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The Monthly Magazine of the League of California Cities

Redevelopment: See It Work p.13 Make Your Voice Heard p.4 Economic Development & Sustainability p.8

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CONTENTS 2

Calendar of League Events

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Executive Director’s Message

13

By John F. Shirey

What’s the Measure of a City’s Success?

Redevelopment revitalizes local economies and puts people to work.

By Chris McKenzie Economic development is city officials’ number one job.

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City Forum

Legislative Action Days: Make Your Voice Heard Local officials come together for this event to show strength in numbers.

News from the Institute for Local Government

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Using Economic Development to Support Sustainability By Steve Sanders Cities can pursue sustainability and a strong local economy by attracting the right kinds of investments.

California Cities Helen Putnam Award for Excellence Lancaster’s Economic Stimulus Package Pays Dividends 19

Stories provide a compelling way for local officials to convey key information.

Sustainable Cities

Declaring a State of Emergency: What You Need to Know Declaring a state of emergency is an essential step for local governments dealing with disasters.

The Value of Sharing Your Agency’s Story

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Legal Notes

By Joan L. Cassman and Cecilia M. Quick

By Eva Spiegel

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How Redevelopment Works for California’s Communities

Beaumont’s Economic Stimulus Program Produces Results 20

21

Job Opportunities

27

Professional Services Directory On the Cover: Courthouse Square, Redwood City Photo: Jerry Pierce

Register Now for the League’s Annual Conference! The League of California Cities 2011 Annual Conference & Expo will be held Sept. 21–23, in San Francisco. Visit www.cacities.org/AC for program information and to register online.


President Jim Ridenour Mayor Modesto

1400 K Street Sacramento, CA 95814 (916) 658-8200 Fax (916) 658-8240

First Vice President Michael Kasperzak Council Member Mountain View

Second Vice President Bill Bogaard Mayor Pasadena

Immediate Past President Judy Mitchell Council Member Rolling Hills Estates

Executive Director Chris McKenzie

For a complete list of the League Board of Directors, visit www.cacities.org/board.

leaguevents

Magazine Staff Editor in Chief Jude Hudson (916) 658-8234 e-mail: <editor@westerncity.com> Managing Editor Eva Spiegel (916) 658-8228 e-mail: <espiegel@cacities.org>

May

4–6

City Attorneys Spring Conference, Fish Camp This meeting covers the latest trends and issues affecting public law practitioners.

Advertising Sales Manager Pam Maxwell-Blodgett (916) 658-8256 e-mail: <maxwellp@cacities.org> Classified/Website Advertising and Subscriptions Sara Rounds (916) 658-8223 e-mail: <info@westerncity.com> Contributors Dan Carrigg Tracy Petrillo Kelly Plag JoAnne Speers Adrienne Sprenger

18 – 20 Legislative Action Days and Advanced Leadership Workshops, Sacramento City officials attending these events get updates on key legislative issues that impact cities.

19 – 20 Board of Directors Meeting, Sacramento The League board reviews, discusses and takes action on a variety of issues affecting cities, including legislation, legal advocacy, education and training, and more.

Associate Editors Carol Malinowski Carolyn Walker Design Pat Davis Design Group, Inc.

June

16 – 17 Western City (ISSN 0279-5337) is published monthly by the League of California Cities, 1400 K St., Sacramento, CA 95814. Subscriptions: $39.00/1 year; $63.00/2 years; student: $26.50; foreign: $52.00; single copies: $4.00, including sales tax. Entered as periodical mail January 30, 1930, at the Post Office, Los Angeles, CA 90013, under the Act of April 13, 1879. Periodical postage paid at Sacramento, Calif.

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FSC is an independent, not-for-profit organization that promotes environmentally appropriate, socially beneficial and economically viable forest management worldwide. Products with the FSC label are independently certified to ensure that they come from forests managed to meet the needs of present and future generations.

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17 Legal Advocacy Committee Meeting, Sacramento The committee reviews cases and recommends friend-of-the-court efforts on cases of significant statewide interest to California cities.

July

21 – 22 Board of Directors Meeting, Long Beach The League board reviews, discusses and takes action on a variety of issues affecting cities, including legislation, legal advocacy, education and training, and more.

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Postmaster: Send address changes to Western City, 1400 K Street, Sacramento, CA 95814. Western City Trademark Reg. U.S. Pat. Off. ©2011 League of California Cities. All rights reserved. Material may not be reprinted without written permission. This issue is Volume LXXXVII, No. 5.

Policy Committee Meetings, Sacramento The League’s policy committees review issues of interest to cities statewide and make recommendations to the League board of directors.

League of California Cities

Event and registration information is available at www.cacities.org/events. For the latest information on League conferences and events follow us on Twitter @CaCitiesLearn. For legislative and policy updates and more, follow @CaCities. Join Us on Facebook! www.facebook.com/westerncity www.facebook.com/LeagueofCaCities www.cacities.org


Executive Director’s Message by Chris McKenzie

What’s the Measure of a City’s Success? R

SELF-ACTUALIZATION

iverside Mayor Ron Loveridge and I recently participated in a panel discussion about Governor Brown’s illegal proposal to

eliminate redevelopment agencies and divert the funds to finance

ESTEEM NEEDS

the state budget. In his defense of redevelopment, Mayor Loveridge (who is also a past president of the League and the National

SOCIAL NEEDS

League of Cities) made the excellent point that city leaders’ number one job is to help make their city economically suc-

SAFETY NEEDS

cessful. He explained the importance of redevelopment in creating jobs, removing blight, reducing crime and fire hazards and enhancing the overall quality of life.

Because most of the observers of the panel discussion were not city officials, Mayor Loveridge’s assertion that economic development is city officials’ number one job may have struck them as odd. Most non-city officials often think that city officials are focused on public safety, water, parks, libraries, trash removal and so on. They do focus on those things, of course, and many of their communications with constituents are related to these services. However, it might surprise many city residents to learn that city officials are also thinking about and planning how to build a stronger local economy. The reason for this emphasis on a healthy economy is very simple. Its importance for cities is perhaps best understood when viewed in the context of psychologist Abraham Maslow’s hierarchy of needs. Maslow developed this concept in 1943 to explain human motivation, and it is often shown as a pyramid (see above right), with physiological needs — what we need for human survival (air, water, food, shelter and clothing) — being the most basic. Not surprisingly, these are the needs that are best met with the most basic economic requirement — a living wage from a decent job. That’s why having the right jobs in the right location means so much to city leaders. It also means that city leaders often view everything they do through a filter of whether it affects the supply of jobs that pay a living wage in or near the city. People with jobs pay taxes that finance a wide range of essential public services, which help meet their safety needs and other needs further up the pyramid’s hierarchy. Employed city residents pay taxes that finance services from the federal, state and local governments for both the employed resident and those who are less fortunate.

