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The Monthly Magazine of the League of California CitiesÂŽ

The

Bay Delta Conservation Plan:

An Overview and Local Perspectives

p.8

Local Diversity or Local Control? p.3 Sustainability’s New Normal p.17

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CONTENTS 2

Calendar of League Events

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Executive Director’s Message

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Why We May Mean “Local Diversity” When We Talk About “Local Control”

By Mark Cowin The Delta supplies a large share of the water used in Southern California and other parts of the state. A new plan proposes dramatic changes to how water is moved from the Delta.

By Chris McKenzie Gov. Jerry Brown recently observed that in a state that values diversity as much as California, you would think there would be more support for honoring the differences among

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Sustainable Cities

communities. So what causes state officials to pre-empt local control and impose one-size-fits-all laws?

Sustainability’s New Normal: Capturing Multiple Benefits

City Forum

By the Institute for Local Government Sustainability Team

It’s Not Too Early: Plan Your Time at the League’s 2013 Annual Conference & Expo

California cities and counties are increasingly finding that investing today in energy efficiency, sustainability and reducing greenhouse gas emissions has both immediate and longer-term benefits.

By Anna Swanson Expert speakers and panelists will discuss a wide range of topics in sessions that take place concurrently throughout the conference. Many cities choose to have their officials and staff coordinate which sessions they will attend so that they can optimize their time at the conference.

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The Bay Delta Conservation Plan: An Overview and Local Perspectives

News from the Institute for Local Government

ILG Releases Updated Sustainability Best Practices Framework The newly revised framework offers options to consider for local action in 10 areas from energy efficiency and conservation to efficient transportation, promoting community and individual action and beyond.

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California Cities Helen Putnam Award for Excellence

Cathedral City Takes Action on Energy Efficiency Using a variety of partnerships and local initiatives, Cathedral City reduced its energy costs.

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Job Opportunities

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Professional Services Directory

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On the Record Local elected officials weigh in on resources that help them serve the public. On the Cover: The Sacramento River Delta region Photo: Courtesy of the California Department of Water Resources


President Bill Bogaard Mayor Pasadena

1400 K Street Sacramento, CA 95814 (916) 658-8200 Fax (916) 658-8240

Second Vice President Tony Ferrara Mayor Arroyo Grande

Immediate Past President Michael Kasperzak Mayor Mountain View

Executive Director Chris McKenzie

For a complete list of the League board of directors, visit www.cacities.org/board.

Magazine Staff

leaguevents

Editor in Chief Jude Hudson, Hudson + Associates (916) 658-8234 email: editor@westerncity.com Managing Editor Eva Spiegel (916) 658-8228 email: espiegel@cacities.org

JULY

11 – 12

Advertising Sales Manager Pam Maxwell-Blodgett (916) 658-8256 email: maxwellp@cacities.org

Board of Directors’ Meeting, San Diego The League board reviews, discusses and takes action on a variety of issues affecting cities, including legislation, legal advocacy, education and training, and more.

Administrative Assistant Anita Lopez (916) 658-8223 email: alopez@cacities.org

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Anti-SLAPP (Strategic Lawsuits Against Public Participation) & Section 1021.5 Motions Webinar, 10:00 to 11:30 a.m. This City Attorneys’ Department webinar will provide important, practical information and training on how to file successful anti-SLAPP motions and how to best defend against Section 1021.5 motions for attorneys’ fees.

Contributors Dan Carrigg Yvonne Hunter Bismarck Obando Lorraine Okabe JoAnne Speers Associate Editors Jim Carnes Carol Malinowski Carolyn Walker

SEPTEMBER

18 – 20

League of California Cities 2013 Annual Conference & Expo, Sacramento This conference offers dozens of educational sessions, numerous professional development opportunities, hundreds of exhibits and a chance to participate in the League’s policy-making activities at the Annual Business Meeting.

Design Taber Creative Group Advertising Design ImagePoint Design For photo credits, see page 20. Western City (ISSN 0279-5337) is published monthly by the League of California Cities, 1400 K St., Sacramento, CA 95814. Subscriptions: $39.00/1 year; $63.00/2 years; student: $26.50; foreign: $52.00; single copies: $4.00, including sales tax. Entered as periodical mail January 30, 1930, at the Post Office, Los Angeles, CA 90013, under the Act of April 13, 1879. Periodical postage paid at Sacramento, Calif.

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FSC ® is an independent, not-for-profit organization that promotes environmentally appropriate, socially beneficial and economically viable forest management worldwide. Products with the FSC label are independently certified to ensure that they come from forests managed to meet the needs of present and future generations.

League of California Cities

Event and registration information is available at www.cacities.org/events. For the latest information on League conferences and events, follow us on Twitter @CaCitiesLearn. For legislative and policy updates and more, follow @CaCities. Follow Western City @WesternCityMag. Join us on Facebook. www.facebook.com/westerncity www.facebook.com/LeagueofCaCities

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Postmaster: Send address changes to Western City, 1400 K Street, Sacramento, CA 95814. Western City Trademark Reg. U.S. Pat. Off. ©2013 League of California Cities. All rights reserved. Material may not be reprinted without written permission. This issue is Volume LXXXIX, No. 7.

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First Vice President José Cisneros Treasurer San Francisco

Did You Miss the June Issue? Read it online at www.westerncity.com www.cacities.org


Executive Director’s Message by Chris McKenzie

Why We May Mean

“Local Diversity” When We Talk About “Local Control”

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any Californians would be hard pressed to name a place where people believe in “diversity” more than we do in the Golden State. We embrace it in our writing, we celebrate it locally with parades and festivals, and we expand it through our interracial and intercultural marriages and other relationships. The Merriam Webster Dictionary defines “diversity” as “the condition of having or being composed of differing elements: VARIETY; especially the inclusion of different types of people (… of different races or cultures).” Our belief in the value of diversity seems almost boundless. A brief online search of organizations’ diversity policies shows that many contain references to educational level, gender, race, age, language, ethnicity, sexual orientation, physical attributes, personality, thinking style (I am not making this up), nationality, income level, work experience, marital status, political ideology, religious beliefs, military status, geographic location and much more. Why Uniformity Misses the Mark People often say they believe in “diverse communities,” but I suspect that is not the same as believing in communities that are

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diverse places because their people make choices about community priorities, programs, services and results based on their unique circumstances, which naturally may differ from those of other communities. So incorporating flexibility for local communities would seem like a practical approach. But instead our state Legislature is busy trying to impose uniform rules and expectations that would erase the very diversity among communities that we should value. State law, in the form of the Annotated California Code, is voluminous largely because our state leaders often try to make California and its communities look, function and perform the same way — and that is the issue.

Our cities and towns are unique. Each has its own history, cultures, architecture, land use patterns, economy, ambience and style. Thus, the differing priorities of our cities and towns actually enrich California much more than they threaten it. As a result, we believe the Legislature should err on the side of restraint when adopting new mandates. continued

Cities’ usual response to such proposed legislation is to ask state leaders to remember their roots and respect “local control” or “home rule.” Perhaps instead we should look at what we are really asking our state and federal colleagues. We aren’t simply imploring them to surrender power to local elected officials. We want them to remember that, just as natural systems depend on biodiversity, our system of government grows stronger when its roots are deep and well developed.

Western City, July 2013

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Why We May Mean “Local Diversity” When We Talk About “Local Control,” continued

We know from studies and experience that California’s diversity of people and places makes it a magnet for tourists and businesses that want to visit, invest and stay here. Our state is unique for many reasons: It combines dynamic business and entertainment districts with safe, quiet neighborhoods. Its natural beauty encompasses mountains, beaches, deserts and rolling hills, with topography as varied as its people. Many of

California’s public and private institutions exemplify excellence.

dous diversity among cities and the value such diversity brings to the state?

In light of the fairly widespread belief that California is stronger for its diversity, a reasonable person could ask what causes state officials to pre-empt local control and impose one-size-fits-all laws? Why should every city have to operate the same way as every other in the state, given the tremen-

The answer may lie somewhere between the fact there are almost always a few bad anecdotes behind every unnecessary law and the fact that all politics is local, as former U.S. Speaker of the House Tip O’Neill so famously said. And state legislators legitimately believe that they too were elected to be “deciders,” as former President George W. Bush described his role.

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Maybe that’s why state leaders (many of whom previously often served in local government) sometimes decide to restrict the flexibility of the very level of government people believe in most. Even more ironic is that, at times, the same state legislators who author bills to restrict local governments once railed against the practice when they were local officials. Governor Brown Raises The Issue of Local Diversity

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Discussing his commitment to local diversity (or “subsidiarity,” as he calls it) in a visit with the League board of directors in April, Governor Jerry Brown wondered aloud just why the residents of Modoc County always have to follow the same mandates and rules as those in San Francisco County or those in Tulare County. In a state that values diversity as much as California, he said, you would think there would be more support for honoring the differences among communities. The reality, he added, is that whichever party is in power seems to want to impose its values and views of what California should be like on the entire state, undermining local diversity. One of the ironies of this dynamic is that voters historically have had a much higher level of confidence in their nonpartisan local governments than in state or federal governments. The National League of Cities (NLC) recently released the results of a poll that confirmed that 37 percent of voters trust local government to address the issues that matter most in their lives. But only 22 percent feel that way about the state, and just 12 percent trust the federal government to do so.

