advice and assistance to the City Council. The City Manager’s Office William Avery & Associates supports the City Council’s efforts to engage in legislative advocacy in Management Consultants support of the City’s interests. Fostering community partnerships and 1 3 /2 N. Santa Cruz Ave., Suite A interagency collaboration is essential. The City Manager will make our Los Gatos, CA 95030 staff and citizens feel they are included and invested in the important 408.399.4424 decisions of the City. Fax: 408.399.4423

The new City Manager will have at least five years of progressively email: jobs@averyassoc.net www.averyassoc.net responsible experience and a proven track record as a city manager, assistant city manager, or senior executive for a comparable public sector organization. A combination of training and experience that provides the required knowledge, skills and abilities is qualifying. A typical education would include a Bachelor’s degree in public/business administration or a closely related field. To be considered, please visit our website at www.averyassoc.net/current-searches/ for a detailed job announcement and how to apply on the Avery Associates Career Portal.

www.cacities.org


J

O

B

O

P

P

O

R

T

U

N

I

T

I

E

S

CITY MANAGER

CITY OF BANNING, CALIFORNIA Annual Salary: $ 180,589 – $244,315 DOQ

The City of Banning, located in Riverside County, population 31,000, is seeking a strong leader with excellent communication and interpersonal skills. This is a career opportunity for someone who has the ability to implement the goals established by the City Council and its diverse community. The ideal candidate must be a public executive with a record of demonstrated leadership in successfully guiding a municipal city under a Council/Manager form of government, and must possess outstanding judgment, management, and communication skills with the verifiable ability to excel in strategic planning and decision making. The ideal candidate must possess a Bachelor’s Degree from an accredited institution; a Master’s Degree is desirable. Candidates should have a minimum of 10 years of executive management experience in a comparable or larger full service City. Experience in public utilities is desirable. Recruitment is open until the position is filled. Apply at www.ci.banning.ca.us/jobs.aspx. A completed job application and supplemental questionnaire is required. Contact (951) 9223155 should you have any questions.

Assistant Community Development Director City of Menlo Park, CA

C

onveniently located between San Francisco and San Jose in the Silicon Valley, the beautiful City of Menlo Park is home to a population of over 32,000. The community offers an incredible quality of life with its stunning natural surroundings, highly desirable neighborhoods, and vibrant commercial districts. The Community Development Department is supported by a staff of 28 and a budget of $6.64 million. The Department encompasses the Planning and Building Divisions as well as the Office of Housing and Economic Development. The Assistant Director oversees the Planning Division. The ideal candidate will be a team player with the proven ability to succeed in a dynamic environment. An excellent critical thinker and problem solver, he/she will be an outstanding people manager who is adept at managing change. Five years of relevant urban planning experience that includes at least three years of supervisory experience and a Bachelor’s degree is required. A Master’s degree and/or AICP certification is preferred. Current salary range is $119,894 - $172,341; placement within the range DOQE. Salary is supplemented by a competitive benefits package. Closing date: Sunday, May 13, 2018. Visit www.tbcrecruiting.com to download recruitment brochure and apply online.

Teri Black • 424.296.3111 Bradley Wardle • 650.450.3299

Photo/art credits Cover: Original graphic by Leontura; adapted by Taber Creative Group Page 3: Chinaface Page 4: Vm Page 5: Yamtono_Sardi Page 7: MmeEmil Page 8: RyanJLane Page 9: PictureLake Pages 10–11: Rvimages Page 12: Shotbydave

www.westerncity.com

Page 13: DustyPixel Page 16: Chaiyapruek2520 Page 17: Kanate Page 19: LeoPatrizi Pages 20–21: OGphoto Pages 22–23: Madmaxer Pages 28, 38 & 39: Courtesy of the City of Temecula and Shawna Sarnowski Photography Page 29: Kubkoo