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PHYSIOLOGICAL NEEDS

MAS LO W'S HI E R AR C HY O F N E E DS C H A R T

Harvard Professor of Economics Edward Glaeser supports this perspective in his new book Triumph of the City. Glaeser argues that cities are essential to economic success and innovation because they attract talented workers, offer the opportunity for face-to-face interaction and competition among these workers and provide social and economic mobility for those who engage and succeed. He also makes the case that cities are good for the environment by reducing the human footprint on land, the number of vehicle trips and the attendant carbon emissions associated with living in a less dense setting. So if city leaders seem passionate about what redevelopment can do to create and retain quality jobs in their city, you understand they came by it rationally, legitimately and justifiably. As we are often reminded, employed people need fewer public services and tend to provide their own housing. Similarly, redeveloped neighborhoods have less crime and fewer 911 calls, generate more revenue to pay for quality public services and provide opportunities to meet our other psychological needs for social interaction, self-esteem and, ultimately, self-actualization. Cities are the most human of institutions, and their success is tied inextricably to their economic success. No further explanation is needed for why redevelopment is the most important economic development tool in our state and critically important to the success of city leaders in providing for their residents. We hope our state partners will come to appreciate that it is of equal importance to the success of our state — because, as we know, you can’t have a strong state economy without strong local economies. n Western City, May 2011

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Legislative Action Days: Make Your Voice Heard by Eva Spiegel One of the most powerful ways to make your city’s voice heard happens this month in Sacramento. The League’s Legislative Action Days, May 18–20, offers briefings from League staff on the year’s most pressing legislative issues, updates from the governor’s administration and the Legislature, time to meet with your legislators and other state officials, and much more. This three-day event provides a unique opportunity for California cities to come together, learn from experts and talk with state lawmakers and officials about how their decisions at the state level affect local communities. Legislative Action Days open on Wednesday, May 18, with a General Session where League Executive Director Chris McKenzie, Legislative Director Dan Carrigg and others will discuss current budget issues and legislation of critical importance to cities. Legislators and representatives from Gov. Jerry Brown’s administration have also been invited. City officials will meet with their legislators in the Capitol during the afternoon, followed by a special session on bank partnerships and community investment strategies for your city. Be sure to invite your legislators to the Legislative Reception, 5:30–7:00 p.m. at the Sheraton, or schedule dinner with them that evening or a breakfast meeting the following morning. Taking advantage of these formal and informal opportuni-

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League of California Cities

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ties with your representatives can help strengthen your city’s lobbying efforts. Legislative Action Days culminate on Thursday with the Advanced Leadership Workshop, which is limited to 75 pre-registered attendees. The seven-hour workshop is strategically designed to prepare council members to work together and problem-solve more effectively. The League will use Facebook and Twitter during these events to inform members and the public about the important work under way. Staff will tweet from the briefings and provide links to more information on the League website. Follow the League on Twitter @cacities and on its Facebook page by visiting www.Facebook. com/LeagueofCaCities. Getting the latest information directly from the source at Legislative Action Days and using it in lobbying meetings with your state representatives give your city an extra edge. Lobbying for your city is always an important activity, but something extraordinary happens when the entire League membership is present. City officials come together for this event to show strength in numbers as they flood the Capitol. When you are part of a unified effort behind a single issue — the needs of California cities — the impact is magnified. Such an effort amplifies the voice you raise on behalf of your city. Don’t miss this opportunity to be heard. Find the event’s full agenda on the League’s website at www.cacities.org/events. n

Eva Spiegel is communications director for the League and can be reached at <espiegel@cacities.org>.

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News from the Institute for Local Government

The Value of Sharing Your Agency’s Story One of the “indispensable competencies” for local government leaders is the ability to communicate through stories, according to Frank Benest, former city manager of Palo Alto and consultant to local governments. Benest uses storytelling as a tool to help local officials with strategic decision-making, because stories provide a compelling way to convey who you are and where you are going.

Consultant Frank Benest emphasizes the value of using stories and anecdotes to explain and explore community priorities.

storytelling. ILG’s Public Engagement and Collaborative Governance program provides resources that support effective and inclusive community involvement in local agency decision-making. Visit www. ca-ilg.org/PEtopic to read about such efforts in the areas of: • Planning, housing and redevelopment; • Public works; • Human services; • Health and the environment;

The Institute for Local Government (ILG) website offers more than 200 community stories that highlight best practices, innovative local action and new policies implemented by local agencies in California. These stories can encourage, inspire and share lessons learned. In today’s era of fiscal austerity, such stories can also help to avoid reinventing the wheel. Take Advantage of These Online Resources

For example, ILG’s Sustainable Communities program provides resources and education for local officials in the areas of climate change, healthy communities, land use and the environment. In this context, community stories demonstrate the breadth of local agency activities and provide examples of how to play a leadership role in protecting and improving community health through planning and land use (www.ca-ilg.org/landuse).

In the area of reducing greenhouse gas emissions, ILG offers best practice stories related to:

• Climate change;

• Energy efficiency and conservation;

• SB 375; and

• Water and wastewater systems;

• Day labor centers.

• Green building;

In addition, many helpful stories are available at www.ca-ilg.org/budgetingstories about the different approaches local officials throughout California are using to engage the public in budgeting.

• Waste reduction and recycling; • Climate-friendly purchasing; • Renewable energy and low-carbon fuels; • Efficient transportation; • Land use and community design; • Open space and offsetting carbon emissions; and • Promoting community and individual action. Find these stories at www.ca-ilg.org/ ClimatePractices. Local agency efforts in public engagement are another natural avenue for

www.westerncity.com

• Emergency preparedness;

Lead by Example

ILG strives to promote good government at the local level and encourages all local agencies to lead by example and tell their stories. As Harvard Professor Howard Gardner said, “Stories are the single most powerful weapon in a leader’s arsenal.” ILG’s stories are also told in video format. If you would like to share your agency’s story, either in print or video, contact Kelly Plag, director of communications and development, ILG; e-mail: <kplag@ ca-ilg.org> or visit www.ca-ilg.org. n Western City, May 2011

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Using

Economic Development to

Support Sustainability by Steve Sanders The question of how to make cities more sustainable is an ongoing issue for local officials. Sustainable communities are places that foster and maintain a high quality of life. This requires a strong local economy that provides all residents with the opportunity to share in prosperity and enjoy the benefits of a clean environment. A healthy local economy also helps to ensure the fiscal health of the community’s public agencies.

Riverbank used a water theme as part of its new gateway to the city and as a major feature in its plaza, a popular spot for community events, right.

left

One way that cities can pursue sustainability and a strong local economy is by attracting the right kinds of investments that will help them develop and revitalize commercial and residential neighborhoods. Some of the characteristics of sustainable community development include: • Places with a healthy mix of jobs, housing and retail options and a diverse tax base; • Neighborhoods that are stable, attractive, safe and convenient for pedestrians and bicyclists; • Communities that offer residents and workers transportation choices, such as retail and employment centers that capitalize on transit investments and services; and

• Access to parks, open space and a clean natural environment for all their residents. Throughout California, communities are implementing a variety of strategies to help strengthen their local economies. While these strategies are tailored to fit the unique needs of each community, one common approach is to revitalize historic town centers as economic hubs and focal points of community life. The following examples illustrate how two very different cities are working to strengthen the local economy in ways that support sustainability. Riverbank (pop. 22,201) is small and rural, with a median family income of $79,940 and per capita income of $20,342. Pleasanton (pop. 70,711) is suburban and more affluent,

Steve Sanders is program director of the Institute for Local Government’s Land Use and Healthy Neighborhoods programs and can be reached at <ssanders@ca-ilg.org>. For more about the programs, visit www.ca-ilg.org/sustainability.

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League of California Cities

www.cacities.org


with a median family income of $139,282 and per capita income of $50,515.

