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M AY 2012 |

The Monthly Magazine of the League of California Cities

Creating Economic Development at the Local Level p.8 Charting a Path to a Sustainable Economy p.13 Gonzales Grows Green p.14

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CONTENTS 2

Calendar of League Events

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Executive Director’s Message

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By Julio J. Fuentes and Joseph Montes

What Comes Next?

The City of Alhambra took action early this year on an innovative plan to stimulate economic development and identified a range of tools to help finance new projects.

By Chris McKenzie In the wake of the elimination of redevelopment agencies, city officials and legislators are wondering, “What comes next?”

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City Forum

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Key Milestones Ahead in 2012 Legislative Session By Eva Spiegel

News from the Institute for Local Government

Built to Last: Charting A Path to a Sustainable Economy Two very different cities offer remarkable examples of pioneering efforts to chart a more sustainable economic future.

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California Cities Helen Putnam Award for Excellence

Gonzales Grows Green: An Innovative Economic Program

California’s Green Economy Links Economic Development and Sustainability The continued expansion in core green industries, such as energy generation and efficiency, recycling and waste, clean transportation, water and wastewater, offers cause for guarded optimism.

Sustainable Cities

By Steve Sanders

One of the most critical periods for legislative action is between now and the first week of July. Learn how you can support the advocacy efforts of California cities.

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Creating Economic Development at the Local Level

Gonzales offers an excellent model of an economic development program that focuses on sustainability and builds trust and understanding.

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Job Opportunities

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Professional Services Directory Cover Photo: Lisa S./ Shutterstock.com


President Michael Kasperzak Mayor Mountain View

1400 K Street Sacramento, CA 95814 (916) 658-8200 Fax (916) 658-8240

First Vice President Bill Bogaard Mayor Pasadena

Second Vice President José Cisneros Treasurer San Francisco

Immediate Past President Jim Ridenour Mayor Modesto

Executive Director Chris McKenzie

For a complete list of the League board of directors, visit www.cacities.org/board.

leaguevents

Magazine Staff Editor in Chief Jude Hudson (916) 658-8234 e-mail: <editor@westerncity.com>

MAY

Managing Editor Eva Spiegel (916) 658-8228 e-mail: <espiegel@cacities.org>

2–4

City Attorneys Spring Conference, Hollywood This meeting covers the latest trends and issues affecting public law practitioners and provides an opportunity to connect with colleagues.

Advertising Sales Manager Pam Maxwell-Blodgett (916) 658-8256 e-mail: <maxwellp@cacities.org>

JUNE

Administrative Assistant Anita Lopez (916) 658-8223 e-mail: <alopez@cacities.org>

14 – 15 Policy Committee Meetings, Sacramento The League’s policy committees review issues of interest to cities statewide and make recommendations to the League board of directors.

Contributors Yvonne Hunter JoAnne Speers Associate Editors Carol Malinowski Carolyn Walker

15 Legal Advocacy Committee Meeting, Sacramento The committee reviews and recommends friend-of-the-court efforts on cases of significant statewide interest to California cities.

Design Pat Davis Design Group, Inc. For photo credits, see page 17.

JULY

19 – 20 Western City (ISSN 0279-5337) is published monthly by the League of California Cities, 1400 K St., Sacramento, CA 95814. Subscriptions: $39.00/1 year; $63.00/2 years; student: $26.50; foreign: $52.00; single copies: $4.00, including sales tax. Entered as periodical mail January 30, 1930, at the Post Office, Los Angeles, CA 90013, under the Act of April 13, 1879. Periodical postage paid at Sacramento, Calif.

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ED US IN G

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Postmaster: Send address changes to Western City, 1400 K Street, Sacramento, CA 95814. Western City Trademark Reg. U.S. Pat. Off. ©2012 League of California Cities. All rights reserved. Material may not be reprinted without written permission. This issue is Volume LXXXVIII, No. 5.

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Supplied by Community Energy

Board of Directors Meeting, Manhattan Beach The League board reviews, discusses and takes action on a variety of issues affecting cities, including legislation, legal advocacy, education and training, and more.

SEPTEMBER

5–7

League of California Cities 2012 Annual Conference & Expo, San Diego Convention Center This conference offers dozens of educational sessions, numerous professional development opportunities, hundreds of exhibits and a chance to participate in the League’s policy-making activities at the Annual Business Meeting.

Event and registration information is available at www.cacities.org/events. For the latest information on League conferences and events, follow us on Twitter @CaCitiesLearn. For legislative and policy updates and more, follow @CaCities. Join us on Facebook! www.facebook.com/westerncity www.facebook.com/LeagueofCaCities

FSC is an independent, not-for-profit organization that promotes environmentally appropriate, socially beneficial and economically viable forest management worldwide. Products with the FSC label are independently certified to ensure that they come from forests managed to meet the needs of present and future generations.

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Executive Director’s Message by Chris McKenzie

What Comes

Next

Creating new, good-paying jobs in California is a goal shared by cities and state government. In fact, with the economy stuck in the slowest recovery in memory, everyone seems to be interested in job creation. We have presidential candidates talking about protecting the “job creators” (a term new to many of us), the governor courting Chinese businesses and government officials to invest in California, and the Legislature beginning to wonder how it can help.

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n the wake of redevelopment agencies’ elimination by the state Legislature and governor, however, city officials and legislators are asking, “What comes next?” What can be done to replace the roughly 300,000 private-sector jobs and $2 billion in state and local tax revenues that economists told us redevelopment helped create each year? In a state without a discernable economic development strategy, quite frankly it’s hard to know what state government policy-makers believe is good for economic development in California. As state leaders ponder this essential question, city leaders know they don’t have the luxury of waiting. They are refocusing, identifying strategic opportunities and proposing ways to help the private sector make future investments through public-private partnerships that translate into good-paying jobs. Business leaders are quick to identify some of California’s competitive disadvantages when compared to some of our neighboring states: high energy costs, high land costs, high labor costs, stricter environmental laws and high workers’ compensation costs. Before the loss of redevelopment funding, cities could help offset many of these business investment disincentives by providing direct and indirect financial assistance through redevelopment. In

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effect, they could essentially buy down the cost of doing business in California through grants, loans and discounted real-estate transactions that made the private investment pencil out. It’s Time for a New Model

With that incredibly valuable economic development tool now gone, city and state officials have the opportunity to work together to develop a new generation of economic development tools that will — we hope — help cities continue some of the best work that redevelopment agencies achieved. In short, it’s time to rebuild a state economic development partnership that will help support what social scientists consistently tell us is the most important element in fighting crime, raising the standard of living, and keeping families together: a good-paying job. A task this complex and important will take both short- and longer-term strategies to succeed in California. One of the most important short-term strategies cities can employ is described in an excellent article in this issue by the city manager and city attorney of Alhambra (see “Creating Economic Development at continued

Western City, May 2012

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What Comes Next?, continued

the Local Level,” page 8). The city’s “selfhelp” approach is an extremely worthwhile initiative that doesn’t require waiting for state action. Every city can and should inventory its available resources and authority and determine what makes sense for it in the months and years ahead regardless of any possible state action. New Task Force Addresses Economic Development

Recently the League created a special Task Force on the Next Generation of Economic Development Tools, chaired by League First Vice President and Pasadena Mayor Bill Bogaard. The task force is developing recommendations that, if adopted, will guide the League’s work with the governor and Legislature in fashioning a new statelocal economic development partnership.

