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MARCH 2013 |

The Monthly Magazine of the League of California Cities

Neglecting Annexation And Incorporation Will Not Serve the State’s Growth Goals p.9 Fontana Revitalizes Downtown With a Focus on Seniors p.15 Fresno’s Planning Process Builds Trust p.7

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CONTENTS 2 3

Calendar of League Events

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Executive Director’s Message

Are We at the Tipping Point in Building a New State-Local Partnership?

legislators came from local government and bring a fresh perspective. Are we on the brink of a new era?

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Communities use planning to make choices about the future. But the process can be as important as the final plan itself and provide a foundation for future efforts around local issues and concerns.

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State policies for achieving sustainability have staked much on the success of cities. Yet the state’s recent actions signal a lack of appreciation for the vital function cities serve as centers of commerce and providers of essential qualityof-life services for the vast majority of California’s population.

Showcase Your City’s Work: Helen Putnam Award for Excellence Program By Eva Spiegel

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News from the Institute for Local Government

California Cities Helen Putnam Award for Excellence

Fontana Revitalizes Downtown With a Focus On Seniors

Meetings: Bane or Blessing? New Resource Center Offers Help Meetings can present a broad range of challenges for local officials. A collection of useful materials offers practical information on related topics that include chairing a meeting, dealing with a grandstander, complying with open government meetings and more.

Neglecting Annexation and Incorporation Will Not Serve The State’s Growth Goals By Kirstin Kolpitcke and Dan Carrigg

City Forum

The deadline for this year’s award program is April 11, so start planning now to enter your city’s outstanding programs that creatively address local challenges. Winners enjoy a variety of benefits.

Fresno’s Planning Process Builds Trust By Jennifer Armer and Steve Sanders

By Chris McKenzie As the economy begins to recover and the state budget shows signs of stabilizing, the challenges facing California require strong leadership at all levels. Many of our new state

Sustainable Cities

The city provided its senior population with high-quality, affordable housing close to the services they need.

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Job Opportunities

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Professional Services Directory On the Cover: Coachella Valley Photo: Tim Roberts Photography/ Shutterstock.com

President Bill Bogaard Mayor Pasadena

1400 K Street Sacramento, CA 95814 (916) 658-8200 Fax (916) 658-8240

First Vice President José Cisneros Treasurer San Francisco

Second Vice President Tony Ferrara Mayor Arroyo Grande

Immediate Past President Michael Kasperzak Mayor Mountain View

Executive Director Chris McKenzie

For a complete list of the League board of directors, visit www.cacities.org/board.

leaguevents

Magazine Staff Editor in Chief Jude Hudson (916) 658-8234 email: editor@westerncity.com

APRIL 4–5

Managing Editor Eva Spiegel (916) 658-8228 email: espiegel@cacities.org

Policy Committee Meetings, Pasadena The League’s policy committees review issues of interest to cities statewide and make recommendations to the League board of directors.

Advertising Sales Manager Pam Maxwell-Blodgett (916) 658-8256 email: maxwellp@cacities.org

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Legal Advocacy Committee Meeting, Pasadena The committee reviews and recommends friend-of-the-court efforts on cases of significant statewide interest to California cities.

Administrative Assistant Anita Lopez (916) 658-8223 email: alopez@cacities.org

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Contributors Samantha Caygill JoAnne Speers Randi Kay Stephens

Legislative Action Day, Sacramento City officials attending this event get updates on key legislative issues and meet with their legislators to discuss local priorities.

Associate Editors Carol Malinowski Carolyn Walker

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Board of Directors’ Meeting, Sacramento The League board reviews, discusses and takes action on a variety of issues affecting cities, including legislation, legal advocacy, education and training, and more.

Design Taber Creative Group For photo credits, see page 17.

MAY 8 – 10

Western City (ISSN 0279-5337) is published monthly by the League of California Cities, 1400 K St., Sacramento, CA 95814. Subscriptions: $39.00/1 year; $63.00/2 years; student: $26.50; foreign: $52.00; single copies: $4.00, including sales tax. Entered as periodical mail January 30, 1930, at the Post Office, Los Angeles, CA 90013, under the Act of April 13, 1879. Periodical postage paid at Sacramento, Calif.

NT RI

JUNE 13 – 14

Policy Committee Meetings, Sacramento The League’s policy committees review issues of interest to cities statewide and make recommendations to the League’s board of directors.

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Legal Advocacy Committee Meeting, Sacramento The committee reviews and recommends friend-of-the-court efforts on cases of significant statewide interest to California cities.

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Postmaster: Send address changes to Western City, 1400 K Street, Sacramento, CA 95814. Western City Trademark Reg. U.S. Pat. Off. ©2013 League of California Cities. All rights reserved. Material may not be reprinted without written permission. This issue is Volume LXXXIX, No. 3.

City Attorneys’ Spring Conference, Napa This meeting covers the latest trends and issues affecting public law practitioners and provides an opportunity to connect with colleagues.

Event and registration information is available at www.cacities.org/events. W

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For the latest information on League conferences and events, follow us on Twitter @CaCitiesLearn. For legislative and policy updates and more, follow @CaCities. Follow Western City @WesternCityMag. Join us on Facebook! www.facebook.com/westerncity www.facebook.com/LeagueofCaCities www.cacities.org

Executive Director’s Message by Chris McKenzie

Are We at the Tipping Point in

Building a New State-Local Partnership? The debut of Malcolm Gladwell’s seminal book The Tipping Point: How Little Things Can Make a Big Difference in 2000 had quite an impact on many people. The book is about how change can happen quickly and unexpectedly. Gladwell’s thesis — that ideas, behavior and messages sometimes spread just like outbreaks of an infectious disease (or “social epidemics”) — was as refreshing as it was startling. I spoke to Gladwell at a League annual conference a few years after his book was published. He continued to express delight at unexpected social changes and the surprising forces that cause them to happen rapidly. Recently Gladwell’s notions of how social change occurs have caused me to begin looking at the factors underlying the almost palpable movement that appears to be under way among new California state legislators. This group expresses a commitment to move their co-equal branch of state government out of the

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doldrums, where it has been mired for many years, and make it a more effective institution with longer lasting positive impact on the public good. Many of the 39 new state legislators came from local government, especially city governments. If you talk with them their infectious enthusiasm and commitment to serving the people of California comes across clearly. They feel a profound duty to restore the public’s trust in the Legislature. In almost the same breath many also frequently say that they can’t do it alone and they need

strong partners in city governments in the years ahead. These legislators have arrived at an important time in our state’s history. Our economy is beginning to recover from the effects of the recession, and the state budget is showing signs of stabilizing. The fiscal, environmental and social challenges facing California need and deserve strong leadership at all levels of government. If Gladwell is correct and a few things can account for relatively rapid social change, what are some of the factors that might be driving the commitment and optimism of our new state legislators — apart from their being freshmen? Let’s take a closer look. Changes to the State Constitution The first factor involves recent changes to the election laws of our state Constitution. Three important though relatively minor continued

Western City, March 2013

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Are We at the Tipping Point in Building a New State-Local Partnership?, continued

changes may have a significant collective impact. They are:

Many of the 39 new state legislators came from local government and feel a profound duty to restore public trust in the Legislature.