CITY MANAGER Wasco, CA population 26,980 The City Manager is Wasco’s Chief Administrative Officer with appointment authority for all Department Head level managers and is responsible for budget preparation and fiscal oversight for all municipal programs and functions, and the advancement of policy recommendations to the City Council. Five years of managerial experience in a public or private agency is required. A four-year degree in Public Administration, Political Science or related discipline is required; a master’s degree is desirable. The previous salary of the City Manager was $168,146.00 with typical benefit package. The City Council has expressed a willingness to negotiate a competitive salary and benefit package in a multi-year employment agreement for the top candidate. Qualified candidates should submit a resume and cover letter electronically to the Human Resources Department at durodriguez@ci.wasco.ca.us or by U.S. mail to City Hall, 746 8th Street, Wasco, California 93280 by Monday, June 11, 2018. Potential candidates who may have questions regarding this career opportunity are encouraged to contact Interim City Manager Larry F. Pennell at 661-758-7214. The Interim City Manager is not a candidate for the position.

Western City, May 2018

31


Tranquility

in Municipal Temporary Staffing Since 2006, MuniTemps has worked with hundreds of City Attorneys and H.R. professionals to municipalize our process for providing temporary staffing.

So Relax. We’ve Got Your Back. After 12 years processing thousands of City requests for temporary staffing, MuniTemps knows where it hurts and what Staffing arrangement works.

That’s Why We’re Here: Stress Relief.

“It’s not just a job, it’s public service”®

MuniTemps.com 866.406.6864

New! Background Checks

CalPERS Compliance Sick Leave

Workers Comp

ACA


Current & Upcoming Opportunities City of Arcata, CA

Rancho Simi Recreation & Park District, CA

Finance Director

The City of Arcata (pop. approximately 17,500) is located on the Northern California coast, framed by the Pacific Ocean, forested hills, the Mad River, and Humboldt Bay. The City enjoys a desirable quality of life, including a small-town atmosphere, mild climate, beautiful scenery, and wealth of outdoor activities and recreation. The City is now seeking a Finance Director to join the key members of the City’s executive team. This is an excellent opportunity for a hands-on Finance Director with a breadth of financial service experience and skill in strategic planning. The typical candidate will possess the equivalent to a Bachelor’s degree with major coursework in business administration, finance, accounting, or public administration; and at least seven (7) years progressively responsible financial management and accounting experience, including at least three (3) years related supervisory and budgetary experience. A Certified Public Accountant certification and/or Master’s degree is desirable. The annual salary range for the Finance Director is $85,935-$104,455 (with a 2.5% salary increase in July 2018); placement within this range is dependent on the qualifications and experience of the individual selected. If you have any questions, contact Valerie Phillips. Filing deadline: May 18, 2018

District Manager

The Rancho Simi Recreation and Park District was formed for the specific purpose of providing parks and recreation activities to the resident population of 147,000. The District is now seeking a District Manager. This is a great opportunity for those candidates who enjoy multitasking and being hands-on. The Board is seeking a candidate who has the leadership skill to inspire support of the Board’s vision and the management skill to promote a cohesive team atmosphere while ensuring that accountability is maintained. Graduation with a Bachelor’s degree from a college or university with major coursework in public administration, business administration, recreation, park management, or a related field is required; a Master’s degree is prefered. Candidates must possess a minimum of five (5) years of high-level professional experience, three (3) years of which should be in the public sector (preferably a special district) at a management level with considerable administrative responsibilities sufficient to show working familiarity with the Ralph M. Brown Act and other laws under which public agencies operate. The District Manager position has a pay step schedule starting at $14,146 per month, increasing to $17,322 per month. If you have any questions, contact Valerie Phillips. Filing deadline: May 25, 2018