Jamie Casso Los Angeles

The task force believes this partnership should focus on two goals:

strategies comprise the following shortand longer-term components.

1. Providing ongoing funding for local infrastructure and economic development projects; and

Short-Term Action: In the Next Few Months

2. Addressing concerns related to: • Cleaning up brownfields now held by successor agencies; • Preserving critical community assets that will be needed for future community revitalization, transitoriented development, etc.; and • Allowing unspent bond proceeds to be used to finish quality projects. The task force has recommended the following League strategies, which will have been reviewed by the League’s policy committees and board of directors as this issue of Western City goes to press. The

Art Hartinger Oakland/Los Angeles

1. Cleanup of AB X1 26. Cities and redevelopment successor agencies are facing serious challenges dealing with many unresolved issues from AB X1 26. Pursuing and supporting legislation that would address these challenges is the most important thing that can be done in the short term. AB 1585 (Perez) is a great first step, but other legislation addressing asset management, brownfields, unspent bond proceeds and other matters should be pursued however possible. (For more on AB 1585, visit www. cacities.org/billsearch.)

Steve Mattas San Francisco

Ruthann G. Ziegler Sacramento

FOUR MEYERS NAVE LAW YERS NAMED TO THE DAILY JOURNAL’S “TOP 25 MUNICIPAL LAW YERS” LIST FOR 2011 For over 25 years, Meyers Nave has practiced public law in California, combining in one firm general counsel services as well as the many specialties that public agencies need. Our readiness to help clients find creative and innovative solutions to financial, regulatory and legal issues coupled with our extensive knowledge of local, state and federal laws allow us to cut to the core of our clients’ issues and deliver solid results. Meyers Nave congratulates all attorneys selected by the Daily Journal for your dedication to municipal law in California. OAKLAND LOS ANGELES

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SACRAMENTO SAN FRANCISCO

League of California Cities

SANTA ROSA FRESNO

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2. Infrastructure Financing Districts (IFDs). Draft and support amendments that make SB 214 (Wolk) and IFDs workable tools for cities to finance infrastructure through taxincrement financing in both existing and newly developing areas. (For more on SB 214, visit www.cacities. org/billsearch.) 3. Other Opportunities. Support other legislation that can expand local economic development and infrastructure options as opportunities arise. 4. Continued Research. Continue to research, examine and develop new possibilities and flexibility for tax-increment financing, assessment districts, economic development corporations and other ways to expand cities’ ability to develop infrastructure, provide services, pursue economic development, remove blight, assemble land and develop affordable housing.

Stay Informed

The governor’s revised budget will be released shortly, and many expect it will reveal the extent to which he will be willing to go in implementing some of these recommendations. The next few weeks and months will be interesting, to say the least. To check on the latest developments, visit www.ca cities.org. n

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Longer-Term Action: Before The Year Ends

1. Legislation to Allow State Investment in Local Projects. Draft concept legislation that would authorize the state, via the State Infrastructure Bank or another entity, to approve the use of some or all of the local school share of property tax to support taxincrement financing for projects that advance important state priorities; for example, projects consistent with SB 375, affordable housing, military base reuse and projects to attract highwage employers to the state.

www.uscommunities.org

2. Additional Legislation From Research. Work with legislators to develop and refine legislation derived from further League research or ideas offered by other stakeholders.

“Pervious concrete has the advantage of meeting multiple design requirements for storm water runoff management in Santa Barbara County.”

3. State Economic Development Strategy. Work with legislators and the governor to encourage the development and adoption of a state economic development strategy, with appropriate state and local fiscal incentives for job creation, urban revitalization and sustainable development.

“We needed a material for the ADA compliant areas of the parking lot that would facilitate wheelchair access, accept code required striping and still allow the storm water to percolate.”

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— Cathleen Garnand, Civil Engineering Associate, County of Santa Barbara Water Resources Division

— Brian Dougherty, FAIA, Dougherty + Dougherty Architects LLP

sccpconcrete.com Western City, May 2012

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Key Milestones Ahead in 2012 Legislative Session Although we’ve passed the halfway mark in the 2012 Legislative Session according to the calendar, things are really just starting to heat up. The lobbying action will intensify through the summer until Sept. 30, the last day that Gov. Jerry Brown can sign or veto bills. League lobbyists are in the Capitol testifying, seeking amendments, attending negotiation meetings, writing letters and taking other actions to protect city interests, but at times they will need city officials to help. The League’s advocacy efforts comprise every city official throughout the state as well as our lobbyists here in Sacramento. Our advocacy strategy relies on engaging both in the Capitol and at the grassroots level. While 2011 presented significant challenges for California cities, it’s helpful to take the long view: The League has been working to protect and advance municipal interests since 1898. Working together, we have achieved many successes and overcome numerous setbacks over the past 114 years. There is strength in numbers, and the League’s strength comes from its member cities and local officials’ willingness to participate in the legislative process on behalf of their communities.

The May Revise This month Gov. Brown releases his May revision to the state budget, also known as the “May Revise.” While the governor’s initial budget released in January did not contain a significant proposal affecting city revenue, cities must remain vigilant. State budget politics have created some unpredictable factors. The governor’s budget relies on a combination of cuts and passing one of two revenue-raising ballot measures in November. Democrats have balked at making some of the proposed cuts for

education and social services, but without cuts it’s unclear how the deficit will be closed. Even if the governor’s revenue measure passes, that alone will not balance the budget. Pressure to reach an agreement will also come from Proposition 25, which requires legislators to forfeit their pay if a budget is not passed by the June 15 constitutional deadline. State Controller John Chiang docked legislators’ pay last year when they passed a budget that he deemed unbalanced. Legislative leaders are suing Chiang over whether he has the authority to independently determine whether a budget is balanced. So cities should pay careful attention to the May Revise and the budget process as it unfolds.

Take Action: Your Voice Makes a Difference This is the second year of the two-year legislative cycle. The Legislature will be addressing not only bills that have been introduced since Jan. 4, but also bills introduced in 2011, known as two-year bills. One of the most critical periods for legislative action is between now and the first week of July, when legislative committees analyze and debate thousands of bills, and the League takes actions on bills of statewide interest to cities. You can help by writing letters, making phone calls and communicating to your legislator exactly how these bills will affect your city. Lobbying efforts are most effective when cities tell their unique stories. Be sure to follow CA Cities Advocate, the League’s electronic newsletter that publishes multiple times a week to keep members informed on the latest developments in the Capitol. Stay in regular contact with your regional public affairs manager, who will

by Eva Spiegel and Dan Carrigg be sending out action alerts on legislation that the League needs your help in lobbying. The newly redesigned League website (www.cacities.org) has a Member Toolbox feature, where you can access the League’s bill search database to track the League’s position on bills and locate sample letters that you can use to contact your legislators on key legislation. The Take Action tab lets you send a position letter to your legislator directly from the League website.