1. The change in term limits that allows a member to serve their entire 12-year legislative career in one chamber, where they can acquire experience, wisdom and seniority. When talking to these new legislators it’s clear they are thinking about the long haul — most expect to stay in the Assembly for 12 years; 2. The Citizen’s Redistricting Commission that gave us the fairest legislative districts in decades, despite California’s partisan tilt; and 3. The “Top-Two Vote-Getters” (or Open) Primary that led to major changes in district boundaries and gave new candidates — sometimes in direct competition with their party’s anointed candidate — the ability to compete and succeed. The combined effect of these changes has brought us a group of reform-minded new legislators who understand they have the ability and opportunity to focus on longer-term policy, rather than where their next political stepping stone may be. A Brighter Economic Outlook The state’s improving fiscal condition is almost certainly a factor. The last few years in state and local governments have been ugly. The word “triage” does not even begin to capture it. As Maslow’s hierarchy of needs teaches us, you can’t ask someone who is wondering where their next meal is coming from to debate obscure matters of public policy. That is a privilege reserved for those with full stomachs and no worries about their next meal’s origin. Comfortable With Transparency Another factor worth mentioning is that the city, county and school governments where these new legislators served during the past few tempestuous years made many tough choices, but they did it in a nonpartisan, transparent way in which they were directly accountable for the

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consequences of those choices. Ask these new legislators if they are intimidated by the openness of the decision-making process in the Legislature, and they may chuckle. Absolutely nothing compares to the scrutiny that local officials frequently experience at their weekly “public questioning” sessions. These men and women don’t seem worried about making tough decisions — if their leaders give them the chance. Clear About Boundaries Finally, state legislators whose experience was forged in local government understand firsthand that state government cannot and will never be the front-line provider of essential public services in California. That is a privilege and a duty reserved for local governments. The new legislators’ immediate concern for restoring the state-local partnership can be addressed by continuing to remember this truism and, as Gov. Jerry Brown

is calling for, avoiding unwanted and unnecessary mandates and intrusions on local decision-making. Encouraging Signs Time will tell whether we are on the cusp of a new era in state-local relations. I am encouraged and, at the same time, realistic about how much can be done. If our new legislators accomplish even half of what they aspire to, it will move things light-years ahead. And I suspect many of them would agree the bottom line is that the public who elected them deserve that kind of collaboration and partnership from their government leaders at all levels. Congratulations, new members of the California State Legislature! I hope we can help you make a lasting contribution to our state and its cities. There is much to be done — let’s get started. ■

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Showcase Your City’s Work: Helen Putnam Award for Excellence Program by Eva Spiegel

Learning from each other is an important part of the work cities do together through the League. One way city officials share helpful information is through the Helen Putnam Award for Excellence program, which highlights the best of cities’ innovative programs. Award-winning cities receive recognition at the League of California Cities Annual Conference, and their inspiring projects are featured throughout the year in Western City. About the Award Program The League board of directors established the Helen Putnam Award for Excellence in 1982 in memory of former Petaluma Mayor Helen Putnam (pictured above), who also served as the League’s first female president from 1976–77. During the program’s 30-plus years, hundreds of awardwinning projects have served as models and have been adapted by other communities. Sponsored by the League Partners, the Helen Putnam Award for Excellence program recognizes cities’ efforts to creatively address local challenges. Winning entries demonstrate innovation, resourcefulness, efficiency and enhanced public trust and support. Entries are judged by a volunteer jury of city officials. The judging criteria include: • The impact of the problem and/or challenge, and how well it is outlined; • The innovativeness of the solution; and • The quality of the results achieved.

Any League member city, or group of California cities, including League Divisions, that provides a program or service with proven tangible and measurable results and a minimum of one year of implementation is eligible to apply.

7. Internal Administration;

Please note: The program has added a new category, Economic Development Through the Arts.

10. Public Safety;

Award Categories

12. Ruth Vreeland Award for Engaging Youth in City Government.

1. Cities, Counties and Schools (CCS) Partnership Intergovernmental Collaboration Award; 2. Community Services and Economic Development;

8. League Partners Award for Excellence in City-Business Relations; 9. Planning and Environmental Quality; 11. Public Works, Infrastructure and Transportation; and

In addition, each year the President’s Advocacy Award honors a person or program that best advocates for one of the League’s annual strategic goals.

3. Economic Development Through the Arts (new this year);

Don’t Miss the April Deadline

4. Enhancing Public Trust, Ethics and Community Involvement;

This year’s Helen Putnam Award entries are due no later than Thursday, April 11, 2013. For more information and an online application, visit www.HelenPutnam.org. ■

5. Health and Wellness Programs; 6. Housing Programs and Innovations;

Eva Spiegel is director of communications for the League and can be reached at espiegel@cacities.org.

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Western City, March 2013

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News from the Institute for Local Government

Meetings: Bane or Blessing? New Resource Center Offers Help For local agency officials, meetings are part and parcel of public service, but perspectives on meetings vary widely. Many officials enjoy meetings because, as former Lafayette City Council Member and Contra Costa County Supervisor Gayle Uilkema observed, “That’s where all the ideas start growing.”

difficulty.” Meetings can be difficult, but they offer the opportunity to bring together diverse perspectives in a community and find common ground to address shared challenges. For better or worse, meetings are central to democratic decision-making. Make them work for you. ■

Contrast her view with that of humorist Dave Barry who quipped, “If you had to identify in one word the reason why the human race has not achieved and never will achieve its full potential, that word would be ‘meetings.’” How can local officials help their communities conduct the kinds of meetings that reflect Uilkema’s perspective instead of Barry’s? In these contentious times, it can be a challenge. The Institute for Local Government (ILG) website offers helpful resources, which are collected in the new ILG Meeting Resource Center (www.ca-ilg.org/Meetings). The center’s offerings include: • How to chair a meeting (www.ca-ilg.org/document/howchair-meeting); • Dealing with deeply held views (www.ca-ilg.org/ DeeplyHeldConcerns) and emotional audiences (www.ca-ilg.org/document/dealing-emotional-audiences); • Simplifying parliamentary procedure (www.ca-ilg.org/ document/parliamentary-procedure-simplified); • Dealing with a grandstander (www.ca-ilg.org/document/ dealing-grandstander); • The role that procedural protocols can play in meetings (www.ca-ilg.org/post/codes-conduct-elected-boards); • Using technology in meetings (www.ca-ilg.org/technologyand-meetings); and • Complying with open government laws (www.ca-ilg.org/abc). For those interested in further exploring the options available for local officials to engage the community in the public agency decision-making process, ILG’s Public Engagement Program (www.ca-ilg.org/public-engagement) offers a wealth of resources. The center is also collecting video clips with insights from current and local officials on how they make meetings successful. Winston Churchill observed, “A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every

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Help ILG Improve Its Resources In an ongoing effort to improve its resources, ILG welcomes comments and suggestions from local officials and staff. For example, are there strategies that work for you in meetings? Is there another dimension of the meeting issue that ILG should address? Do you have an effective PowerPoint ® presentation that you have used to train newly elected officials on meeting techniques and procedures? ILG is also collecting insights from local officials to enhance the Meeting Resource Center’s offerings. Do you know a “meeting maestro” who is exceptionally skilled in making meetings productive? Share your suggestions and insights with Randi Kay Stephens, program coordinator, at rstephens@ca-ilg.org; fax: (916) 444-7535; or phone: (916) 658-8207. ILG publicly acknowledges all contributions to its work in service to local officials.

www.cacities.org

Fresno’s Planning Process Builds Trust by Jennifer Armer and Steve Sanders

California has experienced enormous demographic changes throughout its history. Since the Gold Rush successive waves of immigrants have arrived from around the globe. Many such groups settled in certain regions and created communities; for example, there is a thriving Russian community in West Sacramento, a Vietnamese community in San Jose, and Hmong and Laotian communities in the San Joaquin Valley. Earlier immigrants established the Armenian and Basque settlements in the southern Central Valley, Japanese and Chinese neighborhoods in the San Francisco Bay Area, and Mexican and Central American communities throughout Southern and Central California.

