Page 1

J U N E 2 011 |

The Monthly Magazine of the League of California Cities

Brown Act Perils of E-Communication p.13 Special Rules for Certain Kinds of Gifts p.8 Tools for City Officials Short on Time p.17

www.westerncity.com


You want a bank with a history of government expertise. Tighter budgets and shrinking revenues are issues facing government agencies. That’s why you want a financial partner with in-depth government banking expertise. Union Bank® has a team of government specialists who can show you ways to streamline your operations and reduce fraud through a suite of customized treasury management services. By engaging the expertise of our subsidiary partners, they can assist you with trust and financing services. And UnionBanc Investment Services, our brokerage subsidiary, can help with your investment needs1. For nearly 150 years, Union Bank has helped public servants like you understand the complexities of banking for the government sector. That’s the strength of a bank that puts the public’s best interests first.

To put our Government Services expertise to work for you, call us today. Government Services: Todd Gregory Executive Vice President 800-833-4758

Financing Alternatives: Kenneth E. Huff Senior Vice President 800-833-4758

Corporate Trust and Custody Services: Vicki Elnick Senior Vice President 800-490-8262

James Moore Senior Vice President 800-833-4758

©2011 Union Bank, N.A. unionbank.com Financing subject to credit and collateral approval. Other restrictions may apply. Terms and conditions subject to change. 1 Investments available through UnionBanc Investment Services LLC, a registered broker-dealer, investment advisor, member FINRA/SIPC, and subsidiary of Union Bank, N.A.: · Are NOT insured by the FDIC or by any other federal government agency · Are NOT Bank deposits · Are NOT guaranteed by the Bank or any Bank Affiliate · Are subject to investment risks, including the possible loss of principal.


CONTENTS 2

Calendar of League Events

3

President’s Message

13

Getting the Most Out of Electronic Communication

E-mail, text messages, social media and online comments make it easy for local officials to unintentionally violate California’s open meeting law.

These tools can be extraordinary time-savers for very busy people.

City Forum

Don’t Miss the League’s Annual Conference: Three Days Packed With Learning Opportunities

17

By Eva Spiegel

Twitter offers an efficient way to gather information; build online relationships with your city’s residents, business community and local media; and more.

Everyday Ethics for Local Officials

Gifts, Part III Special Rules for Certain Kinds of Gifts Local officials must comply with complex gift-related rules, which are explained in this series.

Meet Twitter: Social Media for City Officials Short On Time By Emily Cole

The League of California Cities 2011 Annual Conference and Expo offers numerous educational sessions and resources for cities.

8

The Brown Act And the Perils of Electronic Communication By Kara Ueda

By Jim Ridenour

6

Legal Notes

20

Job Opportunities

27

Professional Services Directory Cover Photo: iStockphoto, Bigstock Photo & Peter Salindong

Register Now for the League’s Annual Conference! The League of California Cities 2011 Annual Conference & Expo will be held Sept. 21–23 in San Francisco. Visit www.cacities.org/AC for program information and to register online.


President Jim Ridenour Mayor Modesto

1400 K Street Sacramento, CA 95814 (916) 658-8200 Fax (916) 658-8240

First Vice President Michael Kasperzak Vice Mayor Mountain View

Second Vice President Bill Bogaard Mayor Pasadena

Immediate Past President Judy Mitchell Council Member Rolling Hills Estates

Executive Director Chris McKenzie

For a complete list of the League Board of Directors, visit www.cacities.org/board.

leaguevents

Magazine Staff Editor in Chief Jude Hudson (916) 658-8234 e-mail: <editor@westerncity.com> Managing Editor Eva Spiegel (916) 658-8228 e-mail: <espiegel@cacities.org>

16 – 17

Advertising Sales Manager Pam Maxwell-Blodgett (916) 658-8256 e-mail: <maxwellp@cacities.org>

Policy Committee Meetings, Sacramento The League’s policy committees review issues of interest to cities statewide and make recommendations to the League board of directors.

June

Classified/Website Advertising and Subscriptions Sara Rounds (916) 658-8223 e-mail: <info@westerncity.com> Contributors JoAnne Speers Patrick Whitnell Associate Editors Carol Malinowski Carolyn Walker Design Pat Davis Design Group, Inc.

17 Legal Advocacy Committee Meeting, Sacramento The committee reviews cases and recommends friend-of-the-court efforts on cases of significant statewide interest to California cities.

July

21 – 22 Board of Directors Meeting, Long Beach The League board reviews, discusses and takes action on a variety of issues affecting cities, including legislation, legal advocacy, education and training, and more.

September

21 – 23 Western City (ISSN 0279-5337) is published monthly by the League of California Cities, 1400 K St., Sacramento, CA 95814. Subscriptions: $39.00/1 year; $63.00/2 years; student: $26.50; foreign: $52.00; single copies: $4.00, including sales tax. Entered as periodical mail January 30, 1930, at the Post Office, Los Angeles, CA 90013, under the Act of April 13, 1879. Periodical postage paid at Sacramento, Calif.

NT RI

ED US IN

W

R

0

GY

10

%

21 Policy Committee Meetings, San Francisco The League’s policy committees review issues of interest to cities statewide and make recommendations to the League board of directors.

Event and registration information is available at www.cacities.org/events. For the latest information on League conferences and events follow us on Twitter @CaCitiesLearn. For legislative and policy updates and more, follow @CaCities.

G

P

Postmaster: Send address changes to Western City, 1400 K Street, Sacramento, CA 95814. Western City Trademark Reg. U.S. Pat. Off. ©2011 League of California Cities. All rights reserved. Material may not be reprinted without written permission. This issue is Volume LXXXVII, No. 6.

League of California Cities Annual Conference & Expo, San Francisco This conference offers dozens of educational sessions, numerous professional development opportunities, hundreds of exhibits and a chance to participate in the League’s policy-making activities at the Annual Business Meeting.

IND EN

E

Supplied by Community Energy

Join Us on Facebook! www.facebook.com/westerncity www.facebook.com/LeagueofCaCities

FSC is an independent, not-for-profit organization that promotes environmentally appropriate, socially beneficial and economically viable forest management worldwide. Products with the FSC label are independently certified to ensure that they come from forests managed to meet the needs of present and future generations.

2

League of California Cities

www.cacities.org


President’s Message by Jim Ridenour

Getting the Most Out of Electronic Communication These tools can be extraordinary time-savers for very busy people.

One of our key responsibilities as elected officials is to communicate effectively with many audiences — our constituents, our representatives at the state and federal levels, our colleagues, local leaders and the media, to name a few.

to the ability to respond promptly to requests and comments from our city residents and local businesses, staying connected electronically helps keep us informed about late-breaking news and issues that affect our communities.

Digital communication offers us a broad palette of choices in terms of how we communicate with these audiences. Beyond basic e-mail, city officials are also using social media such as Facebook and Twitter to stay connected and track news and local information of interest. New tools make it possible for us to more easily keep track of incoming items and respond quickly and efficiently.

Rather than casting a wide net and, in effect, trawling for news items that may or may not be relevant, we can use today’s communication tools to track specific issues and customize the flow of incoming information in a way that best supports our needs and our communities. On page 17, the article “Meet Twitter: Social Media for City Officials Short on Time” describes how you can set up and manage your news feeds from social media to streamline the way you stay informed. I encourage you to familiarize yourself with these tools, which can be extraordinary time-savers for very busy people.

Make Technology Work for You

Such tools help us serve the public more effectively in several ways. In addition

www.westerncity.com

Enhancing Transparency in Local Government

Electronic communication also offers the advantage of sharing information with very large groups of people simultaneously and rapidly. When considering techniques your city can use to increase and enhance transparency in local government, you will discover that social media and electronic communication can provide valuable means of sharing information about your city’s activities and priorities. To maximize the usefulness of these tools, it’s wise to develop and adopt a social media policy for your city or agency. You can find helpful information on how to do this in an article titled “Social Media and Public Agencies: Legal Issues You Should continued

Western City, June 2011

3


Getting the Most Out of Electronic Communication, continued

Know About” (Western City, June 2010) available at www.westerncity.com. The League website also provides a variety of social media resources geared to the needs of local officials at www.cacities.org/ socialmediaresources.

the context of electronic communication, this means that you must use a personal account for your e-mail and other online exchanges of information. The new tools described earlier in this column make it easier than ever before for local officials to comply with these requirements.