City of San José, CA

Deputy Director of Homelessness Solutions and Housing Policy

“There’s no place like home.” Housing is one of the highest priorities for the City of San José. In the next five years, the City is looking to create 10,000 affordable homes. To support this goal, the City will release over $100 million in development funding this year. We are pleased to announce the search for two (2) strategic, visionary, and collaborative leaders to join the City’s Housing Department as Deputy Directors. Joining the department, you will be part of an amazing team that takes pride in building a safe and healthy community for City residents and who work tirelessly to ensure that no child, family, or individual should be without a home. As a team, the Department makes concerted efforts in providing housing opportunities for all residents by preventing the displacement of low-income residents and communities of color. If you are an individual who is passionate about building a better community and supporting staff development, while cultivating and maintaining strong working relationships with City Council, diverse community members, and other partners, we look forward to speaking with you. The minimum requirements are: Bachelor’s degree from an accredited college or university with major coursework in public or business administration, housing, urban planning, or a related field. Six (6) years of relevant experience, including three (3) years of management experience and a concentration in at least one of the following areas: affordable housing financing or real estate development OR management of homeless programs of major scope and complexity OR housing policy or community development. A Master’s degree is preferred, however additional experience can be substituted. The salary range for the incoming Deputy Housing Director is $116,893$182,084; placement within this range is dependent upon qualifications. If you have any questions, contact Valerie Phillips. Filing deadline: May 13, 2018

• City of Mountain View, CA – Planning Manager • Oakdale Irrigation District, CA – Chief Financial Officer • City of Pleasant Hill, CA – Police Captain • Santa Clarita Valley Water Agency – Assistant General Manager

• Santa Clara Valley Water District – Deputy Operating Officer - Treated Water Operations & Maintenance

• City of South San Francisco, CA – Fire Marshal • City of Roseville, CA – City Manager

If you are interested in these outstanding opportunities, visit our website to apply online.

www.bobmurrayassoc.com

Check out our new website launching in early May – www.bobmurrayassoc.com


Why We Need Diversity in City Management, continued from page 29

Women in the Profession

Shared experiences and challenges faced by colleagues can increase empathy and inform future local government decisions. Moving forward, the team members can work together to address multiple aspects of a single issue to mitigate potential future municipal or community problems.

J

O

B

O

P

P

O

If our goal is to create a municipal workforce that reflects all segments of its community, the topic of gender must be part of the conversation. As of April 2016, among the 6,617 International

R

T

U

N

I

T

I

E

S

New opportunities . . .

Public Works Director City of Palo Alto

Police Commander Assistant Community Services Director City of Menlo Park

Assistant Directors of Library and Recreation City of Pleasanton

Risk Manager City of Vallejo

tel: 424.296.3111

THE CITY OF

Rolling Hills CALIFORNIA City Manager Rolling Hills, a small, entirely residential equestrian community located atop the Palos Verdes Peninsula of Los Angeles County, is seeking a qualified, motivated, productive, and hands on professional to serve as City Manager. The City, a general law city, operates under the Council-Manager form of government with five Councilmembers elected at large, with each serving a rotation as Mayor. Full-time City staff consists of 4 other staff members. The community is gated and also governed by a Community Association through its CC&Rs. The successful individual would be experienced in city and contract management; service oriented, has a background in public works and has the highest integrity. The City offers excellent benefits for employees and eligible dependents. City participates in CalPERS, (employees pay employee portion of the CalPERS Retirement System and Social Security). Salary negotiated based on qualifications and experience. Filing Deadline is May 29, 2018 by 4:00P.M. Visit: Rolling-Hills.org/index.aspx?NID=89 for additional information and required application or call 310-377-1521. The City of Rolling Hills is an Equal Opportunity Employer.

34

League of California Cities

City/County Management Association (ICMA) members working for U.S. local government full time, 28.5 percent (1,886) are women. Roughly 3,400 of the 6,617 are chief administrative officers (CAOs), of which 15 percent are women. Among the 1,100 ICMA members who serve at the assistant or deputy CAO level, 37.2 percent (409) are women. Cities — and all organizations — are stronger when they draw upon the talents and perspectives of the entire community, not just the male portion. A mix of genders in the workplace can tap into previously unexplored insights about the general population and keep our public services relevant. City managers play a key role in creating change within the workplace. I encourage my colleagues to examine their own cities, acknowledge the various obstacles that may impede upward mobility for women and collaborate with staff to improve the work environment.