Fully engaging and integrating these diverse groups, particularly relatively recent arrivals, into the civic life of the community presents a major challenge for local leaders statewide. One tool to help meet this challenge is the municipal planning process.

for future efforts around local issues and concerns. Fresno’s recent experience in updating its General Plan offers a case in point.

Communities use planning to establish a common vision and make choices about the future. But the process of developing a plan — educating residents about choices and options, seeking consensus and providing the opportunity to learn how to participate effectively in local government and make unique contributions — can be as important as the final plan itself. Planning activities can build relationships and trust that in turn provide a foundation

The City of Fresno (pop. 501,362), located in California’s Central Valley, had areas of significant poverty, especially in and around the downtown core, and a pattern of low-density development on its outskirts. Fresno’s leaders recognized the critical need for a new strategy to guide future development. The General Plan update process in 2011 offered an opportunity to engage the public in developing such a strategy and to restore a sense of community and pride.

Community Partners Play Vital Role in Outreach

The city’s elected officials and executive staff acknowledged that planning is integral to community, fiscal and economic vitality. With this in mind, they encouraged staff to engage in a broad outreach effort to launch the planning process.

The General Plan update process involved hundreds of residents in community meetings.

Fresno, like many California cities, is very ethnically and economically diverse. The city first looked to its community partners, such as the Fresno Interdenominational Refugee Ministries and the West Fresno Family Resource Center, for help in reaching out and engaging residents who had limited prior experience with the city government and its planning process. continued on page 14

Jennifer Armer is a program coordinator for the Institute for Local Government (ILG) and can be reached at jarmer@ca-ilg.org. Steve Sanders is co-director of ILG’s Sustainable Communities program and can be reached at ssanders@ca-ilg.org. Initial research for this article was provided by the Metropolitan Group (www.metgroup.com). www.westerncity.com

Western City, March 2013

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Neglecting Annexation and Incorporation

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League of California Cities

www.cacities.org

Will Not Serve the State’s

Growth Goals

by Kirstin Kolpitcke and Dan Carrigg

As California’s Legislature emerges from a decade of severe budget deficits, many are celebrating the achievement of a balanced budget. Closing the state’s massive deficit required severe spending cuts, a major boost from the taxpayers and a slowly recovering economy. But the desperate budget decisions made in recent years have policy impacts, whether it is the cost of attending public universities, potential increases in crime from realignment or the state’s capacity to compete for jobs. Amid the budget wreckage, major questions also remain about the ability of cities to continue to grow and prosper. continued Kirstin Kolpitcke is a legislative representative for the League and can be reached at kkolpitcke@cacities.org. Dan Carrigg is the League’s legislative director and can be reached at dcarrigg@cacities.org.

www.westerncity.com

Western City, March 2013

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Neglecting Annexation and Incorporation Will Not Serve the State’s Growth Goals, continued

Throughout history cities have served as centers of commerce and culture. This is certainly the case in California — the names of our major cities are known throughout the world. The Golden State’s cities serve more than 83 percent of its residents and provide a range of municipal services including police, fire, libraries, parks and recreation, water, sewers and waste disposal. Cities also maintain a network of streets and roads. State policies for achieving sustainability, greenhouse gas reduction, smart growth, infill and transit-oriented development and preserving farmland and open space have staked much on the role and success of cities. Yet the state’s recent actions have signaled a lack of appreciation for the vital function cities serve as centers of commerce and providers of essential quality-of-life services for the vast majority of California’s population. The de facto state approach to cities appears to be one of neglect. When it comes to economic development, infrastructure and absorbing growth, cities are now on their own. The state discarded redevelopment — the most powerful municipal tool for upgrading urban cores,

The de facto state approach to cities appears to be one of neglect.

decontaminating brownfields, building affordable housing and transit-oriented development and countering urban sprawl. Revenues that supported new cities and cities that annexed inhabited areas were taken with no public process, leaving some cities on the verge of disincorporation. The message being sent is that while growth will occur, the state no longer will expend the effort to support how and where it happens.

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As part of a push to close the budget gap in 2011, the Legislature passed SB 89 (Chapter 35, Statutes of 2011) without a public hearing. The measure swept allocations of the Vehicle License Fee (VLF) from cities and Orange County as part of a scheme to fund realignment programs, which included grants for local law enforcement previously paid

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SB 89 Leaves Incorporation and Annexation Policies Upended

population growth of approximately 300,000 to 400,000 people in the coming years. What is the most appropriate land-use solution to meet the Innovative Solutions. Enduring Principles.

challenge of this growing population?

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from the state General Fund. These local VLF revenues included special allocations dedicated by all other cities to assist newly incorporated and annexed territories. The allocations were established by League-supported legislation to compensate new cities and annexations for provisions of the 2004 VLF-property tax swap, which failed to include the in-lieu property tax adjustments that other cities receive. In addition, these VLF allocations supported state Local Agency Formation Commission (LAFCO) policies that encourage service consolidation, including the annexation of islands of inhabited unincorporated territory. Incorporations also uphold state objectives to control sprawl, because LAFCO policies guide city growth but have less effect on unincorporated county growth. The timing of SB 89 could not have been worse for Jurupa Valley, the state’s newest city, incorporated on July 1, 2011. Before Jurupa Valley incorporated, the Riverside County LAFCO determined that county agencies could not provide services to the Jurupa Valley community “… in a more efficient and accountable manner. Incorporation will allow for increased local accountability.” As a result of SB 89, the city lost more than one-third of its General Fund. According to an Oct. 25, 2012, article in the Press Enterprise, “Over the past two fiscal years, Jurupa Valley has lost more than $13 million in state revenue. The city expects to run out of money by June 30, [2013], the end of the current fiscal year.” Without some sort of reinstatement of the lost revenue or having the county contribute funding, Jurupa Valley faces possible disincorporation. Three other newly incorporated cities have also lost funding because of SB 89. Fontana, San Jose and many other cities that made the state-supported policy decisions to annex and serve inhabited continued

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Key Legislation Articulates State’s Vision for Sustainability In recent years, the State of California has enacted key legislation that focuses on reducing greenhouse gas emissions in an effort to address the impacts of climate change: • AB 32 (Chapter 488, Statutes of 2006) requires the California State Air Resources Board to adopt a statewide greenhouse gas emissions limit to be achieved by 2020 that is equivalent to 1990 statewide greenhouse gas emissions; • SB 375 (Chapter 728, Statutes of 2008) requires each metropolitan planning organization to prepare a sustainable communities strategy that, if implemented would achieve the greenhouse gas emissions reduction targets established by the California Air Resources Board; and • AB 857 (Chapter 1016, Statutes of 2002) established state planning priorities that promote infill development, protect environmental and agricultural resources and encourage efficient development patterns.