Exercise Caution

It’s also worth noting that electronic communication between elected officials has the potential to violate the open meeting provisions of the Brown Act. Be sure to read “The Brown Act and the Perils of Electronic Communication” on page 13 to make certain that you clearly understand the legal limitations associated with such communication. Furthermore, if you are involved in advocacy-related activities, remember that such work must be done on your personal time and without the use of public resources. In

Something Fun: The Boundaries Are Blurring

I’d like to share a personal experience that illustrates how the traditional methods of communication are being transformed by social media. Recently I issued a press release to the local media announcing, “Modesto Mayor Jim Ridenour is searching for 50 teens in Modesto who demonstrate a strong commitment to serving others, have overcome adversity or unique obstacles in life, achieved a significant accomplishment, or serve as positive role models for their peers. These teens will

be named to the inaugural Mayor’s Top 50 Teens program, which aims to boost confidence, provide additional opportunities to get involved in the Modesto community and develop leaders.” A TV news station picked up the release and posted it on its Facebook page — something I had not anticipated, but it significantly increased the likelihood of getting the information into the hands of the people we were trying to reach. This example also underscores the fact that traditional media and the new social media are complementary and symbiotic in sometimes unexpected and delightful ways. I urge each of you to take advantage of the expediency provided by social media and the communication tools that help us serve our communities more effectively. For a list of related resources and links, read the online version of this article at www.westerncity.com. n

CLOSE HAS ITS CONSEQUENCES.

Even when something is slightly off it can have a big impact, especially with property data. Make sure you get the exact data you need with ParcelQuest. It’s the only data company dedicated solely to California property. ParcelQuest, precise data for precise people.

www.ParcelQuestOnline.com

4

League of California Cities

www.cacities.org


Have your top government people call our top government people.

FPO Get access to senior management and increase efficiencies with a relationship-driven bank. At Bank of the West, we understand your need to collect revenues and react to budget gaps. So we offer everything from cash management solutions to public finance and more. Plus, you get access to senior management dedicated to developing strategies for today and tomorrow.

Speak with an experienced Government Banking Relationship Manager at (866 ) 588-1358.

Š2010 Bank of the West. Member FDIC. Financing subject to credit approval.


Don’t Miss the League’s Annual Conference: Three Days Packed With Learning Opportunities by Eva Spiegel

he League of California Cities 113th Annual

Conference and Expo is fast approaching, but

you still have time to register before the Aug. 30 deadline and study the program to select the sessions most

Among the broad range of topics geared to cities are several sessions and expert speakers focused on cutting-edge technology and its role in communication between cities, constituents and others. Understanding how to leverage these tools to effectively provide services and information is a critically important skill for elected leaders and city staff.

relevant for your city. Mark your calendar now to attend

Featured Speakers

Sept. 21–23 at the Moscone West Convention Center

Beth Simone Noveck will speak at Wednesday’s General Session. An expert in open government, Noveck is currently a professor at New York Law School. While serving in the White House as deputy chief technology officer from 2009–11, she coordinated the president’s policy on transparency, participation and collaboration, which resulted in every federal agency and department adopting an Open Government Plan. Noveck’s current work focuses on the future of democracy in the 21st century — specifically, how digital networks impact institutions and how such technologies can be used to strengthen a democratic culture.

in San Francisco. This conference always offers a great investment for your city. During the three-day event, city officials from throughout California come together to attend numerous educational sessions, learn from experts, find resources for their cities and engage with a large network of peers to explore and share solutions to multiple challenges.

Dom Sagolla, co-creator of Twitter, will address attendees at Friday’s featured session. The advent of Twitter and other social networking sites like Facebook and LinkedIn, as well as the popularity of text messaging, have made short-form communication an everyday reality. But expressing yourself clearly in short bursts, particularly in the 140-character limit of Twitter, takes special writing skill. Sagolla’s book, 140 Characters: A Style Guide for the Short Form, deals with the deluge of information in social media and how to command an audience using one’s unique voice.

Eva Spiegel is communications director for the League and can be reached at <espiegel@cacities.org>.

6

League of California Cities

www.cacities.org


Technology-Related Sessions

All This and More

Several interesting sessions will focus on technology-related topics, and panel discussions will cover a wide range of applications and practices. As you plan your annual conference schedule, take note of these tech-related break-out sessions:

In addition, the conference offers specialized program tracks designed for mayors and council members, city managers, city attorneys, city clerks, fire chiefs and municipal human resources/ employee relations staff.

• Caught in the Net — Tools and Tips for Managing Employee Misconduct and Other Issues in Social Media;

Don’t miss this impressive array of engaging sessions, speakers and exhibitors. Come learn from the leading experts in the field. If you haven’t registered yet, there’s still time. Visit www.cacities. org/AC to register online and discover everything in store for you at the 2011 League of California Cities Annual Conference and Expo. n

• Guide to Crisis Communications and Strategic Solutions; • Library Services for Today and Tomorrow; • Smart Grid — What Cities Can Expect; and • Winning Marketing and Networking Strategies for Economic Development Success.

Committed to ... helping California public agencies to fulfill their mission.

Napa SaNitatioN DiStrict “Napa Sanitation District believes that recycling water is an environmentally responsible way to conserve scarce water supplies in the Napa Valley. Meyers Nave’s assistance in assuring compliance with Federal and State regulatory schemes in this area has been invaluable.” ~ Jill Techel, Chair Oakland lOs angeles

www.westerncity.com

sacramentO san FranciscO

santa rOsa FresnO

www.meyersnave.cOm 800.464.3559

Western City, June 2011

7


Everyday Ethics for Local Officials Gifts, Part III

Special Rules for Certain Kinds of Gifts

T

his column is the third installment in a series examining the law and ethics related to public

officials’ acceptance of gifts. The series looks at five key questions that every local official should ask whenever someone does something nice for him or her. The questions (below) and the often complex issues associated with choosing a course of action are explored from a number of angles.

Question 4: What Kind of Gift Is It, and Do Special Rules Apply as a Result? Because there are so many special rules related to certain kinds of gifts, it’s helpful to keep in mind these basic rules of thumb:

3

Gifts from family members (as defined in the Fair Political Practices Commission regulations) are OK and not subject to gift limit and reporting requirements, as long as the family member is not acting as an intermediary for someone else who is the true source of the gift; and

3

Gifts you exchange with friends on birthdays, holidays and similar occasions are OK and not subject to gift limit and reporting requirements, as long as the gifts are of approximately equal value. continued on page 10

Key Gift-Related Questions for Local Officials to Ask 1. What’s the value of what I received? 2. Who gave me what I received? 3. Did I do something in exchange for what I received? 4. What kind of gift is it? (And do special rules apply as a result?) 5. Which of the permitted courses of action do I want to take with respect to the gift?

This column is a service of the Institute for Local Government (ILG), whose mission is to promote good government at the local level. For more information and to access ILG’s resources on public service ethics, visit www.ca-ilg.org/trust. ILG thanks volunteer and retired City Attorney Michael Martello for his assistance with this article.

8

League of California Cities

www.cacities.org


About the Series Part I of the series discussed the ethical principles underlying the gift rules, prohibited actions and disclosure requirements with respect to gifts and the wide variety of gestures that qualify as gifts. It also addressed the options available to a public official who receives a gift the official would rather not disclose or that would exceed the annual $420 gift limit (question 5). Part I appeared in the February 2011 issue of Western City. Part II provided a more detailed discussion of the first three of the five practical questions, including the relevance of who gives the gift. For example, gifts from immediate family (as defined in the regulations) are not subject to reporting and limits, although there can also be an exception for those in “bona fide dating relationships” and for favors from neighbors. Part II appeared in the April 2011 issue. Parts I and II are available online at www. westerncity.com. Click on “Articles” and select “Everyday Ethics.” Part III and the remaining columns in this series will address question 4 — the specific rules applicable to particular kinds of gifts.

www.westerncity.com


Special Rules for Certain Kinds of Gifts, continued from page 8

All other gifts, gestures, gratuities and discounts are subject to fairly complex rules. In crafting these rules, the Fair Political Practices Commission (FPPC) is working to address situations in which gifts are efforts to influence or curry political favor with the recipient or are capable of creating that perception. It’s important to keep in mind that even if these special rules mean that a gift is not, for example, subject to the gift limit, accepting it may obligate the official to step aside from any decision-making process that involves the gift-giver. The FPPC reminded a finance official of this

fact when it gave advice about accepting a scholarship that included travel expenses for a California Municipal Treasurers Association (CMTA) conference. In that instance, the finance official accepted the scholarship. Although the travel expenses were not subject to the gift limit, the travel was nevertheless a gift. The FPPC advised the official to be alert and seek additional advice should a situation arise where the official would be making a decision that would affect CMTA; for example, the decision to pay CMTA dues or renew CMTA membership should be made by someone other than the official who received the scholarship.