The Next Generation A successful city organization continually learns and evolves. The public sector is seeing — and will continue to see — a “silver tsunami” of retirees. To ensure that their city continues to thrive well into the future, city managers should implement a culture that exposes new and emerging talented employees to the upper management path. Mentorship should also be a part of this culture. As Patricia Martel, city manager of Daly City, has said, “One of the most critical things is to have a role model. You can’t be who you can’t see.” As city managers, we need to keep our younger employees engaged in the vision of our organizations and discover what will keep the next generation motivated to pursue a long career in public service. I am fortunate to have had several mentors over the years who taught me many valuable lessons ranging from basic municipal information to profound insights about the local government profession. Mentors can see where we need to improve, and they encourage us to expand our knowledge. Furthermore, having a mentor can www.cacities.org


speed up the learning process, helping early-career employees better tackle challenges that their mentor has encountered in the past.

City managers play a key role in creating change within the workplace.

Community Appreciates Staff Who Are Like Them Diversity at management levels creates more opportunities for a city to better connect with its community. A mix of cultures in the workplace can help city leaders to contextualize issues that may be unique to their municipality. With that foundation, the city can better engage with its multiracial and multicultural populations. Public policy affects residents, first and foremost. As city administrators, we have a duty to ensure our community members feel they are being heard, especially when the city is considering decisions that affect their lives. If residents feel they are understood and see that they are truly being represented, they are typically more likely to participate in the civic life of their community and engage in local government activities.

Next Steps The idea of cultivating diversity is not new. Many cities and public agencies have implemented measures to better reflect California’s increasing diversity. An analysis of the work done to promote diversity in communities of all sizes can help local leaders create an action plan that is responsive to their city’s unique needs and demographics. Embracing a new organizational culture does not happen overnight. City managers should lead their teams and staff members in ongoing discussions about why their personal experiences matter and how they can help create lasting change that benefits the entire community they all serve. ■

More Information Online For links to related resources, read the online version of this article at www.westerncity.com.

www.westerncity.com

J

O

B

O

P

P

O

R

T

U

N

I

T

I

E S

Director of Public Works CITY OF LAGUNA NIGUEL, CA

Laguna Niguel, nestled in the coastal foothills of beautiful South Orange County, seeks their next Director of Public Works. Due to retirement, this exceptional opportunity is available for a dynamic, energetic leader with a solution-oriented attitude and proven approach for getting projects completed while inspiring staff to achieve excellence. The ideal candidate is an experienced, detail-oriented Public Works professional with a strong commitment to excellent customer service. The Department is responsible for engineering, capital improvements and maintenance, primarily performed by contracted service providers. With an operating budget of $11.4M and capital improvements budget of $35M, the Department has 21 full-time employees. Major projects include overseeing the construction of a new 30,000 square foot Community Center, resolving sensitive matters with resident participation and maintaining the City’s high standards. Equivalent to a Bachelor’s degree in civil engineering or related field is required; professional engineer license is highly desired. Salary range is $146,760-$183,456, plus generous benefits. Filing deadline: May 16, 2018, 5:00 p.m. Required City application available at www.cityoflagunaniguel.org.

Director of Public Works City of Palm Desert, California Salary: $139,283 – $191,071

The City of Palm Desert seeks a forward thinking, committed professional to join our leadership team. Overseeing a staff of 40 and an annual operating budget of more than $8 million, the Director of Public Works is responsible for all aspects of Public Works and Engineering operations. You and your team will not only be maintaining our community’s high quality infrastructure, you will be shaping it to meet the needs of the future. Palm Desert’s 50,000 permanent and more than 30,000 seasonal residents enjoy a beautiful natural environment, outdoor activities such as hiking and golfing, and extensive arts, cultural, and shopping options. Recently adopted Strategic and General plans set an exciting stage for how the community will develop and reflect innovative thinking – a hallmark of Palm Desert’s success. Minimum requirements include a bachelor’s degree in civil engineering, business or public administration, or related field (master’s degree preferred), as well as seven years of increasingly responsible management experience in engineering, public works operations, or public administration. Certification as a Professional Engineer is highly desirable. Open until filled. Information/Applications: www.cityofpalmdesert.org EOE

Western City, May 2018

35


PeckhamMcKenney & General Manager Department of Water, City of San Bernardino, CA