August Scramble, September Crunch The extremely busy last month of the session starts Aug. 6, when the Legislature returns from recess, and culminates Aug. 31 when the session ends. During these critical periods, League lobbyists work the halls and offices of the Capitol around the clock. We’ll ask you to call and write your legislators to explain the action they should take on legislation important to cities. In September, even though the Legislature is officially done with its work, the lobbying effort is not over. The League will continue to advocate to the governor to sign and veto legislation that must be decided by Sept. 30. It’s imperative that the governor hear from cities about the real-life implications of legislation passed by the Legislature. The League will provide sample letters on its website that you can personalize to tell your city’s story to the governor as we make a case for each bill on his desk affecting cities. Join us in our efforts to make California cities better places to live, work and play. For more information, visit www.cacities. org. n

Eva Spiegel is communications director for the League and can be reached at <espiegel@cacities.org>. Dan Carrigg is legislative director for the League and can be reached at <dcarrigg@cacities.org>.

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League of California Cities

www.cacities.org


News from the Institute for Local Government

California’s Green Economy Links Economic Development And Sustainability “The California core green economy reflected greater resilience than the California economy as a whole during the recent recession.” This conclusion from Many Shades of Green, an insightful 2012 report about California’s green economy, sheds light on how various segments of the economy are expanding or contracting in different regions of the state. Published by Next 10 (www.next10.org), an organization focused on innovation and the intersection between the economy, the environment and quality-of-life issues for all Californians, the report found that “… while the [economic] downturn reset core green employment back to 2008 levels, total state employment was set back to 2001 levels.” Although this good news must be tempered by the fact that many communities still face significant fiscal and employment challenges, the report underscores the continued expansion in core green industries, such as energy generation and efficiency, recycling and waste, clean transportation, water and wastewater. Communities where these businesses are located will benefit economically from this ongoing expansion.

Walkability Increases Property Values

The website Walk Score (www.walkscore.com) offers another way to look at the connection between sustainability and economic development. Its neighborhood “walkability” scores help potential renters or homebuyers learn about walking opportunities in various neighborhoods. The site provides tools for realtors to promote the walkability of properties in different neighborhoods and helps people find apartments using an “Apartment Search for the Car-Lite Lifestyle” feature. According to a study released by CEOs for Cities (www. ceosforcities.org), one point of Walk Score is worth as much as $3,000 in home value, depending on the metropolitan area. According to the study, “The walkability of cities translates directly into increases in home values. Homes located in more walkable neighborhoods — those with a mix of common daily shopping and social destinations within a short distance — command a price premium over otherwise similar homes in less walkable areas. Houses with the above-average levels of www.westerncity.com

walkability command a premium of about $4,000 to $34,000 over houses with just average levels of walkability in the typical metropolitan areas studied.” Additional potential benefits of walkable communities include opportunities for a healthy lifestyle as residents walk or bicycle instead of using a car, reduced air pollution and increased disposable income as gasoline purchases decline. The City of San Jose exemplifies the benefits of walkable, mixed-use communities in the article “Built to Last: Charting a Path to a Sustainable Economy” on page 13.

Share Your Agency’s Story

The Institute for Local Government (ILG) Sustainable Communities Program (www.ca-ilg.org/sustainability) provides resources to help local agencies learn more about the linkages between land use, healthy neighborhoods, energy efficiency, green buildings, reducing greenhouse gas emissions, resource conservation and economic development. ILG also shares best practices and examples from local agencies. If your agency has a story to tell about linking sustainability and economic development or experience in evaluating the economic potential of sustainability policies, programs or plans, ILG wants to hear about it. Send your information to <sustainability@ ca-ilg.org>. ILG staff will follow up to learn more so that your agency’s experience and lessons learned can be shared with local leaders throughout the state. n

Western City, May 2012

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Creating Economic Develo AT THE LOCAL LEVEL by Julio J. Fuentes and Joseph Montes

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n the aftermath of the California Supreme Court’s December 29, 2011, decision to uphold legislation that eliminated redevelopment agencies, the City of Alhambra wasted no time in re-establishing a means for conducting economic development activities to: • Stimulate growth; • Invigorate the city’s business sector; • Revitalize neighborhoods; and • Generate new tax revenues. Recognizing the importance of quickly reactivating redevelopment and related tools for this purpose, the City Council approved an economic development ordinance at its meeting on Feb. 27, 2012.

Laying the Legal Groundwork

• Expanded retail and commercial options;

The city established several findings and determinations to validate the legitimacy of the ordinance (which adds Chapter 3.34, Economic Development, to Alhambra’s municipal code).

• More dining and entertainment options; and

As a charter-law city whose charter includes authorizing language, the Alhambra City Council is empowered to legislate over any municipal affair to the full extent permitted by the state Constitution. The city council determined economic growth and development to be effective aids in promoting the health and welfare of Alhambra’s residents and thus a general benefit to them in multiple ways, including: • Improved market-rate, affordable and transit-oriented housing options;

• An improved tax base that helps the city provide municipal services to its residents. Moreover, the city found the use of municipal funds and resources for implementing economic development activities permissible as a municipal affair because of the clear benefit to Alhambra’s residents. Based on these findings and determinations, the city council approved the ordinance and authorized city staff to undertake approved economic development activities. continued on page 10

Julio J. Fuentes is city manager of the City of Alhambra and president of the California Redevelopment Association; he can be reached at <jfuentes@cityofalhambra.org>. Joseph Montes is city attorney for Alhambra and a partner in the law firm of Burke, Williams & Sorensen, LLP; he can be reached at <jmontes@bwslaw.com>.

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pment

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Western City, May 2012

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Creating Economic Development at the Local Level, continued from page 8

A Municipal Toolbox for Economic Development The ordinance identifies a number of general categories of authorized activities to help fulfill the goal of economic growth and development. In short, these include (but are not limited to) the ability to: • Purchase and dispose of property; • Acquire property by eminent domain, when necessary; • Provide for site preparation work (demolition, clearing and remediation); • Rent, manage, operate and repair cityowned property for economic development; • Rehabilitate, alter, construct or improve property; • Pursue public and private financial assistance; • Provide grants, loans, insurance payments, tax rebates or other assistance related to commercial and industrial activities, as well as market-rate and affordable multifamily housing; and • Issue bonds or other forms of debt.

Resources for Funding The ordinance does not identify a specific funding source for economic development. However, a variety of tools may be used to finance new development projects, including: • Section 108 loans — long-term loans secured by some form of collateral and revenues generated from a project or

paid from a portion of the city’s annual Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) allocation; • Annual CDBG allocation — ideal for infill development projects and tenant improvements under the category of job creation or blight elimination; • CDBG program income — net proceeds from any project made possible through the use of CDBG funds; • New project-generated sales tax and property tax rebates — uses new sales tax and property taxes created from the development to help offset project costs; • Short-term lines of credit — secured and repaid by new property or sales taxes generated by the project; • Federal/state grants or economic development initiatives — these increase access to capital for small businesses, a key component of job creation, and help provide additional security for a Section 108 loan; • Loans from the General Fund or Enterprise Reserve Funds (if these funds exist) — these may require a loan agreement as well as an interest component to do some types of projects; • Sale of city assets; • City fees that are discounted, waived or deferred — negotiated incentives to make it easier to attract new businesses and investments; • Brownfields assistance — assistance to assess and remediate abandoned or

underused industrial and commercial property. Funding may be available via the Environmental Protection Agency and federal/state agencies; • Infrastructure Financing Districts (IFDs) — bonds issued through IFDs require two-thirds voter approval and can be used to help pay for infrastructure-type projects by diverting property tax revenues to pay debt service from other local governments, except schools; • Revenue bonds — backed by revenue generated from a project funded with bond proceeds and repaid by earnings from the operations of a revenue-producing enterprise; • Conduit revenue bonds — tax-exempt bonds issued by charter cities or joint powers authorities for economic development or multifamily housing. The bond is payable from loan payments received from the non-governmental developer on the condition of a public benefit, and it presents no liability for the governmental entity; • Community Facilities Districts — bonds used mainly to finance public works improvements and services or to pay for specific, limited improvements related to privately-owned or real property. The parcel tax associated with the specific improvements requires twothirds voter approval; • Assessment Districts — a charge assessed against real property whereby there is a benefit from a particular public works or public services project

Perseverance and creative thinking are key in the effort to reinvent local economic development.

