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M AY 2013 |

The Monthly Magazine of the League of California Cities速

How the Arts and Cultural Tourism Spur Economic Development p.12 Collaboration Advances Sustainability, Pays Dividends p.18 From Local Government To the Legislature p.8

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CONTENTS 2

Calendar of League Events

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Executive Director’s Message

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If You Rebuild It They Will Come: How StateLocal Partnerships Have Changed the Face of California and Its Cities

By Craig Watson How cities are taking advantage of local talent to showcase their community’s unique personality and stimulate economic activity in numerous ways.

By Chris McKenzie Today multiple bills are pending to recreate tax-increment financing. It requires vision, persistence and enough public investment to attract private capital and development

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that produce much-needed jobs for Californians.

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Tap Into Strong Cities | Strong State for Models Of Economic Development

News from the Institute for Local Government

Institute Offers Resources For Sustainable Economic Development New tools are available for local leaders looking for resources to help their cities meet fiscal challenges and thrive in today’s economic climate.

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From Local Government To the Legislature: Making The Transition Part 2 of 2 By Samantha Caygill Freshman legislators share insights about the California Civic Leadership Institute®.

Collaboration Promotes Economic Development And Advances Sustainability A diverse alliance in the San Francisco Bay Area is showing that cooperation and collaboration among neighboring communities and the business sector can pay big dividends in new jobs that combine economic development with sustainability.

By Eva Spiegel

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Sustainable Cities

By Karalee Browne and Steve Sanders

City Forum

This program offers ideas for city officials seeking new ways to maximize their city’s economic development opportunities.

How the Arts and Cultural Tourism Spur Economic Development

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Job Opportunities

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Professional Services Directory

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On the Record Local elected officials weigh in on current challenges and priorities. On the Cover: Levitt Pavilion for the Performing Arts, Pasadena Photo: Matt Beard, Courtesy of City of Pasadena


President Bill Bogaard Mayor Pasadena

1400 K Street Sacramento, CA 95814 (916) 658-8200 Fax (916) 658-8240

First Vice President José Cisneros Treasurer San Francisco

Second Vice President Tony Ferrara Mayor Arroyo Grande

Immediate Past President Michael Kasperzak Mayor Mountain View

Executive Director Chris McKenzie

For a complete list of the League board of directors, visit www.cacities.org/board.

Magazine Staff

leaguevents

Editor in Chief Jude Hudson, Hudson + Associates (916) 658-8234 email: editor@westerncity.com Managing Editor Eva Spiegel (916) 658-8228 email: espiegel@cacities.org

MAY 8 – 10

Advertising Sales Manager Pam Maxwell-Blodgett (916) 658-8256 email: maxwellp@cacities.org

City Attorneys’ Spring Conference, Napa This meeting covers the latest trends and issues affecting public law practitioners and provides an opportunity to connect with colleagues.

Administrative Assistant Anita Lopez (916) 658-8223 email: alopez@cacities.org

JUNE 13 – 14

Contributors Yvonne Hunter Bismarck Obando JoAnne Speers

Policy Committee Meetings, Sacramento The League’s policy committees review issues of interest to cities statewide and make recommendations to the League board of directors.

Associate Editors Jim Carnes Carol Malinowski Carolyn Walker

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Legal Advocacy Committee Meeting, Sacramento The committee reviews and recommends friend-of-the-court efforts on cases of significant statewide interest to California cities.

Design Taber Creative Group Advertising Design ImagePoint Design

SEPTEMBER 18 – 20

For photo credits, see page 20. Western City (ISSN 0279-5337) is published monthly by the League of California Cities, 1400 K St., Sacramento, CA 95814. Subscriptions: $39.00/1 year; $63.00/2 years; student: $26.50; foreign: $52.00; single copies: $4.00, including sales tax. Entered as periodical mail January 30, 1930, at the Post Office, Los Angeles, CA 90013, under the Act of April 13, 1879. Periodical postage paid at Sacramento, Calif.

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Event and registration information is available at www.cacities.org/events. For the latest information on League conferences and events, follow us on Twitter @CaCitiesLearn. For legislative and policy updates and more, follow @CaCities. Follow Western City @WesternCityMag.

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Postmaster: Send address changes to Western City, 1400 K Street, Sacramento, CA 95814. Western City Trademark Reg. U.S. Pat. Off. ©2013 League of California Cities. All rights reserved. Material may not be reprinted without written permission. This issue is Volume LXXXIX, No. 5.

League of California Cities 2013 Annual Conference & Expo, Sacramento This conference offers dozens of educational sessions, numerous professional development opportunities, hundreds of exhibits and a chance to participate in the League’s policy-making activities at the Annual Business Meeting.

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Executive Director’s Message by Chris McKenzie

If You Rebuild It They Will Come: How State-Local Partnerships Have Changed the Face of California and Its Cities

It requires vision, persistence and enough public investment to attract private capital and development that produce much-needed jobs for Californians.

The movie “Lincoln” generated much excitement earlier this year, with 12 Academy Award nominations and a story line that demonstrated President Lincoln’s extraordinary leadership in times of national peril. However, many Americans are probably unaware that President Lincoln was also responsible for what was likely the most significant public subsidy of private business in our nation’s history: the Transcontinental Railroad. While it was controversial, that sweeping decision nevertheless opened up the nation to commerce, growth and the expansion of American culture and democracy. It also ensured that our newest states would enter the Union as “free” states at a time when the president was understandably concerned about the nation’s future.

capital alone. The vast majority of the investment capital for the railroad was raised through the sale of federal government-guaranteed bonds, granted per mile of completed track, to interested investors. The bonds were retired through the sale (by the railroads) of government-granted land and prospective passenger and freight income.

Construction of the Transcontinental Railroad was not financed with private

In a companion measure, Congress also passed the Homestead Acts that allowed

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eligible applicants to purchase 160 acres of unclaimed government-owned land, typically called a “homestead,” at a great discount in exchange for the applicants’ sweat equity. This induced tremendous population growth that encouraged many other railroads to be built and connected to the Transcontinental Railroad to serve communities and states off the original main track. continued Western City, May 2013

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If You Rebuild It They Will Come: How State-Local Partnerships Have Changed the Face of California and Its Cities, continued

Grit, Determination and Vision President Lincoln and Congress took a leap of faith in providing financial incentives to spur expansion of the Transcontinental Railroad. Such a leap probably could not have been totally justified even by today’s sophisticated economic modeling techniques. Lincoln’s judgment and the support of Congress were informed by decades of life experience and an uncompromising vision for the nation. Two years after Lincoln’s assassination, the widely criticized Secretary of State William Seward persuaded a skeptical Congress to ratify a treaty with Russia to convey the Alaskan territory to the United States — known for decades as “Seward’s folly.” Yet today no one questions the wisdom of that investment of public funds and the manifold benefits it brought to the nation. In California our state leaders decades ago showed the same grit, determination and vision when they constructed the best public university system in the country, an astonishing state water project and a complex system of freeways. All of these became the envy of the nation if not the world. While our leaders didn’t do it alone (the federal government and private sector assisted), their vision for California and its cities justified a major role for the state in funding these public assets. In doing so, they also provided the foundation for incredible private investment as California grew and began to lead the world in science, technology and the arts and culture. In the process they ushered in years of economic development and progress and helped provide education and jobs to millions of Californians. As California was making its postWorld War II investments in its physical and social infrastructure, in 1952 the voters of the state adopted Article XVI, Section 16, of the California Constitution and thereby embarked on a remarkably innovative and collaborative program. Its purpose was to rebuild the abandoned and blighted industrial, commercial and residential neighborhoods of its cities through a combination of public and private investments. Based on the understanding

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that rebuilding older urban areas often requires much more public infrastructure investment than it does to develop vacant land, the program authorized the use of a new tool known as tax-increment financing (TIF). In a financing arrangement not unlike that used by President Lincoln and Congress in the Transcontinental Railroad project, more than 400 cities eventually put TIF to use in eliminating blight, creating jobs and rebuilding urban California.

This state-local partnership produced truly phenomenal results.

Essentially, TIF dedicates future property tax growth for a fixed period of time to retire the cost of public bonds issued to:

areas. These construction activities generated more than $2 billion in state and local tax revenues in a typical year.

• Acquire and clear property;

TIF was also the lynchpin in the construction of more than 98,000 units of affordable housing since 1993. In recent years, many of those affordable units have been provided in connection with mixeduse, infill development projects. Typically such projects first required brownfields cleanup and major public infrastructure investment. Only then would developers commit to the private investment needed for sustainable development in hard-todevelop areas.

