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J U LY 2 012 |

The Monthly Magazine of the League of California Cities

Draft Stormwater Permit Draws Cities Together p.14 Spotlighting Energy Efficiency p.20 Sustainability’s Many Faces p.10

www.westerncity.com


Thank you to our 2012

League Partners Platinum

($15,000+)

ABM2 AT&T Aleshire & Wynder1,2 American Fidelity Assurance Company Best Best & Krieger LLP1,2 Burrtec Waste Industries Inc. Global Water Fathom HdL Companies Honeywell Kaiser Permanente Keenan & Associates MuniServices Northern California Regional Carpenters PG&E SmartCities Prevail.org Solarcity Southern California Edison1,2 Southern California Gas Co./ SDG&E/The Sempra Energy Utilities1 State Farm Insurance Visa Walmart Willdan Group

Gold

($10,000+)

Bank of America Burke Williams & Sorensen LLP1,2 Hanson Bridgett LLP1,2 Jenkins & Hogin LLP2 Lewis Investment Company2 Liebert Cassidy Whitmore1 Renne Sloan Holtzman Sakai LLP1 Richards Watson & Gershon1,2 Union Pacific Railroad Wells Fargo

Silver ($5,000+)

Athens Cardenas Markets Inc.2 Charles Abbott Associates2 DW Development2 Dart Container Corp. Dokken Engineering ITRON Interwest Consulting Group INC. JPMorgan Chase & Co. Kronick Moskovitz Tiedemann & Girard1 Majestic Realty Co.2 Management Partners Meyers Nave1,2 Northrop Grumman Prometheus Real Estate Group Inc.2 Republic Services Inc.2 San Manuel Band of Mission Indians2 Starbucks TRANE2 Tribal Alliance of Sovereign Indian Nations2 Union Bank

Bronze ($3,000+)

Amador Valley Industries2 AndersonPenna Partners Inc. Atkins Best Way Disposal2 California Dental Association-PAC California Grocers Association California & Nevada IBEW/ NECA Labor-Management Cooperation Trust Cerrell Associates Colantuono & Levin Desert Valley Medical Group Inc./Prime Healthcare2 Garaventa Enterprises2 Ghilotti Construction2 Jose Gonzales for Supervisor2 HMC + Beverly Prior Architects Herum\Crabtree Attorneys Hill International2 Holliday Rock Company

Library Systems & Services LLC Management Partners Morley Brothers LLC Morongo Band of Mission Indians2 Bob Murray & Associates National Community (National Core) Neoteric Entertainment Inc.2 Pacific Code Compliance2 PARS/Phase II Piper Jaffray Regis Homes2 Janice Rutherford for Supervisor2 San Bernardino Police Officers Association Solution Strategies2 SummerHill Homes2 TY LIN International Urban Housing Group2

Basic ($1,000+)

Alcal2 Advance America Alameda County Industries2 Alvarez-Glasman & Colvin2 Arnold and Associates2 Avery Associates2 Blue Line Transfer Inc.2 CH2M Hill California Association of Physician Groups California Building Industry Association California Contract Cities Association California Hotel Lodging California Refuse Recycling Council California Water Service Company Check into Cash California Christiani Architects2 Civil Justice Association of California Continental Development Corporation Paul Cook for Assembly2 Cost Control Associates Inc. DiMare Van Vleck & Brown LLC E&J Gallo

1 – Institute for Local Government supporter 2 – CITIPAC supporter Join the Partners Program Today! Contact Mike Egan | (916) 658-8271 | egan@cacities.org

Ecology Auto Parts Emanuels Jones and Associates Food 4 Less Fresno Police Officers Association GHD Inc. Giacalone Design Hall & Foreman Inc. Harris & Associates HydroPoint Data Systems Inc. Johnstone Moyer Jones & Mayer Jones Hall A Professional Law Corporation Kasdan Simonds Weber & Vaughan LLP LaBarge Industries2 Largo Concrete2 Livermore Sanitation Inc.2 Marchetti Construction Inc.2 NASA Services2 Committee to Elect Gary Ovitt2 Pacific Code Compliance Pacific Water Quality Association Parsons2 Peters Engineering2 Philips Precision Concrete Cutting Quad Knopf2 RJP Framing2 Robson Homes LLC2 SNW Securities Corp. S&S Drywall2 Santa Monica Police Officers Association ServePro Sobrato Organization2 Southern California Concrete Producers Southwest Water Co.2 Swinerton Management Teichert Construction2 Top Grade Construction2 Vali Cooper & Associates Inc. Vulcan2 Waste Management2 Zero Waste Energy LLC

Partial list as of 6/1/2012


CONTENTS 2

Calendar of League Events

3

Executive Director’s Message

10

Summer Reading: Food for Thought

Cities and counties throughout Cali-

A new book reminds us how good leaders seize crises to remake organizational habits.

The California Local Energy Assurance Planning program offers local governments support in planning for interruptions to energy supplies.

7

fornia are demonstrating leadership in creating vibrant, healthy communities by adopting policies and programs that support sustainability.

City Forum

New Program Offers Help With Planning for Energy Emergencies

14

California city officials were stunned when the State Water Resources Control Board issued a highly prescriptive 93-page draft permit containing a number of stringent, unfunded mandates.

New Resources: The Latest In Best Practices and More

8

Draft Stormwater Permit Draws Cities Together in New Coalition By Pauline Roccucci

News from the Institute for Local Government

Local officials looking for tools to help them serve their communities now have access to a variety of new resources.

Sustainability’s Many Faces: Beacon Award Program Participants Create Vibrant Communities By Yvonne Hunter and Jessica Aviña Tong

By Chris McKenzie

6

Sustainable Cities

20

Spotlighting Energy Efficiency in California Communities

Annual Conference Preview

By Lindsay Buckley

Cities Guiding Healthy Government

Looking for ways to better maximize resources in economically challenging times? Energy efficiency offers a number of moneysaving advantages.

By Lorraine Okabe The League of California Cities 2012 Annual Conference & Expo provides a unique opportunity for city officials and staff to learn from policy-makers and experts.

23

Job Opportunities

27

Professional Services Directory Cover Photo: Portokalis/ Shutterstock.com


President Michael Kasperzak Mayor Mountain View

1400 K Street Sacramento, CA 95814 (916) 658-8200 Fax (916) 658-8240

Second Vice President José Cisneros Treasurer San Francisco

Immediate Past President Jim Ridenour Former Mayor Modesto

Executive Director Chris McKenzie

For a complete list of the League board of directors, visit www.cacities.org/board.

leaguevents

Magazine Staff Editor in Chief Jude Hudson (916) 658-8234 email: editor@westerncity.com

JULY

Managing Editor Eva Spiegel (916) 658-8228 email: espiegel@cacities.org

19 – 20 Board of Directors Meeting, Manhattan Beach The League board reviews, discusses and takes action on a variety of issues affecting cities, including legislation, legal advocacy, education and training, and more.

Advertising Sales Manager Pam Maxwell-Blodgett (916) 658-8256 email: maxwellp@cacities.org

SEPTEMBER

Administrative Assistant Anita Lopez (916) 658-8223 email: alopez@cacities.org

5

Policy Committee Meetings, San Diego The League’s policy committees review issues of interest to cities statewide and make recommendations to the League board of directors.