Riverbank Capitalizes on Historic Downtown Like many other small cities in the San Joaquin Valley and elsewhere in California, Riverbank is working to address the challenge of preserving its small-town character in an era of shrinking financial resources and mounting pressure to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Riverbank’s updated General Plan features several specific strategies for supporting pedestrian, bicycle and other non-automobile modes of travel as well as increasing street “connectivity” — the frequency with which streets or roads intersect. Other strategies include requiring bike racks and pedestrian improvements in commercial development projects; siting buildings toward the front of lots, with parking on the side or in back; and planting street trees to improve the comfort and appearance of sidewalks and streets. The city used these strategies in its extensive efforts to revitalize Riverbank’s aging central district. Riverbank completed a major beautification of its historic downtown area in late 2009, investing about $9 million in redevelopment funds to make improvements to the district. The project covered an area four blocks by three blocks, centered on the main downtown intersection of Santa Fe Avenue and Third Street. Underground improvements included new water, sewage and drainage infrastructure. Overhead power and phone lines were moved underground to improve the area’s aesthetic appeal. Riverbank also implemented a number of streetscaping measures to improve safety, slow traffic and facilitate pedestrian and bicycle travel. These included: • Widening sidewalks to nearly twice the original width; • Adding new curbs and gutters; • Installing a new landscaped median along several blocks of Third Street to slow traffic and improve the look of the street; and

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Western City, May 2011

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Using Economic Development to Support Sustainability, continued

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• Providing angled parking along several streets in the project area to better serve downtown businesses. In addition, the city installed bike racks on every corner and added benches throughout the area. Colorful murals and brick accents in street and sidewalk paving add visual interest, and extensive new landscaping increases shade throughout downtown — an especially welcome amenity in the hot Central Valley summers. A new plaza at the main intersection added the final touch to the beautification project, providing an attractive gathering place for residents and visitors. Since the project was completed, five new businesses have opened downtown, creating about 30 jobs and generating new sales tax revenues for the city. Riverbank launched a second project that used about $200,000 in redevelopment funds to engineer and design the architecture for a waterfall entryway to the downtown area and install landscaping on the Highway 108 overcrossing above a rail line.

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League of California Cities

In conjunction with these efforts, Riverbank established a business improvement district. This public-private partnership comprises local business owners, who assess themselves a fee to pay for ongoing improvements, promotions and marketing to draw visitors to the downtown area. As part of its downtown improvements, Riverbank also completed a third project in March 2011: a teen center two blocks from the main downtown intersection and adjacent to the community center. The teen center used $220,000 in redevelopment funds for initial funding, which represented about 20 percent of the total project cost. Other funding sources included Proposition 98 grant funds and about $100,000 raised by local teens. The center offers teens access to computers and study space, pingpong tables, video games, a small gym and some open space. Riverbank’s downtown revitalization efforts won an award from the San Joaquin Valley Blueprint Awards Program in 2010.

www.cacities.org


Residents gather for the Grand Opening of Riverbank’s plaza.

Pleasanton Plans for Economic Health

to encourage longer shopping trips.” In other words, Pleasanton has found that planning for sustainability can also make the city more competitive in attracting retail investors. Pleasanton has worked to create a thriving retail, cultural and entertainment hub downtown through a mix of public and private investments. One recent project,

the Firehouse Arts Center, illustrates Pleasanton’s economic development strategies and efforts to create a sustainable city. The Firehouse Arts Center, which the city owns and manages, is a cultural arts center in a rehabbed, formerly vacant firehouse located one block off Main Street. This continued on page 26

The City of Pleasanton, located in the east San Francisco Bay Area, adopted an updated General Plan in 2005 that for the first time included an economic and fiscal element to help guide the city’s development. This element helped focus city leaders’ attention on economic trends, opportunities to foster job growth and business development, and the potential impact of planning decisions on the city’s revenues and expenditures. The city followed up with an Economic Development Strategic Plan in 2007. The strategic plan outlined the city’s economic strengths, challenges and opportunities and established six economic development goals: 1. Maintain and expand Pleasanton’s economy;

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2. Maintain and enhance Pleasanton’s fiscal revenues; 3. Promote tourism, cultural and recreational activities; 4. Strengthen Pleasanton’s retail and entertainment sector; 5. Increase housing opportunities for Pleasanton’s work force and residents; and 6. Integrate economic development, land use, and transportation decisions to create a sustainable city. The plan noted that “while Pleasanton has a full complement of retail facilities, much of it is … in an auto-oriented configuration that is becoming increasingly obsolete on a national scale. Many national retailers are now seeking a more pedestrian-oriented lifestyle setting for their stores, with outdoor cafes, unobtrusive parking solutions and a mix of uses either within the retail center or nearby

www.westerncity.com

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Redevelopment played a key role in financing and building these projects. top left Redwood City’s Courthouse Square transformed a stagnant downtown area into a lively plaza that draws thousands of visitors to cultural events. top right Burbank’s Peyton-Grismer Revitalization Project refurbished dilapidated homes, built an Activity and Family Resource Center and cut crime by 50 percent in the past five years. Residents now enjoy a safe neighborhood. at right The Fresno Community Regional Medical Center, a publicprivate partnership, created jobs for 1,000 new employees and was a catalyst for public-private investment in the downtown area. inset Residents of all ages, including these prematurely born twins, benefit from the center’s expanded services.

National City, in San Diego County, turned a brownfield site into an urban college campus that also anchors a fire station, Police Department and 20,000 feet of commercial space.

below right

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League of California Cities

www.cacities.org


How Redevelopment Works for California’s Communities

by John F. Shirey

Redevelopment works. It works to create jobs, build affordable housing, clean up contaminated properties, reduce crime, build and improve public infrastructure, and create a sense of place and community.

Redevelopment works for California’s communities in these ways and more. That’s why it’s worth fighting to preserve this time-tested tool that revitalizes local economies and puts people to work throughout the state. According to research conducted by Time Structures, Inc., redevelopment activities support more than 300,000 full- and part-time private sector jobs in a typical year, including 170,000-plus construction jobs. Redevelopment also contributes more than $40 billion annually to California’s economy in the generation of goods and services, and it increases the state’s annual construction sector output by about $19 billion. And finally, redevelopment construction activities generate more than $2 billion in state and local taxes in a typical year. Throughout California, 399 active redevelopment agencies are implementing economic development-related projects in 749 project areas. These agencies are dedicated to revitalizing run-down neighborhoods and restoring vitality to tired downtowns. Increasingly, they are

investing dollars in infill, transit-oriented developments and green buildings, as part of an overall statewide effort to reduce vehicle miles traveled and conserve natural resources. Redevelopment agencies leverage their funding to clean up brownfields (land contaminated by hazardous substances or pollutants) and make communities healthier. All of these investments support jobs and economic growth, which in turn produce tax revenues. The following examples illustrate how redevelopment works in California’s local communities. Redevelopment Creates Jobs

The Fresno Community Regional Medical Center expansion — a 58-acre, $350 million project — was the first major private development launched in the city’s downtown in decades. It is a unique partnership between the medical center, the Fresno Redevelopment Agency, the city and county and the University of San Francisco Medical Program.