The City of San Bernardino (213,000) is the county seat and 17th largest city in the state. Its strategic location has made it home to nationally known companies such as Mattel, Amazon, Kohl’s and BNSF Railway. The General Manager reports directly to the appointed Water Board and oversees a department of 309 employees managing the consolidated functions of water and wastewater treatment, wastewater collection and water distribution. This is an excellent opportunity if you are an energetic and ethical professional; an inclusive, compassionate leader; and a team player looking to make a significant impact in the community. The position requires at least seven years of increasingly responsible professional experience in water and/or wastewater utilities management including a minimum five years in a management capacity in addition to a Bachelor’s degree in public administration, business administration, finance, engineering, or a closely related field. The annual salary is under review and appointment will be made depending upon the qualifications and experience of the selected candidate. The City also offers an excellent benefits package for the position. Filing deadline is May 8, 2018. Contact Ellen Volmert.

City Manager

City of Hood River, OR

Set in the heart of the Columbia River Gorge National Scenic Area, Hood River is one of the most picturesque cities in Oregon. Located 60 miles east of Portland at the convergence of the Hood River and the Columbia River, the city offers stunning views of rivers, lush forests, deep gorges and lovely drives through the fruit orchards of the Hood River Valley. With Oregon’s tallest peak, Mt. Hood is just 30 miles away. The consistently high winds channeling through the Columbia River Gorge have made Hood River an ideal spot for kiteboarding and windsurfing, earning the city the nickname of “The Windsurfing Capitol of the World”. Hood River’s 7,955 residents enjoy an exceptional quality of life with its wide range of outdoor activities, highly ranked schools, low crime, excellent health care and thriving economy. The city is seeking a pragmatic leader with high ethics and an unquestionable sense of integrity, who embraces open government and transparency, as well as having a broad command of management, financial, budgeting, intergovernmental relations, capital improvement planning, and organizational skills to lead the 64 full time employees. Hood River’s next City Manager must possess outstanding communication skills as well as excellent interpersonal skills and will enjoy working in a very diverse environment with an engaged community. Bachelor’s degree and a minimum of five years of senior level public sector experience required. Salary range currently under review with excellent benefits. Filing deadline is June 4, 2018. Contact Phil McKenney.

Parks and Recreation Director City of Bothell, WA

The City of Bothell, WA, population 44,000, is located in the Seattle metropolitan area, in King and Snohomish Counties, east of Lake Washington. Appointed by and reporting directly to the City Manager, the Parks and Recreation Director will be the architect of Bothell’s community recreation future. The ideal candidate will be excited to come to Bothell, have an impact, and leave a legacy, building a relatively new department and maximizing the potential of 150 acres of recently acquired open space. The City Manager is seeking a committed parks and recreation professional, a national-caliber talent. A Bachelor’s Degree (business or public administration, parks and recreation management, or related field) and seven to ten years of progressively responsible experience in parks and recreation management, are required, or equivalent combination of the foregoing. NPRA certifications strongly preferred. Comprehensive benefits. Annual salary range $129,876 to $165,132. Filing deadline is May 21, 2018. Contact Andrew Gorgey.

Police Chief

Town of Severance, CO Situated in beautiful Northern Colorado in the plains at the base of the Rocky Mountains, the Town of Severance (pop. 5,200) is one of the fastest growing communities in the state. About an hour’s drive north of Denver and 10 miles east of Fort Collins, Severance is establishing its first Police Department. Services provided by the Weld County Sheriff’s Office will move in house. The Town Board’s first step is hiring the Police Chief, who will set the standard and build a model department. A Bachelor’s degree from an accredited college or university, plus a minimum of five years of experience in a command-level position within a law enforcement agency, or the equivalent of the foregoing, are required. Must have had the responsibility of supervising personnel while serving in such a position. Certifications and training appropriate to the position. Comprehensive benefits. Annual salary range $85,000-$100,000. Relocation assistance subject to negotiation. Filing deadline is May 29, 2018. Contact Andrew Gorgey.