Contributors Dorothy Holzem Kelly Plag Kyra Ross JoAnne Speers

5 Legal Advocacy Committee Meeting, San Diego The committee reviews and recommends friend-of-the-court efforts on cases of significant statewide interest to California cities.

Associate Editors Carol Malinowski Carolyn Walker Design Pat Davis Design Group, Inc.

5–7

For photo credits, see page 24.

Western City (ISSN 0279-5337) is published monthly by the League of California Cities, 1400 K St., Sacramento, CA 95814. Subscriptions: $39.00/1 year; $63.00/2 years; student: $26.50; foreign: $52.00; single copies: $4.00, including sales tax. Entered as periodical mail January 30, 1930, at the Post Office, Los Angeles, CA 90013, under the Act of April 13, 1879. Periodical postage paid at Sacramento, Calif.

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November

28 – 30

City Clerks New Law & Elections Seminar, San Jose This seminar covers laws affecting elections as well as many aspects of the clerk’s responsibilities.

28 – 30 Municipal Finance Institute, San Jose The conference provides essential information for city officials and staff involved in fiscal planning for municipalities.

ED US IN

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League of California Cities 2012 Annual Conference & Expo, San Diego Convention Center This conference offers dozens of educational sessions, numerous professional development opportunities, hundreds of exhibits and a chance to participate in the League’s policy-making activities at the Annual Business Meeting.

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Postmaster: Send address changes to Western City, 1400 K Street, Sacramento, CA 95814. Western City Trademark Reg. U.S. Pat. Off. ©2012 League of California Cities. All rights reserved. Material may not be reprinted without written permission. This issue is Volume LXXXVIII, No. 7.

IND EN

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Supplied by Community Energy

FSC is an independent, not-for-profit organization that promotes environmentally appropriate, socially beneficial and economically viable forest management worldwide. Products with the FSC label are independently certified to ensure that they come from forests managed to meet the needs of present and future generations.

2

First Vice President Bill Bogaard Mayor Pasadena

League of California Cities

Event and registration information is available at www.cacities.org/events. For the latest information on League conferences and events, follow us on Twitter @CaCitiesLearn. For legislative and policy updates and more, follow @CaCities. Join us on Facebook! www.facebook.com/westerncity www.facebook.com/LeagueofCaCities www.cacities.org


Executive Director’s Message by Chris McKenzie

Summer Reading: Food for Thought

In his recent book, The Power of Habit: Why We Do What We Do in Life and Business, author Charles Duhigg discusses how habits are formed and how individuals and organizations can use this knowledge to effect a transformation.

A

ccording to Duhigg, “Most of the choices we make each day may feel like the products of well-considered decision-making, but they’re not. They’re habits. And though each habit means relatively little on its own, over time … the way we organize our thoughts and work routines has enormous impacts on our health, productivity, financial security and happiness.”

understanding of the neurology of how habits are formed, how new ones can be created and old ones can be changed.

A study by a Duke University researcher in 2006 showed that more than 40 percent of the actions people performed each day weren’t actual decisions, but habits. Once a habit has been established, it becomes virtually automatic.

Shaking Up the Status Quo

Habits, says Duhigg, are “the choices that all of us deliberately make at some point, and then stop thinking about but continue doing, often every day.” Duhigg examines both good and bad habits in his book. He points out that only in the past 20 years have scientists and marketers begun to understand how habits work and also how they change. Perhaps the most interesting development is our relatively new

www.westerncity.com

At the center of Duhigg’s book is the concept that habits can be changed if we understand how they work. He presents examples of how habits emerge within individual lives, the habits of successful companies and organizations, and the habits of societies.

The book is thought-provoking in a number of ways. On an individual, personal level it offers some refreshing insights into the patterns of one’s daily life. On another level, it’s inspiring to read about how leaders who choose to create the right kinds of “keystone” habits in an organization can produce phenomenal, positive change. It also shows how good leaders seize crises to remake organizational habits. Duhigg points out that a crisis often provides the opportunity to do things that you could not do before, which leads me to some observations of my own. continued on page 5

Western City, July 2012

3


Take Western City magazine wherever you go — in print or online, it’s easy to stay up on the news, issues and ideas making a difference in California cities.

Solutions for Your City at Your Fingertips Don’t miss the latest issue of Western City magazine. It’s in your mailbox every month and always online at www.WesternCity.com. You’ve come to rely on Western City magazine as your one-stop shop for resources, ideas, job listings and more. Now read it online at www.WesternCity.com where you’ll find the same great information plus special web-exclusive features.

Western City magazine is your premier source to recruit candidates for municipal jobs, learn about policy affecting California cities and find solutions for your city.

Call us today (800) 262-1801

or visit us online at www.WesternCity.com

Become a Fan! Type “Western City Magazine” in Facebook’s search box.


Summer Reading: Food for Thought, continued from page 3

Cities Demonstrate Leadership

While the State of California grapples with its perpetual fiscal crisis, in local governments we are seeing innovation that is to a large degree a direct product of coping with the economic crunch. As cities and other local governments seek better ways to deliver essential services in the face of ever-shrinking resources and provide taxpayers with the best value for their dollars, best practices are emerging that offer new models for efficiency and effectiveness. You can read about numerous examples of such innovation in this issue of Western City, starting with “Spotlighting Energy Efficiency in California Communities” (page 20) and “Sustainability’s Many Faces: Beacon Award Program Participants Create Vibrant Communities” (page 10). And the article “Draft Stormwater Permit Draws Cities Together in New Coalition”

(page 14) illustrates the power of an impending crisis to bring local officials together to seek solutions and compromise by working with state leaders to head off some disastrous stormwater regulations.

As local governments

While solutions to the state’s budget deficit have yet to be reached, it’s heartening to see local leaders moving forward on so many fronts. Duhigg’s book reminds us all of the importance of re-examining what we do and reinventing ourselves and our cities. And as Winston Churchill said, “Never, never, never, never give up.”

the face of ever-shrinking

You can find many more examples of innovative city efforts at www.strong citiesstrongstate.com. If your city has something noteworthy to share, we want to hear about it. Contact your regional public affairs manager (www.cacities.org/ regionalmanagers) to follow up. n

and effectiveness.

seek better ways to deliver essential services in resources, best practices are emerging that offer new models for efficiency

Meyers Nave provides the full scope of legal services to cities, successor agencies and special districts throughout California in 16 distinct areas of law, which are municipal and special districts law; climate change and green initiatives; crisis management; eminent domain; environmental law; labor and employment; land use; litigation; oil, gas and energy law; public contracts; public finance; public power and telecommunications; economic development, real estate and affordable housing; transportation and infrastructure; school law; and writs and appeals. Our commitment to professional excellence and our deep roots in California’s communities enable us to consistently achieve exceptional results for our clients.