Western City, March 2013

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Neglecting Annexation and Incorporation Will Not Serve the State’s Growth Goals, continued

unincorporated areas were undercut and lost the revenue they relied upon when making those decisions. The policy signals and future impact of SB 89 are obvious: Cities no longer have any incentive to annex and serve inhabited unincorporated areas. Furthermore, without the prospect of future incorporations the state will be faced with more unincorporated county growth patterns, which historically have been less dense than city-centered development.

SB 244’s Leverage Will Reduce Other Annexations Another recent law with good intentions but unintended consequences is SB 244 (Chapter 513, Statutes of 2011). Inspired by advocates concerned about the poor services and infrastructure conditions for low-income people in county unincorporated areas, this bill was designed to promote annexation by adjacent cities. The advocates sponsoring the bill observed

that the quality of infrastructure and services in cities were superior and sought leverage to increase the likelihood of future annexation. The law requires that any area of proposed annexation contiguous to a disadvantaged unincorporated community must include an application to annex the disadvantaged unincorporated community as well. The bill essentially asks those who seek a financially viable annexation to annex an area that’s less than financially viable in hopes that the monetary incentives of the first annexation are so beneficial that they can sustain the financial losses of annexing the disadvantaged unincorporated community.

On Jan. 6, 2012, the Riverside County LAFCO denied a proposal to annex two unincorporated areas that included about 625 acres adjacent to the City of Desert Hot Springs. The LAFCO report states, “Most importantly, recently enacted legislation prohibits the approval of this annexation since it excludes an adjacent disadvantaged unincorporated community. As a result, staff recommends denial of Annexation 29 to the City of Desert Hot Springs.” The annexation will not be pursued any further.

However, while the intent is understandable, the additional financial burden of annexing a disadvantaged unincorporated community will stall other viable annexations. While the law is still relatively new and interest in annexation has slowed with the economy, one example illustrates its impact.

Prior to the passage of SB 89, city incorporations were already significantly limited by the revenue neutrality law adopted in the early 1990s during yet another state budget crisis. As a result, jurisdictions fortunate enough to make incorporations pay their way, or “pencil out,” were typically the exception rather than the rule.

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Revenue Neutrality Compounds Incorporation Challenges

“Revenue neutrality” essentially means that the incorporating city gets to keep only the amount of revenue that the county was spending in the area prior to incorporation, not the amount of revenue generated within the area. For example, the incorporation proponents for the City of Elk Grove agreed to give the county a percentage of property tax that would decline over 25 years while keeping other taxes, such as the sales tax and

When it comes to economic development, infrastructure and absorbing growth, cities are now on their own.

For more information, please visit:

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@LCWLegal

Los Angeles | San Francisco | Fresno | San Diego

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transient occupancy (hotel) tax. Under the revenue neutrality law, counties are in a position to drive hard bargains that limit the ability of new cities to pencil out. That is why in recent years the VLF allocations became so critical to helping cities like Jurupa Valley incorporate. Some at the state level may view the incorporation question as making no real difference. That view has serious flaws. California anticipates annual population growth of approximately 300,000 to 400,000 people in the coming years. These people will need essential community services and a place to live. What is the most appropriate land-use solution to meet the challenge of this growing population? From a growth perspective, an area proposed for incorporation already has a level of development previously approved by the county; in many cases such growth was not subject to LAFCO review. Incorporation will ensure that future expansion complies with LAFCO policies, which reflect state priorities. City incorporation efforts are also one of the most fundamental expressions of democracy. Affected residents may be dissatisfied with growth patterns approved by the county, the remoteness of government offices, the quality of public services, emergency response times and the lack of parks or other desired

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amenities. Once a city is incorporated, public engagement often increases as more attention can be paid to local needs and desires. The thriving communities of Elk Grove, Rancho Cordova and Citrus Heights in Sacramento County provide examples of the community empowerment that incorporation can bring. Residents of East Los Angeles and Carmel Valley have long desired self-governance for the same reasons.

Going Forward It serves little purpose to rehash the past, but the future offers opportunities for change and rectifying the problems described here. As California’s economy

recovers, the challenges of growth will return. Where should this growth be directed? How will infrastructure and services to support growth be provided? If strong cities are truly important to the state’s economic future and growth goals, then the broken policies affecting California’s cities must be repaired. ■

Looking for Footnotes? A fully footnoted version of this article is available online at www.westerncity.com.

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Neglecting Annexation andBuilds Incorporation Will Notfrom Serve the State’s Growth Goals, continued Fresno’s Planning Process Trust, continued page 7

Many of these organizational partners knew one another well and were accustomed to collaborating. A number of them were skilled in community outreach, and their efforts ultimately generated support from the California Endowment’s Building Healthy Communities grant program.

These long-term partnerships helped to overcome immigrant residents’ resistance and mistrust based on their experiences with government in their countries of origin. Both the city and the community partners recognized the importance of building trust and the central role in the potential success of the planning process. continued on page 18

Textile Art Creates Connections

FROM LEFT Community partners Rev. Sharon Stanley, Kia Lor Xiong, Fresno City Council Member Blong Xiong and Youa Vang helped bring residents together.

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The colorful embroidered fabrics (shown here and throughout this article) of the Hmong and other Southeast Asian immigrants were displayed at many of Fresno’s community meetings, along with art created by other groups. These displays provided an opportunity for participants to express themselves and share their cultural heritage, and the artwork contributed to a festive and welcoming atmosphere.

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The City of Fontana (pop. 200,000), located in San Bernardino County, has been one of the nation’s fastest-growing cities in recent years. Much of the growth occurred in new development north and south of the city’s central downtown area. In the 1980s, housing developments and big-box stores enticed residents to the suburbs, and Fontana’s downtown area declined. A large steel mill closed there in 1984, eliminating numerous jobs. As more businesses and residents left the area, many buildings fell into disrepair, and vacant lots became dumping grounds for debris. The downtown community, with no readily identifiable boundaries, sorely lacked character and charm.

proactively address the downtown community’s key needs, including revitalization, creating an attractive “entrance statement” for downtown and adding affordable housing opportunities for senior citizens.

The Fontana City Council sought a cohesive solution to resolve these challenges. The council adopted an economic development strategy in August 1999, designed to

Senior Housing Frames New Core

Once the strategy was in place, the city began implementing it by developing partnerships with local businesses and residents. Downtown business owners and potential business owners, organizations serving seniors, transportation providers and Fontana residents participated in numerous planning sessions. The solutions produced by these sessions ultimately met the community’s needs and garnered widespread support.

The City of Fontana used sales tax revenues from businesses along its Foothill Freeway corridor to revitalize the downtown area.