“All about fit”

County Manager

San Mateo County, CA

Located in the heart of Silicon Valley, San Mateo County’s nearly 765,000 residents enjoy a diverse, multi-cultural citizenry; cosmopolitan ambiance; temperate climate; and clean air. The County has enjoyed a stable, professional, and collegial 5-member Board of Supervisors; long-tenured County Manager and County Counsel; and 5,500 dedicated and talented department heads and employees. The 2017/18 all fund budget is $2.8 billion. The wealthiest county in the state with a AAA bond rating, San Mateo County is a fiscally sound organization with healthy reserves that has proactively addressed pension liability. Over $750 million of exciting construction projects are ongoing and projected over the next six years. With the upcoming retirement of John Maltbie, the next County Manager has the opportunity to be part of one of the most exciting times in the County’s history. A Bachelor’s degree from an accredited college or university in business or public administration or related disciplines is required. A Master’s degree is preferred. The ideal candidate brings proven executive leadership experience within a County organization. The current County Manager’s annual salary is $398,237; the incoming Manager’s salary will be based upon the experience and qualifications of the selected candidate. Filing deadline is May 21, 2018. Contact Bobbi Peckham.

City Manager

City of Glendora, CA

Set in the scenic foothills of the San Gabriel Mountains in northeastern Los Angeles County, Glendora is a thriving, upscale community imbued with small town values and ambience. With a population of 52,000 residents and encompassing 19.86 square miles, Glendora is known as the “Pride of the Foothills.” The City Manager is appointed by a five-member City Council and oversees approximately 206 FTEs and FY 2017/18 total budget of $69.6M. Glendora is a full-service city with the exception of fire. The ideal candidate is a proven, collaborative leader with strong interpersonal and communication skills. A solid knowledge of municipal finance/budget and labor relations is desired as well as an individual that stays current on legislative policies that impact the City. A Bachelor’s degree with major coursework in public or business administration or a related field is required; Master’s degree is preferred. Competitive salary DOQE. Filing Deadline is May 29, 2018. Contact Bobbi Peckham.

Assistant County Manager Summit County, CO

One hour’s drive west of the Denver metropolitan area, Summit County (pop. 30,299) is just west of the Continental Divide, among the high, rugged peaks of the Colorado Rockies. Home to some of the most popular ski areas in the world (Arapahoe Basin, Breckenridge, Copper Mountain, and Keystone), the county sees its seasonal population run to 100,000 to 150,000. Reporting directly to the County Manager, the Assistant County Manager oversees Community Development, Public Works, and the Summit Stage, free public transit, serving about two million riders annually. Bachelor’s degree in public administration, business, engineering or relevant field, and five to seven years progressively responsible experience in local government, at least three of which were in managerial positions, required. Master’s degree in public administration or relevant field, and significant experience in community development, or public works, preferred. The salary range for this position is $115,000 to $160,000, and dependent on experience and qualifications. Filing deadline is May 14, 2018. Contact Andrew Gorgey.

City Attorney City of Brighton, CO

The picturesque suburban community of Brighton, CO (pop. est. 38,000), is located 20 miles north of downtown Denver, 20 minutes from Denver International Airport, and about 30 minutes east of Boulder. This vibrant, engaged, and close-knit community deeply values its history and agricultural roots, while embracing progress, innovation, diversity, and sustainable growth. After decades of faithful service, the longtime city attorney, contracted through a private firm, is retiring. The Brighton City Council has decided to bring the position in house. Hired by and reporting to City Council, the new City Attorney will then build her or his team, establishing a model law office for the City. A JD from an accredited law school and seven to ten years of experience as a practicing attorney, the majority of which were spent in local government, are required. Colorado municipal or local government experience preferred. Active Colorado law license strongly preferred. Comprehensive benefits. Annual salary range $145,900 - $169,400 dependent on qualifications. Filing deadline is June 4, 2018. Contact Andrew Gorgey. To view a detailed brochure and apply, please visit:

Peckham & McKenney

www.peckhamandmckenney.com

Resumes acknowledged within two business days. Call (866) 912-1919 for more information.