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League of California Cities

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or activity undertaken by the city. The voter-approved assessment becomes a part of the funding mechanism to defray the cost of the project. Cities should work with their legal counsel to explore similar “self-help” economic development program options at the local level that may exist for both general-law and charter cities and to ensure that related issues, such as debt limits and gifts of public funds, are appropriately addressed.

Taking Aggressive Action Alhambra is planning to use its new authority to implement an aggressive economic development program. The city is presently working on a 400,000-squarefoot retail center; it may use a combination of new sales and property tax in the center, along with a reduction in its planning and inspection fees, to underwrite the project’s proposed public parking structure. Negotiations are also set to begin on a new downtown mixed-use center that may include 140,000 square feet of retail space with 260 units of for-sale housing and public parking. The city may decide to use CDBG program income from the sale of a former asset along with a portion of new net assessed property tax generated by the proposed center to pay for the project. Alhambra is considering the construction of a 295-space downtown parking structure as well and may elect to borrow from its reserves to underwrite the cost. continued on page 22

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Western City, May 2012

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Thank you to our 2012

League Partners Platinum

($15,000+)

AT&T Aleshire & Wynder LLP1,2 American Fidelity Assurance Company Best Best & Krieger LLP1,2 Burrtec Waste Industries Inc.2 Global Water FATHOM HdL Companies Honeywell Kaiser Permanente Keenan & Associates2 MuniServices Northern California Carpenters Regional Council PG&E2 SIEMENS SmartCitiesPrevail.org Solarcity Southern California Edison1,2 Southern California Gas Co./ SDG&E/The Sempra Energy Utilities State Farm Insurance Visa Walmart Willdan2 2

Gold

($10,000+)

Bank of America Burke, Williams & Sorensen LLP1,2 DW Development2 Hanson Bridgett LLP1,2 Jenkins & Hogin LLP2 Lewis Group of Companies2 Liebert Cassidy Whitmore1 Renne Sloan Holtzman Sakai LLP1,2 Richards, Watson & Gershon1,2 Union Pacific Railroad Wells Fargo

Silver ($5,000+)

Athens Services2 CALPORTLAND Company2 Cardenas Markets Inc.2 Comcast Dart Container Corp.2 Dokken Engineering2 Garaventa Enterprises/ S.E.G. Trucking2 ITRON Inc. Interwest Consulting Group Inc. Kronick Moskovitz Tiedemann & Girard1 Meyers Nave1 Northrop Grumman Prometheus Real Estate Group Inc.2 Republic Services Inc.2 San Manuel Band of Mission Indians2 Starbucks Union Bank

Bronze ($3,000+)

Charles Abbott Associates Inc.2 AndersonPenna Partners Inc. Atkins California & Nevada IBEW/NECA Labor-Management Cooperation Trust California Dental PAC California Water Service Company Cerrell Associates Inc. City Ventures Colantuono & Levin2 Greenberg Traurig LLP Herum\Crabtree Attorneys Hill International2 Holliday Rock Company Johnson and Johnson Jones & Mayer2 Library Systems & Services LLC Molycorp Minerals2 Morley Brothers LLC2 Morongo Band of Mission Indians2 Bob Murray & Associates PARS

PERC Water Corp. Pacific Development Group Inc.2 Petra Solar Inc.2 Piper Jaffray Prime Healthcare Services Inc.2 Recology Inc.2 Janice Rutherford2 San Bernardino Police Officers Association Trane U.S. Inc. TY LIN International2 Young Homes LLC2

Basic ($1,000+)

Advance America Amador Valley Industries LLC2 Arnold & Associates2 Avery & Associates2 Berliner-Cohen Best Way Disposal2 Blue Line Transfer Inc.2 CH2M Hill C+S Engineers Inc. Califia LLC dba River Islands @ Lathrop2 California Association of Physician Groups California Building Industry Association California Contract Cities Associates PAC2 California Grocers Association California Hotel & Lodging Association California Refuse Recycling Council Check Into Ca$h City National Bank Civil Justice Association of California Classic Communities2 Continental Development Corp.2 Cost Control Associates Inc. DiMare, Van Vleck & Brown LLC E&J Gallo Winery2 Ecology Auto Parts2 Emanuels Jones and Associates

1 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Institute for Local Government supporter 2 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; CITIPAC supporter Join the Partners Program Today! Contact Mike Egan | (916) 658-8271 | egan@cacities.org

Food 4 Less2 Fresno Police Officers Association General Mills2 Gonsalves & Son2 Gonzalez Goodale Architects Harris & Associates HydroPoint Data Systems Inc. Inland Valleys Association of Realtors2 Issues Mobilization Political Action Committee2 Jones Hall A Professional Law Corporation2 Kinsell, Newcomb & De Dios Inc. Lewis Brisbois Bisgaard & Smith LLP2 Lilburn Corporation2 Livermore Sanitation Inc.2 Management Partners Marchetti Construction Inc.2 NASA Services Inc.2 Pacific Water Quality Association Parsons2 Peters Engineering Group2 Premier Medical Transportation Inc.2 Quad Knopf2 Robson Homes LLC2 SNW Securities Corp. Santa Monica Police Officers Association Servpro South Bay Recycling LLC2 Southern California Concrete Producers Southwest Water Company2 Specialty Solid Waste and Recycling2 SummerHill Homes LLC2 Swinerton Management2 The Sobrato Organization2 Transtech2 Vali Cooper & Associates Inc. Vulcan Materials Company2 Waste Management2 Zero Waste Energy LLC

Partial list as of 4/2/2012


BUILT TO LAST: Charting a Path to a Sustainable Economy by Steve Sanders

California, like the rest of the nation, has been weathering a severe economic downturn that has resulted in near-record levels of unemployment, widespread home foreclosures and lost income. Local costs for safety-net programs and other essential services have grown while state and federal revenues have fallen, leading to chronic budget shortfalls and fiscal distress. Many observers believe fundamental forces are reshaping the economy and it’s unrealistic to expect the Great Recession will end with a return to “business as usual.” The loss of redevelopment as a local community development tool, coupled with the lack of public and private investment in new jobs and infrastructure, means that many communities are searching for a path to recovery that’s built to last long term. Two very different cities — San Jose, with more than 1 million residents, and Taft, with fewer than 10,000 — are remarkable examples of cities’ pioneering efforts to chart a more sustainable economic future. Although each city has approached the task in its own way, each has addressed similar questions in seeking a way forward. Local and civic leaders in both cities confronted these key questions: • What economic, demographic, environmental and fiscal trends will drive our community’s economic future? • What characteristics and assets can we build on to provide