The medical center is the largest private employer in the Fresno area, with 4,500 employees. The expansion created jobs for more than 1,000 new employees, and plans are under way to add another 320 employees. Most of the new positions are for registered nurses and clinical technicians. The medical center expansion resulted in upgrades and improvements to existing buildings, streets and infrastructure. This development “primed the pump” for public-private investment in the downtown area for additional medical buildings, professional and commercial offices, retail stores and restaurants. The Fresno Community Regional Medical Center is home to the second-largest emergency room in California and also one of the busiest. Redevelopment Revitalizes Communities

The Education Village project encompasses four square blocks of downtown National City in San Diego County. The project area was previously a deteriorating, continued

John F. Shirey is executive director of the California Redevelopment Association and can be reached at <jshirey@calredevelop.org>. www.westerncity.com

Western City, May 2011

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How Redevelopment Works for Californiaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Communities, continued

blighted and vandalized brownfield site. The National City Community Development Commission partnered with several public entities and private developers to transform the site into an urban college campus, which is now home to Southwestern College and the San Diego County Office of Education. The campus also includes 20,000 square feet of commercial space with outdoor patios, cafes and shops. Education Village serves as the anchor for numerous development projects, including a state-of-the-art library, fire station and Police Department, along with a proposed community art center and community theatre. The project helped transform a formerly crumbling area of downtown National City into a vital urban core by providing the community and its low-income residents with convenient access to affordable education. Redevelopment Builds Sustainable, Transit-Oriented Communities

The Contra Costa Centre Transit Village is a sustainable, mixed-use transit-oriented development that includes a network of parks, plazas, open spaces, public art displays and affordable housing for very low-income households. Located in an unincorporated area of Walnut Creek in the east San Francisco Bay Area, the transit village is the product of a successful partnership between the Contra Costa County Redevelopment Agency, the Bay Area Rapid Transit District (BART) and a developer. Today, more than 7,000 employees, 6,000 BART riders and 6,000 residents use the transit village. Its Green Sweep program provides free use of Segways and Smart Cars to people in the area who need to run errands or attend meetings. The Contra Costa Centre Transit Village offers a prime example of how redevelopment, transit and sustainable development work together to creatively build better communities. Four properties within the transit village have secured or are awaiting LEED certification. A fifth property earned a large business sustainability award

in 2009 from Sustainable Contra Costa, a nonprofit organization focused on increasing local sustainability efforts. Redevelopment Cleans Up Contaminated Areas

The Pacific States Steel Corporation project, located in the east San Francisco Bay Area community of Union City, encompassed 60 acres of environmentally contaminated land that lacked infrastructure, roads, drainage and utilities. The Union City Redevelopment Agency, which was formed specifically for this project, began cleaning up the site in 1988 after the abandoned property had been in ruins for a decade. Following the cleanup, the redevelopment agency played a lead role in the construction of 119 single-family homes and 216 multifamily units, with 30 of the multifamily units reserved as affordable for low- and moderate-income families. The new development spurred the cleanup of more than 30 acres of adjacent property as well. The project stimulated transit-oriented development, resulting in 1,988 new housing units and 2,100 new jobs within a quarter mile of the local BART station. Redevelopment made it possible for Union City to transform an abandoned, contaminated industrial site into a new, vibrant community. The site now has utilities and complete infrastructure, including roads, sidewalks, landscaping, and drainage. The former brownfield site, which sat idle for many years, now generates property tax revenues and has become a safe and healthy neighborhood for families. Redevelopment Improves Housing for Low-Income Families

The 2.4-acre Peyton-Grismer Revitalization Project in Burbank rehabilitated 11 buildings that comprised approximately 100 substandard, overcrowded housing units, where more than 70 percent of the residents are low income. The dilapidated site had been plagued with blight and neglect as well as high rates of crime and gang activity. In addition,

the area was disconnected from key city services and programs. The project turned the crime-ridden neighborhood into a secure community. Since rehabilitation commenced at the Peyton-Grismer site in FY 2004â&#x20AC;&#x201C;05, the Police Department has received fewer calls for service in the neighborhood, including calls for serious crimes, such as shots fired, burglary, battery and assault. Such calls have declined about 20 percent every two years since 2004, with an overall 50 percent decrease in the past five years. As part of the revitalization, the nonprofit Burbank Housing Corporation built an Activity and Family Resource Center that promotes learning for residents and provides after-school homework assistance, mentoring programs, volunteer opportunities, adult education classes, financial workshops and more. The center has strengthened a sense of community, and the renovations have helped instill a sense of ownership and pride for residents. Perhaps best of all, the Activity and Family Resource Center inspires a lifelong love of learning. Redevelopment Creates a Sense of Place

Downtown Redwood City was once a thriving urban center, but it experienced a steep decline beginning in the 1960s. Major retail and entertainment establishments began leaving, which left the area lifeless in the evenings and on weekends. As part of an effort to revitalize downtown, the Redwood City Redevelopment Agency built a new Courthouse Square on land formerly occupied by the courthouse annex, which had blocked the view of the historic courthouse building. Removing the annex created an opportunity to create a new entry to the courthouse and construct a public plaza. The $52 million project, completed in early 2007, features improvements that include two semi-enclosed pavilions flanking the central plaza, a series of ornamental fountains that frame views of the courthouse, and an underground public parking garage. Shops and restaurants continued on page 16

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Redevelopment works as a catalyst for positive change.

Union City cleaned up an abandoned, contaminated industrial site, left, and created a new, vibrant neighborhood.

Committed to ... helping California public agencies to fulfill their mission.

NAPA SANITATION DISTRICT “Napa Sanitation District believes that recycling water is an environmentally responsible way to conserve scarce water supplies in the Napa Valley. Meyers Nave’s assistance in assuring compliance with Federal and State regulatory schemes in this area has been invaluable.” ~ Jill Techel, Chair K<>E >K^E'>^

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How Redevelopment Works for California’s Communities, continued from page 14

Families participate in Back to School Week festivities in Burbank’s revitalized PeytonGrismer neighborhood.

fill the pavilions, and the historic Fox Theatre and a 20-screen movie theatre draw evening and weekend visitors. The plaza provides a popular venue for concerts, plays, art shows, festivals and a wide variety of free entertainment. Downtown events on Courthouse Square and Main Street drew more than 120,000 visitors to a total of 135 events in FY 2009–10. The Redwood City Courthouse Square project exemplifies how public redevelopment investments in the heart of a downtown can create a sense of place. Today, Courthouse Square serves as the community’s primary “outdoor living room” in the city’s center. Downtown Redwood City is once again an exciting, fun-filled place to visit because of the efforts of redevelopment. A Catalyst for Positive Change

Your city’s Best resource for legal solutions California’s premier full-service public law firm has one of the state’s most extensive municipal & redevelopment law practices. Economic Development Relocation Benefits Affordable Housing

As these examples illustrate, redevelopment works in most communities throughout California. Redevelopment activities and investments revitalize run-down areas, resulting in increased property values and additional benefits for schools, businesses and residents. Redevelopment activities represent the investments that will help California prosper and simultaneously build better communities throughout the state. Redevelopment serves as the backbone of California’s economic development efforts. In fact, redevelopment is often the only tool most municipalities have to spur local economic growth and job creation. Redevelopment works as a catalyst for positive change, and it will continue to work in building better California communities. n

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More Resources Online For links to related information and resources, read the online version of this article at www. westerncity.com.

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DECLARING A STATE OF

EMERGENCY:

WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW

by Joan L. Cassman and Cecilia M. Quick

Emergencies differ both in type and magnitude. For example, within two hours of the gas pipeline explosion that destroyed an entire neighborhood and took eight lives in San Bruno on Sept. 9, 2010, Joan Cassman was en route to San Bruno City Hall to assist city staff in preparing a declaration of emergency. Cassman serves as city attorney in the neighboring community of Millbrae. Because she knew San Bruno was without a permanent city attorney and the city’s resources were spread thin, she wanted to help ensure that the City of San Bruno met the necessary legal requirements. Flames engulf a San Bruno neighborhood on Sept. 9, 2010.