Improvements included the addition of affordable senior housing complexes surrounded by a bustling core that comprises the Lewis Library and Technology Center, Fontana Senior Community Center, the Center Stage Theater, Fontana Civic Center, and a growing number of retailers, restaurants and service providers. The city decided to place the affordable senior housing developments in the downtown area because of easy access to nearby existing medical facilities and transportation services (Metrolink rail station and Omnitrans bus routes) as well as the opportunity for downtown revitalization. According to City Manager Ken Hunt, “In a time of reduced resources, providing services to the entire community continues to be a challenge. continued on page 23

The City of Fontana won the Award for Excellence in the Housing Programs and Innovations category of the 2012 Helen Putnam Award for Excellence program. For more about the program, see page 5.

www.westerncity.com

Western City, March 2013

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Western City magazine’s job opportunity section is the source for job seekers looking for positions in local government. When you place a job opportunity ad in Western City magazine, it will be posted at no additional charge on our website. For rates and deadlines, visit www.westerncity. com and click on the “Advertise” link.

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Display Advertising Call Pam Maxwell-Blodgett at (800) 262-1801 to place a display (boxed) ad or for rate and deadline information, or email admanager@westerncity.com. Website Job Postings Display ads are posted on our website at no additional charge. But if you miss the deadline for getting your job opportunity ad into the magazine, you can post it on the Western City website right away. To post your job opportunity ad on our automated website, visit www.westerncity.com or contact Anita Lopez, administrative assistant; email: alopez@cacities.org; phone: (916) 658-8223.

Did You Miss the February Issue? Read it online at www.westerncity.com

We are passionate about local government and recruiting talented professionals with an affinity for public service! n n n

Don’t Miss the Top Hits on Our Website! 1 The Power of Groupthink: The New Denial – March 2012

2 How the Second Amendment Right to Bear Arms Affects the Local Police Power to Regulate Firearms – November 2010

3 The “Front Page” Test: An Easy Ethics Standard – February 2012

4 What You Should Know About Hiring CalPERS Retirees – August 2012

5 The Brown Act and the Perils of Electronic Communication – June 2011

Read these articles today at www.westerncity.com

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Economic Development Manager City of San Mateo, CA

The City of San Mateo, with a population of 98,298, is one of the largest cities on the Peninsula in the San Francisco Bay Area. The City provides a full range of services and offers over 30 parks, six recreation centers, a golf course, and three libraries. The Economic Development Manager will be tasked with planning and implementing the City’s economic development program, assisting businesses in their dealings with the City, and marshaling resources from within the community to assist the City in attracting and retaining businesses. This position plays a key role in maintaining and expanding a healthy local economy and City tax base. Bachelor’s degree required along with significant economic development, business or planning experience. Salary range is $117,853 to $140,566 DOQE, CalPERS 2% @ 55, 3 year final or 2% @ 62, 3 year final.

Please send your cover letter and resume electronically to:

Peckham & McKenney apply@peckhamandmckenney.com Resumes acknowledged within two business days. Call Phil McKenney at (866) 912-1919 for more information. A detailed brochure is available at www.peckhamandmckenney.com. Filing deadline is March 29, 2013.

City of Susanville FINANCE MANAGER

The City of Susanville is recruiting for the position of Finance Manager. The ideal candidate will have extensive knowledge of financial accounting best practices. Candidate must demonstrate the ability to effectively manage staff and optimize accounting functions using 21st century accounting systems. Employee will supervise clerical and technical staff and will be responsible for directing accounting functions for the City. Graduation from accredited four-year college or university with a degree in accounting or equivalent field is required with a CPA Certification preferred. A minimum of five years of increasingly responsible experience in governmental accounting is preferred, with at least three years of supervisory experience. Annual salary starting at $60,114 DOQ with service and merit increases up to $80,559 plus excellent benefit package. To apply, visit www.cityofsusanville.org or call (530) 252-5103. Open until filled. EOE.

Photo/art credits Cover: Tim Roberts Photography/Shutterstock.com Page 3: Lowe R. Llaguno/Shutterstock.com Page 4: Samiylenko/Dreamstime.com Page 5: Courtesy League of California Cities Page 6: Sergey Nivens/Shutterstock.com Page 7: top, Thaikrit/Shutterstock.com; bottom, courtesy City of Fresno Page 8: Richard Thornton/Shutterstock.com Page 9: Thomas Barrat/Shutterstock.com Page 10: Stephen Finn/Shutterstock.com Page 11: Ed Gavryush/Shutterstock.com

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Page 13: top, trekandshoot/Shutterstock.com; bottom, Vlue/Shutterstock.com Page 14: left, courtesy City of Fresno; right: Ahmad Faizal Yahya/Shutterstock.com Page 15: Courtesy City of Fontana Pages 20, 22: Courtesy City of Fresno Page 23: Courtesy City of Fontana

Looking for Information?

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» Community Services » Economic Development & Redevelopment

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» Governance, Legislation & Law

» Municipal Finance » Land Use & Planning » Personnel » Public Safety » Public Trust & Ethics » Public Works & Infrastructure » Youth Visit www.westerncity.com and click on “Topics” to read helpful articles that give you both the big picture on statewide issues and detailed examples from cities throughout California.

Western City, March 2013

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Fresno’s Planning Process Builds Trust, continued from page 14

“Most of these folks had never heard of city planning,” says Reverend Sharon Stanley, director of refugee and immigration ministries for the United Christian Church, one of the city’s community partners. “They had certainly never heard of a General Plan, and many of them — particularly those from a refugee J

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background — had histories of oppression in their own homelands where there had been real consequences for that type of engagement. For instance, Laotians had experiences in Laos where if they spoke against the government, it was at the risk of losing their own lives! They had understandably developed very R

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New & upcoming opportunities . . . City Manager

City of Park City, UT

Community Planning & Building Services Director City of Carmel-by-the-Sea City of San Luis Obispo

Finance Director City of Concord

Teri Black-Brann • 310.377.2612 Carolyn Seeley • 949.487.7606

Monterey is a full service (charter) city comprised of the following departments: police, fire, plans and public works, community services (which includes recreation, conference center, parking and harbor), library, finance, human resources, information resources, and city clerk. Additionally, the City Attorney is appointed by City Council. The City Council is desirous of attracting strategically driven professionals who are capable of guiding the organization toward a fiscally sound and high performing future. A history of innovation and resourcefulness, partnered with a passion for results and accountability will be weighted favorably. Compensation package is negotiable depending on qualifications. For more information and details on the application process, please refer to the recruitment brochure on the CPS website.

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Fresno invited conversation through its partner organizations to create a truly collaborative process with the community’s diverse residents.

To launch the process, the partner organizations employed the universal languages of food, art and music. Live music and big pots of soup helped give the introductory meeting an approachable feel, which was especially important for those residents who were leery of government. The partner organizations helped craft the participation processes using a model that emphasizes one-to-one conversations to build relationships and identify issues. Creating a festive spirit supported the relationship-building efforts and introduced city planning in a way that was relevant to many cultures.

City of Monterey, California CITY MANAGER

The City of Monterey seeks a new City Manager to lead an organization of 465 classified employees and administer a total City budget of approximately $103 million. The vacancy will exist by virtue of the upcoming retirement of the longtenured incumbent.