• Install required public infrastructure; and • Finance the not-insubstantial overhead costs associated with a 20- to 30-year build-out plan. In the process, the state (on behalf of schools), county, special districts and cities temporarily devote their property tax growth in the project area to finance the infrastructure and other public investments that set the stage for much greater private developer investment and jobs. In the long run, all levels of government gain from the increased tax revenue growth — from income, sales, utility, property and other taxes — that ensues from the investment and jobs created. Phenomenal Results This state-local partnership produced truly phenomenal results. Economic studies demonstrated that the TIF program at its height in 2006 contributed more than $40 billion annually to the California economy in the generation of goods and services and increased the state’s construction sector output by $19 billion annually. The TIF program supported 304,000 full- and part-time private-sector jobs in a typical year, including 170,600 construction jobs. Most of those jobs were created in neighborhoods and cities that otherwise would never have seen the same level of private investment due to the blight and economic obsolescence of the affected

A Short-Sighted Triage Decision Many Western City readers are aware that the unique name in California for tax-increment financing and its related activities is “redevelopment” — the program that the governor and Legislature dissolved almost two years ago because they concluded the state and other local units of government could no longer afford to be partners in these job-creation endeavors during a serious recession. In one of the strangest legislative acts of its kind, state leaders eradicated an extremely successful job-creation and blight-eradication program as part of the state’s budget triage efforts. Soon thereafter many legislators regretted their decision, but were unable to muster the collective will to turn back. Moving Forward Today multiple bills are pending to recreate tax-increment financing, albeit in a different form and a more modest

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fashion. Many returning and most of the new state legislators express strong support for again using this powerful state-local partnership for job creation. In doing so, they will be following in the footsteps of some great leaders, including their predecessors in the California state Legislature, Governor Pat Brown, President Abraham Lincoln and scores of others, including many city officials. These leaders understood that creating jobs and thriving state and urban areas is not rocket science. It requires vision, persistence and enough public investment to attract private capital and development that produce much-needed jobs for Californians. If we all play our cards right, this year we can summon up our inner Lincolns and lay the groundwork for investing in the kind of California we want for our children and grandchildren. â– 

Local and state leaders have an opportunity to recreate tax-increment financing, a vital tool for economic development.

Meyers Nave provides the full scope of legal services to cities, successor agencies and special districts throughout California in 15 distinct areas of law, which are municipal and special districts law; climate change and green initiatives; crisis management; economic development, real estate and affordable housing; education law; eminent domain; environmental law; labor and employment; land use; litigation; municipal debt restructuring; public contracts; public finance; public power and telecommunications; and transportation and infrastructure. Our commitment to professional excellence and our deep roots in California’s communities enable us to consistently achieve exceptional results for our clients.

OAKLAND LOS ANGELES

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WWW.MEYERSNAVE.COM 800.464.3559

Western City, May 2013

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Tap Into Strong Cities | Strong State for Models of Economic Development

by Eva Spiegel

Cities function as engines of economic development, and they are playing a significant role in helping California emerge from the Great Recession. City officials seeking new ideas about how to maximize their city’s economic development opportunities should take a look at the numerous examples provided by the Strong Cities | Strong State program. The program, launched in September 2011, is a tremendous repository of innovation at the local level. Each participating city’s profile features a number of remarkable success stories. Because cities use different approaches to create vibrant communities for their residents and provide vital local services, the program represents an extraordinarily diverse range of projects. The Strong Cities | Strong State website (www.StrongCitiesStrongState.com)

is easy to search. Selecting the “Cities” menu at the top of the home page makes it simple to view every city participating in the program. Two dropdown menus at the bottom of the home page make it possible to search by county or by category of success stories. Economic development is just one of 12 different categories, but it is the category with the greatest number of examples — more than 150 from every corner of California. You can search for all economic development stories or narrow your search by county. This makes it possible to see not only what your colleagues in your own or neighboring county are doing but also what is happening throughout California. Many of these success stories serve as models that can be replicated and tailored to meet the specific needs of your community.

When you find a program that looks promising, another handy League resource is available to help you locate the city staffer most likely to have more information. The League’s 2013 City Hall Directory is published in early May and mailed to the city manager and city clerk in every city in California. Each city entry includes the names of key department heads and contact information. The League began providing expanded coverage of city economic development success stories through its electronic newsletter CA Cities Advocate, starting last month. This new weekly series will run through the summer and showcase the ways in which cities innovate and thrive at the local level, often through partnerships with the state. It examines how cities have survived some of the toughest times by making key investments in infrastructure, affordable housing and effective land-use planning. These cities have been successful by leveraging local, state and federal resources to get the job done. The first three stories featured Claremont’s efforts to expand its downtown into the adjacent abandoned former citrus packing district; Livermore’s affordable housing policies; and Monrovia’s use of tax-increment financing to revitalize a once-blighted community. If your city hasn’t been profiled yet on www.StrongCitiesStrongState.com, it isn’t too late to join and showcase your city’s innovative initiatives and dedicated leadership. The project provides an easy way to share what is happening in your city with your colleagues and the public. To get started, contact your League regional public affairs manager who will lead you through the simple process. Visit www.cacities.org/regionalmanagers  to identify your region and find contact information for your regional public affairs manager. ■

Eva Spiegel is director of communications for the League and can be reached at espiegel@cacities.org.

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News from the Institute for Local Government

Cities throughout California are struggling to maintain and advance the prosperity of their residents and local businesses in a rapidly changing global economy. Diminishing local fiscal resources, the loss of local redevelopment tools, state budget cuts and the current recession have all contributed to the economic pressures facing local communities and officials. Local leaders are seeking resources to help their cities meet these fiscal challenges and thrive in today’s economic climate. One key strategy to pursue is sustainable economic development. This includes policies and practices that help communities attract and retain jobs for the long term while also maintaining environmental quality, conserving resources, addressing economic disparities, promoting public health and generally improving the city’s quality of life. Many of these policies have the added benefit of reducing the short- and long-term costs of providing and maintaining public services and infrastructure. The Institute for Local Government (ILG) provides tools and resources to help city officials in their efforts to promote local sustainable economic development. For example, ILG’s newly updated Sustainability Best Practices Framework (www.ca-ilg.org/SustainabilityBestPractices) offers options for local agencies to consider for reducing energy use and saving money in agency facilities, as well as options for helping local businesses reduce energy use and save money. Similarly, the accomplishments of cities and counties participating in ILG’s sustainability recognition program, the Beacon Award, include a wealth of examples of how local agencies are working with the business community to become more sustainable, thus contributing to a thriving local economy (see www.ca-ilg.org/participant-accomplishments). Building on the interest and resources generated by the Beacon Award program, ILG recently expanded its new online resource center for cities and counties to include broad resources on sustainable economic development. The Sustainable Economic Development Resource Center (www.ca-ilg.org/SustainableED) offers information, case stories, studies, reports and links to

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A new online resource center provides local agencies a wealth of resources and tools for sustainable economic development.

organizations that can help local officials in their efforts to foster sustainable economic development. Creating prosperous and sustainable communities is a goal all city officials and leaders have in common. ILG wants to help local officials as they pursue that goal. The new Sustainable Economic Development Resource Center provides an opportunity to offer comments, questions and suggestions. Local officials are encouraged to share their stories about the challenges and opportunities they encounter in their communities. Sharing lessons learned about economic development is of great value to local leaders statewide as cities and counties work together to build a stronger and sustainable economy. ■

Western City, May 2013

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From Local Government to the Legislature:

Making the Transition Part 2 of 2 by Samantha Caygill

In November 2012, the Legislature welcomed 39 new members, the largest freshman class since 1966. In the Assembly alone, 69 percent of members have local government experience. Nine members of the freshman class are alumni of the League of California Cities’ California Civic Leadership InstituteŽ (CCLI) or have participated in aspects of it. CCLI is a League Partnersponsored educational program for local government elected officials who are interested in running for the state Legislature. The program offers local officials an in-depth policy and political education as well as numerous networking opportunities. Western City recently checked in with the nine new members to ask what they bring to state office from local government, how the CCLI was helpful and what issues are priorities for them in their districts. These legislators are profiled in a two-part series in the April and May issues. For more information about CCLI, contact Samantha Caygill at scaygill@cacities.org or (916) 658-8204.

Samantha Caygill is public affairs program manager for the League and can be reached at scaygill@cacities.org. This article is the second in a two-part series. Read the first installment online at www.westerncity.com.

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League of California Cities

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Jim Frazier (D-11)

Chris Holden (D-41)

What do you bring to the Legislature from your experience in local government?

What do you bring to the Legislature from your experience in local government?

Frazier: First and foremost, my experience at the local level gave me the ability to build relationships across the aisle and work together on common goals. As a mayor, I worked with the California State Senate to redirect property tax to site a power plant in Oakley. That experience, working with legislators over two years, taught me the benefits of working with all legislators. Also, the legislative effort is not a sprint but a marathon, and it takes time and patience to win the race.