Gifts of Home Hospitality

As discussed in Part I, the concept of gifts is very broad and includes meals, beverages and free lodging. An official typically must track the value of such gestures (question 1), report them on his or her Statement of Economic Interests and not let such gestures total $420 or more from a single source in a calendar year. There is one exception, however, for gestures that an official receives in someone’s home. Consequently, an official need not track the value of food, beverages and occasional lodging he receives in someone’s home. The definition of a “home” includes a vacation home.

Types of Gifts Subject to Special Rules Home hospitality

Not reportable/not subject to limits: see page 10

Informational materials

Not reportable/not subject to limits: see page 22

Inheritances

Not reportable/not subject to limits: see page 23

Emergency leave credits

Not reportable/not subject to limits: see page 23

Disaster relief assistance

Not reportable/not subject to limits: see page 23

Personalized plaques and trophies

Not reportable/not subject to limits: see page 24

Wedding gifts

Reportable/not subject to limits: see page 24

Behested payments

Subject to disclosure under other rules: see page 25

Campaign contributions

Subject to disclosure under other rules and may only be used for specified purposes: see page 24

Travel

Subject to complex rules. This will be covered in the August 2011 column.

Tickets/Free admissions

Subject to complex rules. This will be covered in the October 2011 column.

Gifts to public agencies

Subject to disclosure by agency and subject to restrictions on who may use the gift. This will be covered in the December 2011 column.

Note that whether a particular gesture qualifies as one of the above kinds of gifts is the subject of Fair Political Practices Commission (FPPC) regulations and advice letters, which are sometimes fairly detailed. Consult an attorney or the FPPC whenever a gift-related question arises.

10

League of California Cities

www.cacities.org


The 2011 City Hall Directory Find-it-fast information for every city in California!

3 Mayors, Council Members and

City Department Head Information

3 City Addresses, Phone, Fax and Websites 3 Advertisers with Products and Services That Your City Needs

With the 2011 City Hall Directory, the information you need is right at your fingertips. The rules for gifts of home hospitality include an important exception.

For the exception to apply, the host must be present. The host must also own the home (in other words, not be renting it) and must foot the bill for the hospitality. Assuming that the host is indeed footing the bill for the hospitality is OK, unless you are informed otherwise or it is clear from the circumstances that someone else is paying. Keep in mind that the home hospitality exception is intended to apply to genuinely social relationships. As a result, providing such hospitality cannot be part of the host’s compensation arrangement (that is to say, the host cannot be paid to extend hospitality). The host also may not deduct such costs on his or her taxes. So if you attend a dinner or party at the home of a local developer and suspect that the developer’s company is paying for the catering, the home hospitality exception would not apply. The value of what you received at the event would be determined by the type of event it was — for example, a fundraiser, invitation-only event, testimonial dinner, and so on. Stay tuned, as the FPPC is proposing additional regulatory guidance on home hospitality in 2011. continued on page 22

www.westerncity.com

Download the order form online: www.cacities.org/citybooksorderform or call (916) 658-8247.

The Nation’s Top-Ranked Public Finance Firm Building on a 100-year history in public finance which includes the financing of such iconic projects as the Golden Gate Bridge and Carnegie Hall, Orrick’s public finance lawyers have handled thousands of transactions of every type, including: Health Care, Public Power, Higher Education, School Finance, Housing, Securitizations, Indian Tribal Finance, Swaps and other Hedges, Infrastructure, Transportation, Nonprofit Corporations, Water and Wastewater, Pension Bonds, OPEB Bonds and Public Private Partnerships. Orrick also is a leader in helping municipal market participants with post-issuance compliance and enforcement issues, such as Continuing Disclosure, SEC Investigations, Rebate, Defaults/Workouts, IRS Audits and Bankruptcies. For more information about our public finance practice, please contact publicfinance@orrick.com. orrick, herrington & sutcliffe llp los angeles new york orange county portland sacramento san francisco seattle silicon valley washington dc

Western City, June 2011

11


12

League of California Cities

www.cacities.org


The Brown Act and the Perils Of Electronic Communication by Kara Ueda

Technology makes it easy to unintentionally violate California’s open meeting law.

Local public officials are often frequent and zealous users of technology and social media. Given the rapid speed with which people can now send e-mails and text messages and post comments online, a casual e-mail conversation between two city council members or an offhand comment on a newspaper website may quickly and inadvertently turn into a “meeting” under the Brown Act. About the Brown Act Most members of legislative bodies (including city councils, commissions, boards and committees) soon learn upon taking office that a quorum of their membership may not meet to discuss official business unless the meeting complies with the Brown Act. Often referred to as California’s open meeting law, the Brown Act provides that members of a legislative body may hold a meeting when a majority of them — at the same time and place — “hear, discuss, deliberate or take action on” an item within their subject matter jurisdiction. To hold a lawful meeting under the Brown Act, a local agency must, among other things, provide public notice about the meeting for a certain time period and ensure that the public can access the meeting. Thus, if a city council (for example) has five

members, three of the five may not meet at a restaurant to discuss city business unless the city has posted public notice about the meeting and otherwise complies with the Brown Act. The Brown Act does not prohibit individual members of a legislative body from separately providing their own comments and opinions about a matter. A commissioner may write a newspaper editorial about an item the commission approved, and a city council member may give a speech or tweet about local projects under way in the city. Nor does the Brown Act prohibit “one-way” communications where, for example, a city manager transmits a communication to the entire council by e-mail. The “passive receipt” of a document by public officials is different from a commission’s or city council’s collective action or discussion. continued

About Legal Notes This column is provided as general information and not as legal advice. The law is constantly evolving, and attorneys can and do disagree about what the law requires. Local agencies interested in determining how the law applies in a particular situation should consult their local www.westerncity.com agency attorneys.

Kara Ueda is a partner with the law firm of Best Best & Krieger, LLP, and can be reached at <kara.ueda@bbklaw.com> or (916) 551-2822.

Western City, June 2011

13


The Brown Act and the Perils of Electronic Communication, continued

E-Mail Exchanges May Constitute Serial Meetings

More Resources Online For additional related sources, read the online version of this article at www.westerncity.com.

An In-Depth Guide to the Brown Act The League publishes a guide to the Brown Act for the non-lawyer, which is updated periodically. Open & Public IV: A Guide to the Ralph M. Brown Act is available free online at www.cacities.org/opengovernment.

Similarly, the Brown Act prohibits public officials from doing in successive steps what they cannot do in one step. More specifically, the Brown Act provides that a majority of a legislative body may not use any series of communications, either directly or through intermediaries, to discuss, deliberate or take action on any item of business that is within the legislative body’s subject matter jurisdiction. Serial meetings typically occur by either a “hub and spoke” or a “daisy chain” meeting. Hub and Spoke Meetings A hub and spoke meeting occurs when one person acts as the center and communicates with members of the legislative body. For example, Council Member Newman cannot call Council Member Oliver to discuss an item of city business and then call Council Member Peoples to discuss his conversation with council member Oliver. In this meeting Council Member Newman was the hub, and the other two council members were the spokes. Hub and spoke meetings may also occur by e-mail if the individual members e-mail each other instead of calling.

Technology that thinks like you do.

It’s solutions that empower. It’s service that excels. It’s a team that’s walked in your shoes and seen things from your vantage point. It’s a company committed to being the largest software provider solely dedicated to the public sector. It’s Tyler. Where we don’t just make technology that works for you. We make technology that thinks like you. To learn more, visit us at tylertech.com or email us at info@tylertech.com.

14

League of California Cities

www.cacities.org


Daisy Chain Meetings A serial meeting may also occur if Council Member Newman calls Council Member Oliver to discuss an item of city business, and then Council Member Oliver calls Council Member Peoples to discuss the same thing. This type of communication is also called a daisy chain meeting. This type of meeting is particularly likely to occur by e-mail due to the ease of forwarding e-mails.