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League of California Cities

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The NLC survey revealed that women put more faith in local government than men, and voters with the most trust in local government and the least in the federal government are men and women between the ages of 35 and 49. Perhaps this is because people in this age group are more likely to be parents of small children and are understandably focused on education and public safety — the things local governments consistently deliver. In contrast, these people may not feel as good about the job the federal government is doing on the economic front. A League survey about state and city leaders produced somewhat similar results in 2011. In response to a question about their favorable or unfavorable opinions of elected leaders, Californians responded as shown in the table, above right.

California Voters’ Opinions of Electeds Favorable

Unfavorable

Unknown/ Can’t Rate

Your city council/mayor

56%

23%

21%

Governor Jerry Brown

52%

38%

10%

The California Legislature

21%

62%

17%

Our Job Is to Remind State Officials Many years ago one of my mentors at another municipal league told me that he thought one of the great blessings of our work is that we get to participate in the ongoing debate about what the various levels of government are best suited to do.

That important debate is clearly not going to end anytime soon, but it may be wise in the future for us to talk more about “local diversity” and less about “local control” or “home rule.” Having diverse cities is clearly an asset that California state officials do not want to undermine, and it is our collective job to remind them of that fact every time they forget. ■

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Western City, July 2013

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IT’S NOT TOO EARLY: Plan Your Time at the League’s 2013 Annual Conference & Expo

by Anna Swanson

Although the League of California Cities 2013 Annual Conference & Expo is a couple of months away, it’s not too soon to begin planning your conference schedule. The conference offers many educational opportunities.

• From Me to We — Practical Advice for City Governance Teams; • Parliamentary Procedure for Elected Officials; • The Affordable Care Act and City Responsibilities; • The Future of Sales Tax; • Police Consolidation — More for Less; • Burning Issues for Your City Budget; and • Creative Placemaking — Using Art and Artists to Revitalize Your Communities.

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A Wide Spectrum of Session Topics The conference sessions span a wide spectrum of topics, including:

• Emergency Preparedness — What City Council Members Should Know; • Infrastructure Financing — Brave New Alternatives in a PostRedevelopment World;

Host City Reception. Wednesday evening’s Host City Reception, 5:00 to 7:00 p.m. in the Expo Hall, offers an excellent opportunity to learn about Sacramento’s initiative to become the Farm-to-Fork Capital of America. Discover what the Farm-to-Fork movement entails and how the City of Sacramento has brought together area farmers, chefs and restaurateurs to promote locally grown and sourced food.

Keynote Addresses. The General Sessions on Sept. 18 and 19 feature keynote speakers who offer both expertise and food for thought. On Wednesday, Erik Wahl redefines the traditional keynote address with his creative and inspiring approach. Lowell Catlett, a futurist and professor known for his insights on the shifting

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League Partner Speaker Theater. Located in the Expo Hall, the League Partner Speaker Theater features discussions on a variety of topics, including successful examples of public-private partnerships and creative solutions to problems challenging many California cities. These sessions will be conducted during Expo hours on Thursday, 10:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. Mark your calendar now! The League staff looks forward to seeing you in Sacramento in September. ■

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Anna Swanson is conference marketing coordinator for the League and can be reached at aswanson@cacities.org.

League of California Cities

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First-Time Attendee Orientation. If you’re new to the conference, this orientation provides a good starting point on Wednesday, Sept. 18, from 1:00 to 1:30 p.m. Learn about the League and how to participate in its networking, advocacy and policy-making activities, and get helpful advice on making the most of the educational opportunities available to you during the conference.

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Expo. The grand opening of the Expo Hall, held in conjunction with the Host City Reception, takes place Wednesday from 5:00 to 7:00 p.m. Don’t miss this opportunity to meet with vendors of products and services that can save money, time and resources for your city. The Expo hours on Thursday are 10:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. Thursday’s lunch, served in the Expo hall from 11:30 a.m. to 1:00 p.m., provides another chance to talk with exhibitors.

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Event Highlights

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financial world and coping with coming changes, will give Thursday’s lively keynote address.

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Expert speakers and panelists will discuss a wide range of topics in sessions that take place concurrently throughout the conference. Many cities choose to have their attendees coordinate which sessions they will attend so that afterwards they can share what they’ve learned and optimize their time at the conference. Visit www.cacities.org/ac and click the For Attendees link to see a comprehensive overview and the latest conference session and speaker updates. If you haven’t yet had an opportunity to review the conference announcement brochure, click For Attendees and then click the 2013 Announcement.

• How Your Planning Commission Can Work for You;


News from the Institute for Local Government ILG Releases Updated Sustainability

Best Practices Framework The Institute for Local Government’s newly updated Sustainability Best Practices Framework (www.ca-ilg. org/SustainabilityBestPractices) offers options to consider for local action in 10 areas. These range from energy efficiency and conservation to efficient transportation, community and individual action and beyond. The best practices draw from the practical experiences of cities and counties throughout California, including those participating in the sustainability and climate change recognition program, the Beacon Award: Local Leadership Toward Solving Climate Change (www.ca-ilg.org/BeaconAward). The best practices vary in complexity and are adaptable to fit the unique needs and circumstances of individual communities. In addition, many of the activities in the framework can lead to multiple, simultaneous benefits, such as saving energy, water, fuel and money. Local officials and staff may use the framework in a variety of ways, including to: • Generate ideas about programs and policies to explore and consider; • Inform a comprehensive climate-action planning process; and • Integrate sustainability into General Plan policies. The Sustainability Best Practices Framework has been revised several times since it was first released in 2008. This latest comprehensive update reflects activities that cities and counties participating in the Beacon Award program have implemented, technological advancements and policy changes at the state level. Like the original Sustainability Best Practices Framework, the new version has been peer-reviewed and incorporates input from local and state officials, technical experts and others. The framework offers local officials a wide range of options to consider as they work to save energy, reduce greenhouse gas emissions and make their communities more vibrant, efficient and attractive places to live and work.

background information that may benefit local agencies. Please send suggestions to the Institute for Local Government (ILG) at sustainability@ca-ilg.org.

More Resources to Support Local Sustainability Efforts In addition to the Sustainability Best Practices Framework, ILG offers a suite of free resources to support local sustainability efforts. These include: • Five sustainability resource centers with information about SB 375, commercial recycling, financing sustainability, greening agency fleets and sustainable economic development (www.ca-ilg.org/sustainability-resource-centers); • A video library featuring local officials discussing sustainability efforts at the local level (www.ca-ilg.org/BeaconAwardVideos); • The Sustainable Communities Learning Network, featuring webinars and a LinkedIn group for sustainability practitioners (www.ca-ilg.org/SCLN); • The Beacon Award: Local Leadership Toward Solving Climate Change (www.ca-ilg.org/BeaconAward), including information about participant accomplishments; • Healthy Neighborhoods, with information to help integrate health considerations into planning, land use and other policy areas of operations (www.ca-ilg.org/healthy-neighborhoods); and • Creating Safe Walking and Bicycling Communities: Safe Routes to School Decision-Maker’s Toolkit (www.ca-ilg.org/SRTS-toolkit). ■

Your Feedback Is Welcome The Sustainability Best Practices Framework highlights the ongoing good work at the local level. It is an evolving resource and new ideas are welcome, along with any materials or

www.westerncity.com

Western City, July 2013

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Editor’s note: The controversial Bay Delta Conservation Plan is the recent subject of extensive attention and media coverage statewide. The views expressed in this article and its sidebars represent the authors’ opinions and not the policies or positions of the League.

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League of California Cities

www.cacities.org


The

Bay Delta Conservation Plan:

An Overview and Local Perspectives by Mark Cowin

For 60 years the biggest water projects in California have been drawing water out of the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta for cities and farms. People have been talking for even longer about a better way to divert that water. In a 1982 referendum that split the state, voters rejected a proposal to move the Delta’s main diversion point from its existing location in the south Delta near Tracy. Ever since, efforts to balance the needs of fish, farmers and cities for water from the Delta have been characterized as “water wars.” It’s an easy narrative: Waterrich north versus water-short south.

But nothing about the Delta is that simple, except this: It’s hard to overstate the Delta’s importance to California’s economy and natural heritage. The Delta supplies a large share of the water used in Southern California and the Santa Clara and San Joaquin valleys. California would not be the same without that water — hundreds of billions of dollars

of economic activity a year depend upon it. Much of the fresh fruit, vegetables and nuts produced in the nation is grown with Delta water. Similarly, the hundreds of miles of river channels that crisscross the Delta’s farmed islands provide a migratory pathway for Chinook salmon, which support an important West Coast fishing industry. continued

Mark Cowin is director of the California Department of Water Resources and can be reached at Mark.Cowin@water.ca.gov.

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Western City, July 2013

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The Bay Delta Conservation Plan: An Overview and Local Perspectives, continued

Chinook salmon support a major West Coast fishing industry and use the Delta’s waterways during migration.

Other native fish species depend upon the complex mix of fresh and salt water in the Delta estuary. But the fish are in trouble. Some species reached historically low populations in recent years. Efforts to protect salmon and Delta smelt have reduced the volume of water delivered to farms and cities and made those supplies unpredictable. Furthermore, the current water delivery infrastructure in the Delta is vulnerable to catastrophic disruption.

October Deadline for Draft Water Plan Documents The State of California and the Obama Administration have set a formal deadline of Oct. 1, 2013, for the release of the draft Bay Delta Conservation Plan and accompanying environmental documents for public review and comment.