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n another example in nearby Pacifica, a 20-unit apartment complex on a bluff 60 feet above the ocean was undermined in December 2009 when torrential rains and large wave swells caused the bluffs supporting the structure to collapse. Several months later, the adjoining complex was evacuated, but other complexes and residents remained to brave the elements in an area with a history of steady coastal erosion. In this case, Pacifica City Attorney Cecilia Quick had to determine with the assistance of city staff at what point a state of emergency existed and when a declaration of emergency should be issued. No matter the cause or immediacy, declaring a state of emergency is an essential step for local governments dealing with such situations. The declaration is the cornerstone to protecting a city from legal exposure. A properly issued declaration ensures that the city receives protections and immunities connected to the emergency response. The city attorney’s role often continues months after the emergency is over, as aggrieved parties typically have up to six months to file a claim and then a lawsuit. During the emergency itself, the city attorney can best assist his or her client by ensuring that the client follows procedural steps up front to reduce the risk of a lawsuit later.

Key Steps in Declaring a State of Emergency The California Emergency Services Act (CESA) provides guidelines for the declaration of emergencies by local officials and recognizes the strong role of local government in providing services during emergencies. CESA’s purpose is to empower local and state continued on page 23 Joan L. Cassman is a partner with the legal firm of Hanson Bridgett and city attorney for Millbrae; she can be reached at <jcassman@ hansonbridgett.com>. Cecilia M. Quick is city attorney for Pacifica and can be reached at <quickc@ci.pacifica.ca.us>.

www.westerncity.com

Western City, May 2011

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Louie Lujan2 MarBorg Industries2 Marion Ashley for Supervisor2 McKinstry Morley Brothers, LLC2

Jones & Mayer2 Kronick Moskovitz Tiedemann & Girard1

Optony Inc. PARS PBS&J PERC Water Prometheus Real Estate Group, Inc.2

The Lewis Group of Companies2 Meyers Nave1,2 Noble & Company, LLC2 Northrop Grumman2 Piper Jaffray2 San Diego Gas & Electric2 Santa Ynez Band of Mission Indians Donations & Contributions2

Recology Inc.2 Regis Homes of Northern California2 Rosenow Spevacek Group2 San Bernardino Police Officers Association San Manuel Band of Mission Indians2

SEIU Local 7212 Starbucks Teachers Insurance and Annuity Association-TIAA CREF2

Signal Hill Petroleum, Inc.2 Swinerton Management & Consulting TCM Group2

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Civil Justice Association of California2 Classic Communities2 Construction Industry Force Account Council David Bohannon Organization2 EDGE Development, Inc.2 EMS Management LLC Daniel Frank2 Fresno Police Officers Association Daniel Furtado2 General Mills2 GreenWaste Recovery, Inc.2 Griffin Structures, Inc.2 HDR Engineering Harris & Associates Terry Henderson2 Jones Hall Majestic Realty Co.2 Nicholas Conway2 Quad Knopf2 Clint Quilter2 Susan Reynolds2 River Islands @ Lathrop2 Robson Homes LLC2 Santa Monica Police Officers Association Southern California Concrete Producers Southwest Water Company2 The Sobrato Organization2 A.G. Spanos2 Specialty Solid Waste And Recycling Summerhill Homes LLC2 Tierra West Advisors Waste Management2 Western Manufactured Housing Communities Assn. PAC ID# 742422 William Avery & Associates, Inc.2 Zanker Road Management, LTD.2 Partial list as of 4/1/2011


Lancaster’s Economic Stimulus Package Pays Dividends The City of Lancaster (pop. 145,875), located approximately an hour north of Los Angeles, was hit hard by the recession that began in 2008. Lancaster faced some dismal statistics — a 10 percent decrease in the number of licensed businesses, retail sales down by 8.5 percent and nearly 15 percent of area residents unemployed in late 2008.

Account Clerk Stephanie Valdivia shows Shop & Dine gift cards to a resident and families crowd City Hall to redeem receipts.

The Lancaster City Council agreed that fast action was needed to stimulate the local economy and bring neighborhood businesses back from the verge of extinction. As the federal government debated how to deal with the economic crisis, Mayor Rex Parris and the city council launched Lancaster’s own Economic Stimulus Package. Designed to create $110 million in local economic activity by leveraging $400,000 in redevelopment agency funds, Lancaster’s stimulus package ultimately generated $123 million in economic activity. This temporary, timely and targeted package focused on getting dollars flowing through the local economy, with a variety of programs that encouraged people to shop in Lancaster and explained how doing so helped local services. The stimulus package targeted four major categories — merchant assistance, infrastructure and construction projects, hospitality and developer/broker incentives. The city sought considerable public input, including discussions with the Antelope Valley Chambers of Commerce and the Antelope Valley Board of Trade, in creating the programs. “Our goal was to engage the local business community and our residents in a united effort to protect local jobs and

services,” says Parris. “To accomplish this, we had to do everything in our power to encourage residents to shop locally by helping them understand how essential their purchases are to public infrastructure, city services and local businesses.”

Innovative Programs Spur Broad Participation The merchant assistance program included Shop & Dine Lancaster, which encouraged consumers to shop locally and underscored how doing business in Lancaster supported the community and city services. From March 30 through April 29, 2009, when a shopper accumulated $300 in sales receipts from one or more Lancaster businesses, the consumer could exchange those receipts for a $30 Shop & Dine gift card that could be used at more than 400 participating businesses in the city. Shop & Dine distributed 5,300 gift cards to families throughout the Lancaster area. “The final day of the Shop & Dine program was one of the most rewarding days in my career,” says Economic Development Director Vern Lawson Jr. “More than 1,300 people poured into Lancaster City Hall to claim their gift cards. Every city staff member, from the city manager

down, worked side by side at the finance counter to serve our residents. In a time of great economic difficulty, we were able to provide thousands of local families with economic help, while simultaneously guaranteeing more than $1.7 million in purchases at local businesses.” A similar program, Shop & Drive, was offered in conjunction with the Lancaster Auto Mall. From March 30 through June 30, 2009, people who purchased new vehicles at the auto mall qualified for a rebate of the registration fees in the form of a Shop & Dine gift card. As a result, car sales skyrocketed, and 273 new vehicles were sold or leased in the first month, totaling more than $7.4 million in new car transactions. When the three-month program concluded, Shop & Drive had prompted more than $25 million in local new auto sales. The infrastructure and construction program rehabilitated more than 100 foreclosed homes and supported the construction of two new parks and an art museum. The developer/broker incentives program streamlined planning and permitting processes and offered incentives to commercial and industrial real estate brokers. To read the rest of this article, visit www. westerncity.com. n

The City of Lancaster won the 2010 Helen Putnam Award for Excellence in the Community Services and Economic Development category. For more information about the program, visit www.cacities.org/helenputnam. www.westerncity.com

Western City, May 2011

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Beaumont’s Economic Stimulus Program Produces

Result $

With the nation facing its worst economic crisis since the Great Depression, the Beaumont City Council unanimously approved a local economic stimulus program in early 2009 to help homeowners, merchants, builders and contractors through hard times.

Beaumont issued a total of 679 permits in 2009 and 2010, an average annual increase of 13.2 percent compared to 2008. During the same two-year period, Riverside County’s permits declined by an average of 9.4 percent annually.

Beaumont (pop. 34,217), located in the heart of the Inland Empire region and 78 miles east of Los Angeles, reduced building fees for new homes and businesses by 30 percent and slashed processing fees for existing businesses and residents by 50 percent.

Energy Conservation Helps Small Businesses

Based on the theory that making development more affordable would boost the local economy, the city used redevelopment funds to pay for up to 80 percent of public improvements such as sidewalks, curbs and gutters. The program also allowed property owners to defer interest on the city portion of their property tax bills and provided low-interest redevelopment agency loans to help merchants improve their buildings by putting up facades, new signs and lighting. Program Increases Development

The program produced almost immediate benefits. Beaumont issued more new home building permits in 2009 than any other city in Riverside and San Bernardino counties. Beaumont’s total represented 10 percent of all new home permits in Riverside County. During 2009 Beaumont issued 350 new permits — about 17 percent more than in 2008. Developers saved money and didn’t have to borrow because the city delayed collecting fees until people moved into their homes.