Thus, a discussion among the three of them ensues electronically on the Internet.

Did the planning commissioners violate the Brown Act? At first glance, it may seem that the planning commissioners did not violate the Brown Act if the blog is available for any member of the public to read. The planning commissioners may believe that basic open government principles were followed because they were not trying to have a secret meeting to discuss official business, and anyone could read their electronic conversation. But Serial Meetings in Cyberspace the planning commissioners also did not have their electronic The Internet provides numerous opportunities for local officials conversation pursuant to a noticed meeting under the Brown to post their thoughts and opinions about city issues. Local Act. Instead, they used a series of communications to discuss and bloggers report on city news and sometimes provide a running deliberate on an item within their subject matter jurisdiction. commentary of council and commission meetings as they hapThe sheer openness of a conversapen. And most newspapers have tion is not the critical factor under websites where members of the the Brown Act. For example, the public can â&#x20AC;&#x201D; and frequently three commissioners could have do â&#x20AC;&#x201D; comment on the articles. instead met in one of their living The potential danger with the When these entries or articles rooms and live-streamed their are especially timely or controonline world is the speed with conversation on the Internet as it versial, they practically invite was occurring. That video would comments by interested residents which a simple comment on a also be public and available for evand local officials. eryone to see and possibly to comblog, a Facebook status update, As of this writing, no court has ment on as it was happening. This specifically ruled on the intersecin-person living room conversation a photo or newspaper article tion of comments posted on the about city business, though, would Internet and the Brown Actâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not comply with the Brown Act. may rapidly become a discussion requirements. However, the same In addition, an issue may raise serial meeting rules that apply to about city business by a quorum particular legal and practical sensie-mail may likely apply to other tivities where any type of comment online conduct such as commentof the legislative body. may not be wise. For example, if a ing about online news stories. local agency will consider a matter The potential danger with the onwhere a person is owed certain due line world is the speed with which process rights or if an agency is a simple comment on a blog, a Facebook status update, a photo involved in pending litigation, local officials should first contact or newspaper article may rapidly become a discussion about city their city attorney for advice on whether they should be making business by a quorum of the legislative body. For example, a local any type of comment, regardless of the forum or medium. These blogger may post an entry about an upcoming planning comconsiderations are separate and apart from Brown Act issues. mission agenda item. Proponents and opponents both weigh in on the blog comments. A planning commissioner reads the entry Conclusion and also posts a comment about the item. A second planning While the use of new technology offers important advantages commissioner also decides to post a comment, and then a third in keeping individuals up to date and informed, the speed with planning commissioner responds to the first two commissioners. which messages may be sent and comments posted can have drawbacks if public officials inadvertently find themselves in the midst of an e-mail conversation or conversation thread with other members of their commission or city council. The law may Looking for Footnotes? eventually catch up to the current technology, but until it does public officials should continue to abide by the general Brown A fully footnoted version of this article is available online at www.westerncity.com. Act principles regardless of whether the communication is in person or online. n

www.westerncity.com

Western City, June 2011

15


Meet Twitter:

16

League of California Cities

www.cacities.org


S

ocial media has become one of the quickest methods of mass communication

available and includes Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn and YouTube.

Social Media for City Officials

SHORT ON TIME It’s easy for anyone to be overwhelmed by the range of social media choices, not to mention the time commitment needed to check these sites and engage with people on them. However, city officials who are short on time may want to consider using Twitter as a quick way to interact with their constituents and local media. Twitter is a web-based service that allows users to communicate through quick, frequent messages called “tweets.” Users send tweets of 140 characters or less, often consisting of a short sentence with a link. Words are frequently abbreviated to stay within the character limit.

Gathering Information City officials can benefit from Twitter without ever sending a tweet. Twitter can be used to: • Find out what people are saying about your city; • Discover breaking news as it’s happening; • Locate useful articles; and • Research topics and issues.

by Emily Cole

Basic Twitter Glossary When you are unfamiliar with the terminology, it can be difficult to get started on Twitter. Here are some useful terms and their definitions. Tweet: A message sent through Twitter that is 140 characters or less. Character counts include punctuation, spaces and links. Follow: Twitter users can follow other Twitter users. When you follow someone’s Twitter account, all of their tweets will appear in your news feed. The more accounts you follow, the more tweets you will see in your news feed. Users are referred to as followers. News feed: The news feed is a chronological list of all of the tweets sent by the various Twitter accounts you follow. Retweet: When you see a tweet from someone else that you would like to share with your followers, you can retweet it. Retweeting helps the original tweet reach a wider audience. Retweets are abbreviated in tweets as RT. Mention: When you type a complete user name in a tweet, that tweet is then visible to that user, regardless of whether or not they follow you. Mentioning a user in a tweet is a way to connect with them directly. Hashtag: A hashtag is a way of tagging a tweet so that it is searchable by topic. When a word or code is preceded by the # symbol, it becomes a hashtag. When you want to tag your tweet, include the hashtag somewhere in the tweet. For example, #cabudget is a hashtag used to track tweets related to the California state budget. You can use www.hashtags.com to identify popular hashtags, and you will begin to see which hashtags are popular as you monitor your news feed.

Tools like www.TweetDeck.com and www.HootSuite.com let you access all of your social media accounts through continued Emily Cole is communications and social media outreach specialist for the League. She can be reached at <ecole@cacities.org>.

www.westerncity.com

Western City, June 2011

17


Meet Twitter: Social Media for City Officials Short on Time, continued

one platform and are especially helpful for monitoring information. These tools can be used to create separate columns to search for key words and sort all of the updates you receive from every Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn account you follow. Using a program of this type allows you to see all of your social media news feeds and searches in one place. This is particularly valuable because in a lengthy chronological news feed it’s easy to miss the updates of greatest interest. City officials can also use TweetDeck and HootSuite on their smart phones to provide instant access to Twitter and Facebook from any location.

Sending Information

Building Relationships

As you begin using Twitter to gather information, you are likely to find items that you will want to share. For example, if the League tweets information about the state budget, you can share that information with your followers by retweeting it. Retweeting is just like forwarding an email. City officials can also send their own tweets including news, articles relevant to their city, meeting notices, real-time tweets from meetings, promotions for local businesses and nonprofits, traffic alerts, updates on city services, photos, video and many other types of information.

Think of Twitter as a way to build online relationships with your city’s residents, business community and even your local media. Your constituents will probably be your main audience, so you may want to focus primarily on sending information that’s of interest to them.

Caution: Keep the Brown Act in Mind All electronic communication between elected officials is subject to the requirements of the Brown Act. To avoid inadvertently violating the Brown Act, read “The Brown Act and the Perils of Electronic Communication” on page 13. Your city attorney is also a valuable resource on “do’s and don’ts” when using social media.

If a resident mentions you or your city in a tweet, you can acknowledge them by replying to them or retweeting their message. Twitter can be used in tandem with in-person efforts as well. For example, if you meet with a resident or local business owner in your city office, you can tweet about the meeting to thank them or follow up with them if they also have a Twitter account. Residents may also use Twitter to engage the city or city officials directly to ask questions or make complaints, which underscores the importance of having a social media strategy in place in your city. Once a well-designed social media strategy is in place and city officials and staff are familiar with its provisions, complaints and requests can be addressed online. Doing so demonstrates your city’s commitment to transparency and responding to its residents. Twitter also gives you a chance to immediately correct misinformation, which can make a significant difference in a 24-hour news cycle. Like any public online forum, Twitter gives the public a place to voice negative comments, but having your own Twitter account gives you a way to instantly respond if needed. Tweets are a twoway street.

City Officials and Twitter

sccpconcrete.com 18

League of California Cities

Sacramento Council Member Kevin McCarty uses Twitter more for gathering information than sending it. “It only takes a short time to check in and catch up on news, and it’s a great resource to stay on top of all kinds of information,” he says. Although he primarily used Twitter for sending information in 2010, he says his office has become more focused on Facebook in 2011 because more of his continued on page 26

www.cacities.org


Anatomy of a Tweet These examples of actual tweets from the City of Temecula provide an opportunity to understand the structure of a tweet. Twitter username (no spaces) @cityoftemecula

Twitter userâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s full name (not the username)

cityoftemecula City of Temecula This link has been shortened by using ow.ly. Another commonly used site that lets you create a shortcut is bit.ly. If you sign up for a free account, you can get helpful analytic data about your links.