The city and its partners set the stage by framing the conversation in terms of community values rather than city policies. In developing the outreach program, they asked, “How do we help people feel that ‘this process matters to me, my family and my neighborhood’?”

A Friendly, Accessible Approach

Director of Finance & Information Technology

Located on the breathtaking Monterey Peninsula, Monterey’s natural beauty and historic sights make it a quality residential community and premier tourist destination. With nearly 28,000 residents, Monterey is known for its sense of community and hospitality.

guarded practices, so asking them to say what they want their city to look like was terrifying to most of them. They wondered, how can I say what I really want for my family, my street and my neighborhood without dangerous consequences?”

For more information, contact Stuart Satow CPS HR Consulting 241 Lathrop Way Sacramento, CA 95815 Tel: 916 / 263-1401 Fax: 916 / 561-7205 E-mail: resumes@cps.ca.gov

www.cps.ca.gov/search City Website: www.monterey.org

Initial community meetings brought hundreds of people into the planning process to share their neighborhood priorities firsthand and help shape the new General Plan. Cultural art and food played a key role throughout the process. Potlucks served as an important tool as the meetings gradually shifted from neighborhood venues to city hall. Participants shared meals before the meetings began, making the planning process feel more inclusive and incorporating the familiarity of breaking bread with friends and family. continued on page 20

www.cacities.org

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CITY OF EL CAJON

The success of the

Assistant City Manager

General Plan update

Deadline: 5:00 pm on Thursday, March 28, 2013

process can be

Located 15 miles from downtown San Diego, El Cajon is an established, diverse and vibrant community with 100,000 residents. El Cajon is a full-service city with 448 full-time budgeted positions and a General Fund budget of $53 million and an overall budget of $126 million.

measured in the new higher level of resident engagement.

Salary up to $185,099 DOQ/Competitive Benefits Package

The City seeks an Assistant City Manager to serve as Director of both the Public Works and Community Development Departments and their consolidated management teams. This position will report to the City Manager and may serve as Acting City Manager in his absence. The City seeks an experienced leader who operates with a hands-on style, since this will be a working executive position. The selected candidate will excel in dealing with the City Council, the public, the business/development community and staff. He/she will have the utmost integrity and ethical standards. Management experience in both engineering and planning is considered valuable. Experience in both the public and private sectors would be of additional value. For information on the position, compensation, and the application process, visit www.cityofelcajon.us or contact Human Resources at (619) 441-1736.

Upcoming Opportunities City Of South Lake Tahoe, CA

The City of South Lake Tahoe is a general law city governed by a Council/Manager form of government. The City is a full-service city that encompasses nine square miles with a permanent population of just over 21,500 residents. The City is located within the Lake Tahoe Basin, neighboring the state of Nevada, approximately 80 miles east of Sacramento and 50 miles southwest of Reno.

Please send your cover letter and resume electronically to:

City Attorney

Resumes acknowledged within two business days. Call Phil McKenney at (866) 912-1919 for more information. A detailed brochure is available at www.peckhamandmckenney.com.

The City Attorney is directly appointed by the City Council and is responsible for the administration of all legal affairs of the city, including the City Council, various city commissions, as well as all city departments and officers. The City Attorney is also considered a Department Head and serves on the City Manager’s Senior Management team providing advice and counsel regarding strategic policy and problem solving.

Administrative Services Director The Administrative Services Director (with a strength in Finance) is a critical member of the City Manager’s Senior Management team and reports directly to the City Manager. Finance is just one focus, as this position is generally designed to play a strong supporting role to the City Manager.

Peckham & McKenney apply@peckhamandmckenney.com

Closing deadlines will be late March, 2013 for the City Attorney and early April, 2013 for the Administrative Services Director and Public Works Director.

Public Works Director The Public Works Director is another critical member of the City Manager’s Senior Management team, also reporting directly to the City Manager. The Department includes the motor pool, streets and roads, facilities maintenance, engineering, capital improvement program, and the storm water management program. Professional Civil Engineer preferred. Imagine working, living and playing at the truly one-of-a-kind Lake Tahoe!

www.westerncity.com

Western City, March 2013

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Fresno’s Planning Process Builds Trust, continued from page 18

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»» Analyze proposed legislative and regulatory actions

Likewise, displays of cultural art provided opportunities for community members to express themselves in a way that was comfortable and inviting. Members of the Hmong community created a citizenship quilt that depicts what they value in the neighborhood as well as the changes they want to see.

»» Advocate and track regulations

Time Frame

»» Provide written and oral testimony

The city reached out to thousands of residents, business owners and property owners as the process unfolded. Initial public outreach started in summer 2011. Community discussions and review began in fall 2011 and continued through 2012 and into early 2013. The process will culminate with public hearings on the full Draft General Plan in spring 2013.

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The Regulatory Affairs Director is responsible for:

The California Refuse Recycling Council — Northern District (CRRC), a non-profit trade association, is seeking a Regulatory Affairs Director to advocate policies and objectives involving state regulatory issues regarding all aspects of solid waste management, recycling, and composting in front of the California Environmental Protection Agency’s boards and departments, and other state agencies. Requires a minimum Bachelors of Science degree with some knowledge and experience in the solid waste and recycling industry, or equivalent experience of at least five (5) years in business and government relations. Applied engineering and/or technical experience a plus.

»» Participate in the state rulemaking process

The CRRC is considering an independent contractor or an inhouse, full-time employee for this position. Compensation based on independent contractor or employee status, education and experience.

»» Research technical issues

Please submit your resume for the employee option, or a proposal with a resume for the independent contractor option, no later than April 12, 2013 to Trish Roath at trish@crrcnorth.org.

»» Travel to monthly meetings throughout California

»» Prepare written responses and analyses

»» Write monthly article for CRRC’s newsletter

Police Chief

CITY OF HOLLISTER, CALIFORNIA Salary: $8,764 - $10,652/Month plus Outstanding Benefits

Process Builds Confidence in Local Government The success of the General Plan update process can be measured in a number of ways; one is the new higher level of resident engagement. The previous General Plan was prepared in 2001–02. Fresno Planning Department Assistant Director Keith Bergthold, who attended public

HOLLISTER is located in San Benito County southeast of San Jose just fifteen minutes south of Highway [101] along Route [156]. With 37,000 residents, Hollister maintains a rich agricultural and ranching heritage in a strong community and business-friendly environment. THE POSITION IS VACANT with the City’s intent to fill the position with the most qualified candidate demonstrating excellent technical skills and experience in managing and directing the operations of the City’s Police Department as part of the City’s Management Team. REQUIREMENTS include the equivalent to a Bachelor’s Degree from an accredited College or University with major course work in Public Safety. INTERESTED APPLICANTS can apply directly by April 5th, 2013 by 5:00 pm. Applications are available from the City’s Human Resources Office (375 Fifth Street, Hollister, CA, 95023, (831) 636-4300 ext. 24 or electronically at www.hollister.ca.gov. The City of Hollister is an Equal Opportunity and Affirmative Action Employer.