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League of California Cities

Thirty Years of Knowledge: The Forces at Work Since voters considered the idea of a “peripheral canal” to carry Sacramento River water around the Delta, we’ve gained 30 years’ worth of knowledge. We now know far more about how: • The existing diversion system in the Delta does not work for native fish species; • Seismic risks threaten the Delta water delivery system, which depends on vulnerable earthen levees; and • Climate change is already raising sea levels, with more to come. The specter of climate change also raises the likelihood of more intense storms and higher peak runoff surging through the Delta. If the levees break and Delta islands flood, salt water could be drawn inland, forcing the shutdown of water project pumps for weeks, months or years. Climate change essentially nullifies the historical precipitation record we’ve relied on to predict the future. The Sierra Nevada snowpack that drains to the Delta

is expected to shrink 25 percent or more in coming decades, with precipitation increasingly falling as winter rain, not snow. Protecting California from floods, meeting environmental water needs and capturing runoff for water supply will be complicated. According to the Public Policy Institute of California, “Changes in the Delta are inevitable, given the unstoppable processes of sea level rise, land subsidence, earthquakes and a warming climate bringing larger floods.”

A New Plan In the face of that inevitable change, state, federal and local leaders propose a new way to divert water from the Delta. The Bay Delta Conservation Plan (BDCP), seven years in the making, would prevent water delivery disruption by constructing three new screened intakes along the Sacramento River 35 miles north of the existing pumping plants. Twin tunnels buried up to 150 feet beneath the Delta’s peat soil would carry the water south, ensuring that water supplies could be delivered even if climate change and other forces resculpt the interior Delta.

www.cacities.org


Delta smelt, salmon, sturgeon, sandhill cranes, Swainson’s hawks and dozens of other kinds of Delta wildlife need the food and shelter a healthy Delta ecosystem

The Current Plan is Flawed by Don Nottoli The 2009 Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta Reform Act calls on leaders at all levels to work to achieve the coequal goals of “providing a more reliable water supply for California and to protect, restore and enhance the Delta ecosystem.” It also prescribes that the coequal goals “shall be achieved in a manner that protects and enhances the unique cultural, recreational and natural resources and agricultural values of the Delta as an evolving place.” The Delta region is key to addressing these goals. It’s imperative for others — including lead state and federal agencies responsible for preparing the Bay Delta Conservation Plan (BDCP) — to understand and respect what’s at stake for the people who live and work in the Delta as well as those who enjoy its recreational opportunities.

would offer.

This proposal would divert a total of 9,000 cubic feet per second as opposed to the 1982 proposal for intakes of 21,800 cubic feet per second and a 43-mile-long canal through farmland. The earlier canal proposal assumed California would increase its reliance on the Delta for water supplies. The proposal being refined today does not guarantee bigger water deliveries. In fact, the 2009 Delta Reform Act passed by the California Legislature mandates reduced reliance on the Delta for future supplies. Changing the way we divert water in the Delta cannot solve all of California’s water problems. It would not replace the need for regions to build their own selfsufficiency by investing heavily in water conservation, water-use efficiency, water recycling and use of groundwater basins. Similar investments are needed to create new water storage, whether in reservoirs or aquifers. Regional efforts to stretch water supplies are unfolding throughout California, but they cannot offset entirely the loss of reliability associated with the Delta. For better or worse, California’s nearly $2 trillion economy depends to a great degree on moving Delta water hundreds of miles. continued www.westerncity.com

Sandhill cranes arrive in the Delta in late September each year and spend the fall and winter months there.

The Delta is a majestic place. Encompassing some of the world’s most fertile soil and a fragile and uniquely special ecosystem, it is a place where people make their homes, raise their families and grow crops that sustain the regional economy while contributing to the state, national and global economies. The Delta is also a popular recreational destination that depends on a healthy environment, fresh water and the 1,100 miles of levees that protect it. For these reasons and many others, the Delta is a place worth saving and protecting today and for future generations. What is proposed under the guise of BDCP’s Conservation Measure 1 will vastly alter a tranquil 10-mile stretch along the Sacramento River from Freeport to Walnut Grove. Historic river towns and a quilt of family farms, orchards, row crops and vineyards will be transformed into an “industrial complex” — a landscape littered with 1,600 acres of muck ponds, borrow pits and a web of electrical lines and realigned roadways. This ruination would be the result of the planned construction of three giant, six-story pumping plants, a 1,000-acre reservoir and twin 40-foot diameter tunnels traversing 35 miles of the Delta. The BDCP calls for permanent impacts to more than 145,000 acres of farmland. Suggesting that California invest billions of dollars to undertake construction of a massive water conveyance project without impacts being fully known and addressed is not good public policy and is simply unacceptable. Furthermore, we do not know important details such as operational impacts and how much water is really available for export. No true cost-benefit analysis has been done, nor does the BDCP provide for meaningful local involvement and enforceable assurances and protections for the Delta region. In pursuing the BDCP, those in charge are forsaking the Delta and its people. The current BDCP is flawed and fails to demonstrate how it can be accomplished without forever damaging the Delta’s historic communities, agricultural heritage and rural way of life. We owe it to the people of the Delta and California to get this right, without sacrificing one region of the state for the benefit of another.

Don Nottoli is Sacramento County supervisor of the 5th District and can be reached at nottolid@saccounty.net. Western City, July 2013

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The Bay Delta Conservation Plan: An Overview and Local Perspectives, continued

Unpredictable water supplies put a large portion of California’s economy and population at risk. A new Delta water conveyance system would safeguard the water delivery system. But the ecological imperative for such an improvement is as compelling as the economic reasons.

Ecological Considerations The existing water project pumping plants draw from a dead-end channel in the south Delta. Even if fish here avoid getting sucked into the pumps, they have little hope of finding their way back to the Delta’s main channels and a great chance of being eaten by striped bass and other predators. To upgrade fish screens here would cost a lot of money and yield minimal benefit, as the fish would still have to be collected, put into tanks and trucked elsewhere in the Delta for release.

Water diverted from the Delta is used on farms in the Santa Clara and San Joaquin valleys.

New intakes built on the main Sacramento River, however, could be fitted with lowvelocity approach screens to shield even young salmon headed to the ocean. Once they pass the intakes, the fish would continue

Employment Law

their journey up or down the river. Reducing reliance on the south Delta pumps would also allow for more natural east-west flows in the tidally influenced south Delta. That would minimize the extent to which reverse flows caused by pumping may draw migratory fish off course. There’s another reason to build a northern diversion point: Threatened Delta smelt rarely venture so far north in the Sacramento River. Generally Delta smelt avoid the stretch of the river where the federal and state governments propose to build new intakes. In comparison, Delta smelt frequent the south Delta. Rules to protect the smelt frequently force shutdowns of the south Delta pumps.

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For example, huge volumes of water from December 2012 storms could not be captured because of U.S. Endangered Species Act rules to protect Delta smelt and salmon. As a result, less water was captured to deliver to the San Francisco Bay Area, Southern California cities and San Joaquin Valley farms. Those regions are already dealing with reduced supplies due to dry weather in early 2013. New pumping plants outside the zone of prime Delta smelt habitat would have helped both fish and people this year. continued on page 14

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League of California Cities

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Legal Issues Raised by the Bay Delta Conservation Plan

The tiny Delta smelt, less than three inches in length, is an endangered species found only in the Delta. Such species present legal issues in light of the Bay Delta Conservation Plan.

by Martha Lennihan The Bay Delta Conservation Plan (BDCP) raises a number of questions related to existing law. The following list highlights some — but by no means all — of the key legal issues likely to come into play if the BDCP goes forward. Compliance with environmental laws. To comply with the environmental review laws such as the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) and the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), the BDCP will need to develop an environmental document that discloses and evaluates its impacts. Given the complexity and importance of the affected hydrologic regimes, competent technical analyses will be required. The associated hydrologic modeling and assumptions that drive it will be important elements. The technical analyses are one of the conditions for satisfying the environmental review laws’ requirements. Area-of-origin laws. The federal Central Valley Project (CVP) and the State Water Project (SWP) were built based in part on laws referred to as the “area-of-origin” laws, which provide that those projects would not deprive Northern California communities of water needed for their present and future needs. One of the legal issues presented by the BDCP is how the CVP and SWP facilities will be operated to comply with these laws while enabling the new Delta diversions that the BDCP proposes. Water rights. The SWP and the CVP water rights are senior to (and thus have priority over) more recent water rights, and they are junior to other more senior water rights that either pre-date those projects’ water rights or have priority for other reasons (for example, the area-of-origin laws). Many — though not all — Northern California water rights have priority over the CVP and SWP water rights. There

are also water-right settlement contracts with Northern Californians that require the CVP and SWP to provide particular water supplies to them, in exchange for allowing those projects to be constructed. This presents the legal issue of how the BDCP will affect the ability of the CVP and the SWP to comply with these water rights priorities and settlement contracts. Endangered Species Act and/or Natural Community Conservation Planning Act. The BDCP may be the largest and most complex effort to obtain permits for harming or killing endangered and threatened species, which is also referred to as “incidental take.” The BDCP’s goal of improving conditions for those species in the Delta will need to consider the effects for those same species, and other threatened and endangered species, in the Delta’s tributary waterways. For example, the hydrologic analyses referenced earlier should indicate whether the BDCP will have no effect on, enhance or reduce cold-water storage in upstream reservoirs. Cold-water storage is an important tool for maintaining tolerable conditions for endangered fish species in upstream tributaries, such as the Sacramento and American rivers. Coordination between the SWP and the CVP. The state and federal projects are large efforts that both impact and benefit many Californians and many aspects of the environment. They also impact one another, given that they are managing and affecting rivers, streams and reservoirs in the same hydrologic system. They are now operated

pursuant to a coordinated operation agreement (COA). Whether or how the BDCP will alter the balance previously achieved in the COA is a significant unknown factor. Water quality. When flow amounts, rates, and timing change, as they may in many locations included in the BDCP, the associated water quality can change. This includes a range of water-quality considerations from temperature to turbidity (cloudiness caused by sediment). These affect the source quality for other users and instream aquatic resources, such as fisheries, that can be very sensitive to temperature and other conditions. Existing water-quality regulation is complex and extensive. The present criteria to protect the Delta and Suisun Marsh environments, permits for wastewater dischargers and many other legal rules may need to be changed in order to address changes effected by the BDCP. It will be necessary to understand these changes — and the ripple effect of their ramifications — to understand the impacts of the BDCP. Operational assurances. One contentious issue has been legal “assurances” that Delta export facilities will be operated in ways that do not injure fish and people in and north of the Delta. The export facilities and other CVP and SWP facilities can and may need to be operated in many different ways. Assuming such assurances are needed, determining how to provide the necessary legal protections while also preserving flexibility to address changing hydrologic and other conditions presents a significant challenge.