Today is the last day to sign up to volunteer at the Temecula Special Games on March 19th. http://ow.ly/45MIn

cityoftemecula City of Temecula RT @stacynelson: Temecula Valley Balloon and Wine Festival earns top honors http://ow.ly/418Uu

@cityoftemecula retweeted @stacynelsonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s tweet. Retweeting is a way to pass along interesting or helpful information to your followers.

A word preceded by the # symbol is called a hashtag. These tags are added to tweets so people can search by topic. Hashtags can be used for a place, event, specific topic and much more. Useful hashtags for California local officials include #cabudget and #cacitiesannual.

cityoftemecula City of Temecula Cal State San Marcos at #Temecula has opened! Check out the facility on Margarita Rd. Awesome educational opportunities!!

Keenan & Associates introduces Futuris, a comprehensive program that provides all your GASB 43 and 45 compliance needs from a single source. For more information please contact Steve Gedestad at 800.338.5247 901 Calle Amanecer, Suite 200, San Clemente, CA 92673 www.keenan.com License No. 0451271

Innovative Solutions. Enduring Principles.

www.westerncity.com

Western City, June 2011

19


J

O

Western City magazine’s job opportunity section is the source for job seekers looking for positions in local government. When you place a job opportunity ad in Western City magazine, it will be posted at no additional charge on our website. For rates and deadlines, visit www.westerncity.com and click on the “Advertise” link.

B

O

P

P

O

R

T

U

N

I

T

I

E

S

Display and Classified Advertising

Website Job Postings

Call Pam Maxwell-Blodgett at (800) 2621801 to place a display (boxed) ad or for rate and deadline information. Or e-mail: <admanager@westerncity.com>.

Display and classified ads are posted on our website at no additional charge. But if you miss the deadline for getting your job opportunity ad into the magazine, you can post it on the Western City website right away.

Call Sara Rounds at (916) 658-8223 for classified advertisements. Columntype classified ads are $18 per line with a five-line minimum (approximately 35 characters per line). You must call to confirm receipt.

To post your job opportunity ad on our automated website, visit www.western city.com or e-mail <info@westerncity. com> for more information.

Did You Miss the May Issue? Read it online at www.westerncity.com CareersInGovernment.com Employees are looking for YOU! Post your jobs on CIG — The Public Sector Job Board

CITY OF HERCULES Nestled in the hills of Contra Costa County and framed by a beautiful vista of San Pablo Bay, sits the picturesque City of Hercules. A city of almost 25,000 residents, Hercules is ideally located midway between San Francisco and Napa, with handsome homes, safe neighborhoods and an extensive network of biking and walking trails.

CITY MANAGER

The new City Manager will join the City of Hercules during a time of significant transition and economic challenge and will have the ability to lead a major transformation within this community. The ideal candidate will have a minimum of five years of executive level management within local or regional William Avery & Associates government along with Management Consultants a Bachelors degree 31/2 N. Santa Cruz Ave., Suite A in Public or Business Los Gatos, CA 95030 Administration or a 408.399.4424 related field is required. Fax: 408.399.4423 email: jobs@averyassoc.net A Masters degree is www.averyassoc.net highly desired. Salary is negotiable, DOQ. To apply, submit letter of interest, resume with current salary and five work references (email preferred) by July 1, 2011 to Paul Kimura. A formal job announcement is available on our website at http://www.averyassoc.net/jobs.

20

League of California Cities

Registration & postings are EASY AND QUICK Thousands of CIG links on University, College and career boards Manage all jobs and resumes independently 24/7 CIG advertises in major public sector publications Our focus is on you — we are available to meet your needs anytime via email, fax or voice:

(818) 991-9653

www.careersingovernment.com info@careersingovernment.com

Serving You Since 1996

as America’s Premiere Public Sector Job Board

City Manager, Huntington Park, CA With a long distinguished history, the City of Huntington Park has evolved from a small community of 526 people in 1906 to a bustling retail center for the Los Angeles County Region with a current population of about 64,617. Huntington Park is seeking a City Manager to oversee 200 full-time and 60 part-time staff members and total budget for the FY 20102011 is $88,264,115. The selected candidate will have a broad network of knowledge and experience. The ideal candidate will possess an open door policy for feedback and suggestions. The incoming City Manager will be open, honest and have excellent verbal and written communication skills. Someone who is politically astute but apolitical will be valued. The new City Manager should be ready to step into the role with enthusiasm and confidence. Someone who strives for positive relationships with the community is being sought as the new City Manager. The selected candidate should have at least ten (10) yeas of progressively responsible experience in the management and administration of municipal government, preferably with supervisory and Human Resources experience. A Bachelor’s Degree in Public Administration, Business Administration, Political Science, or a closely related field is required. A Master’s Degree is highly desirable. The salary for the City Manager is open and is dependent upon qualifications. The City also offers an attractive benefits package. If you are interested in this outstanding opportunity, please apply on line at www.bobmurrayassoc.com. Please contact Mr. Regan Williams or Mr. Wesley Herman at (916) 784-9080 should you have any questions. Brochure available. Closing date June 20, 2011

Closing date June 17, 2011.

phone 916 •784•9080 fax 916•784•1985 www.bobmurrayassoc.com

www.cacities.org


J

O

B

O

P

P

O

R

T

U

N

I

Temporary Staffing for All Municipal Departments!

MuniTemps Times “Cities Look to Contract Staffing to Preserve Vital Public Services”

Today’s fiscal crisis threatens vital City services! How can Cities meet this crisis? MuniTemps is the answer! Our professional contract staff can help you meet your short-term needs at a budget-friendly cost.

Serving All California Cities

1-866-406-MUNI (6864) www.munitemps.com

UTILITIES MANAGER – City of Buena Park Salary: up to $115,793/year plus benefits An excellent opportunity exists for a professional with exceptional technical, problem solving, and interpersonal skills to join the City of Buena Park’s utilities maintenance team. The Utilities Manager will plan, organize, and manage the storage, transmission, distribution, construction, and repair of city water and sewer systems. Requires: High School graduation & Five years of water production and distribution systems experience, including two years of experience in a supervisory capacity. Must possess a Grade IV Water Distribution Certificate (D4). View a comprehensive job brochure at: www.buenapark.com/hr

Town Manager

Town of Woodside, CA Characterized by wooded hillsides, scenic vistas, narrow country roads, and natural stream corridors, Woodside is a unique and vibrant rural residential community of close to 5,700. Located on the Peninsula in San Mateo County, the Woodside Town Council is seeking a professional local government manager to oversee the Town’s 21 full-time employees and 2010-11 budget of $8.2M. Ideal candidates possess strong interpersonal skills, staff development and leadership skills, and general finance and budgeting skills as well as knowledge of planning, building, and land use. Bachelor’s degree in public or business administration or a closely related field is required; Master’s degree is preferred. Salary DOQ.

www.westerncity.com

Please send your cover letter and resume electronically to:

Peckham & McKenney apply@peckhamandmckenney.com

Call Bobbi Peckham at (866) 912-1919 for more information or to request a detailed brochure. The brochure is also available on our web site at www.peckhamandmckenney.com. Filing deadline is August 12, 2011.