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Providing translation services in several languages was essential and encouraged full participation.

www.cacities.org

meetings for the previous update, explains that the public notices were typically no more than the required legal notice in the newspaper. Turnout was extremely low at the 20-plus meetings held. “At many meetings,” he says, “I was only the fourth or fifth person there from the community.” But at the public hearing held in April 2012 to consider the five alternatives for this General Plan, Bergthold estimates that 350 people attended, 87 of whom spoke knowledgably on the issues based on their interests and goals. This produced a strong community consensus. In a feature article for Groundswell (groundswellsjv.org), a community network focused on land-use issues, blogger Dan O’Connell wrote about the impressive number of community members who attended: “The breadth of people presenting was stunning — Latino children, Hmong grandmothers, neighborhood activists, mothers with sleeping children on their shoulders, pastors, doctors, public health professionals, air quality advocates, conservation groups, business council reps, League of Women Voters, and on and on. Some comments were given in Spanish and Southeast Asian languages through interpreters.”

By partnering with trusted community organizations, the City of Fresno was able to connect with residents in a collaborative way that helped them feel respected and safe.

in front of city hall. An elderly Hmong woman said, “This is my city hall.” The entire group began chanting, “My city hall, my city hall!” This expression of confidence in local government reflects the success of the extensive public engagement efforts.

As one planning meeting concluded, a group of participants gathered for a photo

continued

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City Clerk

Under administrative direction of the City Manager, assists in planning, organizing, and coordinating the activities of the City Clerk’s function; coordinates municipal elections; provides reference assistance to City departments in areas of responsibility; and oversees the Hercules cable channel. Education: Bachelor’s degree in public administration, business administration, public policy or a closely related field, and/or ten years of responsible on-the-job experience will be considered in lieu of the education requirement. Experience: Six years of responsible professional level experience in, the City Clerk’s function of a public agency, records management and the interpretation of laws and ordinances. Experience must also include progressively responsible financial or analytical experience.

Annual Salary: $78,911 - $100,713 with excellent benefits. For more information on how to apply please visit www.ci.hercules.ca.us or contact the Human Resources Department at jenny.smith@ci.hercules.ca.us. The City of Hercules is an Equal Opportunity Employer. FINAL FILING DATE: 5:00 p.m., Thursday, April 11, 2013.

City Manager City of Burbank, CA Planning is integral to community, fiscal and economic vitality.

www.westerncity.com

Known as the “Media Capital of the World,” Burbank’s approximately 103,000 residents cherish the City’s small town charm and quality of life as well as abundance of amenities and wide range of services. Recently celebrating its Centennial, Burbank is located within the San Fernando Valley just 12 miles north of downtown Los Angeles. Appointed by a five-member Council, the City Manager will oversee a full-service organization of over 1,400 staff and 2012/13 total budget of over $635 million. A Bachelor’s degree in public/business administration or a related field is required; Master’s preferred. Annual salary range is $260,000 to $300,000; appointment will be made DOQ.

Please send your cover letter and resume electronically to:

Peckham & McKenney apply@peckhamandmckenney.com Resumes acknowledged within two business days. Call Bobbi Peckham at (866) 912-1919 for more information. A detailed brochure is available at www.peckhamandmckenney.com. Filing deadline is April 29, 2013.

Western City, March 2013

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Fresno’s Planning Process Builds Trust, continued

The Bigger Picture

Previous assumptions about what works economically and fiscally, what residents need and what trends are shaping the future needed to be re-examined. Planning provides a way for communities to thoughtfully and inclusively grapple with a rapidly changing environment.

Fresno’s planning process occurred in the context of the economic downturn and foreclosure crisis, ongoing regional planning for sustainability, and the loss of redevelopment tools to foster local housing and downtown development.

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Fresno offers a practical example of how communities can address these challenges proactively and build a more robust civic culture and identity through planning. The payoff is a better future for the residents and a stronger bond between local officials and their communities. ■

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Director of Parks & recreation City of Manhattan Beach, California Manhattan Beach is an exciting and beautiful beach community located in the South Bay area of Los Angeles County. It is considered one of California’s most desirable communities in which to work and live. The award-winning Parks & Recreation Department consists of six divisions: administration, recreation services, cultural arts, sports & aquatics, dial-a-ride and volunteers program with annual department budget of $7.02 million. The ideal candidate is a strong hands-on manager with a proven history of leadership. Graduation from an accredited college or university with a Bachelor’s degree in leisure services, recreation management, physical education, or a related field is required. Ten years of professional and managerial experience involving recreation, parks, sports, and senior citizen programs is required. Submit a City employment application form and resume to: City of Manhattan Beach, Human Resources Director, 1400 Highland Ave., Manhattan Beach, CA 90266. Salary range $118,368 - $153,936 annually plus excellent benefits. A formal job announcement is available at: www.citymb.info or by contacting Human Resources at (310) 802-5258. TDD: (310) 546-3501 (hearing impaired). CLOSING DATE: 5:00 PM, Friday, April 19, 2013. EOE

Tightening Your Belt? League of California Cities offers FREE Interim Candidate Searches. View Resumes Online Now! Connect with municipal veterans who can help meet your needs. Free for statewide agencies. No middle man — you contact applicants directly.

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Tips for Inclusionary Meetings Truly inclusive public engagement efforts require making activities accessible physically, culturally and economically. This includes: •

Providing child care during meetings;

Making meetings accessible via public transportation;

Holding meetings at times that are convenient for employed residents;

Providing translation services for multiple languages; and

Providing copies of printed documents for participants to take home and study further.

A variety of public engagement resources are available at www.ca-ilg.org/engaging-publicplanning-housing-sustainability.

More Resources Online For additional information and links to related resources, read the online version of this article at www.westerncity.com.

www.cacities.org

Fontana Revitalizes Downtown With a Focus on Seniors, continued from page 15

The investment of housing monies in downtown Fontana effectively addresses many important community needs, including public safety, transportation, economic development, community revitalization and meeting the needs of our senior community.”

The senior housing developments serve as attractive “bookends” to the city’s revitalized core, each featuring the Spanish Mission-style architecture originally envisioned by the city’s founder in 1913 as well as attractive landscaping. These improvements give the downtown area an aesthetically pleasing, cohesive look. Each complex offers residents numerous amenities, including pools and spas, fitness centers, community and recreation areas featuring pool tables, computer and media rooms, and libraries. As a testament to their success, each complex currently has a waiting list of eligible seniors ready to move in when a unit becomes available.

Amenities for Seniors Fontana built four complexes — the Village, the Fountains, the Gardens and the Plaza at Sierra — between 2003 and 2010, with a total of 384 units for lowincome senior citizens.

Connie Mariano was one of the first residents to move into the Plaza at Sierra in January 2010. “With the other five apartments and a laundry room on my floor, it feels like we have our own little community here,” she says. “I’m very grateful to be able to live at the Plaza and have such easy access to the senior center and the Metrolink.” “The downtown senior housing projects are an outstanding example of how a community can create a high-quality residential development that is also affordable for very low-income individuals,” says Fontana Deputy City Manager David Edgar. The Lewis Library and Technology Center, which opened in 2008, and the Fontana Community Senior Center, which opened in 2010, are within blocks of the senior housing and very popular with residents.

The city focused on providing its senior population with high-quality, affordable housing close to the services they need.