Holden: I am a businessman and have served as an elected official for the City of Pasadena for the past two decades. I was elected to the Pasadena City Council at age 28, and in 1997 I was elected mayor. I also served as commissioner on the Burbank-Glendale-Pasadena Airport Authority.

Former mayor, Oakley

How was your experience with CCLI helpful in deciding to run for office? Frazier: The programs that the League developed and that I participated in taught me the importance of working at a more regional level to help solve issues at a local level. It is important to reach out and build alliances with regional leaders and constituents. If one city is experiencing difficulties solving a problem, you can bet that other cities in the region are having similar issues. Working as a region builds a strong base to solve the similar issues that individual cities are experiencing. I attended a CCLI power and water forum that was amazing and informative. The power and water forum inspired me to work on water and power issues at the state level. Which of your district’s top two or three issues will be a priority for you? Frazier: Constituent service is my number one priority. My top three legislative issues are transportation, public safety and job creation. I want to hear from people. I want to know how I can help them. I want the residents of the 11th Assembly District to contact me by phone, fax, email or write me a letter. If you’re in Sacramento, stop by my office. If you see me in the grocery store, come over and let me know what’s on your mind. Your concerns are my concerns.

Former council member, Pasadena

I’ve been in public service for more than two decades because I believe government can be a partner and catalyst for positive changes, both economically and socially. I also believe our system of government works best when we remain open to diverse points of view and work to foster solutions that build understanding and trust in government decision-making. Perhaps most important, I believe when elected officials make promises, we have an obligation to keep them. I’ve worked hard throughout my service in government to honor those commitments. How was your experience with CCLI helpful in deciding to run for office? Holden: CCLI provided forums to explore and discuss a broad range of policy issues with other visionary leaders in California. Which of your district’s top two or three issues will be a priority for you? Holden: I’ve built my career in public service promoting economic development and making decisions that served the best interests of Pasadena residents. My agenda in Sacramento is straightforward: pursue policies that protect and create new jobs, promote a worldclass public education system, increase economic development and strengthen our state’s infrastructure. continued

Recently elected legislators with backgrounds in local government bring a unique perspective to state office. Their insights provide the opportunity to forge a new style of state-local partnerships in meeting the challenges that California faces.

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Western City, May 2013

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From Local Government to the Legislature: Making the Transition, continued

Marc Levine (D-10)

Kevin Mullin (D-22)

What do you bring to the Legislature from your experience in local government?

What do you bring to the Legislature from your experience in local government?

Levine: During my time on the San Rafael City Council, I worked with my colleagues to develop innovative solutions when addressing local issues. I will take a similar approach here in Sacramento. It is especially important to me that we rebuild the relationship between state and local governments. This relationship has eroded over the last several years due to the ongoing fight for local tax revenues. We need to bring local issues to the forefront at the state level. I plan on working closely with the local elected officials of my district and throughout the state to get their feedback when making decisions about issues that directly impact local municipalities.

Mullin: I was first elected to South San Francisco City Council in 2007 and have seen and lived firsthand the difference government can make in people’s lives. Local elected officials experience for themselves the concerns in their communities; frequently this is what inspires us to run for local elected office.

Former council member, San Rafael

How was your experience with CCLI helpful in deciding to run for office? Levine: First, I am honored to be one of the nine CCLI alumni that were elected this year to the state Legislature. This program offered me further background and understanding from a statewide perspective about the critical issues facing local governments. Meeting with other local elected officials through CCLI gave me the opportunity to discuss how we can work together and incorporate our local government history and expertise when coming to the Legislature. This experience reinforced my decision to run for the Assembly, as it became clearer to me how Sacramento needed to have more voices from local governments.

Former mayor, South San Francisco

Specifically, as a mayor and council member I was a champion of redevelopment, a valuable tool designed to improve living conditions in my community. In addition, I am a local small business owner and know the challenges of the economic downturn as well as frustrations with bureaucratic “red tape.” I am committed to working closely with the communities in my district to make sure that the policies that I seek to implement and the votes I cast are consistent with maintaining local control. I will also resist the dreaded “Yolo Causeway amnesia,” which causes legislators to forget their local government roots once they are in Sacramento.

Which of your district’s top two or three issues will be a priority for you? Levine: My 2013–14 legislative priorities include serving as vice chair of the Assembly Committee on Local Government. This committee will debate key legislation affecting local governments. I look forward to working with the League, California State Association of Counties, special districts and all stakeholders as we consider issues before the committee. My legislation will focus on local government finances, investing in K–12 and higher education, protecting public health, economic growth and preserving the environment. California’s K–12 education has been hard hit by budget cuts. This year, we need to protect our schools from further cuts and to focus budget priorities on education. In the 10th Assembly District, local governments have taken on a variety of issues that I hope to take statewide. This includes a ban on plastic grocery bags and on smoking in multifamily residential housing.

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Kevin Mullin (D-22), continued How was your experience with CCLI helpful in deciding to run for office? Mullin: My experience with CCLI was valuable both in terms of educational content and a way to network. Besides me, eight other members of the 2013–14 class of freshman Assembly members also participated in the institute. Success in policy-making is often based on building trusting relationships. I am hopeful that the voter-enacted reform, which allows newly elected members to serve up to 12 years in one house, will allow members to build better relationships. It was great to see familiar faces from the institute when I was sworn in on Dec. 3, 2012. In all, 39 of us are new to the Assembly and have an opportunity to serve up to 12 years. It is my hope that the opportunity for additional years of service will bring a new sense of stability to the institution of the Assembly and will create opportunities for members to get to know each other. Which of your district’s top two or three issues will be a priority for you? Mullin: I am committed to recreating tools for economic development and affordable housing. Redevelopment was the largest permanent source of funding for affordable housing development. That program no longer exists. Affordable housing finance continues to be a challenge in San Mateo County. In addition, I’ll be working to promote job creation and the innovation economy with a particular focus on bio-tech. I will be a champion of environmentally sustainable regional planning and seek to balance the state budget in a fiscally responsible manner. Finally, I campaigned to work in a bipartisan way to reform state governance. I will reach out to all my colleagues in an attempt to forge compromises and bring a healthier level of discourse to Sacramento.

Rudy Salas (D-32)

Former council member, Bakersfield What do you bring to the Legislature from your experience in local government? Salas: Serving in local government, as I did on the Bakersfield City Council, provided me with real “boots on the ground” knowledge you can’t get any other way. You can’t help learning from and being inspired by the people you interact with at the local level — those who joined me at public meetings, the tireless volunteers who participated in neighborhood graffiti and trash cleanup, and the families I’ve met going door to door or during local neighborhood office hours. When you talk to people like this, you get a feel for what is really important to the community. Things like a balanced budget, improving public safety, looking at education from a grassroots level rather than top down — that’s what matters. I feel if we can be successful locally, we can also succeed on these things at the state level. How was your experience with CCLI helpful in deciding to run for office? Salas: CCLI helped me realize how local government experience can aid tremendously in making decisions at the state level. Working as a local government official with other local elected officials and agencies through collaborative partnerships was invaluable. Our ability to come together to resolve regional issues and address specific concerns toward the common goal of improving our community was vital in moving our cities and our communities forward. Which of your district’s top two or three issues will be a priority for you? Salas: Jobs and economic development, fiscal responsibility, resources for our schools, safer neighborhoods and having a safe, reliable water supply for the Central Valley and the state. We can move our state and our community forward by addressing these important needs, and I look forward to partnering with the League and others in making this happen. ■

Did You Miss Part 1? Read it online at www.westerncity.com

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Western City, May 2013

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Arts

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Spur Economic Development by Craig Watson

It’s the question that all local officials ask themselves: How can we attract and retain profitable businesses and talented people? A key component of such efforts — and one that’s often mislabeled an “amenity” — is arts and culture.

Creative businesses play a huge part in the California economy. These businesses comprise the arts, design, digital media and other fields that utilize a creative workforce. More than 134,000 creative businesses employ 500,000 Californians, with another 100,000 freelance or parttime creative workers in the mix. In addition, the Golden State’s 4,553 arts organizations contribute $3.56 billion annually to its economy. But the value of the arts extends beyond the direct economic impact. When Gallup and the Knight Foundation set out to answer the question “What attaches people to their communities?”

in a three-year study, researchers found that the key reasons cited by residents for loving their cities were entertainment and social offerings, how welcoming the city is and its aesthetics — in other words, the arts and culture. Creative Placemaking: “Every Mayor’s Dream” Today’s buzzword to describe communities’ investment in arts and culture is “creative placemaking” — which means using the arts to develop an area where people want to live, work and congregate. Urban-planning researcher Ann Markusen defined this concept for the Mayors’

Craig Watson is director of the California Arts Council and can be reached at cwatson@cac.ca.gov.