Martha Lennihan is an attorney with Lennihan Law, specializing in water law, and can be reached at mlennihan@lennihan.net.

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Western City, July 2013

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The Bay Delta Conservation Plan: An Overview and Local Perspectives, continued from page 12

But Delta smelt, salmon, sturgeon, sandhill cranes, Swainson’s hawks and dozens of other kinds of Delta wildlife need more than relocated pumping plants. They need the food and shelter a healthy Delta ecosystem would offer. Led by the California Natural Resources Agency, the U.S. Department of the Interior and

the U.S. Department of Commerce, the agencies that seek to revamp the Delta’s plumbing system seek with equal vigor to reverse the Delta’s ecological decline. They propose to create at least 100,000 acres of tidal marsh, floodplain, riparian forest, grasslands and vernal pools that were largely eliminated in the 150-year-long

Working in Partnership with Local Communities

human transformation of the Delta. Such habitat would serve not only to shelter fish and wildlife, but also to boost food production across the aquatic system. They also seek to address other stressors on the ecosystem, including non-native species, pollution and poaching.

If the levees break and Delta islands flood, salt water could be drawn inland, forcing the shutdown of water project pumps for weeks,

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League of California Cities

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Earthen levees in the Delta are vulnerable to earthquakes and more intense storms resulting from the effects of climate change.

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Critics of the BDCP argue that we cannot restore an estuary by taking more water from it. Some call the plan a “water grab.” In fact, the BDCP makes no promise of additional water deliveries from the Delta. Diversions may even decline. Pumping from the Delta would be governed by rules to protect fish and water quality and influenced by whether scientists can document progress toward the achievement of more than 200 biological goals and objectives spelled out in the plan. Examples include reducing the entrapment of fish at pumping plants, improving the survival rates of winter-run Chinook salmon as measured at two Delta islands and creating a viable migratory path for salmon through floodplains adjacent to the Sacramento River. In the past 20 years, annual water diversions from the Delta by the federal and state water projects have averaged about 5.3 million acre-feet. We estimate that the amount of water that could be delivered once intakes of 9,000 cubic feet per second were built on the Sacramento River would range from approximately 4.8 million acre-feet to 5.6 million acrefeet per year. Whether deliveries end up continued

The Bay Delta Conservation Plan calls for impacts to more than 145,000 acres of farmland.

Big Challenges and a Huge Need for Leadership by Glen Becerra California has great challenges to match its size. Among its longest-standing and most vital issues is water — specifically the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta that is the lynchpin of drinking water for most Californians. The Delta provides drinking water for as many as 25 million California residents, including many in my home region of Southern California, and supports billions of dollars of economic activity, from farming to manufacturing and beyond. The Bay Delta Conservation Plan (BDCP) was produced over seven years by a team of federal and state water experts, scientists and public water agencies working together to balance the needs of the environment with California’s human and economic needs. To protect the Delta, the plan needs to move forward. I have been involved in many regional and statewide planning efforts, and few issues loom larger than the Delta in terms of our state’s safety and vitality. California can’t afford for Delta levees to break, flooding thousands of acres of fertile agriculture land with salt water, damaging the ecosystem and wildlife as well as shutting down the water to the San Joaquin Valley and Southern California residents. The BDCP will stabilize the Delta, secure our water supply and ensure that our residents, farmers and businesses have a reliable water source for the foreseeable future. The project will also create as many as 137,000 jobs over its 50-year life. Why is this important now? The Delta has been stretched to the breaking point, and the water that many Californians depend upon is at risk. Environmental restrictions on water deliveries meant to protect Delta fish have also greatly reduced the flexibility to meet statewide water supply needs. The BDCP will improve the Delta ecosystem so that water operations will become more reliable and secure. The direct benefits to water users — reliable supplies, reduced regulatory and legal uncertainty, improved water quality and reduced seismic risk — make the plan well worth the cost. The Southern California Water Committee has been educating business and local government leaders on this issue. I encourage you to visit www. socalwater.org/delta-disrupted and www.baydeltaconservationplan.com for more information. Glen Becerra is outgoing president of the Southern California Association of Governments and a Simi Valley City Council member. He can be reached at gbecerra@simivalley.org.

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Western City, July 2013

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The Bay Delta Conservation Plan: An Overview and Local Perspectives, continued

Efforts to balance the needs of fish, farmers and cities for water from the Delta have been characterized as “water wars.”

on the high or low end of that range would depend on how protected species fare and whether research conducted over the coming decades shows that higher outflows in the spring and fall help Delta smelt and longfin smelt. Critics of the BDCP also argue that a north Delta diversion would harm water quality downstream. The BDCP is examining nine alternative ways to divert water from the Delta, with 15 different variations of conveyance structure and operational rules. The alternatives range from using existing Delta channels to building intakes capable of diverting 15,000 cubic feet per second. Regardless of which alternative is chosen, state and federal water project operators must: • Meet downstream water quality standards; • Allow sufficient flow down the Sacramento and San Joaquin rivers to repel salt water from San Francisco Bay so that water quality is not impaired for farms in the central and south Delta; and • Meet those standards or risk penalties from the State Water Resources Control Board. continued on page 25

Pitting North Against South is Not the Solution by Darrell Fong California needs a statewide solution to its water problems, which must be addressed so that everyone has access to clean, safe, reliable and affordable water. The governor’s preferred proposal, the Bay Delta Conservation Plan (BDCP), will degrade the water reliability and quality of life for Northern California’s residents because it lacks enforceable water supply assurances for the region. Without these assurances, the north state’s economy and natural resources are in jeopardy. Governor Brown’s administration frequently states that the BDCP safeguards California’s economy and its environment. Perhaps it does, but only for Southern California. A reliable supply for Northern California is being neglected. Why can the state guarantee water reliability for Southern California but not Northern California? It’s because the project as proposed increases water supply reliability only to areas that export water out of the Delta, such as Southern California cities and agricultural interests in the San Joaquin Valley. The current plan simply transfers the water shortages from south to north despite the fact that many of these northern communities have long-standing senior water rights. In a dry year there is not enough water for both Delta needs and south-of-Delta exporters. Where will the water come from to meet both the environmental needs of the Delta and the agricultural and/or urban needs of the south? The state has yet to answer this question and leaves Northern California to assume the worst. Focusing on increasing water supply assurances to half the state while jeopardizing the other half is not a viable solution for California’s water supply problems. Pitting one part of the state against another will only result in more conflict and delay. What can be done? 1.

Gov. Brown must provide the leadership to address Northern California’s concerns and water supply assurances for the entire state.

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The solutions need to go beyond the size and operation of the tunnels that export water out of the Delta. California needs a portfolio of water supply strategies that increases conservation, water recycling, desalination and other means that diversify the water supply and decreases reliance on the Delta. This approach will increase regional self-dependence throughout the state and is critical in light of climate change and the anticipated annual decline of the snowpack.

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A balanced governance of the Delta export operations must have Northern California representation. Governance should not be one-sided and should force consensus to ensure fair solutions.

Darrell Fong is a Sacramento City Council member and can be reached at dfong@cityofsacramento.org.

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Sustainability’s New Normal:

Capturing

Multiple Benefits by the Institute for Local Government Sustainability Team

The City of Beaumont hit a home run when it reduced the number of lights at a baseball field in a city park, thus saving energy, money and maintenance costs.

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ore than 65 years ago Mahatma Gandhi said, “The future depends on what you do today.” And more recently teenage poet Mattie Stepanek observed, “Even though the future seems far away, it is actually beginning right now.” When local agencies adopt programs and policies to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and adapt to the long-term impacts of climate change or implement policies to conserve energy, water and other resources, they are looking beyond today and into the future. In doing so, they also realize multiple benefits from their actions.

California cities and counties are increasingly finding that investing today in energy efficiency and other activities that promote sustainability and reduce greenhouse gas emissions has many immediate and longer-term benefits. These additional benefits, where one activity creates positive impacts in other areas, are known as “co-benefits.” One co-benefit of investing in sustainability programs today is helping position a community to adapt to future impacts of climate change over the long term.