Temecula’s Arts and Culture Support a Thriving Economy, continued from page 28

part of our commitment to the arts and to offering the highest quality of life for every resident, business and visitor.” Temecula launched its First Fridays “Art Off the Walls” program in October 2014 to promote visual artists, nurture the creative economy, increase cultural tourism and offer a safe, family-friendly space where the community can gather. Art Off the Walls is held in an unfinished space on the ground floor of a building across from City Hall, provided through the generosity of a developer. The city has increased visits and boosted the local economy by providing a free entrepreneurial venue for artists to showcase their ingenuity, build their clientele and sell their wares.

On First Fridays, the Art Crawl begins at The Gallery at The Merc and continues a short stroll away at Art Off the Walls where over 30 artists exhibit in a wide range of styles and mediums. These popular events have grown to include large-scale art installations, cultural heritage events and live entertainment. These free and culturally enriching experiences always include refreshments and live music and are presented by the city’s Community Services Department. As a result, visitors stay longer in Old Town and enjoy its various businesses and attractions.

Cultural Equity Access to free and affordable arts and cultural events in Temecula supports a thriving economy, enhances the quality

of life, creates a sense of pride and encourages social cohesion. Mayor pro Tem Mike Naggar says, “Building a creative economy requires nurturing the creative community through cross-sector collaborations and public-private partnerships to foster arts education, appreciation, programming and participation for people of all ages and abilities.”

The Arts Mean Business Temecula’s partnerships comprise a strong network of economic, educational and cultural growth facilitators. City staff work with Temecula’s Chamber of Commerce, the Convention and Visitors Bureau (Visit Temecula Valley) and the county’s Office of Economic Development to create business connections and mutually beneficial cooperative advertising

Multiple activities promote the creative, performing and visual arts and involve people of all ages.

38

League of California Cities

www.cacities.org


opportunities. The city also partners with boutique shops and restaurants to provide hospitality and catering.

in the Old Town Temecula Community Theater. According to the Temecula Valley Convention and Visitors Bureau, travel spending in Temecula Valley increased from $142 million in 2000 to $712 million in 2016. Tourism generated 1,700 jobs in 2000 with earnings of $37 million; in 2016, that number rose to 7,430 jobs with earnings of $232 million.

“Temecula’s Cultural Arts District creates income-generating opportunities for start-up artists at Art Off the Walls every month by increasing participation levels at local arts events and classes and developing new partnerships in our community,” says City Council Member James Stewart. Other benefits include increased cultural tourism, new business development and engaged youth.

“Community engagement in long-range planning and problem-solving builds strong relationships and ultimately benefits the community as a whole. We are all partners in Temecula’s success, and the resulting community pride unites us,” says Mayor Rahn. The result is the transformation of Old Town Temecula into a thriving Cultural Arts District, attracting new visitors, generating revenue and giving the area new life by attracting developers, merchants, residents and visitors.

This upward trend in tourism spending and jobs has been steady with the exception of 2009–12, when the Great Recession slowed economic growth and tourism spending stalled. Since 2012, the local economy has rebounded. Local tax revenue related to tourism and travel in Temecula Valley totaled $1.9 million in 2000; in 2016, local tax revenue had increased to $7.8 million.

Temecula’s support of the arts has generated significant economic activity. Beginning in 1999, the city invested $3.3 million in the Temecula Valley Museum, $4.8 million in Pennypickle’s Workshop-Temecula Children’s Museum and $14.6 million

Contact: Bea Barnett, community services superintendent, City of Temecula; phone: (951) 308-6343; email: Beatriz.Barnett@ TemeculaCA.gov. ■

A youngster gets help writing a poem and shows off his completed product; volunteers contribute to the success of Temecula’s arts events, below.