T

I

E

S

City Manager City of Santa Ana, CA The City of Santa Ana, population 370,000, is located 33 miles southeast of Los Angeles and 90 miles north of San Diego. The City is seeking a City Manager to oversee a budget of $472 million and 1,512 authorized full-time positions. The incoming City Manager will be a visionary with a strong set of leadership skills. The incoming manager will inspire confidence with the City Council, department directors and staff and will treat each Council Member equally and keep them well informed. An individual who has experience working effectively with community leaders and individuals with a transparent form of management will excel in this position. The ideal candidate will be a progressive and forward thinker, creative and innovative and able to continue to build upon the positive work environment in Santa Ana. Candidates should possess a well rounded background and understanding of municipal issues including financial management, planning and land use, economic development, housing, and labor and employee relations. The ideal candidate will possess a bachelor’s degree in Public Administration, Business Administration or similar field, a master’s degree is desirable. The salary for the City Manager is open depending on qualifications and experience. If you are interested in this outstanding opportunity, please apply on line at: www.bobmurrayassoc.com Please contact Mr. Regan Williams at (916) 784-9080 should you have any questions. Brochure available. Closing date July 15, 2011.

phone 916 •784•9080 fax 916•784•1985 www.bobmurrayassoc.com

Western City, June 2011

21


Special Rules for Certain Kinds of Gifts, continued from page 11

J

O

B

O

P

P

O

R

T

U

N

I

T

I

E

S

Fire Chief, Salinas, CA The City of Salinas, population 144,276 is located fifteen miles inland from Monterey Bay, 325 miles north of Los Angeles and 106 miles south of San Francisco. Salinas City limits cover approximately 23.5 square miles. The City is seeking a Fire Chief who will provide the overall management of the Fire Department. The incoming Chief will oversee the Deputy Fire Chief, Training and Emergency Medical Services Battalion Chief, and 2 Administrative Assistants and a budget of $16.5 million. The ideal candidate will be a leader and be willing to make decisions for the greater good of the Department. An individual with outstanding interpersonal and communication skills, a track record of successful management and a team oriented approach will excel in this position. The incoming Chief is expected to promote an outstanding image of the Department to the City Council, City Manager, city staff and community. Trust, confidence, professionalism, and recognition for talent will be highly valued traits. An example of the education and experience which most likely demonstrates the skills, knowledge and abilities required to perform the duties would be any combination equivalent to a Bachelors degree in Fire Science, Business Administration, Public Administration or related field, and seven years of responsible supervisory or administrative experience in the fire service. A certificate of completion of the Instructor Training Course given under the California State Fire Training Program is required. The salary range for the Fire Chief is $168,144-$204,384 and is dependent upon qualifications. The City also offers an attractive benefits package. If you are interested in this outstanding opportunity, please apply on line at www.bobmurrayassoc.com. Please contact Mr. Bob Murray at (916) 784-9080 should you have any questions. Brochure available. Closing date July 1, 2011.

phone 916 •784•9080 fax 916•784•1985 www.bobmurrayassoc.com

FIRE CHIEF — City of Eureka, California

Eureka – A Victorian Seaport Situated along the spectacular North Coast, the City of Eureka is one of the California’s best-kept secrets. The City’s 9 sq. miles and its 25,000 residents are bordered by beautiful and functional Humboldt Bay on one side and on other side by the mountains lush with giant redwoods. The City’s municipal fire department provides service from its three fire stations via a staff of 41 personnel and annual budget of $5.8 million. The ideal candidate will be an innovative leader with a high level of integrity and the ability to inspire others to work towards the City’s vision. Graduation from an accredited college or university with a minimum of a Bachelor’s degree in Public Administration or closely related field and seven years of increasing experience as a Fire Captain II, Battalion, Division, or Assistant Fire Chief. Annual salary range is up to $122,422 with excellent benefits including CalPERS (3%@50) and a 10% duty stipend. Please submit a City Application, cover letter and resume to: City of Eureka, Personnel Department, 531 K Street, Eureka CA 95501. For a complete job description and application packet contact the City at the above address, or call the City’s job line at (707) 441-4134 to request that one be mailed to you, or you may apply online at http://www.eurekawebs.com/cityhall/human/ positionsAvailable.cfm? CLOSING DATE: JUNE 30, 2011

22

League of California Cities

Informational Materials

The gift rules also recognize the benefits of public officials receiving information that helps them better serve the public. As a result, informational materials are not subject to gift limit and reporting requirements. Informational material is anything that serves primarily to convey information and is provided to assist a public official in the performance of his or her official duties. Exempted materials include books, reports, periodicals, maps, free or discounted admission to educational conferences and on-site demonstrations or tours. For the latter kinds of activities (tours, demonstrations and admission to conferences), the FPPC examines four factors in determining whether the activity is of a truly informational nature: 1. Whether the activities will primarily convey information relevant to the performance of the official’s duties; 2. Whether the activities are specifically designed for public officials; 3. Whether the activities are formally structured to convey information to the officials; and 4. Whether the activities appear extravagant in value or nature in relationship to the information conveyed. In applying these criteria, the FPPC has also examined whether there are indications that the travel serves recreational (instead of informational) purposes. A Practical Example For gift reporting and limit purposes, what appears to be one invitation and/or gesture may actually need to be divided into its components. This happened to one local official who asked the FPPC about accepting a trip to France that included an offer to pay for travel, lodging, conference admittance, concert attendance and a tour of a frigate. The FPPC analyzed each gesture separately under the various gift rules. This meant the admittance to the conference was analyzed under the “informational materials” rules, the transportation, meals and lodging

www.cacities.org


were analyzed under the travel rules, and the concert and frigate tour were simply analyzed as gifts (subject to the general reporting requirements and annual limits). The FPPC is also proposing refinements to its rules in this area.

Seek Professional Advice Although the Institute for Local Government endeavors to help local officials understand laws that apply to public service, its informational materials are not legal advice. In addition, attorneys can and do disagree on the best interpretation of the complex rules relating to public service ethics. Officials are encouraged to consult an attorney or the Fair Political Practices Commission for advice on specific situations.

Inheritances

Inheritances are also exempt from the gift limits and reporting requirement. Inheritances usually involve the distribution of a person’s assets following his or her death. The FPPC has also acknowledged, however, that federal tax policy permits limited distributions from an estate during a person’s life. As a result, the FPPC was willing to find that a distribution of assets from the estate of a relative, made during the relative’s lifetime to avoid estate taxes, does not constitute reportable “gifts” and is not subject to gift limits. Note, however, that if such inheritance is converted into a reportable interest (for example, converting cash into a stock investment), then the interest must be disclosed on the official’s Form 700. Emergency Leave Credits

Emergency leave credits donated to an official through his or her employer’s emergency leave program are exempt from the gift limits and reporting requirements. To not be a gift, the leave program must be available to all employees in the same job classification or position as the public official. Leave credits include vacation and sick or compensatory time off. The exemption does not extend to donations of cash. Disaster Relief Assistance

Food, shelter or similar assistance received by an official through a disaster relief program is not considered a gift subject to the reporting requirements or gift limits. The assistance must be received from a governmental agency or 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization. The assistance must be available to members of the public regardless of official status. continued

www.westerncity.com

J

O

B

O

P

P

O

R

T

U

N

I

T

I

E S

City Manager

City of Corvallis, OR The City of Corvallis is nestled in the heart of Oregon’s Willamette Valley, within 90 minutes of the Portland Metropolitan area, world class skiing, vineyards, and the spectacular Oregon Coast. Corvallis has a residential population, including Oregon State University, of just over 54,600 and is the county seat for Benton County. The City Council is seeking a strong communicator who embraces open government as well as having solid management, financial and organizational skills to lead this high performing organization of 450 full time employees. Bachelor’s degree required, Master’s preferred, along with minimum 7 years experience. Salary DOQ with competitive benefits.

Please send your cover letter and resume electronically to:

Peckham & McKenney apply@peckhamandmckenney.com

Call Phil McKenney at (866) 912-1919 for more information or to request a detailed brochure. The brochure is also available on our web site at www.peckhamandmckenney.com. Filing deadline is June 30, 2011.

City of Alexandria, Virginia City Manager The City Manager for the City of Alexandria, Virginia (pop. 140,000 and a land area of 15.75 square miles) is an extraordinary opportunity for a highly experienced, local government chiefexecutive to provide strong leadership and management to a full-service organization with approximately 2,600 staff and a budget of almost $600 million. The City Manager serves as the administrative head of the government, overseeing a talented and well qualified executive management team. He or she must be a confident, “hands on,” creative, and innovative leader who is capable of operating in a robust and dynamic environment. The ideal candidate will also be intuitive, perceptive, and know when to lead and when to be supportive. The selected candidate must also be results-oriented and committed to serving the community, with the ability to provide vision on an array of complex and interesting topics impacting the citizens of Alexandria. Competitive salary and executive benefits package. Apply immediately via email to apply@ralphandersen.com. Confidential inquiries encouraged. Detailed brochure available at www.ralphandersen.com. Contact Robert Burg, Ralph Andersen & Associates, at (916) 630-4900.

Western City, June 2011

23


Special Rules for Certain Kinds of Gifts, continued

Personalized Plaques

during an event; officials should be alert to the need to analyze whether the other benefits (for example, food and beverages) they received in attending the event need to be reported or are subject to the gift limits.