More Than Saving Energy Even relatively modest sustainability actions can have important co-benefits, as the City of Sacramento learned. Beginning in 2011, throughout eight city-owned public parking garages the city began replacing more than 4,000 existing high-intensity discharge lights with new light-emitting diodes (LEDs), which use two-thirds less energy than the existing lights. In addition, most of the LED fixtures installed use motion sensors that switch to a lower light level when no continued on page 22

The Institute for Local Government Sustainability Team members who contributed to this article include Karalee Browne, program coordinator; Lindsay Buckley, program coordinator; Yvonne Hunter, program co-director; Steve Sanders, program co-director; and Jessica Aviña Tong, program coordinator. The team can be reached at sustainability@ca-ilg.org.

www.westerncity.com

Western City, July 2013

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Cathedral City Takes Action on Energy Efficiency Municipal employees distribute energy-efficient light bulbs to residents for $1 each at the “Buck a Bulb” event.

About 10 years ago Cathedral City (pop. 55,000) was paying an average of $850,000 annually for electricity, natural gas and fuel costs. Alarmed by these bills, community leaders began examining ways to reduce the city’s energy costs and greenhouse gas emissions. The city’s Environmental Conservation Division, in partnership with several municipalities and government agencies, implemented successful measures starting in 2004 that decreased energy consumption by 16 percent in municipal buildings and 11 percent throughout the community. This saved the city more than $100,000 per year. Cathedral City also entered into a sevenyear contract with a private firm in 2004. The agreement’s scope of work included installing a solar photovoltaic system and executing comprehensive energy-efficiency measures in municipal buildings to reduce power and gas bills. The solar system cut the city’s power requirement by 10 percent. The contractor also replaced the incandescent lamps in traffic lights and pedestrian crossing signals with light-emitting diode (LED)

technology. As a result the traffic signals are brighter, maintenance costs are lower and the city has reduced its signal-related energy use by 86 percent. With the help of a $478,000 Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant, Cathedral City upgraded the lighting and heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) systems at its Civic Center and library in 2011. At the Civic Center, HVAC units are programmed according to occupancy use, controlling air conditioning and heating needs. And municipal buildings were outfitted with energyefficient lighting, occupancy sensors and reflective window film, which reduce energy output. Cathedral City also installed energysaving bi-level induction lighting in its municipal parking structure. The local electric utility provided the city monetary

incentives of $9,540, or $45 per fixture, to help finance this project. On another front, Cathedral City has been working with the Energy Coalition, a nonprofit that empowers governments, businesses and schools to be energyresponsible communities, since 2004 when they teamed up to create the Community Energy Partnership. This program focuses on educating low-income residents about energy-saving tips and strategies. The Community Energy Partnership distributed energy-efficient fans and compact fluorescent light bulbs and performed energy upgrades in a neighborhood known as Dream Homes — an area that is predominantly lower-income and Hispanic. These initiatives, plus educational outreach programs in the schools, help to curtail high energy usage and save residents money on utility bills. The Community Energy Partnership is partly responsible for the recorded 1 million annual kilowatt-hour savings and 13,243 therms in annual energy savings. Cathedral City continues to research new energy-efficient community projects, most recently installing 20 photovoltaic systems in the Dream Homes area. continued on page 21

Cathedral City won the 2012 Helen Putnam Award for Excellence in the Planning and Environmental Quality category for this project. For more about the award program, visit www.helenputnam.org.

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Western City magazine’s job opportunity section is the source for job seekers looking for positions in local government. When you place a job opportunity ad in Western City magazine, it will be posted at no additional charge on our website. For rates and deadlines, visit www.westerncity. com and click on the Advertise link.

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Display Advertising Call Pam Maxwell-Blodgett at (800) 262-1801 to place a display (boxed) ad or for rate and deadline information, or email admanager@westerncity.com. Website Job Postings Display ads are posted on our website at no additional charge. But if you miss the deadline for getting your job opportunity ad into the magazine, you can post it on the Western City website right away. To post your job opportunity ad on our automated website, visit www.westerncity.com or contact Anita Lopez, administrative assistant; email: alopez@cacities.org; phone: (916) 658-8223.

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Fire Chief, Encinitas, Del Mar, and Solana Beach, CA Encinitas, Solana Beach, and Del Mar are coastal cities located along the beautiful Pacific Ocean in northern San Diego County, approximately 30 minutes from San Diego. These cities have a Cooperative Fire Management Services Agreement and are currently seeking a new Fire Chief. Under the Agreement, senior Fire staff (which may be selected from Encinitas, Solana Beach, or Del Mar) provide operational oversight for all three Fire Departments; the Departments respond to approximately 7,600 calls per year and comprise a total of 8 fire stations. The cities desire a Fire Chief who will work collaboratively with the staff of each City, ensuring communication is transparent and open. Candidates for this position will typically possess a bachelor’s degree and at least three years of experience in the fire service at the level of Battalion Chief or higher. Candidates who possess a master’s degree and/or certification from the National Fire Academy are desirable. The salary for the Fire Chief is $111,865 to $173,539 annually; placement within the range is dependent upon qualifications. If you are interested in this outstanding opportunity, please apply online at www.bobmurrayassoc.com. Please contact Regan Williams at (916) 784-9080 should you have any questions. Brochure available. Closing date July 22, 2013.

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Temporary staff help is just a phone call away! Police Chief, City of Huntington Beach, CA Huntington Beach, population 200,000, is located on the shore of the Pacific Ocean in northwestern Orange County, 40 miles south of Los Angeles and 90 miles north of San Diego. The City is currently seeking a Police Chief to join high-energy, creative, and professional executive management team. The desired candidate will set the tone for the Police Department, encourage collaboration and teamwork, and promote a high level of dedicated customer and community service at all times. The incoming Chief will manage complex projects involving cross-functional teams requiring coordination and collaboration with internal and external stakeholders. The preferred candidate will be a strong and innovative leader who is both creative and conservative in his/her approach to financial management. This individual will have a successful history of solving a variety of complex administrative and organizational challenges. A Bachelor’s degree from an accredited college or university with major course work in Administration of Justice, Criminology, Public Administration, or a closely related field is required, a Master’s degree is preferred. Ten (10) years of increasingly responsible command and supervisory experience in a full-service police department, including five (5) years in a command position equivalent to a Police Captain and/or Assistant/Deputy Police Chief is desirable. Experience as a current Police Chief is preferred. California POST Management and/or Executive Certification preferred. The salary range is $165,384 to $204,876 and will be dependent upon the qualifications and experience of the selected candidate. The City also offers an attractive benefits package. If you are interested in this outstanding opportunity, please apply online at www.bobmurrayassoc.com. Please contact Mr. Regan Williams at (916) 784-9080 should you have any questions. Brochure available. Closing date August 2, 2013.

phone 916•784•9080 fax 916•784•1985 www.bobmurrayassoc.com

Western City, July 2013

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MONTEREY PARK DIRECTOR OF

Community & Economic Development Annual salary range is $116,000 – $148,000, plus excellent benefits.

The City of Monterey Park is seeking a Director of Community/Economic Development who is a hands on, dynamic leader and excellent communicator with outstanding interpersonal skills. The new Director of Communty/ Economic Development will need to dedicate attention to achieving specific strategic plan objectives, and a dedication to providing exemplary services to residents, businesses and visitors. The successful candidate will be required to develop sustained and concerted actions with the policy makers and business community to promote the standard of living and economic health of the City of Monterey Park. Graduation from an accredited fouryear college or university with major course work in public administration, urban planning, economics or a related field is required. A Masters degree is desirable. Visit: www.ci.monterey-park.ca.us for additional information and required application or call 626-3071334. Deadline to file: 7/29/2013 5:00 P.M.. Terms and conditions subject to change without prior notice.

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General Manager

Incline Village General Improvement District Incline Village, NV Please send your cover letter and The Incline Village General Improvement District (IVGID) sits on the northeast corner of Lake Tahoe, a unique and incredibly beautiful national treasure. IVGID is a unique organization as well, providing utility services and community oriented recreation facilities and programs including a ski area, two superior golf courses, a recreation center with a swimming pool, tennis center, and beaches. The General Manager reports to an elected five member Board of Trustees and is responsible for a total budget of just over $35 million with 103 FTE’s and 647 seasonal and part-time employees. The ideal candidate will be a very strong leader with the proven ability to re-direct an organization’s culture along with operational expertise in providing quality of life amenities to a demanding community. Bachelor’s degree required, Master’s preferred. Salary up to $200,000 DOQE (includes measurable incentives) with benefits.

resume electronically to:

Peckham & McKenney apply@peckhamandmckenney.com Resumes acknowledged within two business days. Call Phil McKenney at (866) 912-1919 for more information. A detailed brochure is available at www.peckhamandmckenney.com. Filing deadline is July 29, 2013.