The City of San Jose is focused on creating vibrant public places as a key to long-term prosperity.

at top and above

an economic foundation and competitive advantage for our community? • What vision for a more prosperous future will community leaders and residents from all walks of life rally around, and how can we pursue that vision? In answering these questions, each city decided to build on its existing strengths to attract and retain jobs, while making a dramatic break with the past to capitalize on some of the opportunities offered in the new economy. Their experiences provide some important lessons for communities grappling with similar challenges. continued on page 18

Steve Sanders is program director of the Institute for Local Government’s Sustainable Communities program areas of Healthy Communities and Land Use and Environment; he can be reached at <ssanders@ca-ilg.org>. For more about the Institute for Local Government, visit www.ca-ilg.org.

www.westerncity.com

Western City, May 2012

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Gonzales Grows Green: An Innovative Economic Program Gonzales is a friendly community of nearly 9,000 along the U.S. Highway 101 corridor south of Salinas in Monterey County. The city is an ethnically and economically diverse community where parks, businesses, older residential neighborhoods and newer housing developments are spread on both sides of the highway. The Gonzales City Council has adopted a community sustainability initiative built around three principles: economic viability, environmental responsibility and social equity for all. The initiative is called Gonzales Grows Green, or G3. The Challenges of Helping Diverse Businesses Increasing economic opportunity for local employers is a key focus of G3. The city is home to many small businesses with few resources to invest in planning activities or community involvement. Larger businesses in Gonzales tend to have limited time for participating in

community-based events. Consequently, city department heads and staff make regular visits to businesses as part of G3. Small businesses receive the same level of attention and assistance as larger ones. When city staff spends time with local businesses to identify opportunities for improved energy efficiency, savings and profitability, employers and employees understand they can play an important role in community sustainability. And when G3 efforts can save businesses significant amounts of money through efficiencies, they are more willing to invest part of those savings back into the community by sponsoring local events and programs.

City Manager RenĂŠ Mendez, center, represents Gonzales in the partnership opening of the Biodiesel Fueling Station with (left to right) City Council Member Liz Silva, CEO Mark S. Mitchell of Coast Oil, Gonzales Mayor Pro Tem Scott Funk and Monterey County Supervisor Simon Salinas.

G3 in Action Gonzales has assisted many local businessses through G3. One is HealthySoil, a company that develops innovative products that improve soil health and is committed to sustainable business practices. HealthySoil began as a small operation in Gonzales and subsequently

The City of Gonzales won the League Partners Award for Excellence in City-Business Relations in the 2011 Helen Putnam Award for Excellence program. For more about the award program, visit www.HelenPutnam.org.

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League of California Cities

www.cacities.org


expanded, with several regional offices. The company’s hub for training staff and clients remains in Gonzales. Working with G3, HealthySoil expanded its facility with an investment from a Community Development Block Grant and enterprise zone tax credits. HealthySoil donates excess product to help landscape areas throughout the city.

The 2012 City Hall Directory

Another local company, Converted Organics of California, started small and now distributes its all-natural fertilizer products throughout North America. Working with many partners, G3 developed a food waste diversion program whereby local schools take their food waste to Converted Organics to be returned as free fertilizer for school sites and city parks. This model zero-waste lunch program is currently being considered as a regional solution for food waste. “The relationship between Converted Organics, the City of Gonzales and the school district is a model for other communities,” says Edward J. Gildea, president of Converted Organics. “The city is an innovative partner, and the G3 program is a cutting-edge example of how business and government can work together to benefit the community.”

3 City Addresses, Phone, Fax and Websites 3 Advertisers with Products and Services

The city helps numerous businesses realize savings through recycling and waste diversion efforts. One local food processor now saves nearly $80,000 annually on waste disposal fees after working with G3 on recycling and redirecting its waste. An international winery with a local facility is now diverting between 82 and 90 percent of its waste stream from the landfill at a substantial cost savings after exploring options through G3. Gonzales is also home to biodiesel producer Energy Alternative Solutions, Inc. The company expanded with investments from Gonzales business and redevelopment agency loans, and local farmers are piloting a project to grow biodieselproducing crops. Looking to the future, Gonzales and the local air district collaborated with private industry to build a biodiesel fueling station to distribute the local fuel. In addition to benefiting from the sales tax produced through continued on page 23 www.westerncity.com

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Display Advertising

Western City magazine’s job opportunity section is the source for job seekers looking for positions in local government. When you place a job opportunity ad in Western City magazine, it will be posted at no additional charge on our website. For rates and deadlines, visit www.westerncity.com and click on the “Advertise” link.

Call Pam Maxwell-Blodgett at (800) 2621801 to place a display (boxed) ad or for rate and deadline information. Or e-mail <admanager@westerncity.com>. Website Job Postings Display ads are posted on our website at no additional charge. But if you miss the deadline for getting your job opportunity

ad into the magazine, you can post it on the Western City website right away. To post your job opportunity ad on our automated website, visit www.western city.com or contact Anita Lopez, administrative assistant; e-mail: <alopez@ cacities.org>; phone: (916) 658-8223.

Did You Miss the April Issue? Read it online at www.westerncity.com

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Exciting opportunity in the City of San Bernardino located in the heart of Southern California in between Los Angeles and Palm Springs! The City of San Bernardino invites you to apply today! Visit the City of San Bernardino website for detailed information regarding this opportunity @ www.sbcity.org

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League of California Cities

Port Attorney, Port of San Diego, CA The Port of San Diego oversees the protection and development of the San Diego Bay and the surrounding waterfront land. The Port of San Diego is now seeking a Port Attorney. The Board of Port Commissioners desires an open, direct, and accessible Port Attorney who can act decisively and courageously while remaining sensitive to matters of conflict or controversy. Candidates must possess a strong personal values system that includes integrity, compassion, humility, and unimpeachable business ethics. The demands of this position require a candidate who is versed in the legal issues of public safety; land use; real estate, complex leasing, and purchasing; and environmental law, especially CERCLA and CEQA. Candidates must possess at least 15 years of experience, with several years’ experience in working with public agencies and managing a legal team or department; Port experience is desired, but not required. Candidates must be members in good standing of the State Bar and reside in California. The salary for the Port Attorney is dependent upon qualifications and is highly competitive. If you are interested in this outstanding opportunity, please apply online at www.bobmurrayassoc.com. Please contact Bob Murray at (916) 784-9080 should you have any questions. Brochure available. Closing date May 18, 2012. phone 916•784•9080 fax 916•784•1985 www.bobmurrayassoc.com

www.cacities.org


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Director of Aurora Water City of Aurora, CO

The City of Aurora, just east of Denver, offers its 325,000 residents something for every lifestyle, from convenient urban living to master-planned communities. Acknowledged as one of the best in the country, with an annual operating budget of $135 million, a five-year capital plan of $422 million, and 422 full-time employees, Aurora Water manages the water operations, wastewater operations, utility billing, engineering, water resources, water/wastewater quality control, and storm drainage functions for the city. Bachelor’s degree required, Masters preferred with at least five years progressively responsible experience in a large utility system. Salary range is from $105,341 to $159,622 DOQ with competitive benefits.