left and right

P

R

O

F

E

S

S

I

O

N

A

L

S

E

R V

I

C

William Avery & Associates, Inc. Labor Relations / Executive Search / Human Resources Consulting 31/2 N. Santa Cruz Ave., Suite A Los Gatos, CA 95030 408.399.4424 Fax: 408.399.4423 email: jobs@averyassoc.net www.averyassoc.net

www.westerncity.com

E

S

D

I

R

E

C

T O

R Y

Bobbi C. Peckham • Phil McKenney

Peckham&McKenney www.peckhamandmckenney.com

Roseville, CA

866.912.1919

Western City, May 2018

39


P

R

O

F

E

S

S

I

O

N

A

L

S

E

R V

I

C

E

HF&H CONSULTANTS, LLC

S

D

I

R

E

C

T O

R Y

HELPING LOCAL GOVERNMENT LEADERS

Managing Tomorrow’s Resources Today Providing Consulting Services to Recycling, Solid Waste, Water and Wastewater Management for more than 20 Years

• Planning • Procurement • Management

• Financial/Rates • AB939 Compliance • Litigation Support

www.hfh-consultants.com Walnut Creek (925) 977-6950

Irvine (949) 251-8628

managementpartners.com Budget Strategies ∙ Service Sharing Organization Analysis ∙ Performance Management Process Improvement ∙ Strategic Planning Executive Recruitment ∙ Facilitation/Team Building

E XPERIENCE , T ALENT , COMMITMENT TO PUBLIC SERVICE San Jose ∙ Orange County ∙ Cincinnati ∙ 408-437-5400

WRITTEN TESTS

Elevate Your ExpectaƟons

Sales and Use Tax Property Tax SoŌware SoluƟons Cannabis Compliance Business Tax AdministraƟon TOT and Short Term Rental Compliance

888.861.0220 I www.hdlcompanies.com 888.861.0220  I   hdlcompanies.com 

40

League of California Cities

Over 70 stock tests available for jobs in public agencies. Toll Free (877) 22-EXAMS exams@donnoe.com www.donnoe.com

www.cacities.org


P

R

O

F

E

S

S

I

O

N

A

L

S

E

R V

I

C

E

S

D

I

R

E

C

T O

R Y

Still comparing apples to oranges? U.S. Communities delivers cooperative purchasing solutions that can’t be matched.

www.uscommunities.org/lcc

Providing innovative and practical solutions for Cities, Counties and Special Districts

• Leadership & Organizational Assessments • Project Management • Human Resource Services • Chief Executive Officer Evaluations • City Council & Board Governance • Financial Management & Fiscal Sustainability • Workplace Investigations • Planning, Community & Economic Development • Recreation, Parks & Community Services • Public Safety Studies

675 Hartz Avenue, Suite 300 • Danville, CA 94526 866-774-3222 • www.municipalresourcegroup.com

Contact: Allan Crecelius or Sandra Comrie

12707 High Bluff Dr., Ste 200 San Diego, CA 92130 Tel 858.259.3800 fax 858.792.7465 acrecelius@rewardstrategy.com

Exceeding clients’ expectations since 1987. Classification | Compensation Special Surveys | Performance Management

matrix consulting group

Reach New Clients For advertising information, call (800) 262-1801.

Over 130 Public Agencies across California put their TRUST in us, because we check all the boxes when it comes to managing their investments.

201 SAN ANTONIO Circle, Suite 148 MOUNTAIN VIEW, CA 94040 650.858.0507 • www.matrixcg.net

Offices in SF Bay Area (Headquarters), Boston, Dallas, St. Louis, Portland, Charlotte, Salt Lake City

Management and operations studies Feasibility studies User fees and cost allocation Police • Fire • Public Works • Utilities Parks & Recreation • Administration Planning & Building

CALTRUST.ORG (888) 225-8787

Sponsored by the League of California Cities

SPECIALISTS IN CLASSIFICATION, JOB EVALUATION AND COMPENSATION

5663 Balboa Ave., #399, San Diego, CA 92111-2705 915 L Street, #C-102, Sacramento, CA 95814 Brentwood Village, 149 S. Barrington Ave., #726, Los Angeles, CA 90049-2950 1-888-522-7772 • www.compensationconsulting.com Offices in various major cities

www.westerncity.com

Western City, May 2018

41


Western City May 2018  

Economic Development

Western City May 2018  

Economic Development

Advertisement