Director of Aviation, City of Fresno, CA The City of Fresno, CA (population approximately 509,000) is located in the heart of the state in the fertile San Joaquin Valley and serves as the financial, industrial, trade, and commercial capital of the central San Joaquin Valley. Fresno is now seeking a Director of Aviation to oversee a staff of 77.3 full-time employees and FY 2013 budget of $43.6 million. The Director of Aviation is appointed by and reports to the City Manager and exercises supervision over Fresno Airports’ management, professional, technical, maintenance, and clerical staff. Candidates must possess a least five years of recent, progressively responsible, high-level experience managing a multi-purpose, multi-structure facility; this experience would typically be gained as a Director at an airport of similar size and complexity to Fresno Airports or as an Assistant Director/Division Head at a larger airport. Candidates must also possess a Bachelor’s Degree in Business, Public Administration, Aviation, or a closely related field; a Master’s degree is desirable. The salary range is dependent upon qualifications, up to $145,000 annually. If you are interested in this outstanding opportunity, please apply online at www.bobmurrayassoc.com. Please contact Di Smith at (916) 784-9080 should you have any questions. Brochure available. Closing date July 19, 2013. phone 916•784•9080 fax 916•784•1985 www.bobmurrayassoc.com

Photo/art credits Cover: Courtesy of the state Department of Water Resources (DWR)

Pages 8–16: Courtesy of DWR

Table of Contents: Courtesy of DWR

Pages 18 & 21: Courtesy of City of Cathedral City and League of California Cities

Page 3: Skyline, Christos Georghiou/Shutter stock.com; figures, Aleksander1/Shutterstock. com; and Taber Creative Group Page 6: Conference logo, courtesy League of California Cities

Page 17: Courtesy of City of Beaumont

Page 24: Courtesy of City of Santa Clarita Page 26: Courtesy of DWR Page 29: Jude Hudson, Hudson+Associates

Page 7: Best practices logos, courtesy of Institute for Local Government

www.cacities.org


Cathedral City Takes Action on Energy Efficiency, continued from page 18

The city implemented successful measures that decreased energy consumption and saved more than $100,000 per year.

Cathedral City also joined the Coachella Valley Energy Conservation (CVEC) Initiative, an energy conservation and resource sustainability effort, in 2008. Cathedral City, along with other cities in the region, adopted the CVEC goal to reduce per-capita energy consumption 10 percent by 2012 — and met this goal. Cathedral City Mayor Kathy DeRosa is extremely grateful for the implementation of these energy- and money-saving projects in the community. She says, “By teaming up with our local electric utility and other agencies, we have been able to honor our environmental commitment to the community while helping to improve our local economy.” Supported by the Desert Cities Energy Partnership and Southern California Edison’s Green for Life program, Cathedral City adopted a 2012 Energy Action Plan to outline additional energy-related goals to be accomplished in the next five years. “We applaud Cathedral City for its dedication to energy conservation,” says Katie Barrows, director of environmental resources for the Coachella Valley Association of Governments (CVAG). “As a member of CVAG, the city has shared its valuable strategies, which positively impact sustainability and conservation efforts in the entire Coachella Valley.” As part of its efforts to keep costs manageable, the city is seeking federal, state and regional funding sources for all energy-saving projects. ■ Contact: Deanna Pressgrove, environmental conservation manager, Cathedral City; phone: (760) 770-0369; email: dpressgrove@cathedralcity.gov.

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Upgrading the lighting and heating, ventilation and air conditioning system at the library contributed to significant savings in energy costs.

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ASSISTANT CITY MANAGER City of Santa Clara, California The City of Santa Clara located in the heart of California’s Silicon Valley, population 118,000. The City provides a full range of public services including an electric utility. Position Requirements: BA in public administration or related field w/five years progressively responsible managerial experience; Master’s Degree preferred. The ideal candidate will be a seasoned administrator with extensive intergovernmental relations experience. Critical skills include: strategic planning, project coordination/management & economic development. Seeking a professional leader that works collaboratively w/departments on multi-level departmental projects, who is personable and has a reputation of strong ethics and integrity. Deadline for applications: August 30, 2013. Information available at www.santaclaraca.gov or call Human Resources at (408)615-2080. Please send a letter of interest, resume and salary history to the City of Santa Clara, Human Resources Department, 1500 Warburton Ave., Santa Clara, CA 95050.

Monthly Salary Range: Control Point 85% to 100% to 110% $15,924 -$18,734-$20,607

CalPERS Pension: 2.7% @ 55 for Classic Employees 2% @ 62 for new CalPERS Members.

Human Resources Administrator City of Arcadia, CA Known as the “Community of Homes,” Arcadia has over 56,800 residents and is located at the base of the San Gabriel Mountains in the San Gabriel Valley, fifteen miles northeast of Los Angeles. The City is seeking a skilled, dynamic, confident, approachable and highly trust-worthy human resources professional who enjoys working in an organization that embraces a team-oriented work environment. The City’s Human Resources Administrator will assume responsibility for all Human Resources Division services and activities, including contract negotiation, collective bargaining agreement administration, workforce planning, recruitment and selection, budget development and management, EEO, training and orientation programs, risk management, the administration of the classification, and job evaluation and performance appraisal systems. An open-door and collaborative management style, excellent decision making capability, the ability to develop and manage staff effectively, develop partnerships, trust, and cooperation with the department heads is significant to the success of the Administrator. The City would benefit from an Administrator who has excellent communication and listening skills. The selected candidate must have six years of general administrative experience in a public agency, including three years of increasingly responsible professional human resources, budgetary and supervisory experience. This position requires the equivalent to a Bachelor’s degree from an accredited college or university with major course work in human resources, public administration, business administration or a related field. A Master’s degree in Human Resources, Public Administration or a related field is preferred. The salary rage is $8,740-$10,916 per month. The City also offers an attractive benefits package. If you are interested in this outstanding opportunity, please apply online at www.bobmurrayassoc.com. Please contact Ms. Di Smith or Mr. Bob Murray at (916) 784-9080 should you have any questions. Brochure available. Closing date July 19, 2013.

phone 916•784•9080 fax 916•784•1985 www.bobmurrayassoc.com

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Sustainability’s New Normal: Capturing Multiple Benefits, continued from page 17

motion is detected, such as on weekends or late at night. This reduces energy use by an additional 40 percent. Over the 11-year life of the LEDs, the lighting retrofit is expected to save the city $3.3 million.

provide Sacramento with public safety and maintenance co-benefits. When police patrols see a normally low-lighted parking garage area fully lit at 2:00 a.m., it alerts them to possible criminal activity. Similarly, the city saves on maintenance and labor costs, as the energy-efficient LEDs

Beyond the energy and financial savings, the parking garage lighting systems also

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THE CITY OF

Rolling Hills CALIFORNIA City Manager The bucolic community of Rolling Hills, on the Palos Verdes Peninsula, is recruiting for a City Manager. Consistent with the unique character of the community, the City Manager is 1 of 4 staff where City services are primarily provided through contracts. The position requires the talents of a professional who can provide leadership, work with volunteers, and is task-oriented. The City Manager is responsible to a 5 member City Council, works with several other Commissions, and is engaged in community events. The successful candidate will be a “people” person, team player, good writer and selfstarter. Additionally, the ideal candidate would be experienced in city management, communicative, inventive, customer service oriented and have the highest integrity. The position is exceptionally suited for a Deputy or Assistant City Manager, or Department Head interested in their first City Manager position. Candidates are requested to send a resume and letter of interest to City of Rolling Hills, c/o City Manager Recruitment, 2 Portuguese Bend Road, Rolling Hills, CA 90274. Resumes should be submitted by August 30, 2013. The compensation for the position will be negotiated, commensurate with the experience and background of the successful candidate. For more information, visit the City’s web site at www.Rolling-Hills.org.

City Manager, City of Hemet, CA The City of Hemet, population approximately 82,000, is located in the San Jacinto Valley in Riverside County. The formation of Lake Hemet helped the city grow and prosper, and stimulated agriculture in the area. The City of Hemet has a General Fund operating budget of approximately $37 million and a total budget of $76 million and 278 full time employees. The City Council is looking for an experienced professional to assume the duties of City Manager. The ideal candidate will be an effective leader who has the ability to earn the respect of the Council, staff, and members of the community. The new City Manager should be capable of making an assessment of the current organization and offering recommendations for improvement recognizing that the City has a talented staff. The ideal candidate as a leader will create an environment where employees feel empowered to excel. Candidates should possess excellent management skills and be able to delegate effectively while holding staff accountable. The new City Manager should have a demonstrated background of success in economic development. An individual who understands the environment created as a result of the loss of redevelopment will be an asset. A strong understanding of financial management is important. An individual should possess experience in the evaluation of contracting for services and its fiscal impact and level of service. Candidates should possess a bachelor’s degree in public administration, business administration or a related field. The City Council is open to consider a person with a mix of public and private sector experience. A broad range of expertise in municipal operations will be an asset. The salary for the incoming City Manager is open and is dependent upon qualifications. The City also offers an attractive benefits package. If you are interested in this outstanding opportunity, please apply online at www.bobmurrayassoc.com. Please contact Mr. Bob Murray at (916) 784-9080 should you have any questions. Brochure available. Closing date July 26, 2013.

phone 916•784•9080 fax 916•784•1985 www.bobmurrayassoc.com

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last longer and thus do not need replacing as frequently as traditional lighting. The City of Beaumont hit a home run when it reduced the number of lights at a baseball field in a city park, saving energy, money and maintenance costs. Working with a sports lighting designer, the city actually optimized the lighting

Understanding Co-Benefits And Adaptation The term “co-benefit” is often used in the public health community to describe multiple, ancillary health benefits of a program, policy or intervention. For example, community design strategies that increase access to parks and make walking and bicycling easier also have direct and indirect co-benefits of improving residents’ health. Similarly, co-benefits of activities that save energy or water include saving taxpayers’ money and reducing maintenance costs. Adaptation activities help a community respond to the impacts of climate change and make them more resilient in the face of impacts. Some observers consider adaptation to be a co-benefit of individual sustainability activities. For example, in addition to the most commonly identified benefit of investing in energy efficiency — saving money — using less energy can position an agency or homeowner to be nimble in the face of future rising energy costs and possible shortages. Conserving energy also lessens pressure on the existing energy infrastructure. Likewise, besides saving water and money, using water-efficient landscaping or installing water-efficient appliances extends existing water supplies and helps to reduce water-related vulnerabilities resulting from climate change.

www.cacities.org


by reducing the number of lights. The city replaced 36 quartz light fixtures with 18 high-intensity metal halide fixtures, reducing the lighting output by more than 1 million lumens (lumens are a standard measure of light). Although the ball field has less light overall, it is more evenly lit to maximize efficiency and create a better viewing experience.