Fontana Mayor Acquanetta Warren says, “It is the strength of our partnerships, our love for children and seniors and our vision for this community that make us a strong city.” With its thoughtful efforts to care for its senior citizens and revitalize the city’s core, Fontana has restored community pride and the heart of downtown. ■ Contact: David Edgar, deputy city manager; phone: (909) 350-6739; email: dedgar@fontana.org.

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Co-sponsored by the League of California Cities

www.uscommunities.org

Consultants To Management

• Organization and Management Studies • Executive Search • Assessment Centers • Compensation and Classification Studies • Strategic Planning • Utility Studies P.O. Box 546 Weimar, California 95736-0546 (530) 637-4559 FAX (650) 240-3933 E-Mail: cwurzberger@mercergroupinc.com

Pinpointing Workable Solutions from 18 Offices Nationwide

Providing a Complete Range of Services to Cities, Counties and Special Districts

• Management, Leadership & Organizational Assessments • Financial Management, Fee Studies & Fiscal Sustainability • Human Resource Management, Labor Relations & Investigations • Recreation, Parks & Community Services • Police, Fire & Communication System Studies • Public Works & Engineering • Library Operations • Planning, Community & Economic Development • Project Management

675 Hartz Avenue, Suite 300 • Danville, CA 94526 866-426-2323 • www.municipalresourcegroup.com

matrix consulting group

Creating value by delivering innovative and sustainable solutions for infrastructure and the environment.

201 SAN ANTONIO Circle, Suite 148 MOUNTAIN VIEW, CA 94040 650.858.0507 • www.matrixcg.net

Planning & Urban Design Environmental Services Public Works Surveying & Mapping GIS Community Engineering

Offices in California, Texas, Illinois, Massachusetts & Washington

Management and operations studies Feasibility studies User fees and cost allocation Police • Fire • Public Works • Utilities Parks & Recreation • Administration Planning & Building

SPECIALISTS IN CLASSIFICATION, JOB EVALUATION AND COMPENSATION

www.rbf.com

Transportation Planning & Engineering Traffic Engineering & Mobility Planning Structrual Water Resources

www.mbakercorp.com

800.479.3808

HELPING LOCAL GOVERNMENT LEADERS

managementpartners.com Budget Strategies ∙ Service Sharing 5663 Balboa Ave., #399, San Diego, CA 92111-2705 915 L Street, #C-102, Sacramento, CA 95814 Brentwood Village, 149 S. Barrington Ave., #726, Los Angeles, CA 90049-2950 1-888-522-7772 • www.compensationconsulting.com Offices in various major cities

www.westerncity.com

Organization Analysis ∙ Performance Management Process Improvement ∙ Strategic Planning Executive Recruitment ∙ Facilitation/Team Building

E XPERIENCE , T ALENT , COMMITMENT TO PUBLIC SERVICE San Jose ∙ Orange County ∙ Cincinnati ∙ 408-437-5400

Western City, March 2013

25

Thank you to all of the 2013 League Partners

Platinum ($15,000+) 2

1,2

2

2

1,2

AAGIE

Apartment Association Greater Inland Empire

2

2

2

1,2

2

2

1

Gold ($10,000+) Burke Williams & Sorensen LLP1,2 Hanson Bridgett LLP1,2

Jenkins & Hogin LLP2 Lewis Investment Company2 Liebert Cassidy Whitmore1

Renne Sloan Holtzman Sakai LLP1 Richards Watson & Gershon1,2

Union Pacific Railroad Wells Fargo Willdan2

Silver ($5,000+) Charles Abbott Associates2 Athens California/Nevada Soft Drink Association2 Cardenas Markets Inc.2 DW Development2 Dart Container Corp.

Dokken Engineering2 Greenwaste Recovery Inc.2 ITRON Interwest Consulting Group Inc. JPMorgan Chase & Co.

4 Creeks2 Amador Valley Industries2 American Red Cross AndersonPenna Partners Inc. Atkins Best Way Disposal2 California Dental Association-PAC California Grocers Association2

California & Nevada IBEW/ NECA Labor-Management Cooperation Trust Cerrell Associates Colantuono & Levin Desert Valley Medical Group Inc./Prime Healthcare2 Garaventa Enterprises2 Ghilotti Construction2 Jose Gonzales2

Kronick Moskovitz Tiedemann & Girard1 Majestic Realty Co.2 Management Partners Meyers Nave1,2 Northrop Grumman Peña’s Disposal2

Prometheus Real Estate Group Inc.2 Republic Services Inc.2 San Manuel Band of Mission Indians2 Santa Ynez Band of Mission Indians2

Schiff Hardin LLP Starbucks TRANE2 Tribal Alliance of Sovereign Indian Nations2 Union Bank US Bank

Morongo Band of Mission Indians2 Bob Murray & Associates National Community Neoteric Entertainment Inc.2 Pacific Code Compliance2 PARS/Phase II Piper Jaffray2 Recology2 Regis Homes2

Riverside Construction2 Janice Rutherford for Supervisor2 San Bernardino Police Officers Association Seifel Consulting, Inc. Solution Strategies2 SummerHill Homes2 Urban Housing Group2 Young Homes2 Zarc Recycling2

Marchetti Construction Inc.2 NASA Services2 Gary Ovitt2 Pacific Code Compliance Pacific Water Quality Association Parsons2 Peters Engineering2 Precision Concrete Cutting Quad Knopf2 RJP Framing2 Republic Services Inc. Robson Homes LLC2 SNW Securities Corp. S&S Drywall2 Santa Monica Police Officers Association

ServPro Severn Trent Enviromental2 Sobrato Organization2 Southern California Concrete Producers Southwest Water Co.2 Swinerton Management Teichert Construction2 Top Grade Construction2 Urban Futures2 Vali Cooper & Associates Inc. Waste Management2 WaterMarke Properties2 Zero Waste Energy LLC

Bronze ($3,000+) HMC + Beverly Prior Architects Herum\Crabtree Attorneys Hill International2 Holliday Rock Company Kinsell Newcomb & De Dios Inc.2 Library Systems & Services LLC Morley Brothers LLC2

Basic ($1,000+) Advance America Alcal2 Ashwood Construction Alameda County Industries2 Alvarez-Glasman & Colvin2 Arnold and Associates2 Avery Associates2 Berliner Cohen Blue Line Transfer Inc.2 CH2M Hill California Association of Physician Groups California Building Industry Association California Contract Cities Association California Hotel Lodging

California Refuse Recycling Council California Water Service Company Check into Cash California Christiani Architects2 Civil Justice Association of California Continental Development Corporation Paul Cook for Assembly2 Cost Control Associates Inc. DiMare Van Vleck & Brown LLC E&J Gallo Ecology Auto Parts Emanuels Jones and Associates

Food 4 Less2 Fresno Police Officers Association GHD Inc. Giacalone Design Gresham Savage Nolan & Tilden PC Hall & Foreman Inc. Harris & Associates HydroPoint Data Systems Inc. Johnstone Moyer Jones Hall Jones & Mayer Kasdan Simonds Weber & Vaughan LLP LaBarge Industries2 Largo Concrete2 Livermore Sanitation Inc.2

Join the Partners Program Today! Contact Mike Egan | (916) 658-8271 | egan@cacities.org

Partial list as of 2/1/2013

1 – Institute for Local Government supporter 2 – CITIPAC supporter


Western City March 2013