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continued

Institute on City Design in the white paper Creative Placemaking: In creative placemaking, partners from public, private, nonprofit and community sectors strategically shape the physical and social character of a neighborhood, town, city or region around arts and cultural activities. The economic impact of clustering creative businesses was explained by Jamie Bennett, director of public affairs for the National Endowment for the Arts. Bennett said, “A theater has 1,000 people show up at eight o’clock and leave at eleven o’clock. A museum might have 1,000 visitors spread out over the course

of an eight-hour day. A rehearsal studio might have 30 people coming and going every hour over 12 hours. You put the three different organizations in proximity to one another and, all of a sudden, you have a full day of positive foot traffic on a street — feet that belong to people who need to eat meals, buy newspapers, go shopping and take public transportation. You have every mayor’s dream.” The key is to treat the arts as an essential part of the city’s identity. Successful creative placemaking builds the economy at the local level, enhances surrounding non-arts businesses and provides job opportunities and ways for individuals to

participate in activities associated with the arts and cultural events. The results bring people together, spark community pride and create a more vibrant “place.” Other states are actively investing in arts and culture as a challenge to California’s historic leadership in the global creative economy. The National Governors Association (www.nga.org) examined this issue in the report New Engines of Growth: Five Roles for Arts, Culture and Design. The report notes that as technology sectors have shifted from basic engineering to the added values of innovative design and creative products, establishing a network of creative workers is vital to staying competitive. continued

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Western City, May 2013

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How the Arts and Cultural Tourism Spur Economic Development, continued

Tap Your Local Talent Successful creative placemaking acknowledges and supports local arts and culture. “Art and artists are the asset all communities are gifted with,” noted Carol Coletta, director of ArtPlace, a collaboration of 13 leading national and regional foundations and six of the nation’s largest banks that invests in creative placemaking. “In a time when we especially need to jump-start economic and development momentum in our communities, I have to ask, ‘Why wouldn’t you put every single asset you have available to work to make that happen?’ And that includes art and artists.” Creative clusters that combine artists and entrepreneurs have mushroomed in California cities. In Santa Monica, an old rail yard has blossomed into the visualart gallery complex of Bergamot Station. Originally a railway station in the 19th century, Bergamot Station functioned as a warehouse storage facility until the 1980s when the City of Santa Monica purchased it for a future use as a light-rail station. When the light-rail project stalled, the city approached a local developer and architect to create an artists’ and gallery space. It opened in 1994 and has since become a key attraction both locally and for tourists,

Bergamot Station features art galleries, performing arts theatres and other creative businesses.

with more than 600,000 visitors each year visiting the galleries and other businesses in the complex. In San Francisco’s South of Market neighborhood, a handful of nonprofits teamed up with entrepreneurs to establish the 5MPlaceWorks partnership where tech entrepreneurs mix with artists and designers. These creative clusters may seem spontaneous, but are the result of direct and meaningful planning and investment. Yet clusters of arts, culture and entrepreneurship aren’t exclusive to major urban areas.

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Smaller cities can take advantage of local talent to showcase the community’s unique personality and, at the same time, provide important job training and creative interaction for local citizens. Modesto Fosters Creative Innovation Modesto’s new Building Imagination Center is a contemporary art and videoart venue. It’s also an education and artist residency center. Its activities, including investment in local video artists, encourage production and job training for anyone interested — mid-level professionals, recent graduates of California State University, Stanislaus, and members of the public.

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League of California Cities

Today’s creative arts encompass a wide range of media.

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Investing in the arts doesn’t necessarily need to strain the pocketbooks of local governments or require extra staff.

Tech entrepreneurs, artists and designers participate in San Francisco’s 5MPlaceWorks’ Urban Prototyping Festival.

The Building Imagination Center is part of a greater network of the Modesto arts and culture scene, and its monthly short documentary projects on local subjects enhance these characteristics and bring the community together, according to Jessica Gomula-Kruzic, the center’s director. The center plans to highlight other local cultural assets, such as the American Graffiti Car Show and Festival and the area’s largely unknown architectural treasures, which include buildings designed by Julia Morgan, Frank Lloyd Wright and other notable architects. The center is not solely for professional artists and filmmakers, however. It also offers free workshops that teach individuals

how to create short videos using common devices like smart phones. As technology advances, the nature of work is changing, and employers increasingly expect employees to have multimedia skills. One-minute videos for YouTube and websites are being produced by businesses from real estate to restaurants and retail. “We’re hoping to give people the skills to do those things,” said Gomula-Kruzic.

enacted official cultural-district designations, some with remarkable measurable results. An analysis of Maryland’s arts and entertainment districts notes a 17 percent growth in new jobs, goods and services, and wages from new business in the state’s arts and entertainment districts between 2008 and 2010 — a significant achievement during the recession. Some California communities are already moving in this direction. A part of San Diego’s downtown East Village area, called the I.D.E.A. District for its focus continued A d v e rt i s e m e n t

The Role of Cultural Districts Cultural districts are zones that aggregate cultural or artistic ventures (both nonprofit and commercial) and, in the process, stimulate economic development. A dozen states nationwide have

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Modesto’s Building Imagination Center offers video production training and showcases local artists and art programs. www.westerncity.com

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How the Arts and Cultural Tourism Spur Economic Development, continued

on innovation, design, education and arts, was conceived by a pair of local developers who have partnered with higher education institutions, the San Diego Foundation, community groups and others. “[Local governments] need to answer the question, ‘What do people want?’ Artistic, cultural and social experiences are what keep people in a community,” said David Malmuth, one of the founders of the I.D.E.A. District. Pete Garcia, Malmuth’s partner in the I.D.E.A. District project, emphasizes the need for communities to identify their own strengths and not be swayed by what’s popular elsewhere. Cultural district supporters need to ask the question, “What is our city about? And what is it missing?” Malmuth encourages planners and coordinators to work quickly, perhaps in small ways rather than spending too

The Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival draws large crowds of young people to a six-day event over two weekends.

much time on long-term planning. He said, “Take too long and the community loses focus, loses enthusiasm.”

been a popular vacation spot for film stars. In the 1980s and ‘90s the area was better known as a retirement community than as a place of creative economic activity.

Creating an Arts Oasis

Today the creative economy is thriving in the region, notes Robert Stearns, the executive director of ArtsOasis, an initiative of the Coachella Valley Economic Partnership. Policy-makers and leaders in the area sensed that the arts and creative businesses were a strong economic driver. A study of the area, Creative California Desert, revealed that the creative economy is “a robust engine that employs nearly one out of every five persons working in the Coachella Valley and produces a raw impact of close to $1 billion per year.”

A rebirth of the creative community is under way in Palm Springs and the Coachella Valley. Palm Springs has long

This vigorous creative activity started in small ways. The Palm Springs International Film

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League of California Cities

More than 170,000 people visit Palm Springs Art Museum each year. www.cacities.org


Creative Placemaking Resources Resources and funding opportunities for cities interested in investing in creative placemaking are listed below. For additional resources, read the online version of this article at www.westerncity.com. • Our Town grants from the National Endowment for the Arts (www.arts.gov). Organizations may apply for creative placemaking projects that contribute to the livability of communities and place the arts at their core. • ArtPlace funding (www.artplace.org). ArtPlace works to accelerate creative placemaking through grants and loans, partnerships, solid and imaginative research, communication and advocacy.

Palm Springs uses the arts to stimulate other local businesses.

Creative clusters that combine artists and entrepreneurs have mushroomed in California cities. Festival began as a modest proposal in 1989. Now, almost 25 years later, it’s a major international event that draws 140,000 visitors in a 10-day period. The festival’s success encouraged film-related businesses to set up in the area. A weekend trade show grew into the Modernism Week, a celebration of architecture and related businesses, like clean energy and design, that attracts experts worldwide. Interest in visual art, architecture, design and modern art produced art festivals and fostered a unique brand of cultural tourism, where people visit different art studios and participate in hands-on projects. The area has also been successful in attracting younger people, due in part to the success of the Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival, a six-day event spanning two weekends. One result of local leaders’ discussions and planning around arts and economic activity was the ArtsOasis website (http://artsoasis.org), which lists the regional arts-related activities in a single comprehensive resource to help facilitate event planning and cultural tourism. continued on page 24

www.westerncity.com

• Creating Places of Vitality grants from the California Arts Council (www.arts.ca.gov). This program targets rural and underserved communities in California by supporting partnerships and cultural activities that create a distinct sense of place. • Various websites consolidate hundreds of grant opportunity listings. These include www.California.grantwatch.com, www.foundationcenter.org, and www.arts.ca.gov (see opportunities/grants). California communities have plenty of creative assets, both large and small, that can be utilized even in this tough economy. The California Arts Council website (www.arts.ca.gov) lists hundreds of festivals throughout the state that demonstrate our will and desire to have arts in our communities. Local governments may be strapped, but a small investment in the arts and creative communities can have a huge impact in the long run.