Please send your cover letter and resume electronically to:

Peckham & McKenney apply@peckhamandmckenney.com Resumes acknowledged within two business days. Call Phil McKenney at (866) 912-1919 for more information. A detailed brochure is available at www.peckhamandmckenney.com.

Filing deadline is June 1, 2012.

Just announced...

Fire Chief City of Long Beach

Assistant Fire Chief

City Manager

City of San José

CITY OF HAWTHORNE

Incorporated in 1922, the City of Hawthorne has been proudly serving its diverse community for 90 years. The City Council is seeking a strong innovator and proven leader who is hands on and able to quickly gain a sense of community and the trust and respect of the City Council and City staff through a collaborative approach to city management. The City Manager should view and rely on Department Heads and Division Managers as resources in leading the City and developing solutions to any current and future challenges. Ideal candidates for the position will be well versed in municipal finance/budgeting, economic development, and possess a strong generalist background developed through a broad background of managing municipal operations and organizations. A detailed recruitment brochure providing further information on the position, additional requirements, and filing information can be obtained by visiting the City’s website at www.cityofhawthorne.com. Final filing date is May 24, 2012.

Photo/art credits: Page 3, antkevyv/Shutterstock; Page 6, Rozhkovs/Shutterstock; Page 7, SCOTTCHAN/Shutterstock; Page 9, Lisa S./Shutterstock; Pages 10 & 11, Filipchuk Oleg Vasiliovich/Shutterstock; Page 13, Courtesy City of San Jose;

www.westerncity.com

Fire Chief City of Palo Alto

Teri Black-Brann 310.377.2612 Steve Parker 949.322.8794 www.tbcrecruiting.com

Page 14, Courtesy City of Gonzales and League of California Cities; Page 19, Courtesy City of San Jose; Page 21, Courtesy City of Taft; Page 22, AnnaIA/Shutterstock; Page 23, Courtesy City of Gonzales and League of California Cities.

Western City, May 2012

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Built to Last: Charting a Path to a Sustainable Economy, continued from page 13

San Jose Designs an Economic Strategy to Fit the Times San Jose’s commitment to sustainable economic development can be traced to 2007, when the city adopted a “Green Vision” for the future, encompassing 10 ambitious goals to be achieved over 15 years. The J

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effort went beyond traditional “green” jobs and was notable for including measurable objectives and an annual report to chart progress. The city followed up with an updated economic development strategy in 2010 that focused on creating vibrant public places as a key to long-term prosperity.

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Fire Chief, City of Napa, CA The City of Napa, CA (population 76,900) is located 50 miles northeast of San Francisco and serves as the business and residential hub of California’s famous Napa Valley. The City is now seeking a Fire Chief to oversee the Department’s 66 full-time employees and FY 2012/2013 budget of $11 million. Napa is seeking a Fire Chief who will maintain a high level of professional standards and promote morale. A fair and impartial executive who is able to work collaboratively with a high-performing management team to support the City’s common goals and vision would do well in this position; as the Police Department and Fire Department have a shared administrative support staff, a positive working relationship between the Fire Chief and the Police Chief is paramount. Candidates must possess five years’ municipal fire service experience at the command level, including at least three years at the level of Division Chief, Deputy Chief, or Assistant Chief. A Bachelor’s Degree in Fire Science, Public or Business Administration, or related field is required; a Master’s Degree is desirable. The salary for the Fire Chief is open and is dependent upon qualifications. If you are interested in this outstanding opportunity, please apply on line at www.bobmurrayassoc.com. Please contact Mr. Bob Murray at (916) 784-9080 should you have any questions. Brochure available. Closing date May 18, 2012. phone 916•784•9080 fax 916•784•1985 www.bobmurrayassoc.com

CITY OF CHICO The vibrant, charming and artistic City of Chico offers an extraordinary quality of life and is characterized as having a special “sense of place.” Chico offers excellent schools, a safe community and endless recreational activities including the renowned Bidwell Park. The City is proud of its rich culture and established traditions enhanced by a thriving fine arts community and fine dining establishments. With a population of over 86,000 residents, the City is also home to California State University at Chico, providing an environment as a progressive learning community.

CITY MANAGER

The new City Manager will join a proud, stable and full service city operation with a total of 398 allocated full-time positions and a FY201112 General Fund of almost $43 million. City William Avery & Associates government includes eleven operating departments and the senior Management Consultants management team is talented and well respected. The City operation 1 3 /2 N. Santa Cruz Ave., Suite A enjoys a very positive and respectful relationship with its City Council. Los Gatos, CA 95030

408.399.4424 The ideal candidate will have minimum of five years of executive level Fax: 408.399.4423 management experience, preferably within a public agency along with a email: jobs@averyassoc.net Bachelor’s degree. A Master’s degree is desirable. The salary for this www.averyassoc.net position is currently under review. To apply, submit a letter of interest, resume with current salary and five work-related references (email preferred) by the recruitment close date of May 25, 2012. For additional information contact Paul Kimura at 408.399.4424. A formal job announcement is available on our website at http://www.averyassoc.net/jobs.

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Many communities are searching for a path to recovery that’s built to last long term. City leaders understand that San Jose’s economic vitality depends on positioning the city to respond to the trends that will drive the economy in the future, rather than relying on solutions based in the past. For example, in the decades prior to the current downturn, San Jose based its growth on the standard post-war suburban model: spread-out neighborhoods of detached homes for families with children, along with large shopping malls and industrial districts with light manufacturing. In a dramatic departure from this historical approach to economic development, San Jose recently adopted an ambitious General Plan to guide the future growth of the 10th-largest city in the United States. Envision San Jose 2040 builds on years of effort by local officials, civic leaders and residents. According to Kim Walesh, the city’s economic development director and chief strategist, “Envision 2040 consciously integrates environmental, fiscal, economic and social sustainability.” The economic development strategy underlying the Envision San Jose 2040 General Plan is firmly grounded in the trends shaping the city’s future. One trend is the increasing value that residents and workers place on natural resources and open space. Walesh says, “As our population increases potentially to 1.4 million people by 2040, our city’s borders will not expand. Residents want to maintain the current green belt and open space.” Consequently the city plans to capture new commercial, industrial and residential development by infilling existing areas — instead of spreading out — to maintain the quality of life that is a key element of the city’s economic competitiveness. Demographic trends also played a big part in the city’s decision to focus new economic development in higher density urban villages near transit. In the past, about half of San Jose’s households included a child younger than 18; now only www.cacities.org


vestments that have been made in transit infrastructure, providing job opportunities and strengthening the local economy in the process. The city’s economic development strategy is also intended to be fiscally sustainable. San Jose is unique among big U.S. cities

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in that it is a bedroom community with more nighttime residents than daytime employees. “Right now, servicing lowerdensity, single-family neighborhoods costs local government more than the revenue these neighborhoods bring in,” says continued

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Now open . . . TB&Co. is pleased to be recruiting Pedestrian-friendly neighborhoods that feature mixed-use development are key elements of San Jose’s planning efforts.