OAKLAND LOS ANGELES

www.westerncity.com

SACRAMENTO SAN FRANCISCO

SANTA ROSA FRESNO

WWW.MEYERSNAVE.COM 800.464.3559

Western City, July 2012

5


New Program Offers Help With Planning for Energy Emergencies California’s cities lead the nation in disaster preparedness. But what will your city do if a disaster knocks out electricity supplies or interrupts delivery of natural gas, gasoline or diesel fuel? A new program, California Local Energy Assurance Planning (CaLEAP), offers local governments assistance and support in developing a plan to deal with interruptions to energy supplies. Sponsored by the California Energy Commission, CaLEAP is designed to help ensure that a community’s key assets continue to function during emergencies or disasters that impact energy. This

protects public safety and health and helps to minimize economic losses.

How It Works CaLEAP’s voluntary planning effort differs from traditional emergency management, planning and hazard mitigation efforts because it focuses on ensuring that the energy critical to essential services — like fire protection — is available despite any disruption. In addition, an energy assurance plan complements your community’s existing emergency management and/or disaster response plan. The CaLEAP program essentially helps local governments prepare for, respond to, recover from and mitigate events that affect energy supplies. Local governments can use CaLEAP’s technical assistance to: • Build local energy expertise and awareness of impacts and dependencies;

Working in Partnership with Local Communities

(888) 794-2016 www.csgengr.com

6

Staff Augmentation

Digital Plan Review

Code Enforcement

Program & Construction Management

Fire & Life Safety

Civil Engineering Design & Plan Check

Information Technology

Sustainability Programs Services

Public Works Management

League of California Cities

Santa Ana

Pleasanton

Sacramento

• Explore energy choices, including alternative resources that are reliable, safe, diverse, affordable and environmentally acceptable.

Planning for Outages As a general rule, local communities should be prepared to keep essential services online for at least 72 hours if a disruption in energy occurs. With this in mind, the California Energy Commission launched CaLEAP in December 2011 to assist local governments in creating and implementing plans. Communities already working with CaLEAP to develop energy assurance plans include Berkeley, Fresno, Hayward, Lancaster, Laguna Woods, Palo Alto, San Diego County, San Francisco, San Joaquin and Taft. A few things are certain, especially during dry years in California. Energy disruptions will continue for some time, essential community services depend on energy supplies, and energy outages cause significant inconvenience and disturbances to residents’ lives and economic health. Preparing an energy assurance plan will help local governments cope with the impacts of an energy disruption and provide critically important services when they are needed.

Building Plan Review & Inspection

San Mateo

• Help identify energy vulnerabilities and deficiencies of critical assets; and

Salinas

Learn More About CaLEAP For more information, including project team contacts and how to get started, visit www.caleap.org. n www.cacities.org


News from the Institute for Local Government

New Resources: The Latest in Best Practices and More Have you checked out the Institute for Local Government (ILG) website at www.cailg.org lately? It includes a variety of new resources to assist local officials in their service to their communities. ILG offers these as part of its mission to provide practical, impartial and easy-to-use materials, which are free and readily available online. Local Government 101

Many local agencies are in the process of preparing orientation materials for newly elected officials in conjunction with the 2012 election cycle. With this in mind, ILG has added a number of new items to its resource section for newly elected officials at www.ca-ilg.org/ new-local-public-service. These materials can save local agency staff time and cover topics including: • Understanding the labor relations process; • How to chair a meeting; and • How to work with colleagues to accomplish your goals. If your local agency has helpful orientation materials for newly elected officials, ILG welcomes the opportunity to see them and, if appropriate, adapt them for statewide use. For more information, contact Randi Stephens, program coordinator, at rstephens@ca-ilg.org. Sustainability and Public Engagement

Understanding SB 375: Opportunities to Engage the Public in Regional Planning describes options and best practices to engage the public in regional transportation planning, especially as it relates to developing sustainable communities strategies. The electronic version is available free from the

www.westerncity.com

ILG website at www.ca-ilg.org/sb-375resource-center. One chapter addresses the challenges of seeking public input when some members of the public have deeply held concerns about the underlying premises of the planning process and SB 375’s requirements. Because it may assist local officials in any situation involving potentially contentious issues, this chapter is available as a standalone item at www.ca-ilg.org/sb-375resource-center. Other ILG resources to help familiarize local officials with SB 375 include: • Understanding SB 375: Regional Planning for Transportation, Housing and the Environment — a plain-language overview of SB 375’s requirements; and • Understanding SB 375: Public Participation Requirements — an explanation of SB 375’s requirements for seeking public input in developing sustainable communities strategies. These SB 375 resources and more can also be found at www.ca-ilg.org/sb-375resource-center. For additional materials related to sustainability visit www.ca-ilg. org/sustainable-communities. Realignment

Another new section on the ILG site offers resources on public safety realignment and re-entry. This information includes: • The evolving realignment of state and local responsibilities for public safety and community corrections throughout the state; • Specific realignment and re-entry activities with an emphasis on cross-sector innovations; • The work of re-entry councils throughout the state that are coordinating local

efforts to support the successful re-entry of formerly incarcerated individuals into the community and to reduce recidivism; and • Examples of efforts to inform and engage the public about realignment and re-entry plans and issues. These materials are available at www.ca-ilg. org/realignment-and-reentry. Ethics

Western City’s April installment of the “Everyday Ethics for Local Officials” column explains recent changes to the gift rules (www.westerncity.com/Western-City/ April-2012/Understanding-Changes-tothe-Gift-Rules). Local officials who want a more comprehensive explanation of how the gift rules work can visit www.ca-ilg.org/GiftCenter. The best source of information on how these rules apply to specific situations is either the Fair Political Practices Commission (www.fppc.ca.gov) or your agency counsel. ILG has updated its analysis of federal ethics laws reflecting the U.S. Supreme Court’s decision narrowing the application of the “honest services fraud” laws (discussed in a 2006 “Everyday Ethics” column). This resource is available at www.ca-ilg.org/document/makingfederal-case-out-corruption. Feedback and Suggestions Welcome

ILG welcomes suggestions and feedback on these resources; staff contact information is posted at www.ca-ilg.org/staff. You can also follow ILG on Facebook and Twitter. ILG is the nonprofit research affiliate of the League and California State Association of Counties. n Western City, July 2012

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Annual Conference Preview

C TIES

GUIDING HEALTHY GOVERNMENT

LEAGUE OF CALIFORNIA CITIES 2012 ANNUAL CONFERENCE & EXPO

San Diego Convention Center, Sept. 5–7 by Lorraine Okabe

Plan now to attend! The League of California Cities 2012 Annual Conference & Expo provides a unique opportunity for city officials and staff to learn from policy-makers and experts working together to help cities guide healthy government. The conference offers timely topics and quality content to help better serve your city, and the Expo showcases a wide range of products and services designed to improve efficiency and save money. New Conference Schedule Highlights This year’s conference schedule features a number of changes from previous years. On Wednesday evening, Sept. 5, the Grand Opening of the Expo Hall will be held in conjunction with the Host City Reception from 6:00 to 8:00 p.m. The Expo will be open from 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. on Thursday, Sept. 6, and no competing events are scheduled from 11:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. that day. The Expo concludes at 4:00 p.m. on Thursday and will not be open on Friday. The General Assembly will be held on Friday, Sept. 7, from noon to 2:00 p.m. Delegates will vote on resolutions, and

new League board members will be sworn in during the Annual Business Meeting. Throughout the conference, enjoy CityTalks — a new learning format consisting of 20-minute sessions. Each session features one speaker who will share great ideas to change attitudes and inspire creative approaches.