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Collaboration Promotes Economic Development and Advances Sustainability by Karalee Browne and Steve Sanders

As California’s unemployment rate hovers almost two percentage points above the national average, cities are working to attract business investments that will bring jobs, skilled workers and new tax revenue. Local officials seek economic prosperity that is sustainable over the long term and not threatened by cycles of boom and bust. This requires: • An effective strategy to attract and retain investments from businesses and employers based outside the community; and • Understanding what stimulates new job creation, retention and expansion within the community. When such efforts succeed, they not only build the local economy but also improve the quality of life.

Regional Effort Produces Results Competition to attract employers can be fierce. While competition between neighboring cities and counties may spark economic activity, avoiding the rivalry that pits communities against one another can make it easier for cities to promote sustainability and improve their fiscal bottom line. A diverse group of cities and partners in the San Francisco Bay Area is showing that cooperation and collaboration among neighboring communities and the business sector can pay big dividends in new jobs that combine economic development with sustainability.

The East Bay Economic Development Alliance (EDA) is a public-private partnership of cities in Alameda and Contra Costa counties as well as businesses, universities, community colleges and community groups. The alliance convenes regularly to share information and strategies that advance regional interests. It also develops marketing materials and strategic relationships to attract and retain businesses and promote workforce development programs. Through this collaboration, city leaders learn about potential opportunities and contribute to the region’s future economic competitiveness. Sustainable economic development strategies can generate growth by demonstrating that the best ways to increase jobs, incomes, productivity, fiscal stability and competitiveness over the long term involve innovation, efficiency and conserving resources — both natural and fiscal. continued on page 21

Karalee Browne is a program coordinator for the Institute for Local Government and can be reached at kbrowne@ca-ilg.org. Steve Sanders is co-director of ILG’s Sustainable Communities program and can be reached at ssanders@ca-ilg.org.

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www.cacities.org


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Western City magazine’s job opportunity section is the source for job seekers looking for positions in local government. When you place a job opportunity ad in Western City magazine, it will be posted at no additional charge on our website. For rates and deadlines, visit www.westerncity. com and click on the “Advertise” link.

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OPERATIONS MANAGER City of Carson, California Salary: $7,626 - $9,731 per month Superior Benefits Under general direction of the Director of Public Works, to manage the operations of the Public Works Operations Division in the Public Works Department. Education: High school or trade school supplemented by courses in public works maintenance, horticulture and building maintenance. Experience: Seven years full-time paid increasingly responsible experience in management of public works and landscape and building maintenance operations including three years of supervisory experience. APPLY BY: Thursday, May 23, 2013 by 6:00 p.m. For more information, Call (310) 952-1736, Monday-Thursday, 7:00 a.m. - 6:00 p.m.

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Display Advertising Call Pam Maxwell-Blodgett at (800) 262-1801 to place a display (boxed) ad or for rate and deadline information, or email admanager@westerncity.com. Website Job Postings Display ads are posted on our website at no additional charge. But if you miss the deadline for getting your job opportunity ad into the magazine, you can post it on the Western City website right away. To post your job opportunity ad on our automated website, visit www.westerncity.com or contact Anita Lopez, administrative assistant; email: alopez@cacities.org; phone: (916) 658-8223.

Did You Miss the April Issue? Read it online at www.westerncity.com

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MuniTemps will Save Your City Money! City Manager, City of Santa Ana, CA The City of Santa Ana, population 325,000, is located 33 miles southeast of Los Angeles and 90 miles north of San Diego. The City is seeking a City Manager who will be a visionary with a strong set of leadership skills. A personable yet professional manager with cultural sensitivity and a willingness to address community issues is highly desirable. The new manager must appreciate diversity and recognize the strength it brings to the community. The incoming manager must be a change agent for the City, willing to adapt and evolve to improve processes, methods and results. An individual who is willing to listen and accept input from staff, community members and other stakeholders is being sought. The incoming manager will earn the confidence of City Council, department directors and staff, and will treat each Councilmember equally and keep each one well informed. The ideal candidate will be a team builder with the ability to hire and mentor staff. An individual who has experience working effectively with elected officials, community leaders and staff using a transparent form of management will excel in this position. Candidates should possess a well rounded background and understanding of municipal issues including financial management, planning and land use, economic development, housing, and labor and employee relations. The ideal candidate will possess a bachelor’s degree in Public Administration, Business Administration or similar field; a master’s degree is preferred. It is highly desirable that the City Manager reside within the city limits. The salary is negotiable depending on qualifications and experience; the salary of the previous incumbent was $265,000 per year. The City also offers an attractive benefits package. If you are interested in this outstanding opportunity, please apply online at www.bobmurrayassoc.com. Please contact Mr. Regan Williams at (916) 784-9080 should you have any questions. Brochure available. Closing date May 24, 2013.

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Now available . . .

Deputy Director of Finance City of San Mateo, CA City Manager

City of Imperial Beach

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City of Livermore

Finance Director

San Mateo is a diverse and vibrant community of 97,000 residents that boasts a high quality of life marked by its great neighborhoods, schools, and outstanding libraries and parks. Enjoying a positive reputation as a progressive organization, this full-service agency has approximately 530 employees and annual budget of $137M. The Department has a staff of 19. The ideal candidate brings progressively responsible municipal finance experience and a Bachelor’s degree in business administration or a related field; Master’s and certification is desirable. Salary range: $131,475 - $159,085.

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City of Napa

Director of Planning & Community Environment

Chief Financial Officer Morongo Band of Mission Indians Salary: D.O.E. Excellent benefits, including 100% paid medical, dental and vision

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Finance Director

City of Menlo Park Visit the TB&Co. website for the latest information – www.tbcrecruiting.com Teri Black • 310.377.2612 Carolyn Seeley • 949.487.7606 Joe Brann • 310.265.7479

BASIC DUTIES: Under the direction of the Tribal Council, oversee all financial and accounting matters for the Tribal Government, Tribal Enterprises and varied Tribal Investments, including investments or ownership in business ventures. Prepare and/or review financial reports, including audited financial reports. Oversee risk management and 401(k) plan for the Tribe and all business ventures. Review and evaluate current and potential business investments. Prepare and review Tribal and Enterprise budgets. Establish and implement policies and procedures. EXPERIENCE & EDUCATION: Certified Public Accountant with five years’ experience as a Chief Financial Officer or equivalent. Governmental and/or business experience required; Tribal experience preferred. Knowledge of GAAP in both a FASB and GASB setting required. Bachelor’s degree in a business related field, preferably Accounting required; MBA preferred. APPLY: Send resume to Human Resources and C.A.O. Michael Milhiser at resumes@morongo-nsn.gov and MMilhiser@morongo-nsn.gov; you may also fax 951-922-0321. Visit our website at www.morongo-nsn.gov for an employment application. Interviews by appointment are available. Call 951-755-5180 for more information.

Photo/art credits Cover: Matt Beard, courtesy City of Pasadena Page 3: coin, rsooll/Shutterstock.com; Lincoln, ksb/Shutterstock.com Page 5: Andrey Yushkov/Shutterstock.com Page 7: file404/Shutterstock.com Page 8: City Hall, Les Palenik/Shutterstock.com; Capitol, Brandon Bourdages/Shutterstock.com Page 9: Capitol stairs, Samiylenko/Shutterstock.com; Pages 9—11: legislator photos courtesy of their respective office staff Page 10—11: flag, Jeffrey M. Frank/Shutterstock.com Pages 12—13: panorama, Matt Beard, courtesy City of Pasadena

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Page 12: brushes, David Pereiras/Shutterstock.com; crowd, courtesy Greater Palm Springs CVB Page 13: Ferrari show, Larry O’Rourke, courtesy City of Pasadena; Palm Springs Art Museum, courtesy Greater Palm Springs CVB Page 14: top, courtesy City of Santa Monica; bottom, Shamleen/Shutterstock.com Page 15: top, courtesy 5MPlaceWorks; bottom, courtesy Building Imagination Center Page 16: both images courtesy Greater Palm Springs CVB Page 17: courtesy Greater Palm Springs CVB Page 18: motorolka/Shutterstock.com Page 22: courtesy City of Richmond Pages 24—25: both images courtesy City of Pasadena Page 29: Jude Hudson, Hudson + Associates

www.cacities.org


Collaboration Promotes Economic Development and Advances Sustainability, continued from page 18

“There is a strong relationship between economic development and community development,” says Linda Smith, who serves as economic development director and public information officer for the City of Dublin and marketing chair for East Bay EDA. “You must always do the right thing for your community, but you need to be able to have a long-term vision of how it will affect the region.” Local officials in the East Bay have learned that it is imperative to involve representatives who can communicate each jurisdiction’s interests while understanding the vision and competitive advantage for the region as a whole. When local resources are limited, cooperation allows cities to address their immediate essential services needs while planning for a more sustainable future. The Code of Collaboration To strengthen regional accountability and sustainable development within the region, the East Bay EDA adopted a code of ethics, including a “no raid” policy, which was adapted from a similar code of ethics created by the California Association for Local Economic Development (CALED). The premise is that businesses are more willing to invest in a region whose communities work together and understand its neighboring jurisdictions as well as its unique assets. In the East Bay EDA’s ethics code, information sharing and transparency are paramount. If a company or organization intends to move from one locality to another within the region, members are expected to contact the affected community and inform them of the potential move. The guidelines first attempt to retain the company in the East Bay. If that is not possible, the organization extends information and assistance to retain the company in the Bay Area, then in Northern California and, finally, within California. Maintaining peaceful relations among the alliance’s members when marketing a particular community to outside firms is another important element of the ethics code.