about a third do. Over the next 20 years, the city projects that the current supply of detached single-family housing will be sufficient to serve the smaller number of households headed by adults age 35 to 54, the prime child-rearing years. Meanwhile, new housing will be needed for the growing population of young adults age 20 to 34 who form the foundation for the Silicon Valley workforce, as well as those 55 and older who no longer need or want large homes in suburban neighborhoods. Rather than channel private and public investments into a development pattern that no longer meets future economic and demographic needs, the community that emerges as a result of the plan will be different from the single-family neighborhoods of the past. “Urban villages are active, walkable neighborhood centers where shops, restaurants, offices, and homes are located together — typically in buildings that may be two to six stories high,” says Walesh. “Envision 2040 plans for dozens of these urban villages throughout the city.” The community as a whole will benefit because “over time, we can refresh older retail areas and strip malls into more lively, interesting places,” adds Walesh. This will position San Jose to take advantage of major inwww.westerncity.com

City Managers City of Hermosa Beach City of Los Banos Teri Black-Brann • 310.377.2612 Carolyn Seeley • 949.487.7606 www.tbcrecruiting.com

City Manager

City of Cupertino, CA The City of Cupertino (population 55,000) is located against the foothills of the Santa Cruz Mountain range at the west end of the world famous Silicon Valley. Rich in economy, culture, and diversity, Cupertino is committed to becoming a model multicultural community for the 21st century. Appointed by the five-member Council, the City Manager will oversee a staff of 160 and $67.4 million operating budget. Proven experience in municipal finance/budgeting, economic development, and land use as well as communication and collaboration in a diverse community is desired. Bachelor’s degree in public or business administration or related field required; Master’s preferred. Salary is DOQ.

Please send your cover letter and resume electronically to:

Peckham & McKenney apply@peckhamandmckenney.com Resumes acknowledged within two business days. Call Bobbi Peckham at (866) 912-1919 for more information. A detailed brochure is available at www.peckhamandmckenney.com.

Filing deadline is June 11, 2012.

Western City, May 2012

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Built to Last: Charting a Path to a Sustainable Economy, continued

Walesh. The future development planned for the city, with a mix of commercial and retail development and compact housing in areas with good walking, bicycling and transit options, will strengthen local finances, reinforcing the economic attraction of San Jose as a place to do business.

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Taft Builds on Community Assets The City of Taft demonstrates that small towns, as well as big cities, can plan for an economic future that incorporates sustainability. Located in the hills at the southwestern edge of Kern County, Taft R T

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The City of Salinas

Fire Chief The City of Salinas, population 150,300 is located fifteen miles inland from Monterey Bay. The City is seeking a strong and committed Fire Chief who will provide exceptional management of the Fire Department/Fire Prevention Bureau. The ideal candidate will be a fair and ethical leader and be willing to make decisions for the greater good of the Department and the Community. The incoming Chief should be creative, innovative, open to technology and be collaborative with outside agencies. Candidates should have experience in labor management negotiations, strategic planning, succession planning, and community outreach. Ideally, the selected candidate will provide clear direction, establish measurable goals and hold staff accountable for achieving results. A Bachelor’s Degree in Fire Science, Business Administration, Public Administration or related field, and seven years of responsible administrative experience in fire service. Fire Chief experience highly desirable. The salary range for the Fire Chief is $156,276 - $189,972 before a 13% concession. To apply, please visit the CalOpps website at www.calopps.org. A complete application packet includes a City Employment Application AND Resume. If you have any questions, please contact City of Salinas, Human Resources Department at (831) 758-7417. Filing Deadline: May 24, 2012 by 5:30 p.m.

City Attorney, City of Orange, CA The City of Orange, with a population of 138,640 is situated in Central Orange County, approximately 32 miles southeast of Los Angeles. The City is seeking a City Attorney with a broad range of municipal government. The ideal candidate must be politically astute yet apolitical when dealing with land use, planning issues, and labor/employee relations. The selected candidate must possess a thorough understanding of legal issues and trends confronting California cities and demonstrate the ability to work cooperatively and effectively with elected officials, City employees and the public. The ideal candidate must be comfortable in serving as a legal counsel and advisor to the City Council, providing sound legal advice, and must be able to perform their work with creativity, good judgment and sensitivity. The ideal candidate will have a J.D. from an accredited law school and be licensed to practice law in California. The salary for the City Attorney is open and is dependent upon qualifications. The City also offers an attractive benefits package. If you are interested in this outstanding opportunity, please apply online at www.bobmurrayassoc.com. Please contact Mr. Bob Murray at (916) 784-9080 should you have any questions. Brochure available. Closing date May 18, 2012. phone 916•784•9080 fax 916•784•1985 www.bobmurrayassoc.com

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began as an oil town and still relies on petroleum extraction as a mainstay of the local economy. Taft may seem an unlikely place to embrace sustainability, but community leaders realized that they needed to engage in creative thinking to secure a stable economic future. Perhaps the most creative economic development initiative is the community’s vision to transform Taft from a 20th century oil town to a 21st century energy city. Building on local expertise in the energy business, Taft is promoting biofuels research, development and manufacturing and welcoming solar energy. Taft was the first Kern County community to join Pacific Gas and Electric’s “ClimateSmart” program, which focused on reducing greenhouse gas emissions. Taft also participates in the Institute for Local Government’s Beacon Award program (www.ca-ilg.org/BeaconAward), which recognizes cities and counties that reduce greenhouse gas emissions and save energy, adopt policies and programs to address climate change, and promote sustainability. As part of Taft’s commitment to sustainability, it has retrofitted city facilities with solar panels and energy-saving improvements, and the city is working to attract solar-industry manufacturers. With fewer than 10,000 residents, Taft faces growth pressures that are the opposite of those facing San Jose. Taft’s daytime population swells with 20,000 oil workers commuting in from Bakersfield and surrounding communities. “We didn’t experience the housing boom or the housing bust,” says Paul Gorte, the city’s planning director. This sets Taft apart from many other Central Valley communities. The city is using minimum zoning densities and other tools to create a mix of housing to attract some of these commuters to live in Taft, thereby buttressing the city’s retail businesses and tax base. Taft is also making creative use of its other economic, natural and historic assets. The city chose to become the successor to the local redevelopment agency, and a large portion of the redevelopment area is under contract for development. Taft and

www.cacities.org


More Resources Online For additional information and links to related resources, read the online version of this article at www.westerncity.com.

The City of Taft, above, has long depended on petroleum, as evidenced by its monument to oil workers, left, but is now planning for green industry opportunities.

Kern County operate a joint enterprise zone as well as an economic development joint powers authority. The city is capitalizing on nearby natural resources, such as the pristine Carrizo Plain National Monument to the west, to appeal to the growing ecotourism industry. Taft is also promoting its location for the manufacture and transport of LEED-certified products and materials; products shipped from Taft to San Francisco, Los Angeles and San Diego have a smaller carbon footprint than those shipped directly between the state’s major urban centers. In these and many other ways, Taft is striving to capitalize on the community’s assets and seize economic opportunities through a long-term vision for sustainable development.