Featured Speaker: Marie Lopez Rogers Hear from the National League of Cities First Vice President Marie Lopez Rogers, mayor of Avondale, Arizona. Rogers is the city’s first Latina mayor. She has been widely recognized for her

Lorraine Okabe is assistant director of education and conferences for the League and can be reached at LOkabe@cacities.org. For more information about the conference, visit www.cacities.org/AC.

8

League of California Cities

www.cacities.org


The San Diego Convention Center provides a convenient location easily accessible from the hotels providing conference housing.

dedication and accomplishments in local government. Rogers will address the conference during the Opening General Session on Wednesday, Sept. 5, which begins at 4:00p.m.

League Policy Development A key part of the League’s legislative efforts focuses on policy development. The resolutions process conducted during the conference provides one way that city officials can directly participate in the development of League policy. The deadline for submitting resolutions is Saturday, July 7. Policy committees will review resolutions on Wednesday, Sept. 5. The General Resolutions Committee will meet on Thursday, Sept. 6 to make recommendations. The General Assembly will convene at the Annual Business Meeting on Friday, Sept. 7 to vote on the resolutions brought forward for consideration.

Register Now to Attend Visit www.cacities.org/AC for registration options and more information. See you in San Diego! n

www.westerncity.com

Peter Kageyama: Featured Speaker Peter Kageyama has traveled the world learning and speaking about community development and grassroots engagement. His book For the Love of Cities explores in detail the value of emotional engagement with our cities, how that connection is created and nurtured and how it can be turned into a development resource for places. Kageyama has produced three Creative Cities Summits in Florida, Michigan and Kentucky. A self-described “recovering attorney,” Kageyama will share inspiring stories of community passion from throughout the nation during his General Session keynote address on Thursday, Sept. 6, beginning at 9:45 a.m.

Western City, July 2012

9


Sustainability’s Many Faces: Beacon Award Program Participants Create Vibrant Communities by Yvonne Hunter and Jessica Aviña Tong Sustainability is all about making communities more livable — creating healthy, dynamic places to live and work while simultaneously saving money, energy and resources and helping the local economy. Cities and counties throughout California are demonstrating leadership in creating active, lively communities by adopting policies and programs that supWater conservation is one of many sustainability practices.

port sustainability. This diverse range of activities brightens the future of their communities.

Forty-one cities and counties are participating in the sustainability and climate change recognition program known as the Beacon Award: Local Leadership Toward Solving Climate Change. These participants reflect the diversity of local agencies working to save resources, reduce greenhouse gas emissions and create healthy

communities. The Beacon Award (www. ca-ilg.org/BeaconAward) is a program of the Institute for Local Government and the Statewide Energy Efficiency Collaborative (www.CaliforniaSEEC.org). The accomplishments of Beacon Award participants shine a bright light on the ability of California local agencies to vol-

untarily address sustainability issues. The range of policies and programs explored here provides a sampling of their efforts. (To learn about the energy-efficiency accomplishments of Beacon Award communities, see “Spotlighting Energy Efficiency in California Communities” on page 20.) continued on page 12

Yvonne Hunter is co-director of the Institute for Local Government’s Sustainability Program and can be reached at yhunter@ca-ilg.org. Jessica Aviña Tong is a former program coordinator for the Institute for Local Government.

10

League of California Cities

www.cacities.org


Beacon Award:

Local Leadership

Toward Solving Climate Change Recognizing California Cities and Counties

BEACON AWARD CRITERIA

10 Best Practice Areas

Energy Efficiency

Greenhouse Gas Emissions

Spotlighting Interim Accomplishments

Congratulations to these leading communities that have completed steps toward achieving a Silver, Gold or Platinum Beacon Award (as of June 15, 2012). Apple Valley

Palo Alto

Santa Barbara

Beaumont

Pleasanton

Santa Clarita

Benicia

Rancho Cucamonga

Simi Valley

Chula Vista

Riverside

Sonoma County

Glendale

Sacramento

South Gate

La Mesa

San Diego County

Tulare

Palm Springs

San Rafael

West Sacramento

Learn more at: www.ca-ilg.org/BeaconAward/ParticipantAccomplishments For a complete list of Beacon Award Program participants, please visit: www.ca-ilg.org/BeaconAward/Participants

www.ca-ilg.org

This Program is funded by California utility ratepayers and administered by Southern California Gas Company, San Diego Gas & Electric Company, Pacific Gas and Electric Company and Southern California Edison, under the auspices of the California Public Utilities Commission.


Sustainability’s Many Faces: Beacon Award Program Participants Create Vibrant Communities, continued from page 10 Community gardens allow residents to grow and harvest healthy produce, and drought-tolerant plants conserve water.

left to right

Water Conservation

To reduce the amount of water used for landscaped areas, Simi Valley, Woodland and Santa Clarita installed weather-based, water-efficient irrigation systems for city parks and open spaces. The systems not only reduce the amount of irrigated water used by about 25 percent, but they also save energy and staff resources. Manhattan Beach and Glendale encourage residents to conserve water by providing free classes on water-smart irrigation and water-efficient plants. Manhattan Beach also offers residents free landscape audits that help identify opportunities to convert traditional gardens to Californiafriendly, drought-tolerant landscaping. Sacramento’s Water Wise Garden at the city’s Water Conservation Office includes native and drought-tolerant plants, low-volume irrigation, mulch and other water-saving features. Educational signage

provides tips on ways residents can implement water-efficient practices while still maintaining a beautiful landscape. The Water Wise Garden is 44 percent more water efficient than the previous landscaping at the site and is open to the public year-round for viewing. Waste Reduction and Recycling

Many agencies use partnerships to reduce and recycle waste. The City of Santa Barbara worked with the Santa Barbara Unified School District to implement a food scrap recovery program at elementary schools and is expanding the project to secondary schools in the 2012–13 school year. Palm Springs started a compost pilot program for hotels and casinos, the largest producers of food waste in the city. Sonoma County implemented a pilot composting program in its detention facilities, diverting approximately 1,200

“Pervious concrete has the advantage of meeting multiple design requirements for storm water runoff management in Santa Barbara County.” — Cathleen Garnand, Civil Engineering Associate, County of Santa Barbara Water Resources Division

“We needed a material for the ADA compliant areas of the parking lot that would facilitate wheelchair access, accept code required striping and still allow the storm water to percolate.” — Brian Dougherty, FAIA, Dougherty + Dougherty Architects LLP