Beaumont’s economic stimulus program emphasized sustainable practices by encouraging energy conservation. The city partnered with Southern California Edison (SCE), the Beaumont Chamber of Commerce and about 100 local businesses in 2009 to cut electricity use. Under SCE’s Direct Install program, prequalified local merchants received nearly $123,000 in free energy-saving improvements, including new fluorescent lighting, LED exit signs and upgrades to refrigeration equipment. Participating small businesses saved a total of 440,000 kilowatt-hours — the equivalent of the electricity used by about 26 homes in a year. Beaumont also saved 394,405 kilowatthours of electricity with two retrofit programs that installed new interior lighting at the Civic Center and “smart” pumps at the sewer lift station. As a result of the energy savings, SCE paid the city an incentive of nearly $33,000. Fueling the Economic Engine

The city’s economic stimulus program will more than pay for itself in the long run despite the fee cuts. The lower fees gave developers, homeowners and merchants an incentive to move forward on projects they

A city building inspector checks a construction site for a new home.

had been postponing. This in turn helped the local economy and created more revenue for Beaumont. The new development also increased revenue, which led to more sales and property taxes, and provided economic growth and jobs. The business community is enthusiastic about the local economic stimulus program, which will remain in full effect until 2012. Developer Grady Hanshaw received approximately $500,000 in fee credits from the city when he spent about $600,000 to add two street signals to his Beaumont Marketplace shopping center. Business owner John Dexter says the fee cuts helped his clients and business save money and boost the local economy. “It keeps the wheels turning in hard economic times,” says Dexter. So far Beaumont has waived more than $3.3 million in fees. Beaumont Mayor Brian De Forge has watched the city that he grew up in prosper despite today’s daunting economic challenges. He credits Beaumont’s visionary stimulus plan and a can-do attitude with helping to make the difference. “Everyone benefits when cities decide to give back to the communities that they serve,” says De Forge. Contact: Darci Mulvihill, public information officer, City of Beaumont; phone: (951) 769-8520; e-mail: <dmulvihill@ ci.beaumont.ca.us>. n

The City of Beaumont won the League Partners Award for Excellence in City-Business Relations in the 2010 Helen Putnam Award for Excellence program. For more information about the program, visit www.cacities.org/helenputnam.

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Western City magazine’s job opportunity section is the source for job seekers looking for positions in local government. When you place a job opportunity ad in Western City magazine, it will be posted at no additional charge on our website. For rates and deadlines, visit www.westerncity.com and click on the “Advertise” link.

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Display and Classified Advertising

Website Job Postings

Call Pam Maxwell-Blodgett at (800) 2621801 to place a display (boxed) ad or for rate and deadline information. Or e-mail: <admanager@westerncity.com>.

Display and classified ads are posted on our website at no additional charge. But if you miss the deadline for getting your job opportunity ad into the magazine, you can post it on the Western City website right away.

Call Sara Rounds at (916) 658-8223 for classified advertisements. Columntype classified ads are $18 per line with a five-line minimum (approximately 35 characters per line). You must call to confirm receipt.

To post your job opportunity ad on our automated website, visit www.western city.com or e-mail <info@westerncity. com> for more information.

Did You Miss the April Issue? Read it online at www.westerncity.com CareersInGovernment.com Employees are looking for YOU! Post your jobs on CIG — The Public Sector Job Board Registration & postings are EASY AND QUICK Thousands of CIG links on University, College and career boards Manage all jobs and resumes independently 24/7 CIG advertises in major public sector publications Our focus is on you — we are available to meet your needs anytime via email, fax or voice:

Don’t Miss the Top Hits on Our Website! 1 Understanding The City Attorney’s Role 2 Proposition 26: An Executive Summary for The Layperson 3 Fiscal Oversight: Ask the Right Questions 4 Redevelopment Debate Is All About Our Old Friend “Land Use” 5 Why Now Is a Smart Time to Consider Updating Your General Plan Read these articles today at www.westerncity.com

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Police Chief, City of San Bernardino, CA The City of San Bernardino, the seat of San Bernardino County, is located in the heart of Southern California in between Los Angeles and Palm Springs and has an estimated population of 198,464. The City is currently seeking a Police Chief to oversee a full-time staff of 325 sworn and 152 civilian employees with a budget of $62.2 million. The ideal candidate will be a proven leader with a vision for the future of a contemporary department and a commitment to Community Policing methods. The City is seeking an excellent communicator with the ability to establish and maintain effective relationships with the Mayor, City Council, City management, department staff, and the community. Candidates for this position must have a minimum of 7 years of service at division commander level with a large city, as well as a bachelor’s degree in Administration of Justice, Public Administration, Police Science, Criminology or a related field. The salary for the Police Chief is $237,300 annually and is dependent upon qualifications. If you are interested in this outstanding opportunity, please apply on line at www.bobmurrayassoc.com. Please contact Bob Murray at (916) 784-9080 should you have any questions. Brochure available. Closing date May 31, 2011. phone 916 U784U9080 fax 916U784U1985 www.bobmurrayassoc.com

Western City, May 2011

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Visit www.westerncity.com and click on “Topics” to read helpful articles that give you both the big picture on statewide issues and detailed examples from cities throughout California.

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AVERY ASSOCIATES The following career opportunities are currently open. Please visit our website for further information. City of Redwood City

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Declaring a State of Emergency: What You Need to Know, continued from page 17

governments to respond in emergencies to preserve lives and property and protect public health and safety. Under CESA, declarations of emergency can be made prior to, during or after a disaster, depending on the unique circumstances surrounding the event. This action may be taken by the city council (with the assistance of a city attorney) in an emergency meeting. If the city council cannot be quickly called into session, the city’s director of emergency services as designated by local ordinance may declare the emergency. Such a proclamation must be confirmed by the city council within seven days. Once the local emergency is declared, it remains in effect for a period of no more than seven days unless extended by the city council. Declaring a state of emergency provides local governments with the powers necessary to coordinate and implement plans aimed at protecting people and property during a disaster. For example, a declaration of emergency is necessary to secure mutual disaster aid from local, state and federal agencies. A declaration of emer-

A city may need to

drafting the declaration of emergency, other important legal considerations and suggestions help local governments in dealing with emergencies. Participate in test emergency exercises. Test exercises organized by cities and other public agencies involve such things

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as mock airplane crashes, tsunamis or other potential disasters. There should be broad participation among city staff, including the legal staff, in these exercises. The benefits of participating include the opportunity to actually meet the field continued

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Director of Planning and Community Development City of Santa Monica, CA Santa Monica is a world-class seaside city in Southern California. Conveniently located a few miles from Los Angeles and a short drive to the neighboring attractions of the region, Santa Monica is a beach city with all of the sophistication, culture, and stimulation of an active metropolis. The City is 8.3 square miles, has a population of 90,000, and a daytime population of over 150,000. The City is seeking a Planning and Community Development Director to administer a full time staff of 105 and total budget of $15,183,384 in the four Divisions: City Planning/Development Review; Strategic and Transportation Planning; Building and Safety; and Administration Division. The Director will oversee implementation of the award-winning Land Use and Circulation Element (LUCE), Civic Center Specific Plan, and focused Downtown/Civic Center planning efforts. In the next several years, the City will put smart growth policies into practice through $300 million in capital projects and in conjunction with the coming of the Exposition Light Rail. The new Director will oversee policy development, planning, design review, permitting, inspection, and enforcement as they relate to these elements as well as the City’s traffic system and parking policies. A major undertaking will include updating the City’s zoning ordinance. An individual who is highly skilled with development projects, negotiations, project management, streamlining processes, planning, and financial management will be essential for this position. The ideal candidate must be sensitive to the neighborhood concerns, as Santa Monica residents are very engaged in the community and care deeply about the character of their City and the quality of life. The new Director must take into consideration how development impacts the citizen’s lives and the livability of the community. A bachelor’s degree in urban planning, public administration, business administration or a related field is required; a master’s degree is preferred. The salary range is $156,336-$193,008 annually and is dependent upon qualifications. The City also offers an attractive benefits package. If you are interested in this outstanding opportunity, please apply on line at www.bobmurrayassoc.com. Please contact Mr. Bob Murray at (916) 784-9080 should you have any questions. Brochure available. Closing date May 13, 2011.