Looking to the Future The paths that diverse cities like San Jose and Taft are taking to create a sustainable future for their residents also position these communities to prosper in a highly competitive national and global marketplace. By pioneering viable approaches to economic development that incorporate sustainability principles and are built to last, these communities and others like them may well have a significant impact on California’s place in the national and global economy for years to come. n

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El Dorado Hills Community Services District, CA El Dorado Hills is nestled along Highway 50 in the lower Sierra Nevada foothills only 25 miles from Sacramento and 75 miles from Lake Tahoe. The District operates as a form of local government delivering Recreation, Parks, Street Lighting and Landscaping, CC&R Enforcement/Design Review, Solid Waste Collection, and Telecommunication (Cable TV) services. With a 2012 budget (operating and capital) of approximately $9.8 million, 31 benefited employees, and 102 part-time employees, the District serves a population of 38,650. Bachelor’s degree required, Masters preferred with at least seven years of management experience in a municipal or community services district setting. Salary range is up to $145,594 DOQ with competitive benefits.

Please send your cover letter and resume electronically to:

Peckham & McKenney apply@peckhamandmckenney.com Resumes acknowledged within two business days. Call Phil McKenney at (866) 912-1919 for more information. A detailed brochure is available at www.peckhamandmckenney.com.

Filing deadline is May 28, 2012.

Director of Public Works CITY OF LAWNDALE, CA The City of Lawndale is currently recruiting for the position of Director of Public Works. Under the direction of the City Manager, the Director of Public Works is responsible for supervising, planning, organizing, directing and administering the activities and operations of the Public Works Department, including engineering and inspections, building, grounds and street maintenance, and graffiti. The ideal candidate will have a minimum of five (5) to six (6) years experience in public works administration and/ or engineering, including at least two (2) years experience in a supervisory capacity. Graduation from an accredited college of university with a Bachelor’s degree in public administration, business administration, civil engineering or a related field. A Master’s degree in public administration and licensed professional engineers (P.E.) desirable. For a complete job description and application, please visit our website, www.lawndalecity.org. CLOSING DATE: May 17, 2012

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Creating Economic Development at the Local Level, continued from page 11

The Road Ahead Even with the approval of the new economic development ordinance, the city’s leaders recognize that the road ahead will not be an easy one, especially as Alhambra winds down its redevelopment agency operations. While implementing a new

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economic development program in a post-redevelopment agency world is sure to present challenges, it will also certainly provide opportunities. Going forward, cities must remain steadfast and unified in building alliances by working with the League and the

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a variety of tools may be used to finance new development projects.

Human Resources Manager/Assistant to the City Manager, City of Patterson, CA The City of Patterson, population 21,251, is located along the I-5 corridor a short distance from both the Bay Area and Modesto. Under the general direction of the City Manager, the Human Resources Manager is the principal assistant responsible for managing the City administrative functions including human resources, labor relations and special projects. Additionally, the position advises and makes recommendations to the City Manager on matters related to personnel and provides similar advice to City staff while ensuring the city’s operations are compliant with city, state, and federal personnel rules, regulations and policies. The ideal candidate must be detail oriented with outstanding follow through. An individual with strong technical knowledge in the human resources field and the ability to stay current with changing laws will be essential for the selected candidate. The ideal candidate will be approachable, engaging, and committed to creating an open atmosphere where ideas and feedback are encouraged, supported, and valued. A Bachelor’s degree from an accredited college or university with major course work in human resources, business/public administration or a related field is required, as well as five years of increasingly responsible experience in human resources or a related field, preferably in the public sector including three years of administrative and supervisory responsibility. The salary is $76,836-$93,396 annually and is DOQ; the City also offers an attractive benefits package. If you are interested in this outstanding opportunity, please apply on line at www.bobmurrayassoc.com. Please contact Mr. Wesley Herman at (916) 784-9080 should you have any questions. Brochure available. Closing date May 18, 2012.

phone 916•784•9080 fax 916•784•1985 www.bobmurrayassoc.com

City Manager City of La Palma, CA

Enjoying a rating in the Top 16 of “Best Places to Live” by Money Magazine, Orange County’s smallest city of La Palma (pop. 16,000) enjoys a small town character and strong sense of community pride within the greater metropolitan area. Appointed by the five-member Council, the City Manager will oversee a staff of 65 and total budget of $9.5 million in this fullservice city. Proven local government experience in a leadership position with strong working knowledge of municipal finance/budgeting, economic development, and community outreach is desired. Bachelor’s degree in public or business administration or related field is required; Master’s degree preferred. Salary is DOQ.

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Please send your cover letter and resume electronically to:

Peckham & McKenney apply@peckhamandmckenney.com Resumes acknowledged within two business days. Call Bobbi Peckham at (866) 912-1919 for more information. A detailed brochure is available at www.peckhamandmckenney.com.

Filing deadline is May 31, 2012.

California Redevelopment Association to appeal to the Legislature and Gov. Brown to develop a statewide economic development program and strategy. Perseverance and creative thinking are key in the effort to reinvent local economic development. Cities can use this opportunity to devise innovative, sound alternatives to finance development projects that will ultimately generate new investment and jobs in their communities and promote sustainability and resiliency when new challenges arise. n

www.cacities.org


Gonzales Grows Green: An Innovative Economic Program, continued from page 15

Increasing economic opportunity for local employers is a key focus.

fuel sales, the city negotiated an innovative revenue-sharing arrangement with Energy Alternative Solutions, Inc., which provides additional revenues to help fund essential local services. Gonzales receives regular inquiries from companies seeking new opportunities, as a result of referrals from existing businesses. Local businesses indicate satisfaction with the partnerships the city has fostered. Mike Kennedy of Green Valley Farm Supply says, “I’m very pleased with the G3 effort. Gonzales has made the extra effort to assist our business. When we’re asked to sponsor local events, there is no hesitation on our part because of the reciprocal effort.”

focuses on sustainability, builds trust and understanding and helps all businesses regardless of size.

Through G3’s sustainability efforts, Gonzales businesses perceive local government as a partner and provider of helpful services rather than simply a regulator. Gonzales offers an excellent model of an economic development program that P

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Melissa Ortner, food safety manager for Taylor Farms, reviews a business response plan with Michael Lechman, a Gonzales city building official.

Contact: Harold Wolgamott, emergency services director/special projects analyst; phone: (831) 594-8101; e-mail: <hwolgamott@ ci.gonzales.ca.us>. n

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Congratulations Monrovia!

Proving again there are infinite ways to improve a city’s quality of life, Monrovia augmented its existing Environmental Accords to fulfill the California Green Communities’ challenge, meeting its 2013 goal more than a year ahead of schedule. Going Green Gets The Silver — For A City With So Much To Be Proud Of! Monrovia has reduced its per capita water use 10.7 percent from 2008 with the help of increased public education and free water audits completed by the City’s Utilities staff in its Water 4 Life conservation program. These conservation efforts are helping protect the City’s water supply AND saving energy as they pump less water from City wells up to hillside reservoirs. “As we rebuild the economy locally and nationally, we must do so in ways that are sustainable. The focus should be on creating new jobs and improving our environment while decreasing our long-term costs. Monrovia’s Silver certification is a great example of our commitment to being a leader and advocate for both.” — Monrovia Mayor May Ann Lutz

To learn more, log on to www.cagreencom.org California Green Communities is a registered trademark of USA Green Communities, Inc., a non-profit corporation Pictured: Monrovia Public Library in beautiful Liberty Park, Monrovia, California

May 2012  

Economic Development Issue

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