12

League of California Cities

The accomplishments of Beacon Award participants shine a bright light on the ability of California local agencies to voluntarily address sustainability issues. pounds of food waste per month. The program is the first vermiculture composting (worm farm) program in a detention facility in the state. Inmates learn about green industry and acquire job skills, thus potentially reducing recidivism. Pleasanton offers residents free electronic waste and pharmaceutical drop-off events twice a year. Each event collects about 700 pounds of pharmaceutical waste and 49,000 pounds of e-waste. South Gate partnered with its waste hauler to offer a free home delivery program for all residents in need of sharps disposal containers. Green Purchasing

sccpconcrete.com

Besides adopting policies to buy recycled paper, green purchasing policies can be expanded to support local businesses. For example, Tulare’s Environmentally Preferable Purchasing Policy gives a 5 percent purchasing preference to bids from local vendors. By doing so, Tulare increases www.cacities.org


Public Transit’s Additional Benefits Besides providing more transportation options to residents and commuters, access to public transit helps seniors maintain their independence even after losing the ability to drive, thus decreasing the isolation that they may otherwise experience.

number of stops at signals. This reduces idling and makes the trips faster.

investment in the local economy and helps reduce greenhouse gas emissions associated with shipping or travel from outside the city. Several cities use recycled materials in community upgrades. La Mesa uses recycled tires or wood chips for playground upgrades and replacement. Chula Vista completed a pilot project that incorporated recycled asphalt roof shingles into roadway pavement projects.

Apple Valley adopted a multi-use trail plan and a bicycle system that include more than 31 miles of trails. New developments incorporate adjacent bike paths that pedestrians can also use.

Efficient Transportation

Pleasanton teamed up with the Livermore-Amador Valley Transportation Authority to launch a new electric-hybrid bus service that connects riders to busy employment and shopping centers and mass transit stations. The limited-stop service uses innovative technology, such as bus signal priority, that reduces the

Community Design

Simi Valley’s Affordable Housing Standards include incentives for projects that demonstrate strategies to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Simi Valley also continued on page 26

Looking for Savings?

Sonoma County’s purchasing surplus program has reused 952 surplus office supplies and pieces of furniture since 2010, saving about $103,000. The county has also donated more than 1,200 surplus items to local nonprofit organizations.

1. Early Retirement Incentives - facilitate downsizing

Renewable Energy

2. 115 OPEB Trust - reduce liabilities by pre-funding for GASB 45

San Rafael and Chula Vista require new construction to be solar ready by being pre-plumbed for solar hot water or prewired for solar photovoltaic systems.

3. FICA Alternative - savings of 79% for part-time employee plan

Yolo County adopted an ordinance that sets criteria for siting and approving solar photovoltaic systems on agricultural and other open space lands in the county.

League of Cities Conference in San Diego!

PARS has 3 ways to help:

Visit with PARS in booth 606 at this year’s

800.540.6369 x 116 mbarker@pars.org

www.pars.org © 2012 Public Agency Retirement Services (PARS). All rights reserved.

www.westerncity.com

Western City, July 2012

13


Draft Stormwater Permit Draws Cities Together in New Coalition

by Pauline Roccucci

City officials throughout California were stunned when the State Water Resources Control Board issued its initial draft of the revised Phase II small municipal separate storm sewer (MS4) permit on June 7, 2011. The highly prescriptive 93-page permit, drafted to replace a 20-page permit that had expired three years earlier, contained a number of stringent, unfunded mandates that more than 200 smaller California cities would be required to meet. The cities had just 30 days to respond to the draft permit requiring them to implement new programs for public outreach, water-quality improvement and monitoring, business inspections and enforcement. With no state money and Propositions 218 and 26 essentially prohibiting cities from paying for the programs through fees, reimbursements or tax increases, funding would have to come from the cities’ beleaguered General Funds. continued on page 16

Pauline Roccucci is mayor of Roseville and can be reached at proccucci@roseville.ca.us.

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Draft Stormwater Permit Draws Cities Together in New Coalition, continued from page 14

Looking at the Price

To assess the cost impact, two cities with strong water-quality programs put numbers to the new requirements. In Rose­ ville, staff conservatively estimated that implementation costs would initially more than quadruple, and in the long run more than triple the city’s stormwater program budget — from $800,000 per year to $3.5 million in year one, with an average permit term cost of ​ $2.9 million per year. Similarly, the City of Napa estimated implementation costs at $4 million the first year — an amount 10 times greater than the city’s current stormwater budget. Businesses Face High Costs

While increased costs are enough to set off municipal alarms in a tough economy, the impact on local businesses raised equal concern. As written, the permit required a long list of businesses to retrofit properties by installing stormwater treatment vaults and covering trash enclosures and loading docks. In addition, they would need to implement operational best management practices and comply with extensive reporting requirements. The implementation and business disruption costs could cause a number of the state’s struggling businesses to close. “We see these permits having significant implications on businesses across the state, affecting their pocketbooks and livelihoods,” says Courtney Kienow, director of government affairs for the San Luis Obispo Chamber of Commerce. “We all want clean water, but there has to be a more realistic way to achieve that goal.”

Ken Denio, owner of Denio’s Roseville Farmers Market and Auction, estimates retrofitting stormwater infrastructure to meet the new standards on his company’s 70 acres could cost between $1.5 and $2 million. “The frequent inspections and record-keeping will also create ongoing expenses for us and the city. And I know we’re not unique,” says Denio. “Looking across California, this permit could break cities, put small businesses under and drive employers out of the state. Of course we’re in favor of clean water, but let’s work together to determine how to do it in a way that makes economic sense.” Landscape architect Erik Justesen, chief executive officer of RRM Design Group in San Luis Obispo, summed up the issue in testimony before the Senate Select Committee on Job Creation and Retention: “These costs are exactly the kind of government regulations that can put us out of business. And for what? Insignificant and immeasurable improvements to water quality and better reports. The cost for benefit of this new program is just not there.” Questioning Benefits Versus Costs

Expanding on Justesen’s points, staff at many cities questioned the scientific basis for certain permit aspects, including extensive water-quality monitoring; frequent, redundant business inspections; and an onerous process of categorizing and inspecting catch basins. They also questioned the need to create a costly community-based social marketing program based on — and later validated by — statistically valid phone surveys and focus groups.

Heidi Niggemeyer, program manager of the Monterey Regional Storm Water Management Program, questions some of the mandates, but has a more tolerant view of the permit’s genesis. “The permit mirrors many of the points spelled out in the 2008 National Research Council Report to the EPA on urban stormwater management,” she says. “It’s a dream document that simply can’t be implemented in California. Many of the ideas are good ones, and they may be possible in states with stormwater utilities that collect fees or taxes to cover costs. But Prop. 218 prohibits collecting funds without a voter supermajority, which is all but impossible to achieve on an issue like water quality. Without a funding mechanism, the permit becomes untenable.” Though the permit is a regulation in all but name — it’s mandatory, enforceable and leaves cities subject to fines and open to third-party litigation for noncompliance — the state’s permitting process is not required to conform to the federal Administrative Procedure Act (APA). Because of this fine-line distinction, the State Water Resources Control Board was not required to conduct cost or economic impact analyses.

The permit is a regulation in all but name — it’s mandatory, enforceable and leaves cities subject to fines and open to third-party litigation for noncompliance.