phone 916 U784U9080 fax 916U784U1985 www.bobmurrayassoc.com

prove that there was an emergency in order to obtain financial aid and restitution from state or federal agencies. gency also permits a local governing body to promulgate orders and regulations necessary for the protection of life and property, such as imposing a curfew and ordering the demolition of unsafe structures. Furthermore, declaring a state of emergency ensures that the local government and its officials and employees are immune from liability when exercising their official duties during an emergency.

Other Legal Considerations Emergencies demand the contribution and participation of all functions of government. In addition to assisting with

www.westerncity.com

East Bay Regional Park District A S S I S TA N T G E N E R A L M A N A G E R F O R O P E R AT I O N S $135,948 to $173,534 (possible future merit steps to $200,865) Spanning the San Francisco/Oakland Bay Area counties of Alameda and Contra Costa, the East Bay Regional Park District seeks an Assistant General Manager (AGM) for Operations. Headquartered in Oakland, the District serves a populace of approximately 2.5 million. Reporting to the General Manager, the Assistant GM oversees a $57 million operating and project budget with approximately 406 fulltime equivalent employees. With three divisions (Park Operations; Interpretative and Recreational Services; Maintenance and Skilled Trades) the Department manages 65 parks and 1,150 miles of regional trails covering more than 110,000 acres. The ideal candidate will be an experienced local government manager/ administrator in park management with a thorough knowledge of park operations relating to a wide variety of outdoor recreational and interpretive programs and maintenance management. This collaborative, enthusiastic, and results-oriented leader will bring outstanding communication, interpersonal, collaborative and consensus building skills and must be able to work cooperatively with elected officials and diverse community stakeholders. Strong experience in budget and fiscal management expected; background in collective bargaining/labor relations a plus. A bachelor’s degree is required.

For more information, contact Stuart Satow 241 Lathrop Way Sacramento, CA 95815 Tel: 916 / 263-1401 Fax: 916 / 561-7205 E-mail: resumes@cps.ca.gov

www.cps.ca.gov/search District web site: www.ebparks.org

Submit cover letter, current salary and resume with four work-related references by Monday, May 23, 2011.

Western City, May 2011

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Declaring a State of Emergency: What You Need to Know, continued

Confirm that the city has adopted a local emergency plan, and obtain a copy. CESA provides for a state emergency plan and requires cities and counties to administer it. The plan contains information regarding the continuity of government, emergency services of governmental agen-

responders and see what they do in the real world. This personal connection can be invaluable in a crisis situation. In addition, it gives the city attorney an opportunity to anticipate legal issues that may arise and to be better prepared for these issues.

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CITY OF CONCORD #ONCORD #ALIFORNIA WITH A POPULATION OF   RESIDENTS IS THE LARGEST CITY IN #ONTRA #OSTA #OUNTY ,OCATEDJUSTMILESEASTOF3AN&RANCISCOADJACENTTOSCENIC-T$IABLO #ONCORDOFFERSEASYACCESSTO MANYOF.ORTHERN#ALIFORNIASMOSTDESIRABLEDESTINATIONS

PUBLIC WORKS DIRECTOR

4HE #ITYS 0UBLIC 7ORKS $EPARTMENT HAS A STAFFOFANDANANNUALOPERATINGBUDGETOF  MILLION 4HE $EPARTMENT IS CURRENTLY ORGANIZED ACROSS lVE DIVISIONS 0ARKS 3ERVICES 3EWER AND 3TREETS -AINTENANCE William Avery & Associates 4RAFlC 3YSTEMS AND -AINTENANCE &ACILITIES -AINTENANCE AND &LEET Management Consultants -AINTENANCE4HE$IRECTOROF0UBLIC7ORKSWILLBEANINTEGRALMEMBEROF 1 THECITYSEXECUTIVEMANAGEMENTTEAMANDWILLBEANEXCEPTIONALLEADER 3 /2 N. Santa Cruz Ave., Suite A Los Gatos, CA 95030 PROGRESSIVEMANAGER ARELATIONSHIPBUILDERANDCOMMITTEDTEAMPLAYER 408.399.4424 Fax: 408.399.4423 email: jobs@averyassoc.net www.averyassoc.net

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Watch for these Upcoming Opportunities: UĂ&#x160; Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;Â&#x153;vĂ&#x160;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x203A;>`>]Ă&#x160; "\Ă&#x160;*Â&#x153;Â?Â&#x2C6;ViĂ&#x160; Â&#x2026;Â&#x2C6;iv UĂ&#x160; Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;Â&#x153;vĂ&#x160;Ă&#x2022;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;}Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160;*>Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x17D;]Ă&#x160; \Ă&#x160; Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;>Â&#x2DC;>}iĂ&#x20AC;

Current Opportunities: UĂ&#x160; Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;Â&#x153;vĂ&#x160;->Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;>Ă&#x160;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;Â&#x2C6;V>]Ă&#x160; \Ă&#x160;*Â?>Â&#x2DC;Â&#x2DC;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;}Ă&#x160;>Â&#x2DC;`Ă&#x160; Â&#x153;Â&#x201C;Â&#x201C;Ă&#x2022;Â&#x2DC;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;

iĂ&#x203A;iÂ?Â&#x153;ÂŤÂ&#x201C;iÂ&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160; Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x20AC;iVĂ&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x20AC; UĂ&#x160; Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;Â&#x153;vĂ&#x160;,i`Â?>Â&#x2DC;`Ă&#x192;]Ă&#x160; \Ă&#x160;*Â&#x153;Â?Â&#x2C6;ViĂ&#x160; Â&#x2026;Â&#x2C6;iv UĂ&#x160; Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;Â&#x153;vĂ&#x160;->Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160; iĂ&#x20AC;Â&#x2DC;>Ă&#x20AC;`Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;Â&#x153;]Ă&#x160; \Ă&#x160;*Â&#x153;Â?Â&#x2C6;ViĂ&#x160; Â&#x2026;Â&#x2C6;iv UĂ&#x160; Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;Â&#x153;vĂ&#x160;->Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160; >Ă&#x20AC;Â?Â&#x153;Ă&#x192;]Ă&#x160; \Ă&#x160;`Â&#x201C;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x20AC;>Ă&#x152;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x203A;iĂ&#x160;-iĂ&#x20AC;Ă&#x203A;Â&#x2C6;ViĂ&#x192;Ă&#x160; Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x20AC;iVĂ&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x20AC; For more information and filing deadlines, please contact: Â&#x153;LĂ&#x160;Ă&#x2022;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x20AC;>Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;>Â&#x2DC;`Ă&#x160;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x192;Â&#x153;VÂ&#x2C6;>Ă&#x152;iĂ&#x192;, 1677 Eureka Road, Suite 202, Roseville, CA 95661 Phone: (916) 784-9080, Fax: (916) 784-1985, E-mail: apply@bobmurrayassoc.com