A personalized plaque or trophy with a value of less than $250 is not a gift that needs to be reported or counted toward one’s gift limit from that particular source. Typically plaques are presented

J

O

B

O

P

P

O

R

T

U

N

I

T

I

E

S

The public has a right to know who gives gifts, including wedding gifts, to public officials.

City Administrator

City of Carmel-by-the-Sea, CA Located 120 miles south of San Francisco on the Monterey Peninsula, Carmel is characterized by its white sand beach, coastal vistas, tree-lined streets, and European flavor all within one square mile. This natural beauty is a cultural mecca for the performing and visual arts and offers its 4,000+ residents and visitors quality services and amenities. Carmel has a high median household income and property values and is known for active public participation. Appointed by a five-member Council, the City Administrator will oversee a total staff of 76 and approximately $14M budget. Proven experience in municipal finance/budgeting, land use/ planning, and/or engineering is desired. Bachelor’s degree in public or business administration or related field required; Master’s preferred. Salary is DOQ.

Please send your cover letter and resume electronically to:

Peckham & McKenney apply@peckhamandmckenney.com

Call Bobbi Peckham at (866) 912-1919 for more information or to request a detailed brochure. The brochure is also available on our web site at www.peckhamandmckenney.com. Filing deadline is July 8, 2011.

City Attorney City of Eureka, CA

Situated along the spectacular Northern California coastline, the City of Eureka, also the Humboldt County seat, with a population of 25,500 is the largest coastal community north of San Francisco. The City Attorney is appointed by and takes direction from the City Council and provides counsel to all City Departments, the City Council, and various Boards and Commissions. Experience in municipal law including litigation, land use, code enforcement, labor relations and environmental law desired. A Juris Doctorate from an accredited school of law and the ability to practice law in California is required. Salary DOQ with competitive benefits.

24

League of California Cities

Please send your cover letter and resume electronically to:

Peckham & McKenney apply@peckhamandmckenney.com

Call Phil McKenney at (866) 912-1919 for more information or to request a detailed brochure about this tremendous opportunity. The brochure is also available on our web site at www.peckhamandmckenney.com. Filing deadline is June 30, 2011.

Wedding Gifts

The general rule is that an official must report wedding gifts, but such gifts are not subject to the annual limits. There is also an issue of how much the official should report. The usual rule is when a gift is given to an official and his or her spouse or child, the gift is considered a gift to the official for purposes of the reporting requirement and gift limit (for more information on the gifts-to-family issue, read the online version of this article at www.westerncity. com). However, there is a special rule for wedding gifts that says the official must report only half the value of the gift. The assumption is that wedding gifts usually are for the couple, so reporting half the value represents the official’s share. There is an exception if the gift is adaptable to use by one spouse and specifically intended for exclusive use by that spouse. When the gift is of that nature, its full value is attributed to the spouse who will enjoy its exclusive use. The FPPC is also considering making changes to the wedding gift rules. Campaign Contributions

Technically, campaign contributions fit within the definition of a gift (something received but not paid for). As such, they would be subject to the limitations on

www.cacities.org


gifts were it not for a special exemption. The exemption recognizes that those who receive campaign contributions must disclose such contributions under other provisions of the Political Reform Act. As a result, campaign contributions — including rebates or discounts received in connection with campaign activities — are not subject to the limitations on gifts. However, campaign contributions must be reported in accordance with the law governing campaign disclosure. More to Come

The August, October and December 2011 installments of the gift series will examine travel, tickets and free admissions, and gifts to public agencies, respectively. n

When an Official Asks for Gifts for Others: “Behested” Payments Behested payments are donations made to a government agency or charity at the request of an elected official for a legislative, governmental or charitable purpose. Behested payments are not considered gifts, but must be disclosed if donations from a single source in a calendar year equal or exceed $5,000. These occur when an official asks a person or business to make a donation to the official’s favorite charity or to contribute to an agency project: for example, a skate park. If the payment equals or exceeds $5,000, the official must complete the new FPPC Form 803 within 30 days and should file it with the local filing officer. For more information, visit www.ca-ilg.org/ behestedpayments.

www.westerncity.com

More Resources and Footnotes Online Footnotes, additional information and sample materials related to gift issues for local officials are available at www.ca-ilg.org/gifts.

J

O

B

O

P

P

O

R

T

U

N

I

T

I

E S

FINANCE DIRECTOR — City of San Rafael Salary is competitive with an excellent benefits package. EOE

Reporting directly to the City Manager, the Finance Director manages and oversees the activities and operations of the Finance Department comprised of nine employees, including financial reporting, general accounting, payroll, budget preparation, treasury function, debt administration, revenue management, business licensing and purchasing programs; and coordinates assigned activities with other City departments and outside agencies. The ideal candidate will be an experienced leader with effective interpersonal skills and considerable senior management experience in municipal finance. To be considered for this position, complete a City of San Rafael job application by visiting: www.calopps.org. In addition, please submit a cover letter and resume highlighting related background education and experience to: City of San Rafael, Human Resources, Room 210 1400 Fifth Avenue, San Rafael, CA 94901 For a detailed job description, please visit the City’s website at www.cityofsanrafael.org. Contact Human Resources at 415-485-3063 or Khelri.Jhovahn@cityofsanrafael.org. Filing Deadline: June 30, 2011

Police Lieutenant, University of California, Merced Located approximately four miles from the town of Merced in the Central Valley of California, the University of California, Merced’s mission is embodied in its proud claim of being the first American research university of the twenty-first century. The UC Merced Police and Public Safety Department provides police, security, and emergency management services for the university campus, which currently comprises a combined student, faculty, and staff population of 6,000. The Department is now seeking a Lieutenant to serve as second-in-command to the Chief in the management of a budget of $2.2 million, a staff of 11 sworn officers and 12 civilians, and over 30 paid and volunteer student employees. The Police Department is seeking candidates with high ethical standards who can provide leadership for the staff and instill trust within the campus community. Candidates should possess excellent community relations skills and a customer-service orientation. This position requires a bachelor’s degree in criminal justice or a related field, as well as a POST advanced certification. The salary for the Lieutenant position is open and dependent upon qualifications. If you are interested in this outstanding opportunity, please apply on line at www.bobmurrayassoc.com. Please contact Bob Murray at (916) 784-9080 should you have any questions. Brochure available. Closing date July 5, 2011. phone 916 •784•9080 fax 916•784•1985 www.bobmurrayassoc.com

Western City, June 2011

25


Meet Twitter: Social Media for City Officials Short on Time, continued from page 18

constituents use it. “I use Twitter mostly for tracking local and state news,” he adds.

relevant and sometimes fun things to our Facebook fans,” says McCarty, “but we’re cognizant about not overloading people with too much information and updates.”

McCarty and his staff also make it a priority to meet weekly to discuss social media strategies for his Facebook page. “It’s important to us that we send out

J

O

B

O

P

P

El Cerrito Assistant City Manager Karen Pinkos, on the other hand, uses Twitter

O

R

T

U

N

I

T

I

E

The City of Inglewood, CA (population 116,000) is in a unique position on the shore of the Pacific Rim and acts as a gateway to major commercial centers in the United States and internationally. Close proximity to the bustling harbors at Los Angeles and Long Beach, as well as access to four major freeways, facilitates domestic and international trade through the City. Inglewood is now seeking a Community Development Director to oversee a Department comprising five divisions (Housing, Community Development Block Grant, Planning, Building and Safety, and Redevelopment/Economic Development), 48 employees, and a budget of $19.4 million. The new Community Development Director will be responsible for the implementation of the $2 billion Hollywood Park Tomorrow project, which comprises 237 acres of mixed-use development. The City desires a proven, effective leader with the ability to manage a complex organization. Candidates for this position should possess a bachelor’s degree in planning or a related field. The salary for this position is open and dependent upon qualifications. If you are interested in this outstanding opportunity, please apply on line at www.bobmurrayassoc.com. Please contact Bob Murray at (916) 784-9080 should you have any questions. Brochure available. Closing date July 8, 2011. phone 916 •784•9080 fax 916•784•1985 www.bobmurrayassoc.com

Just announced . . .

City Manager City of Tustin

Visit the TB&Co. website for the latest information on Tustin as well as other leadership opportunities.