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“In any business, we have to decide whether an action makes economic sense,” says Denio. “We determine if the benefits of the action outweigh the cost and how we’ll pay for it. My biggest heartburn on this permit is that the State Water Resources Control Board is not tasked with assessing costs or determining the cost-benefit ratio and economic impact. Any government body that has the legal authority to mandate actions should be required to study and support the economic argument.” The State Water Resources Control Board conducted very limited stakeholder outreach before releasing the first draft of the permit, and current rules prohibit stakeholders from talking continued

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The City of Napa estimated implementation costs at $4 million the first year — an amount 10 times greater than the city’s current stormwater budget.

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Draft Stormwater Permit Draws Cities Together in New Coalition, continued

directly to board members. The initial draft allowed stakeholder input through written comments submitted within 60 days of draft issuance, which was later extended to 90 days, and a three-minute presentation at the State Water Resources Control Board hearing. New Coalition Gathers Voices

As the full impact of the permit mandates on cities and businesses became clear and magnified by the limited ability to have a voice in the process, staff at the City of Roseville decided its geographic proximity to Sacramento made it the best candidate to help cities address the issue. Roseville staff proposed the idea of a Statewide Stormwater Coalition. The coalition soon attracted a number of municipal government and other organizations that would be regulated under the permit, which could also cover school districts, higher education institutions, fairgrounds, harbors, ports, marinas, military bases and more. The coalition’s first act was to secure bipartisan legislative support for a response extension. At the July State Water Resources Control Board public hearing, Assembly Member Mariko Yamada (DDavis) requested a 60-day extension on

The coalition needs more cities, businesses and other organizations affected by the permit to add their voices to the call for reform. behalf of the Statewide Stormwater Coalition. Coalition members with budgets to make the trip did so. Those who couldn’t make the trip asked coalition members who attended to hold up signs and represent them by proxy. In total, 40 signs rose to show the coalition members’ support. The board granted a 30-day extension giving stakeholders until Sept. 8, 2011, to respond to the draft permit. During the extension, the coalition worked tirelessly to get the word out to others who would be impacted by the permit.

The coalition also made its case to the Senate Select Committee on Job Creation and Retention on Oct. 6, 2011. Through testimony by Statewide Stormwater Coalition members, the coalition brought the permit issues and underlying process flaws to the Legislature’s attention. During the committee hearing, the State Water Resources Control Board admitted the need to substantially revise the permit and meet with stakeholders to evaluate the cost impacts of permit changes. Tentative Success

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The coalition’s efforts paid off. In May 2012, the State Water Resources Control Board released a new draft permit for public review with notable changes. The new draft omitted several permit sections, such as the industrial and commercial retrofitting requirements, and reduced complexity in other sections. Many requirements remain that will be challenging for cash-strapped cities to implement without funding support, but it’s too early for the affected cities to provide full cost analyses. Public comments on the new draft are due by July 23. Reforming the Permitting Process

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Costs for the revised permit may be unclear, but one thing became apparent to Statewide Stormwater Coalition members who fought for the changes. While some of the initial permit’s most onerous

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Staff at many cities questioned the scientific basis for certain permit aspects, including an onerous process of categorizing and inspecting catch basins. • Include only requirements that an external scientific peer review confirms will result in appreciable improvements to water quality. These fundamental process changes would help eliminate well-intended but misguided permit drafts and create a more collaborative approach to permit development. Join the Coalition

sections were simplified or removed, the time-consuming effort required to effect change underscores the need to overhaul the permitting process. Specifically, coalition members believe many future problems could be averted if the State Water Resources Control Board were required to: • Meet with all stakeholders statewide to fully understand their various viewpoints and concerns;

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• Allow ex-parte communication between the board members and permit stakeholders; • Produce a cost analysis covering the costs to cities, businesses and other affected entities; • Include only requirements that are justified by an economic analysis showing that the benefits will exceed the cost to implement the requirements; and

To bring about these process changes, the coalition needs more cities, businesses and other organizations affected by the permit to add their voices to the call for reform. To join or learn more about the State Stormwater Coalition, visit www. stormwatercosts.com or contact Sean Bigley, government relations analyst, at sbigley@roseville.ca.us. n

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The City of Chula Vista implemented energy-efficiency measures at its two municipal aquatic centers to save natural gas used for heating water and reduce operating costs.

by Lindsay Buckley

As California’s communities seek ways to maximize resources in economically challenging times, energy efficiency offers a number of money-saving advantages. Cities and counties are making great strides in reducing energy use at agency facilities through

The Beacon Award program (www.ca-ilg.org/BeaconAward), sponsored by the Institute for Local Government and the Statewide Energy Efficiency Collaborative (www.californiaseec.org), recognizes cities and counties in California that reduce greenhouse gas emissions, save energy and adopt sustainability policies and programs. Information from program participants demonstrates leadership in several areas of energy efficiency — in agency facilities, the local community, policy initiatives and planning.

traditional building audits and retrofits. At the same time, they are advancing community energy efficiency through collaboration and outreach activities. Other strategies, such as policies and long-range planning, also support these efforts.

Local agencies set an example of fiscal and environmental stewardship by addressing energy efficiency in facilities. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency estimates that energy savings of 35 percent are possible for many existing buildings. According to the U.S. Department of Energy, energy costs can account for as much as 10 percent of an agency’s operations budget. Local agencies have tremendous opportunities to save money by reducing energy use through building audits and retrofits, as the following examples illustrate.

Lindsay Buckley is a program coordinator for the Institute for Local Government and can be reached at lbuckley@ca-ilg.org.

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Using a performance agreement with an outside firm, the City of Tulare retrofitted all city buildings — where cost effective — with high-efficiency heating and cooling systems, double-paned windows, efficient fluorescent lighting, programmable thermostats and reflective roof coating. Santa Clarita used American Recovery and Reinvestment Act funds for lighting retrofits in agency facilities. The retrofits save the city nearly 284,000 kilowatt hours a year, translating into annual savings of approximately $32,100. Chula Vista installed new high-efficiency boilers at two municipal aquatic centers, resulting in more than 75,000 therms in annual natural gas savings. The city saves 300,000 kilowatt hours annually from heating and air conditioning energy efficiency upgrades at the city’s public works facility. Combined, the projects save the city about $97,000 annually. Glendale recently finished a third round of energy efficiency upgrades in 23 city facilities. Retrofits included heating and air conditioning, lighting and vending machine upgrades. The city also installed equipment to transfer energy use to off-peak hours. These efforts reduced annual energy use by 2.3 million kilowatt hours and 47,000 gas therms, saving $180,000 per year. Sonoma County implemented 38 energy efficiency retrofit measures in 24 county buildings, including lighting retrofits in 20 buildings and heating and air conditioning upgrades in four facilities. This project reduced the county’s energy utility bills by 33 percent, translating to $1.6 million in savings annually, with a total savings of $38 million over the 25-year life of the project.