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Deputy County Executive Officer COUNTY OF NEVADA, CA — $102,364 - $124,966 per year Plan, organize and supervise the work of staff involved in fiscal planning, and general administrative activities of the County, and serve in the absence of the CEO and the ACEO. Minimum requirements include Bachelor’s degree in public or business administration or a closely related field and three years experience equivalent to Nevada County’s classification series of Administrative Analyst. A Master’s degree in public administration is highly desirable. Oral Board date to be determined. Please see website for updates. For complete information and to apply, visit www.mynevadacounty.com, or call 530-265-7010.

Museum and Cultural Affairs Director City of Riverside, California

Annual Salary: $116,136 – $145,116 + a comprehensive benefits package

The City of Riverside is seeking a dynamic and innovative professional to serve as Museum and Cultural Affairs Director and to lead the City’s expanding Arts and Culture program. The position is an integral member of the executive management team and will direct the development and operation of the Municipal Museum and promote the arts for people of all ages. The successful candidate will be responsible for multiple entertainment venues to include programming for two 1,600 seat theaters as well as a black box theater. The Museum and Cultural Affairs Director is also responsible for putting on the City’s signature events including the famed “Festival of Lights.” Applicants for this position will have at least five years of increasingly responsible experience in the management and operations of an organization or agency primarily concerned with promoting the arts to a broader public and/or preserving archival museum/artifact collections, exhibits, historically related facilities and their furnishings and artifacts. The successful candidate will have experience in funding source development, grants preparation and administration, working with lay governing and advisory boards and volunteers, and museum operations and management. APPLY BY: May 31, 2013. Interested candidates shall apply on-line by completing an application and submitting a cover letter, current resume and professional references at www.riversidca.gov.

continued www.westerncity.com

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Collaboration Promotes Economic Development and Advances Sustainability, continued

Benefits for All

development offered the potential to create thousands of jobs and transform its host city into a hub of energy research and innovation.

The code of ethics served the region well in 2011 when several members competed for a new campus of the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, which conducts unclassified research across a wide range of scientific disciplines. The new campus

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City Manager

City of Los ALAmitos, CALiforniA Los Alamitos, population of 11,449, located on the border between Los Angeles County and Orange County, is seeking a City Manager. The City Manager will possess a desire for community involvement throughout the City. Vision, leadership and administrative strengths are critical. The expectation is to maintain the high levels of quality service. The City Manager will be resourceful, have a strong financial orientation and create a teamwork environment. The ideal candidate will have a successful track record as City Manager or Assistant City Manager in a vibrant community similar to Los Alamitos. The position requires a minimum of five years experience as a Chief Executive or Assistant in a full service public agency. A Bachelor’s Degree in Public Administration, Political Science or closely related field is required and a Master’s Degree is desirable. Salary Range: $137,613 - $192,650 DOQ/annually. OPEN UNTIL FILLED. Submit applications and resumes to City of Los Alamitos, 3191 Katella Ave., Los Alamitos, CA 90720, (562) 431-3538, for City Application or visit www.cityoflosalamitos.org

City of P O M O NA Human Resources/ Risk Management Director

Salary range negotiable DOQ. The City offers a generous benefits package, for more information please see the City’s Job Opportunities page at http://agency. governmentjobs.com/ pomona/default.cfm.

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California announced it sought to consolidate approximately 1,000 employees working in leased spaces in Walnut Creek, West Berkeley, Emeryville and Oakland into one central location. The university narrowed the field to six cities, which each offered sites along the waterfront and close proximity to the main campus in the Berkeley hills, and ultimately selected Richmond. The site offered open space for development, easy access to the freeway, public transportation and zoning already in place for light industry, and the university already owned the land. The Richmond campus will host research focused on cancer, health, energy and the environment. The new development is expected to create thousands of jobs and inspire dozens of spin-off companies, nearby restaurants and retail businesses. Lab directors believe that the expanded research presence at the larger site will allow UC Berkeley to better compete for new federal programs, while neighboring cities are hoping to benefit from the industry growth and job creation. Even though the communities in the East Bay competed to persuade the university to locate this valuable economic development asset in their jurisdiction, the history of collaboration and the code of Richmond’s Ford Assembly Plant building (circa 1931) was redeveloped as a business light industrial center of approximately 500,000 square feet.

The City seeks an experienced, executive manager who can effectively direct the City’s Human Resources Department, currently staffed with 6 Full-Time positions and comprised of Personnel and Risk Management functions. The Human Resources/Risk Management Director will be responsible for a full range of activities including contract negotiations and arbitration, collective bargaining agreement administration, recruitment, selection and placement services, EEO, training and orientation programs, ADA administration, workers’ compensation, benefits administration, personnel records maintenance, risk management programs, safety, emergency preparedness, and the administration of the classification, job evaluation and performance appraisal systems. Successful candidates will have a minimum of eight years of increasingly responsible professional human resources experience including five years of administrative and supervisory responsibilities. A Bachelor’s degree in related field is required; Master’s Degree is preferred. Please send your cover letter/resume electronically to: Susan Dippolito, 909-620-2296, susan_dippolito@ci.pomona.ca.us

www.cacities.org


ethics established through the East Bay EDA ensured that the competition was fair and civil, rather than a destructive exercise pitting cities against one another. “It was a great opportunity for everyone,” says Scott Peterson, deputy director of the East Bay EDA. “It mobilized cities to get everything in place to attract someone else.” Collaborating on Regional Investments This belief in the power of collaboration was demonstrated in the development of the nine-county Bay Area’s regional plan for transportation. The Association of Bay Area Governments (ABAG) and the Metropolitan Transportation Commission (MTC) are currently at work developing a long-term regional transportation plan for the Bay Area. The two regional agencies are also preparing a sustainable communities strategy as a key component of the plan. The sustainable communities strategy is a new element of the regional transportation plan intended to demonstrate how the nine-county region will meet regional targets to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from transportation, as required under SB 375 (Chapter 728, Statutes of 2008). The regional transportation plan will guide the investment of tens of billions of dollars in new transportation infrastructure in the Bay Area over the next 30 years. These investments will have a substantial effect on the type, location and timing of new commercial and residential development and related economic activity throughout the region. The East Bay EDA organized a coalition in 2012 to work with ABAG and the MTC to ensure that the sustainable economic development opportunities of all of the East Bay communities are reflected in the final regional transportation plan and sustainable communities strategy. Boosting the Economy Local governments can boost their economy in both the short and long term by implementing a coordinated, collaborative approach with a specific focus on optimizing sustainable results. Engaging both

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neighboring communities and the private sector to harness their particular social, financial and managerial expertise is one way that local governments are able to set the playing field for sustainable economic development. A coordinated sustainable economic strategy can guide a city or

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region in creating a culture of stewardship, innovation and action that can lead to prosperity and future economic gains. In the process, collaboration over time can benefit the region’s residents — regardless of where they happen to live, work, play, study or visit. ■

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ASSISTANT CITY MANAGER (An at-will position)

City of Carson, California Salary: $11,615 - $14,821/month Plus Superior Benefits APPLY BY: Thursday, May 23, 2013 by 6:00 p.m. A completed original City of Carson employment application is required. APPLY AT: City of Carson Human Resources, 701 E. Carson Street, Carson, CA 90745. Phone: (310) 952-1736 Monday – Thursday, 7:00 a.m. – 6:00 p.m.