The scientific consensus is that the consequences of climate change are happening sooner than previously thought. They are likely to include higher temperatures; an increase in extreme weather events such as heat, heavy rain and storms; flooding; and reduced snowpack and resulting water shortages.

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Trees, Water and Energy The City of West Sacramento launched a comprehensive municipal urban forestry program in 2004. The program provides free shade trees and education to residents and community groups and creates innovative demonstration projects that enhance the city’s landscaped areas. In 2010 the city planted 375 trees and 10,000 square feet of grasses. The landscaping is irrigated by a filtered water-pumping system connected to the existing stormwater reclamation system. West Sacramento’s urban forestry program offers multiple benefits. It provides shade trees for residents, lowers cooling costs and reduces the “heat island” effect. It also conserves water by tapping into the stormwater reclamation system and uses less electricity to pump water. This enables the city to plan ahead for the possibility of future reduced water availability due to the impacts of climate change. The multiple benefits of smart irrigation systems can be seen in cities such as Simi Valley, Woodland and Santa Clarita. Smart irrigation systems function like a thermostat by responding to weather and moisture content in the soil and adjusting the amount of water dispensed accordingly. Estimates suggest that installing smart irrigation systems can reduce water use by 20 percent. Additional benefits can include reducing: • Energy costs related to pumping and distributing water; • Vehicle miles traveled by agency staff (and related fuel costs) to inspect landscaped areas; and • Staff resources needed to maintain the irrigation systems.

continued

www.westerncity.com

Consensus on Climate Change

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Financial Services Director, Oceanside, CA The City of Oceanside, CA (population 170,000) is a thriving beachfront community centrally located in the heart of the beautiful Southern California coastline. Oceanside is now seeking a Financial Services Director to oversee a staff of 31 and a FY2013/2014 budget of $4.8 million. The Director reports to the City Manager and works closely with other City department directors to provide the full range of financial services support. This position is responsible for the revenue and business activities, budget development and administration, and financial management activities of the City. Candidates for this position must possess at least five years of increasingly responsible experience in public- or private-sector administration with responsibility for finance, accounting, or other related administrative functions. A Bachelor’s Degree in Business Administration, Public Administration, or a closely related field is required; a Master’s Degree and/or other financial resource credentials are highly desirable. The salary for the Financial Services Director is open and dependent upon qualifications, up to $156,000 annually. If you are interested in this outstanding opportunity, please apply online at www.bobmurrayassoc.com. Please contact Regan Williams at (916) 784-9080 should you have any questions. Brochure available. Closing date August 9, 2013. phone 916•784•9080 fax 916•784•1985 www.bobmurrayassoc.com

Development Services Director San Juan Capistrano

The City of San Juan Capistrano, population 34,593, is a captivating community with an engaged citizenry located in south Orange County between Los Angeles and San Diego. The City is seeking a dynamic and experienced Development Services Director to lead a staff of 13 in planning, building, code enforcement, inspection and permitting. The new Director will be highly experienced with a hands-on management style and strong interpersonal skills in working with appointed officials, department heads and the community. The ideal candidate will be a champion for the City Council’s business friendly priority and support businesses, small and large, to foster economic development opportunities. Candidates must be able to apply his/her broad experience and understanding of current and advanced planning functions, land use, economic development and housing, in implementing the City’s Historic Town Center Master Plan, updating the City’s ordinances and policies and developing a strategic plan to manage the City’s vast open space. To apply for this unique opportunity, visit www.sanjuancapistrano.org or contact Tom Bokosky, Human Resources Manager at 949-443-6321 for more information.

Western City, July 2013

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Sustainability’s New Normal: Capturing Multiple Benefits, continued

The multiple benefits of smart irrigation systems can be seen in cities such as Simi Valley, Woodland and Santa Clarita. J

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Regional Government Services

Seeking Public Sector Professionals

in HR, Finance, IT, public works, and other public-sector areas Consultant Salary starts at $50 hourly and may increase up to $80 depending experience, qualifications, or job assignment. Regional Government Services seeks to fill several Public Sector Consultant positions at a variety of professional and technical levels, from analyst to director, for our service partners (other public agencies).

Sustainable Communities Are Resilient Over the past five years, most of the activity related to climate change has focused on reducing greenhouse gas emissions. Local agency and community investments in projects and policies designed to save energy and reduce greenhouse gas emissions will continue to be important. Recently, however, more attention is being given to understanding how actions taken today can help the community adapt to the impacts of climate change in the future. Thus, policies and programs implemented now to help adapt to the impacts of climate change, such as water shortages and severe heat events, will make communities more resilient and able to rebound more quickly. By launching such efforts, local officials can plan for the future, help their communities save money and reap multiple benefits today. ■

Assignments vary and are throughout California. Assignment mixed between home-based and service partner offices. Hours are flexible, 20-40 hours weekly. Benefits may be provided to those employees who regularly work 30 or more hours per week. Candidates must have a BA in HR, Business, Finance, Accounting, IT, public policy, engineering, or related (Master’s preferred) and 5 years of professional-level public-sector managerial experience. For more detailed information and to submit an online application, go to CalOpps at http://www. calopps.org. Click Member Agencies, then Regional Government Services then Public Sector Consultant. Applications taken on an Open Until filled basis. Only applications filed through CalOpps will be reviewed. For our website, visit http://rgs-lgs.org. Contact roppenheim@rgs.ca.gov for questions.

City Manager | CITY OF ESCALON City of Escalon is seeking a City Manager, located in the California’s Central Valley. Escalon is an attractive City of 7,208 residents, in a productive area of San Joaquin County. The City Manager will possess desire for community involvement throughout the city. Vision, leadership and administrative strengths are critical. The City Manager is appointed by the City Council and serves as the operational head of city government. The ideal candidate will have a successful track record, possess a unique combination of interpersonal, organizational and management attributes in providing focused leadership and guiding vision for the City. This position requires a self-starter with the ability to flourish in a small department. Responsibilities include carrying out policies of the City Council, organization and operation of municipal government, coordinating major City projects and initiatives, and management of personnel. For an application packet visit our website at www.cityofescalon.org.

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Santa Clarita’s smart irrigation system functions like a thermostat to reduce water usage.

More Resources Online For additional information and links to related resources, read the online version of this article at www.westerncity.com.

www.cacities.org


The Bay Delta Conservation Plan: An Overview and Local Perspectives, continued from page 16

At the simplest level, the operating rules for any new intakes would tie diversions to the volume of flow in the Sacramento River, so that when flows are critically low, no water would be diverted. As flows increase, so could diversions, depending upon the presence of fish and other factors. Intakes of 9,000 cubic feet per second would allow the federal and state water projects to take a “big gulp” of winter storm flows, when pumping causes minimal ecological harm. If the intakes are too small, the existing south Delta pumping plants would remain the primary diversion, with all the attendant troubles for fish.

Examining the Cost At a cost of roughly $25 billion over 50 years, the BDCP would not be cheap. Most construction, operation and maintenance costs — $14 billion — would be paid by the ratepayers of the water districts that buy water from the federal and state water projects. The general public would be expected to pay several billion dollars toward habitat restoration, most likely through future general obligation bonds. A reasonable person might ask: Why should ratepayers make such a big investment for a project that may not increase water supplies at all? Ultimately, the board of directors of each water agency must weigh the costs and potential benefits of the project and decide for themselves whether to commit to paying for the BDCP. But the economic value of stabilizing the Delta’s ecosystem and water deliveries — as well as reducing the risk of catastrophic disruption — is at least as powerful an incentive as any potential increase in water supplies. Once water district managers know what they can reasonably expect in Delta deliveries, they can invest efficiently to meet local demand. continued

Protecting California from floods, meeting environmental water needs and capturing runoff for water supply will be complicated. J

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City of South San Francisco, CA The “Birthplace of Biotechnology,” South San Francisco is located in San Mateo County and occupies the valley formed by the San Bruno Mountains on the north and the Coast Range on the west. The City’s approximately 62,500 residents enjoy not only beautiful views of the San Francisco Bay but easy access to transportation, quality neighborhoods and parks, cultural activities, and high performing schools. Appointed by the five-member City Council, the City Manager will lead a staff of over 400 full- and part-time employees in this full-service organization with proposed general fund operating budget of $71.6M. The ideal candidate will bring proven executive level experience in local government, preferably as a City Manager or Assistant City Manager. Bachelor’s degree in public/business administration or a related field is required; Master’s preferred. Salary DOQ.