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While cities and counties provide leadership through energy efficiency audits and retrofits at agency facilities, many opportunities exist to achieve energy savings in the broader community through collaboration and outreach activities. Working with investor-owned utilities provides agencies with funding, expertise and marketing materials to conduct community energy efficiency programs. For example, Pleasanton worked with Pacific Gas and Electric to develop a program targeting business owners. It provides businesses with free energy audits, written recommendations, payback analyses and information on rebates and incentives. As a result, local businesses reduced energy use by more than one megawatt, approximately enough energy to power 300 homes annually. Many Southern California agencies partner with Southern California Edison through the Energy Leader Partnership program. Palm Springs achieved 9 percent energy savings from 2005 levels in the community. Its partnership activities include marketing, outreach and education to connect the community with utility rebate and energy-saving incentive programs. Through a formal local government partnership with San Diego Gas & Electric, Chula Vista receives resources to help identify unique ways to promote energy efficiency in its community. City staff attributes much of the program’s success to a positive working relationship with San Diego Gas & Electric, as well as the resources the utility provides through the partnership. continued

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Spotlighting Energy Efficiency in California Communities, continued

Adopting policies tailored to local conditions yields energy savings both in local agencies and their communities. Cities and counties use a variety of policies and ordinances to achieve energy efficiency in agency facilities, new construction and existing housing stock. Green building ordinances are one of the most popular ways local agencies make gains in energy efficiency in the broader community. Palo Alto took a comprehensive approach when crafting its mandatory green building ordinances in 2008. The ordinances apply to public and private construction and require new projects to exceed the California Building Energy Efficiency Standards (also known as Title 24) by 15 percent. The ordinances have impacted 98,275 square feet of construction since 2008, with projects achieving an average 24 percent energy efficiency savings, surpassing the ordinance’s 15 percent requirement. Simi Valley’s green building ordinance includes a requirement that new construction exceed statewide energy efficiency standards, also known as a “reach code.” The first such ordinance in Ventura County, it helped spur other sustainabil-

ity measures including increased requirements for construction and demolition recycling and landscape water efficiency in new development. The City of Santa Barbara’s 2008 energy efficiency ordinance also exceeds California’s standards. The ordinance applies to any new construction, remodels greater than 100 square feet, and upgrades to indoor lighting, heating and cooling systems, and heating or pumps in swimming pools, spas and water features. Voluntary green building programs can also increase energy efficiency by providing incentives and encouragement. Beaumont’s voluntary Green Building Program, adopted in 2009, offers expedited permitting for new construction and building renovation projects that meet its program standards. La Mesa’s development review process encourages new development to incorporate energy efficiency and green building concepts in the early stages of project development. The city provides support to homeowners and offers assistance on ways to improve energy efficiency. Beyond green building policies, agencies are finding other innovative ways to increase energy efficiency. San Rafael requires home performance audits for any

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Energy savings of 35 percent are possible for many existing buildings. residential remodel that costs more than $50,000 in order to educate homeowners about energy retrofit opportunities. With funding from Southern California Edison, South Gate plans to develop policies for benchmarking and retrocommissioning city facilities. Benchmarking compares a facility’s energy use to similar facilities in order to assess opportunities for improvement; retrocommissioning identifies improvements to help make the building and equipment operate as efficiently as originally designed.

Local agencies can also promote and guide energy efficiency through longrange planning activities, such as General Plans. For example, San Rafael’s General Plan Conservation Element and Santa Barbara County’s General Plan Energy Element both address energy. Innovative Solutions. Enduring Principles. 2355 Crenshaw Blvd., #200 Torrance, CA 90501 800.654.8102 License #0451271 www.keenan.com/pa

South Gate is developing an Energy Action Plan through its partnership with Southern California Edison. Energy Action Plans comprise energy use data, energy reduction goals and activities to achieve those goals. The City of Riverside’s Public Utilities Department adopted an Environmental continued on page 25

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Display Advertising

Western City magazine’s job opportunity section is the source for job seekers looking for positions in local government. When you place a job opportunity ad in Western City magazine, it will be posted at no additional charge on our website. For rates and deadlines, visit www.westerncity.com and click on the “Advertise” link.

Call Pam Maxwell-Blodgett at (800) 2621801 to place a display (boxed) ad or for rate and deadline information, or email admanager@westerncity.com. Website Job Postings Display ads are posted on our website at no additional charge. But if you miss the deadline for getting your job opportunity

ad into the magazine, you can post it on the Western City website right away. To post your job opportunity ad on our automated website, visit www.western city.com or contact Anita Lopez, administrative assistant; email: alopez@ cacities.org; phone: (916) 658-8223.

Did You Miss the June Issue? Read it online at www.westerncity.com

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Don’t Miss the Top Hits on Our Website! 1 Local Agency Electronic Media Use and California Public Records Law – June 2012 2 What Comes Next? The future of jobs in California – May 2012 3 Local Agency Opportunities for Website Transparency – June 2012 4 Creating Economic Development at the Local Level – May 2012 5 Act Now to Create a Healthier Community – April 2012 Read these articles today at www.westerncity.com

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MuniTemps will Save Your City Money! City Manager, City of South Gate, CA The City of South Gate, California (population 94,400) is located just 12 miles southeast of downtown Los Angeles and is the 16th-largest city in Los Angeles County. South Gate is now seeking a City Manager to oversee a FY 2011/2012 combined budget of $131.8 million and 284 full-time employees. An individual with excellent management skills who demonstrates respect for and values staff, department heads, and labor organizations while maintaining accountability within the City would do well in this position. A straightforward and honest candidate who will present the City Council with balanced information on issues in the City will be highly valued. Candidates for this position must possess a Bachelor’s degree in Public Administration, Business Administration, or a closely related field and significant, progressively responsible experience in municipal management. The salary for the City Manager is open and dependent upon qualifications. If you are interested in this outstanding opportunity, please apply online at www.bobmurrayassoc.com. Please contact Bob Murray at (916) 784-9080 should you have any questions. Brochure available. Closing date July 27, 2012. phone 916•784•9080 fax 916•784•1985 www.bobmurrayassoc.com

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Opportunities available this summer...

City Manager City of Pismo Beach

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City of West Hollywood

Visit the TB&Co. website for the latest information – www.tbcrecruiting.com

Teri Black-Brann • 310.377.2612 Carolyn Seeley • 949.487.7606 Steve Parker • 949.322.8794 www.tbcrecruiting.com Assistant Director of Utilities, San Diego, CA The City of San Diego (population 1.3 million) is located on the Pacific Ocean near the U.S./Mexico border. The City of San Diego, through the Public Utilities Department, owns and operates the Water and Wastewater Systems; the Water System serves the City and certain surrounding areas, including retail, wholesale, and reclaimed water customers. The City is now seeking an Assistant Director of Utilities, Business Support Branch who will be responsible for the management and performance of the departmental divisions of Long-Range Planning and Water Resources, Finance and Information Technology, Customer Support, and Employee Services and Quality Assurance. A Bachelor’s Degree in Business Administration, Public Administration, Engineering, or the equivalent is required, as well as ten or more years of executive-level management experience. A Master’s Degree in the above fields and five or more years experience in Water and Wastewater executive-level management are desirable, but not required. The salary for the position is flexible up to $140,000 and dependent upon the qualifications and experience of the selected candidate. If you are interested in this outstanding opportunity, please visit our website at www.bobmurrayassoc.com to apply online. If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to call Mr. Bob Murray or Mr. Wesley Herman at (916) 784-9080. Brochure Available. Filing deadline July 20, 2012. phone 916•784•9080 fax 916•784•1985 www.bobmurrayassoc.com