26

League of California Cities

For additional resources, read the online version of this article at www.westerncity.com.

S

Community Development Director, Inglewood, CA

Teri Black-Brann • 310.377.2612 Carolyn Seeley • 949.487.7606 www.tbcrecruiting.com

More Resources Online

both personally and in tandem with her city’s official Twitter account. The city’s account follows agencies and organizations connected with or directly related to El Cerrito, including the local newspaper, the county, the state and the League. Pinkos uses her personal account to search for tweets about the city, monitor any official city information that is being retweeted, and send and retweet information related to her city and activities as assistant city manager. Using TweetDeck to help manage her time, Pinkos has been able to integrate Twitter into her daily routine. “It’s the same to me as answering and sending e-mail or taking a call,” she says. One of her biggest concerns when she first started using Twitter was getting caught up in negative conversations. While her city is still developing its formal policy for social media, she has informally adopted a policy of not responding to tweets unless a factual correction needs to be made or a specific question can be answered. However, she also realizes that it is crucial for the city to be involved in social media. She adds, “Now that social media is a part of life, it’s another tool in our public information toolbox. We continue to provide as much outreach as possible and be transparent and open as a government. Using Twitter has become part of how we do that. Being involved and putting out our message is critical — otherwise it will be done for us, and not necessarily how we want it.” Learn More About Twitter and Social Media

The League has compiled a variety of social media resources, including a www.cacities.org


Connect With the League

complete PowerPoint presentation on getting started with Twitter, at www.cacities.org/socialmediaresources. The page also offers a comprehensive list of known Facebook and Twitter accounts for California cities, best practices, white papers on legal issues, sample social media policies and information about Facebook and LinkedIn.

P

R

O

F

E

S

S

I

O

City officials can connect with the League on Twitter using @CaCities for updates on advocacy efforts and @CaCitiesLearn for updates on League events and learning opportunities. If you prefer Facebook, visit the League’s main Facebook page at www.facebook.com/leagueofcacities and

N

A

L

S

E

R V

I

C

William Avery & Associates, Inc. Labor Relations / Executive Search / Management Consulting 31/2 N. Santa Cruz Ave., Suite A Los Gatos, CA 95030 408.399.4424 Fax: 408.399.4423 email: jobs@averyassoc.net www.averyassoc.net

E

S

Western City magazine at www.facebook. com/westerncity. The League’s main Facebook page also features a Twitter tab on the left side of the profile, which links you to the last five tweets from the League. n

D

I

R

E

C

T O

R Y

“All About Fit” Bobbi C. Peckham

Phil McKenney

Sacramento www.peckhamandmckenney.com

(866) 912-1919

916.630.4900 Ralph Andersen & Associates

There’s an Entire Team Behind Every Assignment

Teri Black-Brann 310.377.2612 Los Angeles www.tbcrecruiting.com

• Executive Recruitment • Management Consulting • Public Safety

www.RalphAndersen.com

Your Executive Search Solution™

Celebrating our 31 st year! Executive Search Leadership Development Human Resources Consulting Career Transition 916.977.3700

www.westerncity.com

wilcoxcareer.com

Western City, June 2011

27


P

R

O

F

E

S

S

I

O

N

A

L

S

E

R V

I

C

E

S

D

I

R

E

C

T O

R Y

A Full Service Right of Way & Real Estate Consulting Firm n n n n n n

Program Planning / Consulting Project Coordination Real Estate Appraisal Property Acquisition Residential / Business Relocation Uniform Act Compliance

Executive Recruitment for Senior Level Positions

Norman Roberts 2300 Contra Costa Blvd., Suite 525 Pleasant Hill, CA 94523

Valerie Roberts

PO Box 16692 Beverly Hills, CA 90209 Telephone: (310) 606-0628 Email: robertsrcg@msn.com Web: www.robertsrcg.com

800.558.5151 tel 925.691.8500 • fax 925.691.6505

arws.com

San Mateo Santa Ana Pleasanton Sacramento Salinas

Environmental & Sustainable Programs Building Plan Review Building Inspection Construction Management Municipal Engineering Code Enforcement Fire & Life Safety

(888) 794-2016 www.csgwebsite.com

Extreme Retirement • Retirement

Incentives and Enhancements Alternatives • GASB 45 Funding Programs • 457 Deferred Compensation Plans Leave the extreme to them... ...keep it simple with PARS. • FICA

800.540.6369 x127 www.pars.org

This Space For Lease For advertising information, call (800) 262-1801.

28

League of California Cities

www.cacities.org


P

R

O

F

E

S

S

I

O

N

A

L

S

E

R V

I

C

E

S

D

I

R

E

C

T O

R Y

Consultants To Management

• Organization and Management Studies • Executive Search • Assessment Centers • Compensation and Classification Studies • Strategic Planning • Utility Studies

YOUR COMPANY could be featured here!

P.O. Box 546 Weimar, California 95736-0546 (530) 637-4559 FAX (650) 240-3933 E-Mail: cwurzberger@mercergroupinc.com

For advertising information, call (800) 262-1801.

Pinpointing Workable Solutions from 18 Offices Nationwide

KOFF & ASSOCIATES, INC. Solving the Human Resources Puzzle

Technical public sector human resources expertise since 1984 • • • • • • •

Classification Studies Compensation Surveys Executive and Staff Search Organizational Studies Strategic Planning HR Audits Regulatory Compliance

• Outsourced HR Projects • Performance Management Strategies • Policy Development and Employee Handbooks • Management/Labor Relations • Grievance Dispute Resolution

Co-sponsored by the League of California Cities

• • • • • •

Time & Resource Savings Competitively Solicited Contracts Quality Products & Services Great Pricing No-Cost Participation 1000s of Green Products

Offices in Northern and Southern California 510/658-5633 • 800/514-5195 • www.KoffAssociates.com San Mateo

Arroyo Associates, Inc. Contact: Nicholas T. Conway 1000 S. Fremont Ave., Unit 42 Alhambra, CA 91803 626-457-8700 office 626-457-1285 fax arroyo@arroyoassociates.com www.arroyoassociates.com

Providing Management Consulting Services to Cities, Counties and Special Districts Since 1990 ❖ Operations and Management Studies ❖ Organization and Program Evaluation ❖ Financial Analysis and Cost Allocation ❖ Performance Measurement and Benchmarking ❖ Public and Private Grant Writing

Helping Local Government Leaders • Management

Improvement • Organizational Analysis • Performance Review/Audit • Process Improvement

• • • •

Performance Management Strategic/Business Planning Training/Team Building Executive Recruitment

San Jose (408) 437-5400 Cincinnati (513) 861-5400

www.managementpartners.com

SPECIALISTS IN CLASSIFICATION, JOB EVALUATION AND COMPENSATION

5663 Balboa Ave., #399, San Diego, CA 92111-2705 915 L Street, #C-102, Sacramento, CA 95814 Brentwood Village, 149 S. Barrington Ave., #726, Los Angeles, CA 90049-2950 1-888-522-7772 • www.compensationconsulting.com Offices in various major cities

www.westerncity.com

Western City, June 2011

29


“FATHOM’s unique financing option makes state-of-the-art technology available to a city of any size.”

GRASS VALLEY

DAn HOlleR

City Administrator, City of Grass Valley

mENLO PARK

“FATHOM brings economies of scale to a smaller utility operation.” Ruben ninõ

Assistant Director of Public Works, City of Menlo Park

“FATHOM was selected due to the significant cost savings and customer service enhancements they are able to offer.” TM

“ This system allows our customers to have access to their daily usage.”

Ken Flewellyn

Assistant Finance Director, City of Torrance

Steve Henley

Director of Public Works, City of Covina

TORRANCE COVINA

HOW DO YOU CUT COSTS WHILE EXPANDING SERVICE? JUST ASK CALIFORNIA. FATHOM by Global Water is changing the utility game in the Golden State and beyond. Our integrated, Utility-to-Utility (U2U™) technology allows municipalities to increase efficiency as they expand their customer service offering. With Advanced Metering Infrastructure, Customer Information System and Asset Management capability, FATHOM helps smaller cities upgrade without the traditional time and capital barriers. With FATHOM, every town can afford to be a better water utility. Call us at 1.855.FATHOM1 (1.855.328.4661) or visit www.gwfathom.com.

Rapid. Proven. Guaranteed.

Western City June 2011  

Technology issue

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you