24

League of California Cities

A December 2009 storm undermined cliffs supporting apartments in Pacifica.

cies, mobilization of resources, mutual aid and public information. Cities have a plan in place in order to receive state disaster assistance funds for response-related costs. Although CESA does not contain mandatory elements for local agencies to include in their own emergency plans, such plans often contain invaluable practical information, including the names and contact information of the chain of command, contact information for assistance organizations, and sample forms and documents to be used to ensure that emergency powers are properly exercised. Confirm that the city has entered into mutual aid agreements for emergency and disaster responses, and obtain and keep copies of them. CESA establishes mutual aid regions throughout the state and authorizes local agencies to enter into mutual aid agreements to ensure the requisite emergency response. Collect these agreements and keep them together in an accessible location, and make sure other city employees know where they are. There is no time to search for these documents once a crisis strikes. Document, document, document. Designate someone to be responsible for collecting and maintaining evidence of the emergency, including resolutions, newspaper articles, photographs, reports and correspondence. Provide this material to the city clerk. To the extent possible, reference the information in the emergency declaration or follow-up public staff reports to ensure the evidence is in the record and known and available to interested members of the public. It may become necessary after the fact to prove www.cacities.org


evidence to support the city’s actions and reduce the likelihood of a lawsuit. In the event of a lawsuit, having such evidence puts the city in a strategic position to effectively defend its actions.

strikes. From a legal standpoint, the best insurance for an effective response to emergencies involves preparation, practice and proper procedures. n

The legal department plays an important role in local government when disaster

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Police Chief , City of Redlands, CA not only the existence of the emergency but also its severity and effect on public safety and property. For example, after the event, people who were injured or who lost property during the emergency may question whether it was necessary for the city to respond as it did. Or a city may need to obtain emergency permits from a state or federal agency and may need to demonstrate that an emergency occurred in order for the permit to be granted. Similarly, a city may need to prove that there was an emergency in order to obtain financial aid and restitution from state or federal agencies. Maintaining documentation of the emergency on an ongoing basis will be useful in each of these scenarios. Don’t forget the Brown Act. During emergencies the Brown Act still applies. It contains special provisions that recognize and attempt to accommodate emergencies, granting local agencies some leeway with respect to notice and agenda requirements in calling an emergency meeting of a legislative body. The city attorney should be familiar with the Brown Act’s emergency provisions so he or she can advise on compliance during the disaster. Be mindful that private property is still private property, even in an emergency. A city attorney can help a local government avoid liability for damaging or destroying property in an emergency by taking steps to ensure that there was a clear necessity to demolish the property and the demolition or destruction was reasonably necessary to correct any existing danger. The city attorney can work with staff to make sure there is adequate www.westerncity.com

Nestled in the heart of the Inland Empire in San Bernardino County, the City of Redlands (population 70,000) is approximately 63 miles northeast of Los Angeles and 110 miles north of San Diego. The City is seeking a Police Chief who will administer direction, plan and oversee the activities and operations of the Police Department including community policing, patrol, traffic, investigations, internal affairs, communications, animal control, and support services. The ideal candidate should be a confident team player who is intuitive and can employ political acumen when representing City interests. The incoming Chief will be a positive leader who can motivate those around them, and be able to build consensus. The ideal candidate will approach issues as opportunities instead of threats, confront reality with reasonable expectations and work across departmental lines. The new Chief should be innovative, progressive and embrace technology and volunteerism. The position requires seven years of responsible law enforcement experience including five years of experience in a supervisory capacity; a Master’s Degree from an accredited college or university in Public Administration, Business Administration or other related fields within 12 months of appointment; and possession of a P.O.S.T. Management Certificate. P.O.S.T. Command College Graduation Certificate; and F.B.I. National Academy Graduation Certificate is desirable. The salary for the Police Chief is open and is dependent upon qualifications. If you are interested in this outstanding opportunity, please apply on line at www.bobmurrayassoc.com. Please contact Mr. Regan Williams or Mr. Wesley Herman at (916) 784-9080 should you have any questions. Brochure available. Closing date May 16, 2011. phone 916 U784U9080 fax 916U784U1985 www.bobmurrayassoc.com

CITY MANAGER City of Tulare, CA

TOWN MANAGER

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Western City, May 2011

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Using Economic Development to Support Sustainability, continued from page 11

$13 million capital improvement project was completed in fall of 2010. The center has a 240-seat “black box” theatre with a movable stage and seats, an art gallery and classroom space upstairs. Pleasanton also built a parking lot for the center that serves as additional downtown parking.

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Tightening Your Belt? League of California Cities offers FREE Interim Candidate Searches. View Resumes Online Now! Connect with municipal veterans who can help meet your needs. Free for statewide agencies. No middle man — you contact applicants directly.

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Administrative Services Director City of San Carlos, CA The City of San Carlos, located at the north end of the Silicon Valley, is known as “The City of Good Living.” The City’s 28,406 residents are friendly, involved, and treasure their inviting sense of community. San Carlos is now seeking an Administrative Services Director to oversee a department budget of $3 million and a staff of 12 professionals. San Carlos is seeking a collaborative, hands-on Administrative Services Director to promote and support an atmosphere of teamwork within the Department. The City desires a Director with the vision and creativity to investigate innovative options and alternatives for issues faced by the City, including shared services and privatization as appropriate. This position requires at least five years of public sector experience at the Department Director level in a finance, human resources, information technology, or risk management department or division. The salary range for the Administrative Services Director is $141,600 to $171,900; placement within the range is dependent upon qualifications. If you are interested in this outstanding opportunity, please apply on line at www.bobmurrayassoc.com. Please contact Bob Murray or Wesley Herman at (916) 784-9080 should you have any questions. Brochure available. Closing date June 3, 2011. phone 916 U784U9080 fax 916U784U1985 www.bobmurrayassoc.com

26

League of California Cities

• Increase opportunities for downtown revitalization in an area that was underutilized before the center was built. The Pleasanton Downtown Business Association works with city staff who manage the center to cross-promote local businesses and events. For example, tickets to shows have coupons on the back offering specials and discounts at local restaurants and businesses. The Firehouse Arts Center is used for theatre productions, concerts, an annual poetry and prose festival, movies (in partnership with the city library) and the city’s annual Shakespeare camp.

Sustainability and the Economic Bottom Line Riverbank and Pleasanton are very different types of small cities, but both demonstrate that innovation and a healthy dose of entrepreneurial determination can maximize a community’s strong points and create economic development efforts that also support sustainability. By attracting new investment to their downtowns, Pleasanton and Riverbank have made their communities better places to live, work and visit. Town centers offer transportation choices — walking, cycling and transit — that reduce traffic and air pollution. Concentrating economic activity downtown relieves pressure to build on the outskirts, thus protecting open space and farmland. And local agencies can benefit from the new revenues that economic activity brings, as well as the lower cost of providing services and facilities in existing neighborhoods. These are challenging times for cities and their residents. While individual cities can do little about the overall vitality of the national economy, they can do many things locally to set the stage for economic growth. Sustainable community development offers cities a path to a better future — one that brings a wealth of benefits, including greater prosperity and opportunity for all residents, a healthier environment and a more stable and secure fiscal outlook. n

www.cacities.org


More Resources Online For additional examples and resources on sustainable economic development and more information about Riverbank’s and Pleasanton’s efforts, read the online version of this article at www. westerncity.com.

Pleasanton’s Firehouse Arts Center is an economic driver for the downtown area.

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Western City May 2011