Under general direction of the City Manager and in accordance with established procedures assists the City Manager in directing the operations of all departments in compliance with policies established by the City Council; serves as City Manager in the City Manager’s absence; provides direct supervision to City Manager’s Office staff and provides direction to department directors; performs related duties as required pursuant to provisions of the Municipal Code. REQUIREMENTS – Education: Bachelor’s degree from an accredited four-year college or university with major course work in public administration, business administration or related field; a master’s degree is desirable. Experience: Five (5) years increasingly responsible administrative management experience in the planning, coordinating and financing of a municipality or public agency.

COMMUNITY AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT DIRECTOR Salary Range is $111,985 to $150,059

Located in the beautiful Eastern Sierra, the Town of Mammoth Lakes is seeking a seasoned professional to fill the position of Community and Economic Development Director. The duties include preparation and implementation of an economic development program that builds on work the Town has already done, as well as the oversight of economic development, zoning, building, code enforcement, and longrange and current planning functions of the Community and Economic Development Department. QUALIFICATIONS: Six years of professional planning and administration experience in the field of municipal

land use development, including two years of managerial experience as the head of a planning or community development department. Economic development or land use development experience in the private sector and North American mountain resort planning experience are desirable. A degree from an accredited college or university with major course work in economic development, urban planning, engineering or a related field. For more information, visit the Town’s website at http://www.ci.mammoth-lakes.ca.us/jobs.aspx for an application and job description, or to request a packet by mail call (760) 934-8989, ext. 223 FILING DEADLINE: May 24, 2013 at 5:00 p.m. PST.

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How the Arts and Cultural Tourism Spur Economic Development, continued from page 17

Another result is the development of a creative marketplace and trade center for talent, services and products — initially for film and media workers, but with the goal of expanding to other creative industries.

take a lot of infrastructure money for this community,” he said. “Building the creative economy requires building the creative community.” The first step, according to Stearns, is to determine exactly who is in the local creative community. “If you look at the broad field, you may see there is a much

Stearns sees this collaboration as a key way to build the creative economy during tough economic times. “It doesn’t J

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CITY OF PACIFICA CITY MANAGER The natural beauty of the coastal city of Pacifica (pop. 37, 234) provides a scenic backdrop to this community, located in San Mateo County just 15 minutes south of San Francisco. Beautiful beaches, rugged coastal bluffs and picturesque hiking trails provide unparalleled serenity to both residents and travelers alike. Pacifica seeks a progressive and collaborative city manager that will embrace the organization and community in providing exceptional municipal services.

bigger world than the ‘starving artists’ and the nonprofits,” he said. While the traditional arts play a very big role, they are only part of the overall creative economy. If your community is home to creative businesses or related industries, invite them to participate and include them in your city’s creative placemaking efforts. Pasadena and Levitt Pavilions Partner to Revitalize Area, Create Festivals While local governments are strapped for funding, public-private partnerships can be instrumental in building the creative economy, and Levitt Pavilion in Pasadena offers a great example.

Pacifica, like many desirable communities, seeks the ideal balance between quality of life and economic vibrancy. Passion for public service, a value system based on ethics and integrity with a leadership style that engenders high levels of trust and confidence with all constituents is essential in this role. William Avery & Associates The new manager will be a seasoned public servant with strong finance/ Management Consultants budget management and administration skills, along with a solid background in economic development. The ability to relate to the issues and concerns 31/2 N. Santa Cruz Ave., Suite A Los Gatos, CA 95030 of a coastal community will be highly advantageous in this role. A BS/BA in a related field is expected and a MS/MA is highly desirable. To be 408.399.4424 considered, submit your letter of interest, resume, current salary and five Fax: 408.399.4423 work-related references (email preferred) to Paul Kimura by May 31, 2013. A email: jobs@averyassoc.net www.averyassoc.net formal job announcement is available at www.averyassoc.net/jobs.

City of Monterey – Fire Chief

The City of Monterey is a historic and progressive coastal community located approximately 100 miles south of San Francisco and 300 miles north of Los Angeles. With a resident population of 30,000, and daily populations rising to 70,000, Monterey is a full-service city with 454 full-time and regular part-time employees. The Fire Department serves the City of Monterey as well as cities of Pacific Grove, Carmel-by-the-Sea, Sand City, Presidio of Monterey, Naval Postgraduate School and La Mesa Village, while operating out of five strategically located stations. The Fire Chief position is an Executive, at-will classification that provides highly responsible staff assistance to the City Manager and City Council. Eight years experience, including at least three years in a responsible management capacity at the Battalion or Division Chief level or higher and the equivalent of a Bachelor’s degree is required.

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Levitt Pavilion draws families to diverse events.

The salary for the Fire Chief is $168,312, plus an attractive benefit package. Please visit the City of Monterey’s website at www.monterey.org for more information. The closing date for this job opening is May 15, 2013.

More than 30,000 fans attend the one-day Make Music Pasadena festival.

www.cacities.org


Levitt Pavilions is a nonprofit foundation whose goal is bringing communities together through music. To qualify for its support, a city must make available a publicly owned space and commit to at least 50 free music concerts annually. Levitt Pavilions provides capital seed funding to renovate or build a music venue, and a local “Friends of the Levitt Pavilion” nonprofit must be formed. In addition, the local government maintains the location. The first Levitt Pavilion project, other than one in the founders’ hometown in Connecticut, was the band shell in Pasadena’s Memorial Park. The park was run-down and suffering from the effects of crime, vagrant drug use, homelessness, graffiti and under use. Levitt Pavilions provided approximately $250,000 in capital seed funding plus annual operating support to improve the band shell for public concerts, the local “friends of” nonprofit raised the additional funds

Other states are actively investing in arts and culture as a challenge to California’s historic leadership in the global creative economy.

(about $1.5 million), and an annual music program for the community was born.

families. “It brings out the entire community,” said Vanessa Silberman, director of communications for Levitt Pavilions. “There’s a sense of neighborliness — a nice small-town feel in a city.”

The free concerts are a vital part of the Levitt Pavilion model. By hosting the community events, the venue becomes a destination in the city for people from all socioeconomic backgrounds, especially

The turnaround for the area in Pasadena is significant, said Silberman. Nearby continued

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City Manager City of Imperial Beach, CA Located in San Diego County, Imperial Beach (pop. 28,243) is the most southwesterly city in the United States. Known for its classic Southern California features, this coastal community offers 3.5 miles of white sand beach along with an emerging ecotourism and hospitality industry. City operations and services are supported by 78 full-time and 66 part-time staff and a General Fund FY2012-13 budget of $17.5 million. The ideal candidate will be an inspiring hands-on manager with a passion for strategic economic development. He/she will be well versed in municipal finance and be accustomed to helping communities advance without an abundance of resources. This increasingly popular coastal city also expects its manager to be visible and engaged with the community. Extensive intergovernmental relations experience will be considered favorably. Considerable municipal management experience and a Bachelor’s degree are required. A Master’s degree is preferred. Salary will be DOQE. Salary is supplemented by an attractive benefits package. This recruitment will close on Sunday, May 19, 2013. For detailed recruitment brochure and to apply online, visit www.tbcrecruiting.com.

Teri Black-Brann • 310.377.2612 Carolyn Seeley • 949.487.7606

CITY MANAGER CITY OF AVALON, CA The City of Avalon invites applications from highly skilled candidates to serve as the City’s next City Manager. Located on Catalina Island, the City of Avalon is a picturesque and leisurely seaport village with an estimated permanent population of 3,500 and an annual visitor count of close to one million. The City Manager is appointed by the City Council and serves as the operational head of city government. The new manager will provide exceptional leadership and a collaborative and engaging management style throughout the City’s operations and with interactions with the City Council. Maturity of judgment, strong personal leadership and the ability to communicate effectively are essential skills. A Bachelor’s degree in public/business administration or a related field is required; Master’s preferred. The City offers a salary and benefit package which is competitive and is negotiable based on the chosen candidate’s qualifications and experience. The position will remain open until filled but candidates are encouraged to apply by Thursday, May 30, 2013. Please send your cover letter, resume and references electronically to: Scott Campbell – scott.campbell@bbklaw.com.

www.westerncity.com

Western City, May 2013

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How the Arts and Cultural Tourism Spur Economic Development, continued

Colorado Boulevard in the center of Pasadena’s original downtown had undergone a revitalization, evolving into the extremely popular Old Pasadena area. Prior to the Levitt Pavilion investment, local residents avoided Memorial Park because of the crime problem. Now the area around the park has become as vibrant as Colorado Boulevard, with new condominiums, restaurants and other amenities nearby.