Photo/art credits Page 3, Fotohunter/Shutterstock Page 6, Brian Weed/Shutterstock Page 8, logo, Jenifer Forsythe Page 9, San Diego, Christopher Penler/ Shutterstock Page 10, Pedro Nogueira/Shutterstock Page 12, Alison Hancock/Shutterstock Page 13, center, Allicat Photography/ Shutterstock Page 13, right, Tomi Murphy/Shutterstock Pages 14-15, Portokalis/Shutterstock

Page 17, bottom & top, Joyfull/Shutterstock Page 17, center, Robert Crow/Shutterstock Page 18, Emmanuel R. Lacoste/Shutterstock Page 19, bottom, Alan Linn/Shutterstock Page 19, top, Katharina Wittfeld/Shutterstock Pages 20-21, courtesy City of Chula Vista Page 22, Nadirco/Shutterstock Page 25, left, Mark Cinotti/Shutterstock Page 25, right, courtesy City of Santa Clarita Page 27, left, courtesy City of Pleasanton Page 27, right, courtesy City of Santa Clarita

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Spotlighting Energy Efficiency in California Communities, continued from page 22

More Resources Online For additional information and links to related resources, read the online version of this article at www.westerncity.com.

Santa Clarita workers retrofit street lights.

Energy costs can account for as much as 10 percent of an agency’s operations budget.

and Economic Effectiveness Effort Plan (also known as the E4 Plan). The E4 Plan outlines strategies to foster Riverside’s economic development by: • Stabilizing utility rates; • Offering discounted economic development and business retention electric rates to large-scale customers or specific industries; • Encouraging use of renewable energy technologies; and • Providing business incentives and energy efficiency programs. Although Riverside has a municipal electric utility, many of the E4 Plan’s strategies may be employed by other cities and counties. For example, in partnership with investor-owned utilities local agencies may promote low-income and water efficiency programs, digital meter installation, and building audits and retrofit recommendations.

As cities and counties face continued budget challenges, local agency best practices include identifying ways to save money and operate more efficiently. The efforts of cities and counties participating in the Beacon Award program offer models of energy efficiency projects and leadership at the local level that can be replicated by other local agencies. n

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Director of Maintenance Services CITY OF ARROYO GRANDE, CA

Located on the beautiful central coast, the City of Arroyo Grande, California (population 17,252) is offering a unique opportunity for an experienced professional to serve as its first Director of Maintenance Services. The newly formed Maintenance Services Department will oversee maintenance of parks, streets, water, sewer, facilities and the vehicle fleet. The ideal candidate will be an experienced professional with strong values and outstanding management, technical and interpersonal skills. Any combination of experience and training equivalent to five years of increasingly responsible parks, streets, or utility maintenance experience as a supervisor or superintendent and a bachelor’s degree in a related field is required. Arroyo Grande is a special place to live and work – offering a friendly small town atmosphere, outstanding climate, beautiful environment and excellent recreational opportunities. Salary for the position is $7,057 - $8,582 per month plus CalPERS 2.5% at 55 retirement and competitive benefits package. For a brochure and job application, call (805) 473-5410 or visit the City’s website at www.arroyogrande.org. Filing deadline: Friday, August 10, 2012

Chief Ranger/Parks Director, Monterey County The Monterey County area, with its moderate Mediterranean climate, is a multicultural and diverse society set in a picturesque coastal location. Monterey County is now seeking a Chief Ranger/Parks Director to oversee a FY budget of $13.6 million and 54 employees. The Chief Ranger/Parks Director is an at-will employee, appointed by and reporting directly to the County Administrative Officer, and is a key member of the County’s executive team. Candidates for this position must: meet the minimum standards for peace officers in the State of California; possess a Bachelor’s degree in Recreation, Park Administration, Conservation, Business or Public Administration, or a closely related field; and have at least 5 years’ experience in community recreational development and/ or park administration, with at least 3 years in a management capacity. The salary range for the Chief Ranger/Parks Director is $116,400 - $136,680, depending on qualifications. Step increases can be awarded every two years beyond the top of the advertised ranged, based on satisfactory performance. If you are interested in this outstanding opportunity, please apply online at www.bobmurrayassoc.com. Please contact Judy LaPorte at (916) 784-9080 should you have any questions. Brochure available. First application cutoff date July 13, 2012. phone 916•784•9080 fax 916•784•1985 www.bobmurrayassoc.com

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Sustainability’s Many Faces: Beacon Award Program Participants Create Vibrant Communities, continued from page 13

maintains a citywide database of vacant and underutilized infill sites to monitor the city’s growth and change, including annual reporting on the number of infill sites that were developed during the previous year. J

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Public Transit’s Additional Benefits Besides providing more transportation options to residents and commuters, access to public transit helps seniors maintain their independence even after losing the ability to drive, thus decreasing the isolation that they may otherwise experience.

Using Open Space

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Conserving and maintaining open space provides multiple community benefits. Parks and open spaces offer community members places to walk, sit or play, as well as aesthetic beauty. Over the past decade, Riverside planted more than 110,000 trees through its Tree Power Program, increasing its urban forest and community shade cover. These additional trees resulted in saving more than 16.2 million kilowatt hours of electricity, reducing greenhouse gas emissions by 24.6 million pounds, or 12.3 tons, and directing $500,000 in economic investment to local nurseries. Using community open space for gardens can provide additional health benefits. Palm Springs and Palo Alto promote healthy eating by allowing residents to grow and harvest their own vegetables and herbs in city-provided community gardens. Glendale offers its residents four community gardens and three farmers markets, which help provide locally grown food. Conclusion

The achievements highlighted here reflect the diversity of California communities, as well as local officials’ leadership in creating policies and programs tailored to local needs. Their creativity serves as an inspiration. To learn more about these and other accomplishments of Beacon Award program participants, visit www.ca-ilg.org/BeaconAward/ParticipantAccomplishments.

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Engaging the Public in Sustainability Santa Clarita’s website (GreenSantaClarita.com) provides information to the entire community about sustainability issues and resources. The website helps stimulate the green economy in Santa Clarita by making it easy and cost effective for residents, businesses and builders to “go green.”

Pleasanton and the LivermoreAmador Valley Transportation Authority joined forces to launch a new electrichybrid bus service; right, Santa Clarita students celebrate Earth Day. above

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Proving there are infinite ways to improve a city’s quality of life, the City of Santa Clarita answered a California Green Communities’ challenge by reducing City water use by about 150,000,000 gallons per year with a weather-based irrigation retrofit of public landscaping. Santa Clarita also recently completed a solar array expansion project that allows the previously LEED Gold-certified Transit Maintenance Facility to move towards near zero net energy. Protecting the environment remains a high priority for the City of Santa Clarita whose efforts, which began shortly after cityhood in 1987, have yielded tremendous results.

To learn more, log on to www.cagreencom.org California Green Communities is a registered trademark of USA Green Communities, Inc., a non-profit corporation Pictured: Santa Clarita Transit Maintenance Facility


Western City July 2012