Police

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DOQ – Contract position

Applications available at:

383 Main St, Brawley or www.brawley-ca.gov Deadline to apply:

July 31, 2013

www.westerncity.com

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Please send your cover letter and resume electronically to:

Peckham & McKenney apply@peckhamandmckenney.com Resumes acknowledged within two business days. Call Bobbi Peckham at (866) 912-1919 for more information. A detailed brochure is available at www.peckhamandmckenney.com. Filing deadline is July 22, 2013.

City of Brawley, California The Police Chief plans, oversees, and directs the operations and services of the Police Department, including law enforcement, crime suppression and prevention; works cooperatively with City departments and outside agencies; is committed to community engagement and provides highly responsible and complex administrative support to the City Manager. Minimum qualifications include a Bachelor’s degree from an accredited college or university in criminal justice, police science, public administration or a closely related field. A Master’s degree is preferred. The successful candidate must pass an extensive background investigation, possess a valid California driver’s license and an acceptable driving record. Any combination of experience and training that provides the required knowledge and abilities qualifies. A typical way to obtain the knowledge and abilities would be: • Six (6) years of experience in police work, including at least three (3) years of supervisory/management experience in a municipal police department or county sheriff’s department. • California P.O.S.T. Management certificate. • Possession of, or the ability to obtain, an appropriate, valid California P.O.S.T. Executive certificate.

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The Bay Delta Conservation Plan: An Overview and Local Perspectives, continued

The Delta’s unique ecosystem is home to both farms and wildlife. It also offers numerous recreational opportunities.

• The west side of the San Joaquin Valley also produces billions of dollars’ worth of food and depends on the Delta for about three-quarters of its irrigation supply; and

The Delta supply is not easily or cheaply replaced. Consider: • Southern California, with half of the state’s population, gets almost a quarter of its average water supply from the Delta;

• The San Francisco Bay Area, including the innovation hub of Silicon Valley, takes about half of its water supply from the Delta and its tributaries.

• Kern County, which produces nearly $3 billion annually in grapes, almonds, pistachios, milk, citrus and carrots, depends on the Delta for about a fifth of its irrigation supply;

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west coast headquarters 1677 Eureka Road, Suite 202 Roseville, CA 95661 phone 916•784•9080

east coast 2910 Kerry Forest Parkway D4-242 Tallahassee, FL 32309 phone 850•391•0000

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Economists at the California Department of Water Resources estimate that roughly 24 percent of California’s economic activity

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After 60 years of drawing water from the Delta, Californians recognize that the existing system does not work for fish or people. We have a chance to reverse environmental degradation and guard water supplies before climate change creates even more difficult conditions for our economy and native wildlife. Doing nothing will cost future Californians a lot more someday. ■

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Peckham&McKenney “It’s all about fit” www.peckhamandmckenney.com Sacramento, CA

866.912.1919

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Municipal Engineering Construction Management Building Plan Review, Inspection & CASp Fire Prevention Services Environmental & Sustainable Programs Code Enforcement Digital Plan Review & Archive Scanning GreenVue Software Planning Services San Mateo Santa Ana Sacramento Salinas Pleasanton Newman

HF&H CONSULTANTS, LLC Managing Tomorrow’s Resources Today Providing Consulting Services to Recycling, Solid Waste, Water and Wastewater Management for more than 20 Years

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Irvine (949) 251-8628

Looking for budget balancing tools? More than 600 public agencies have chosen PARS for retirement solutions that help save money, such as: • OPEB pre-funding trust to reduce liabilities • Social Security alternatives for part-timers to save 79% • Leave conversion plans to reduce large payouts at end 800.540.6369 x 116; mbarker@pars.org www.pars.org ©2013 Public Agency Retirement Services (PARS). All rights reserved.

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How does the League help you serve your community? Read more “On the Record” at www.westerncity.com.

Rich Constantine Mayor Pro Tem Morgan Hill

Mike Villalta Mayor Los Banos

Ella Zanowic Council Member Calimesa

www.westerncity.com

Its educational sessions give me an opportunity to get information from other members, too, and hear their input on common issues. The League is very instrumental in keeping me current.

Our League regional public affairs manager is very helpful and does a great job of informing us about what’s happening on policy issues. The League’s training sessions are also well prepared.

The education the League provides is outstanding. It informs us and helps my city plan. And networking with fellow electeds gives me new ideas to take back to my city.

Jan Arbuckle Council Member Grass Valley

Gustavo Comacho Mayor Pico Rivera

Angel Carrillo Council Member Azusa

The League gives us information we need and a way to network with other cities. The collaborative aspect is most effective because we are able to exchange ideas.

The League provides resources and information that we in turn use to make better policy decisions.

Meeting colleagues from other cities dealing with similar challenges is great. We learn about how other cities are solving problems, and it helps me be a better policy-maker at the local level.

Western City, July 2013

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Thank you to all of the 2013 League Partners

Platinum ($15,000+) 1,2

2

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2 2 AAGIE

Apartment Association Greater Inland Empire

2

2

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2

1,2 BUILDING AMERICA®

Gold ($10,000+) Hanson Bridgett LLP1,2 Jenkins & Hogin LLP2

Lewis Investment Company2 Liebert Cassidy Whitmore1 Meyers Nave1,2

Renne Sloan Holtzman Sakai LLP1,2 Republic Services Inc.2 Richards Watson & Gershon1,2

Willdan Young Homes2

Silver ($5,000+) JPMorgan Chase & Co. Kronick Moskovitz Tiedemann & Girard1 Majestic Realty Co.2 Management Partners Morongo Band of Mission Indians2

Charles Abbott Associates2 Athens California & Nevada IBEW/ NECA Labor-Management Cooperation Trust California/Nevada Soft Drink Association2

California Grocers Association2 Cardenas Markets Inc.2 DW Development2 Dart Container Corp. Greenwaste Recovery Inc. Interwest Consulting Group Inc.

4 Creeks2 American Red Cross AndersonPenna Partners Inc. Best Way Disposal2 CMTC California Dental Association-PAC Cerrell Associates Colantuono & Levin Desert Valley Medical Group Inc./Prime Healthcare2

Edgewood Partners Insurance Center Fieldman Rolapp & Associates Fulbright & Jaworski Garaventa Enterprises2 Ghilotti Construction2 Jose Gonzales2 HMC + Beverly Prior Architects Herum\Crabtree Attorneys Hill International2 Holliday Rock Company

Kinsell Newcomb & De Dios Inc.2 Library Systems & Services LLC Molycorp2 Morley Brothers LLC2 Morongo Band of Mission Indians2 Bob Murray & Associates National Community Neoteric Entertainment Inc.2

Alcal2 Amador Valley Industries2 Architects Orange2 Ashwood Construction Alameda County Industries2 Alvarez-Glasman & Colvin2 Arnold and Associates2 Atkins Avery Associates2 Berliner Cohen Blue Line Transfer Inc.2 CH2M Hill California Association of Physician Groups California Building Industry Association California Consulting2 California Contract Cities Association California Debt & Investment2

California Hotel Lodging California Refuse Recycling Council California Water Service Company Christiani Architects2 City Ventures2 Civil Justice Association of California Classic Communities2 Continental Development Corporation Paul Cook for Assembly2 Cost Control Associates Inc. Desert Valley Builders2 DiMare Van Vleck & Brown LLC Dokken Engineering2 E&J Gallo Ecology Auto Parts

Emanuels Jones and Associates Fard Engineers2 Food 4 Less2 Fresno Police Officers Association GHD Inc. Giacalone Design Gresham Savage Nolan & Tilden PC Hall & Foreman Inc. Harris & Associates HydroPoint Data Systems Inc. Innisfree Ventures2 Jamboree Housing Corporation Johnstone Moyer Jones Hall Jones & Mayer J.R. Roberts/Deacon Inc. Kasdan Simonds Riley & Vaughan LLP

Northrop Grumman Pena’s Disposal2 Prometheus Real Estate Group Inc.2 San Manuel Band of Mission Indians2 Santa Ynez Band of Mission Indians2

Schiff Hardin LLP Starbucks Tribal Alliance of Sovereign Indian Nations2 Union Bank US Bank

Pacific Code Compliance2 Pacific Rail2 PARS/Phase II Piper Jaffray2 Psomas2 James Ramos2 Recology2 Regis Homes2 Robson Homes LLC2 Janice Rutherford2

San Bernadino County Safety Employees2 San Bernardino Police Officers Association Seifel Consulting, Inc. Solution Strategies2 Stradling Yocca Carlson & Rauth SummerHill Homes2 TREH Development2 Zarc Recycling2

LaBarge Industries2 Largo Concrete2 Livermore Sanitation Inc.2 Marchetti Construction Inc.2 NASA Services2 Gary Ovitt2 Pacific Water Quality Association Parsons2 Peters Engineering2 Potential Industries Precision Concrete Cutting Quad Knopf2 Riverside Construction2 RJP Framing2 SNW Securities Corp. S&S Drywall2 San Mateo County Association of Realtors2

Santa Monica Police Officers Association ServPro Severn Trent Enviromental2 Sobrato Organization2 Southern California Concrete Producers Specialty Solid Waste & Recycling2 Studio T SQ2 Swinerton Management Teichert Construction2 Top Grade Construction2 Urban Futures2 Vali Cooper & Associates Inc. Waste Management2 WaterMarke Properties2 Zero Waste Energy

Bronze ($3,000+)

Basic ($1,000+)

Join the Partners Program Today! Contact Mike Egan | (916) 658-8271 | egan@cacities.org

Partial list as of 6/1/2013

1 – Institute for Local Government supporter 2 – CITIPAC supporter


Western City July 2013