In conjunction with the Levitt Pavilion project, Pasadena launched an annual music festival called Make Music Pasadena. Now in its sixth successful year, Make Music Pasadena presents Grammy Award-winning musicians and top recording artists performing blues, jazz, folk, alternative rock and more. The festival’s eclectic mix of music appeals to audiences of all ages and has earned it high praise. It’s been dubbed by L.A. Weekly as “Los Angeles’ best free festival.” More than 30,000 fans flock to Pasadena to hear 500 musicians performing 140 free concerts on 35 stages spread throughout the city — all in one music-filled day.

The success of the Levitt Pavilion partnership is due to the long-term commitment of the city, the local nonprofit and the national foundation.

Police Chief City of Livermore, CA

Your Town, Your Arts Enhancing the creative sector is essential to the future of the Golden State. But investing in the arts doesn’t necessarily need to strain the pocketbooks of local governments or require extra staff. Assess what is already in your own community. Assist and support the local businesses, nonprofits and residents who propose innovative projects. Invite creative leaders to share ideas, and encourage high-quality proposals that can make a real difference. A little investment in the arts can go a long way toward keeping your community on the forefront of the creative economy. ■

More Resources Online

The City of Livermore (pop. 80,968) is home to renowned science and technology centers and prides itself on the unique blend of small-town ambience and metropolitan amenities. There is a strong sense of community in this San Francisco Bay Area city and the Police Chief will benefit from the Department’s well established reputation and partnerships. The Livermore Police Department is supported by 90 sworn and 45 civilian staff and an annual operating budget of $26.7 million.

A wealth of additional information is posted with the online version of this article at www.westerncity.com and includes:

Impressive experience dealing with a wide range of crime and quality of life issues will be expected. The ideal candidate will display a sophisticated understanding of contemporary policing practices, and be familiar with the current uses of technology and expanding uses of data in law enforcement. In addition to having a strong community orientation, he/she will also be an exceptional communicator with outstanding interpersonal skills. At least three (3) years of command level experience at the rank of captain or higher along with a Bachelor’s degree are required.

• Funding resources; • How arts investment can improve civic engagement for disadvantaged neighborhoods and immigrant communities;

Salary range $147,726 - $184,658. Salary is supplemented by a competitive benefits package. This recruitment will close on Sunday, May 19, 2013. For detailed recruitment brochure and to apply online, visit www.tbcrecruiting.com.

• Links to projects, reports and studies mentioned in this article;

Teri Black • 310.377.2612 Joe Brann • 310.265.7479

And more.

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west coast headquarters 1677 Eureka Road, Suite 202 Roseville, CA 95661 phone 916•784•9080

east coast 2910 Kerry Forest Parkway D4-242 Tallahassee, FL 32309 phone 850•391•0000

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William Avery & Associates, Inc. Labor Relations / Executive Search / Management Solutions 31/2 N. Santa Cruz Ave., Suite A Los Gatos, CA 95030 408.399.4424 Fax: 408.399.4423 email: jobs@averyassoc.net www.averyassoc.net

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www.westerncity.com

Irvine (949) 251-8628

Looking for budget balancing tools? More than 600 public agencies have chosen PARS for retirement solutions that help save money, such as: • OPEB pre-funding trust to reduce liabilities • Social Security alternatives for part-timers to save 79% • Leave conversion plans to reduce large payouts at end 800.540.6369 x 116; mbarker@pars.org www.pars.org ©2013 Public Agency Retirement Services (PARS). All rights reserved.

Western City, May 2013

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Budget cuts have resulted in reduced services for many communities. What services has your city been able to preserve that you are most proud of? Read more “On the Record” at www.westerncity.com.

Susan Rohan Mayor Roseville

Mike Gipson Council Member Carson

Scott Nelson Mayor Placentia

www.westerncity.com

Library hours at our branches. The economy has made our libraries a critical tool for career development and job searches.

Protecting and maintaining public safety services.

Public safety. And public-private partnerships have helped us maintain some of our swim programs and after-school programs for youth, but not a lot of them.

Eduardo Montesino Council Member Watsonville

Larry Carr Council Member Morgan Hill

Robert Pullen-Miles Council Member Lawndale

Fifty percent of our city is age 18 or younger. We’ve worked hard to keep libraries open and preserve parks and recreation programs.

Public safety and recreation programs. The biggest hit is finding how to fund infrastructure improvements that were previously done with redevelopment.

Preserving senior services and programs for youth.

Western City, May 2013

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Thank you to all of the 2013 League Partners

Platinum ($15,000+) 2

1,2

2

1,2

2 AAGIE

Apartment Association Greater Inland Empire

2 2

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2

1,2

1 BUILDING AMERICA®

Gold ($10,000+) Hanson Bridgett LLP1,2 Jenkins & Hogin LLP2

Lewis Investment Company2 Liebert Cassidy Whitmore1 Meyers Nave1,2

Renne Sloan Holtzman Sakai LLP1,2 Richards Watson & Gershon1,2

SolarCity2 Wells Fargo Willdan

Silver ($5,000+) Charles Abbott Associates Athens California & Nevada IBEW/ NECA Labor-Management Cooperation Trust California/Nevada Soft Drink Association2 California Grocers Association2 2

Cardenas Markets Inc. DW Development2 Dart Container Corp. Dokken Engineering2 Greenwaste Recovery Inc. ITRON Interwest Consulting Group Inc. 2

JPMorgan Chase & Co. Kronick Moskovitz Tiedemann & Girard1 Majestic Realty Co.2 Management Partners Morongo Band of Mission Indians2 Northrop Grumman

Pena’s Disposal2 Prometheus Real Estate Group Inc.2 Republic Services Inc.2 San Manuel Band of Mission Indians2 Santa Ynez Band of Mission Indians2

Schiff Hardin LLP Starbucks TRANE2 Tribal Alliance of Sovereign Indian Nations2 Union Bank US Bank

National Community Neoteric Entertainment Inc.2 Pacific Code Compliance2 Pacific Rail2 PARS/Phase II Piper Jaffray2 Recology2 Regis Homes2 Riverside Construction2

Janice Rutherford2 San Bernardino Police Officers Association Seifel Consulting, Inc. Solution Strategies2 SummerHill Homes2 Urban Housing Group2 Young Homes2 Zarc Recycling2

Largo Concrete2 Livermore Sanitation Inc.2 Marchetti Construction Inc.2 NASA Services2 Gary Ovitt2 Pacific Water Quality Association Parsons2 Peters Engineering2 Potential Industries Precision Concrete Cutting Quad Knopf2 RJP Framing2 Robson Homes LLC2 SNW Securities Corp. S&S Drywall2 Santa Monica Police Officers Association

ServPro Severn Trent Enviromental2 Sobrato Organization2 Southern California Concrete Producers Southwest Water Co.2 Swinerton Management Teichert Construction2 Top Grade Construction2 Urban Futures2 Vali Cooper & Associates Inc. Waste Management2 WaterMarke Properties2 Zero Waste Energy

Bronze ($3,000+) 4 Creeks Amador Valley Industries2 American Red Cross AndersonPenna Partners Inc. Atkins Best Way Disposal2 California Dental Association-PAC Cerrell Associates Colantuono & Levin 2

Desert Valley Medical Group Inc./Prime Healthcare2 Edgewood Partners Insurance Center Garaventa Enterprises2 Ghilotti Construction2 Jose Gonzales2 HMC + Beverly Prior Architects Herum\Crabtree Attorneys

Hill International2 Holliday Rock Company Kinsell Newcomb & De Dios Inc.2 Library Systems & Services LLC Morley Brothers LLC2 Morongo Band of Mission Indians2 Bob Murray & Associates

Basic ($1,000+) Advance America Alcal2 Ashwood Construction Alameda County Industries2 Alvarez-Glasman & Colvin2 Arnold and Associates2 Avery Associates2 Berliner Cohen Blue Line Transfer Inc.2 CH2M Hill California Association of Physician Groups California Building Industry Association California Contract Cities Association California Hotel Lodging

California Refuse Recycling Council California Water Service Company Check into Cash California Christiani Architects2 Civil Justice Association of California Continental Development Corporation Paul Cook for Assembly2 Cost Control Associates Inc. DiMare Van Vleck & Brown LLC E&J Gallo Ecology Auto Parts Emanuels Jones and Associates

Food 4 Less2 Fresno Police Officers Association GHD Inc. Giacalone Design Gresham Savage Nolan & Tilden PC Hall & Foreman Inc. Harris & Associates HydroPoint Data Systems Inc. Jamboree Housing Corporation Johnstone Moyer Jones Hall Jones & Mayer Kasdan Simonds Weber & Vaughan LLP LaBarge Industries2

Join the Partners Program Today! Contact Mike Egan | (916) 658-8271 | egan@cacities.org

Partial list as of 4/1/2013

1 – Institute for Local Government supporter 2 – CITIPAC supporter


Western City May 2013